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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cost Avoidance vs. Utility Bill Accounting - Explaining theDiscrepancy Between Guaranteed Savings in ESPC Projects and UtilityBills  

SciTech Connect

Federal agencies often ask if Energy Savings PerformanceContracts (ESPCs) result in the energy and cost savings projected duringthe project development phase. After investing in ESPCs, federal agenciesexpect a reduction in the total energy use and energy cost at the agencylevel. Such questions about the program are common when implementing anESPC project. But is this a fair or accurate perception? Moreimportantly, should the federal agencies evaluate the success or failureof ESPCs by comparing the utility costs before and after projectimplementation?In fact, ESPC contracts employ measurement andverification (M&V) protocols to measure and ensure kilowatt-hour orBTU savings at the project level. In most cases, the translation toenergy cost savings is not based on actual utility rate structure, but acontracted utility rate that takes the existing utility rate at the timethe contract is signed with a clause to escalate the utility rate by afixed percentage for the duration of the contract. Reporting mechanisms,which advertise these savings in dollars, may imply an impact to budgetsat a much higher level depending on actual utility rate structure. FEMPhas prepared the following analysis to explain why the utility billreduction may not materialize, demonstrate its larger implication onagency s energy reduction goals, and advocate setting the rightexpectations at the outset to preempt the often asked question why I amnot seeing the savings in my utility bill?

Kumar, S.; Sartor, D.

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cost Avoidance vs. Utility Bill Accounting - Explaining the Discrepancy Between Guaranteed Savings in ESPC Projects and Utility Bills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

savings is not based on actual utility rate structure, buta contracted utility rate that takesthe existing utility rate at the time the contract is signed

Kumar, S.; Sartor, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Avoided Gigawatts Through Utility Capital Recovery Fees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric rate structures can be used to provide customers with the proper pricing signals as well as provide economic incentives for increased market penetration for energy efficient new buildings. An innovative, marginal (replacement cost) rate structure is possible through the use of capital recovery fees for new electric meter hookups similar to those commonly used for new water and wastewater hookups where the developer/owner is required to capitalize the marginal cost of new demand. By giving credit for the more efficient loads placed on an electric utility system, a utility could rapidly advance the market penetration of commercially available, highly efficient building systems and equipment resulting in potential gigawatts of conserved energy. Simultaneously, the capital costs of new generating plants could be shifted to the end-user from the already debt-burdened electric utility industry. This paper will explore this pricing option and analyze its potential on future electric load growth and the design of efficient new buildings.

Frosenfeld, A. N.; Verdict, M. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QFin Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the surrogate avoidedResource (SAR) Method Used in Idaho QFs up to 10 MW are

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost inpu t assumptions, the Utah Wind Working Group may wish to consider pursuing two other poss ible sources of revenue: renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

COMPREHENSIVE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR BURIED UTILITIES Sanat A. Talmaki 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialists 2006). Unlike other types of infrastructure, buried utilities are difficult to locate and often smoothly. However with aging buried infrastructure, pipe bursts, costly repairs and exposure of citizensCOMPREHENSIVE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR BURIED UTILITIES Sanat A. Talmaki 1 , Suyang Dong 2

Kamat, Vineet R.

9

Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The customer-owned backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the customer owned backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

10

Avoided Costs and Competitive Negotiations for Power from Qualifying Facilities in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas is among the states with the highest potential for cogeneration. Currently, 3,121 MW of cogenerated power supplies more than ten percent of the energy needs of ERCOT under firm contracts. This paper summarizes the key aspects of the regulatory framework related to cogeneration in the State of Texas. In addition, it discusses the current round of standard avoided cost filings submitted to the Public Utility Commission of Texas for approval and focuses on future trends in the State's cogeneration market.

Panjavan, S.; Al-Jabir, A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site June 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Harrel McCray, left, and Joey Clark, employees with SRS management and operations contractor, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, stand by an extensive SRS cleanup system that safely and successfully rid the site of more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical

14

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site Cutting-Edge Savannah River Site Project Avoids Millions in Costs, Removes Chemical Solvents from Underground: Project avoided costs totaling more than $15 million, removed tons of chemical solvents from beneath the Savannah River Site June 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Harrel McCray, left, and Joey Clark, employees with SRS management and operations contractor, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, stand by an extensive SRS cleanup system that safely and successfully rid the site of more than 33,000 gallons of non-radioactive chemical

15

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

16

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

17

The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored Energy Efficiency Programs Title The Total Cost and Measured Performance of Utility-Sponsored Energy Efficiency...

18

title Utility Scale Solar An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Scale Solar An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost Performance and Pricing Trends in the United States year month institution LBNL abstract p Berkeley Lab hosted a webinar...

19

Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state's citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a How-To'' manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Price and cost impacts of utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. In particular, should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity Most of the debates about the appropriate economic tests to use in assessing utility programs do not address the magnitude of the impacts. As a result, questions remain about the relationships among utility DSM programs and acquisition of supply resources and the effects of these choices on electricity prices and costs. This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. A dynamic model is used to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios for three utilities: a base that is typical of US utilities; a surplus utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. Model results show that DSM programs generally reduce electricity costs and increase electricity prices. However, the percentage reduction in costs is usually greater than the percentage increase in prices. On the other hand, most of the cost benefits of DSM programs can be obtained without raising electricity prices.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate, timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

27

Distributed utility technology cost, performance, and environmental characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed Utility (DU) is an emerging concept in which modular generation and storage technologies sited near customer loads in distribution systems and specifically targeted demand-side management programs are used to supplement conventional central station generation plants to meet customer energy service needs. Research has shown that implementation of the DU concept could provide substantial benefits to utilities. This report summarizes the cost, performance, and environmental and siting characteristics of existing and emerging modular generation and storage technologies that are applicable under the DU concept. It is intended to be a practical reference guide for utility planners and engineers seeking information on DU technology options. This work was funded by the Office of Utility Technologies of the US Department of Energy.

Wan, Y.; Adelman, S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Load management strategies for electric utilities: a production cost simulation  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the development and application of a simulation model for analyzing strategies for managing the residential loads of electric utilities. The basic components of the model are (1) a production-cost model, which simulates daily operation of an electric power system; (2) a load model, which disaggregates system loads into appliance loads and other loads; and (3) a comparison model, which compares the production costs and energy consumption needed to meet a particular load profile to the corresponding costs and energy consumption required for another load profile. The profiles in each pair define alternative ways of meeting the same demand. A method for disaggregating load profiles into appliance components is discussed and several alternative strategies for residential load management for a typical northeastern electric utility are formulated. The method is based on an analysis of the composition of electric loads for a number of classes of residential customers in the model utility system. The effect of alternative load management strategies on the entire residential loadcurve is determined by predicting the effects of these strategies on the specific appliance components of the loadcurve. The results of using the model to analyze alternative strategies for residential load management suggest that load management strategies in the residential sector, if adopted by utilities whose operating and load characteristics are similar to those of the system modeled here, must take into account a wide variety of appliances to achieve significant changes in the total load profile. Moreover, the results also suggest that it is not easy to reduce costs significantly through new strategies for managing residential loads only and that, to be worthwhile, cost-reducing strategies will have to encompass many kinds of appliances.

Blair, P.D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

30

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

31

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Low-cost load research for electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) developed two pragmatic approaches to meet most load-research objectives at a substantially lower cost than would be incurred with traditional techniques. GVEA serves three customer classes, with most of its load in the Fairbanks area. GVEA's new approaches simulate load curves for individual customer classes to the degree necessary to meet most load-research objectives for the utility, including applications to cost-of-service analysis, rate design, demand-side management, and load forecasting. These approaches make class load-shape information available to utilities that cannot otherwise afford to develop such data. Although the two approaches were developed for a small utility, they are likely to work at least as well for medium and large utilities. The first approach simulates class curves by combining load data from system feeders with information on customer mix and energy usage. GVEA's supervisory control and data acquisition system gives hourly data on feeder loads, and its billing database provides the number of customers and kilowatt-hour usage by customer class on each feeder. The second approach enhances load-research results by redefining target parameters. Data from several like-hours are used to calculate substitutes for the parameters traditionally defined from single-hour data points. The precision of peak responsibility estimates, for example, can be improved if several of the highest hourly demands in a given time period are used rather than the single highest hourly demand. Arguably, use of several highest hourly demands can also improve the reliability of the allocation of responsibility.

Gray, D.A.; Butcher, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The cost and performance of utility commercial lighting programs. A report from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored, energy-efficiency, demand-side management (DSM) programs. Consistent documentation of DSM programs is a challenging goal because of problems with data consistency, evaluation methodologies, and data reporting formats that continue to limit the usefulness and comparability of individual program results. This first DEEP report investigates the results of 20 recent commercial lighting DSM programs. The report, unlike previous reports of its kind, compares the DSM definitions and methodologies that each utility uses to compute costs and energy savings and then makes adjustments to standardize reported program results. All 20 programs were judged cost-effective when compared to avoided costs in their local areas. At an average cost of 3.9{cents}/kWh, however, utility-sponsored energy efficiency programs are not ``too cheap to meter.`` While it is generally agreed upon that utilities must take active measures to minimize the costs and rate impacts of DSM programs, the authors believe that these activities will be facilitated by industry adoption of standard definitions and reporting formats, so that the best program designs can be readily identified and adopted.

Eto, J.; Vine, E.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.; Payne, C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Public Utilities Commission This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports required to be filed with

35

FACILITIES ENGINEER WEST CHICAGO Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvements, including all stages of project engineering: scope development, cost estimation, system designFACILITIES ENGINEER ­ WEST CHICAGO OVERVIEW: Execute capital projects for manufacturing facilities and utilities systems: scope development, cost estimation, system design, equipment sizing

Heller, Barbara

36

Utility Scale Solar PV Cost Steven SimmonsSteven Simmons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, permitting) Early construction (procurement, site prep) Construction Month % of TTL Cost 12 month ­ 1% 12 month ­ 14 % 12 month ­ 85 % Month % of TTL Cost 12 month ­ 1% 12 month ­ 14 % 12 month ­ 85 % Financing.69 113.43 96.66 TTL 213.94 189.08 156.97 137.12 0 debt term 25 years 200 250 $/MWh 2012$ Levelized Cost

37

Can Solar PV Rebates Be Funded with Utility Cost Savings?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation was given by Jan Aceti of Concord Light at the February 19, 2013, CommRE webinar which focused on how municipal utilities fund solar energy projects.

38

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electric Utility Rate Design Study: embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis for Iowa Southern Utilities Company  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a method for determining average embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis and describes the application of the method to Iowa Southern Utilities. These costs are not allocated to customer classes. Since average embedded costs are composed of the running (or variable) costs and the capital costs, the analysis examines each of these separately. Running costs on a time-of-day basis are determined through the use of a generation dispatch model that reports the loadings by generating unit and the running costs of meeting the load. These costs are reported on an hour-by-hour basis. The dispatch model takes into account the operating characteristics of each unit and the major engineering constraints on a system; e.g., must-run units, minimum up and down time, startup cost. After reviewing several suggested capital-cost allocation procedures, a method is developed that allocates capital costs on a time-of-day basis by using a recontracting-for-capacity procedure that allows capacity to vary by hour for each month. The method results in allocations to customers who benefit from its use. An important and distinguishing feature of this method is that it allows calculation of the costs before rating periods are chosen.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New, Cost-Competitive Solar Plants for Electric Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix to develop its 7700 Amonix to develop its 7700 system, which drastically reduces the requirement for costly solar cells by using Fresnel lenses to concentrate sunlight 500 times onto small, highly efficient photovoltaic cells. This reduces the cell area so that expensive solar cell materials can be replaced with inexpensive plastic lenses. Amonix Inc. (Torrance, CA), founded in 1989, develops and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Can Solar PV Rebates Be Funded with Utility Cost Savings?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jan Aceti Jan Aceti Concord Light February 19, 2013 Concord Municipal Light Plant Photo Credit: K.M. Peterson  7,600 Customers ◦ 6,000 Residential ◦ 1,600 Commercial/Institutional/Governmental  Retail Sales: 180,000,000 kWh per Year  Peak Electrical Demand: 40 MW  Power Purchased from Facilities in Northeast Year # of Installations kW DC kW AC 1999 1 5 5 2008 3 4.2 4.0 2009 5 75.0 74.6 2010 3 158 151 2011 7 36 35 2012 19 143 137 2013 2 8.2 7.7 Total 40 429 414 Residential 35 178 170  $1,000 per kW AC, up to $5,000  Retail Net Metering  Replaced Retail Net Metering with Wholesale Net Metering ◦ Credit at Avg. Monthly Spot Market Energy Price  Rebate: 10 Years Worth of Estimated Cost Savings, Up to 5 kW AC of Installed Capacity  Transmission Cost Savings  Forward Capacity Market Cost Savings

42

Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry  

SciTech Connect

The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting April 14, 2010 What's On the Minds of Your Utilities?  Transformation of the Electricity Industry  Emerging smart technology  Financial reform  Reliability  Major initiatives to address climate change  Gaps / Lack of Clarity in Federal / State Decisions on Infrastructure and Market Issues  Operating in a carbon constrained world EEI  Our members serve 95% of the ultimate customers in the shareholder-owned segment of the industry,  and represent approximately 70% of the U.S. electric power industry.  We also have more than 80 international electric companies as Affiliate Members  Organized in 1933, EEI works closely with all of its members, representing their interests and

45

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ancillary-service costs for 12 US electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ancillary services are those functions performed by electrical generating, transmission, system-control, and distribution-system equipment and people to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission defined ancillary services as ``those services necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.`` FERC divided these services into three categories: ``actions taken to effect the transaction (such as scheduling and dispatching services) , services that are necessary to maintain the integrity of the transmission system [and] services needed to correct for the effects associated with undertaking a transaction.`` In March 1995, FERC published a proposed rule to ensure open and comparable access to transmission networks throughout the country. The rule defined six ancillary services and developed pro forma tariffs for these services: scheduling and dispatch, load following, system protection, energy imbalance, loss compensation, and reactive power/voltage control.

Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Early, Cost-Effective Applications of Photovoltaics in the Electric Utility Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV)-powered systems can compete economically with conventional utility approaches such as distribution line extensions and step-down transformer installation for powering small electric loads. This study identified more than 60 cost-effective applications of PV-powered systems for utilities and their customers.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis is an update to the 2005 Energy Efficiency Potential Study completed by KEMA for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) and identifies potential energy efficiency opportunities in the residential sector on Kauai (KEMA 2005). The Total Resource Cost (TRC) test is used to determine which of the energy efficiency measures analyzed in the KEMA report are cost effective for KIUC to include in a residential energy efficiency program. This report finds that there remains potential energy efficiency savings that could be cost-effectively incentivized through a utility residential demand-side management program on Kauai if implemented in such a way that the program costs per measure are consistent with the current residential program costs.

Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR  

SciTech Connect

There is growing evidence that the cost savings potential of the Title IV SO{sub 2} cap-and-trade program is not being reached. PUC regulatory treatment of compliance options appears to provide one explanation for this finding. That suggests that PUCs and utility companies should work together to develop incentive plans that will encourage cost-minimizing behavior for compliance with the EPA's recently issued Clean Air Interstate Rule.

Sotkiewicz, Paul M.; Holt, Lynne

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Case Study: Sustained Utility Cost Reduction in a Large Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This case study presents results of a systematic utility cost reduction plan implemented at a 450,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in a hot and humid climate. Electricity, natural gas, and water usage were all reduced on an absolute basis in both 2002 a

Fiorino, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Design and cost of a utility scale superconducting magnetic energy storage plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) has potential as a viable technology for use in electric utility load leveling. The advantage of SMES over other energy storage technologies is its high net roundtrip energy efficiency. This paper reports the major features and costs of a jointly developed 5000 MWh SMES plant design.

Loyd, R.J.; Nakamura, T.; Schoenung, S.M.; Lieurance, D.W.; Hilal, M.A.; Rogers, J.D.; Purcell, J.R.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

58

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Markets for renewable energy have historically been motivated primarily by policy efforts, but a less widely recognized driver is poised to also play a major role in the coming years: utility integrated resource planning (IRP). Resource planning has re-emerged in recent years as an important tool for utilities and regulators, particularly in regions where retail competition has failed to take root. In the western United States, the most recent resource plans contemplate a significant amount of renewable energy additions. These planned additions--primarily coming from wind power--are motivated by the improved economics of wind power, a growing acceptance of wind by electric utilities, and an increasing recognition of the inherent risks (e.g., natural gas price risk, environmental compliance risk) in fossil-based generation portfolios. This report examines how twelve western utilities treat renewable energy in their recent resource plans. In aggregate, these utilities supply approximately half of all electricity demand in the western United States. Our purpose is twofold: (1) to highlight the growing importance of utility IRP as a current and future driver of renewable energy, and (2) to identify methodological/modeling issues, and suggest possible improvements to methods used to evaluate renewable energy as a resource option. Here we summarize the key findings of the report, beginning with a discussion of the planned renewable energy additions called for by the twelve utilities, an overview of how these plans incorporated renewables into candidate portfolios, and a review of the specific technology cost and performance assumptions they made, primarily for wind power. We then turn to the utilities' analysis of natural gas price and environmental compliance risks, and examine how the utilities traded off portfolio cost and risk in selecting a preferred portfolio.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and UtilizationChapter 26 Cost Estimates for Soybean Processing and Soybean Oil Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 26 Cost Estimates for Soybean Processing and Soybean Oil Refining Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 26 Cost Est

60

DYNASTORE operating cost analysis of energy storage for a midwest utility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the savings in utility operating costs that could be obtained by installing a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS). The target utility was Kansas City Power and Light (KCPL), a typical Midwestern utility with a mix of generating plants and many interconnections. The following applications of battery energy storage were modeled using an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed and supported program called DYNASTORE: (1) Spinning Reserve Only (2) Load Leveling with Spinning Reserve (3) Load Leveling Only (4) Frequency Control DYNASTORE commits energy storage units along with generating units and calculates operating costs with and without energy storage, so that savings can be estimated. Typical weeks of hourly load data are used to make up a yearly load profile. For this study, the BESS power ranged from ``small`` to 300 MW (greater than the spinning reserve requirement). BESS storage time ranged from 1 to 8 hours duration (to cover the time-width of most peaks). Savings in operating costs were calculated for each of many sizes of MW capacity and duration. Graphs were plotted to enable the reader to readily see what size of BESS affords the greatest savings in operating costs.

Anderson, M.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Jungst, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

62

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

267 267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett Prepared under Task No. IDHW9170 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

63

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8267 8267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48267 June 2010 Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative S. Busche and S. Hockett Prepared under Task No. IDHW9170 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

64

COST IMPACT OF SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT COMPLIANCE FOR COMMISSION-REGULATED WATER UTILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NRRI) with funding provided by participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This study was prepared for state public utility commissioners and their staff in response to the growing concern about the effect of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) on water utilities under their jurisdiction. Compliance with the SDWA is expected to have a significant impact on water utilities and the rates they charge for service. A sensitivity analysis was developed for this report using a hypothetical water company to identify the costs associated with alternative treatment processes. A total of eighteen different treatment processes are considered, from conventional treatment to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and reverse osmosis. Capital costs for these processes range from $100,000 to $3.25 million for a water plant with a designed capacity of one million

Patrick C. Mann; Janice A. Beecher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A model of the Capital Cost of a natural gas-fired fuel cell based Central Utilities Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model defines the methods used to estimate the cost associated with acquisition and installation of capital equipment of the fuel cell systems defined by the central utility plant model. The capital cost model estimates the cost of acquiring and installing the fuel cell unit, and all auxiliary equipment such as a boiler, air conditioning, hot water storage, and pumps. The model provides a means to adjust initial cost estimates to consider learning associated with the projected level of production and installation of fuel cell systems. The capital cost estimate is an input to the cost of ownership analysis where it is combined with operating cost and revenue model estimates.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Std Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW AverageStd Dev Cost Per Annual Cost Per kWh Usage Peak kW Average3-2. Logged Outage Cost per Annual kWh Figure 3-3. Logged

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage. Table A-1 lists the utility company, survey year, andRequested From Utility Participants v List of Figures and

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Initial cost analysis of a desalination process utilizing hydrotalcite and permutite for ion sequestration.  

SciTech Connect

An initial cost analysis of a proposed desalination process was performed. The proposed process utilizes tailored inorganic ion exchangers, hydrotalcite and permutite, to sequester anions and cations from a brackish water solution. Three different process scenarios were considered: (1) disposal of the spent exchangers as dry waste (2) conventional chemical regeneration, and (3) acid regeneration of permutite coupled with thermal (550 C) regeneration of hydrotalcite. Disposal of the resin and conventional regeneration are not viable options from an economic standpoint. Applying limited data and optimistic assumptions to the third scenario yielded an estimate of $2.34/kgal of product water. Published values for applying conventional reverse osmosis to similar water streams range from $0.70 to $2.65/kgal. Consistent with these baseline values, the Water Treatment Estimation Routine, WaTER, developed by the United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation produced a cost estimate of $1.16/kgal for brackish water reverse osmosis.

Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Cogeneration - A Utility Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has become an extremely popular subject when discussing conservation and energy saving techniques. One of the key factors which effect conservation is the utility viewpoint on PURPA and cogeneration rule making. These topics are discussed from a utility perspective as how they influence utility participation in future projects. The avoided cost methodology is examined, and these payments for sale of energy to the utility are compared with utility industrial rates. In addition to utilities and industry, third party owner/operation is also a viable option to cogeneration. These options are also discussed as to their impact on the utility and the potential of these ownership arrangements.

Williams, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customer needs. Renewable energy cost reductions, combinedthe likely cost of renewable energy in the longer term.Renewable Energy Credits (RECs)38 5.2 Geothermal Cost

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

Not Available

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cost-effective applications of photovoltaics for electric utilities: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cost targets for the large-scale entry of photovoltaic (PV) systems keep moving, subject to the vagaries of global oil prices and the economic health of the world. Over the last four decades since a practical PV device was announced, costs have come down by a factor of 20 or more and this downward trend is expected to continue, albeit at a slower pace. Simultaneously, conversion efficiencies have nearly tripled. There are many applications today for which PV is cost-effective. In recognition of this, utility interest in PV is increasing and this is manifested by projects such as PVUSA and Central and South West`s renewable resource development effort. While no major technical barriers for the entry of PV systems have been uncovered, several key issues such as power quality, system reliability, ramp rates, spinning reserve requirements, and misoperation of protection schemes will have to be dealt with as the penetration of this technology increases. PV is still in the evolutionary phase and is expected to grow for several decades to come. Fueled by environmental considerations, interest in PV is showing a healthy rise both in the minds of the public and in the planning realms of the electric power community. In recognition of this, the Energy Development Subcommittee of the IEEE Energy Development and Power Generation Committee organized a Panel Session on photovoltaics applications at the 1993 International Joint Power Generation Conference held in Kansas City, Missouri. Summaries of the four presentations are assembled here for the benefit of the readers of this Review.

Bigger, J.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the process. The utility provided a list of contractors whoUtility staff randomly chose three contractors off the list and

Fuller, Merrian C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-Family Owner-Occupied Homes. ? November 2000. EERE (1981. ? Review of Utility Home Energy Assessment Programs. ?1984. ? Evaluation of Utility Home Energy Assessment (RCS)

Fuller, Merrian C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the likely cost of renewable energy in the longer term. ItBalancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable EnergyBalancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies, however, wind integration costs used in some of theestimated by recent wind integration studies is shown to theStudies Resource Plans Wind Integration Cost ($/MWh) Wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Utility-Scale Solar 2012: An Empirical Analysis of Project Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through key findings from this report. The webinar covers trends in not only installed project costs or prices, but also operating costs, capacity factors, and power purchase...

79

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of Wind Power Also important to how renewable energyenergy considered in these plans. Not surprisingly, the total modeled cost of wind

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs to access in-state wind power, either in their 2004 IRPs, or in subsequent renewable energycost and performance of wind power, with limited analysis of geothermal. In its subsequent 2005 renewable energyWind Power Cost and Performance Assumptions .23 5.1.1 Busbar Costs ..26 5.1.2 Indirect Costs .29 5.1.3 Treatment of Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Instrumentation and Control Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction: Utility Application Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This CD provides guidance from the EPRI initiative on IC Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction. Included on the CD are EPRI Technical Report 1015087, Instrumentation and Control Strategies for Plant-Wide and Fleet-Wide Cost Reduction: Utility Application Guideline, published October 2007, and two multimedia briefings. The report and briefings describe a wide range of options while emphasizing integrated modernization across the plant or fleet. Coordinated improvements to shared communi...

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimated lifecycle cost is 7.1 per kWh (assuming 44-yearsector. Estimated lifecycle cost is 1.4 per kWh (Canadian$;A Estimated lifecycle cost is 3.5 per kWh (assuming 10-year

Fuller, Merrian C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the Real Cost: Why Renewable Power is More Cost-Previously Believed. Renewable Energy World, 6(2): pp. 52-Price Risk When Comparing Renewable to Gas-Fired Generation:

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burlington, VT. Efficiency Vermont. LINK Geller, E.S.One Stop Program (page 119) 13. Vermont Community Energyoverall program costs. Vermont Community Energy Mobilization

Fuller, Merrian C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as sources of low-cost baseload power. 4.6.3 LargeScaleEEb is the variable cost of baseload power purchases, and L isbut simply avoids baseload power purchases. Utilities that

Abhyankar, Nikit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Office of Planning,I. Introduction Markets for renewable electricity have grownRisk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Product Developer at Xcel Energy who is working with theby the areas two utilities, Xcel Energy and CenterPointstandards. Product Developer at Xcel Energy who is working

Fuller, Merrian C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The sensitivity of wind technology utilization to cost and market parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study explores the sensitivity of future wind energy market penetration to available wind resources, wind system costs, and competing energy system fuel costs for several possible energy market evolution scenarios. The methodology for the modeling is described in general terms. Cost curves for wind technology evolution are presented and used in conjunction with wind resource estimates and energy market projections to estimate wind penetration into the market. Results are presented that show the sensitivity of the growth of wind energy use to key cost parameters and to some of the underlying modeling assumptions. In interpreting the results, the authors place particular emphasis on the relative influence of the parameters studied. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Dodd, H.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hock, S.M.; Thresher, R.W. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Section 5.6.2 Managing Utility Costs: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rates for power used at times the utility establishes as off-peak. The difference in energy charges (per kWh) between on-peak and off-peak power can be a fac- tor of two to four....

92

Least cost planning regulation; Restructuring the roles of utility management and regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This purpose of this paper is to examine the roles of regulators in long-range utility resource planning. Summary of major points include: Three regulatory options exist today with respect to integrated resource planning: Command and Control Regulation; Incentive Regulation; and Flexible Regulation. If deregulation is likely in the end, flexible regulation today offers the greatest promise of long-run success. Flexible regulation requires commissions and companies to agree on underlying principles and for utility management to exercise defensible judgment.

Donovan, D.J.; Goldfield, S.R. (Richard Metzler and Associates, Northbrook, IL (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Benefit/Cost Analysis of Geothermal Technology R&D. Volume III: Energy Extraction and Utilization Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the benefit/cost relationship for 44 research and development (R and D) projects being funded by the Utilization Technology Branch (UTB) of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE), Department of Energy (DOE) as a part of its Energy Extraction and Conversion Technology program. The benefits were computed in terms of the savings resulting from the reduction in the cost of electricity projected to be generated at 27 hydrothermal prospects in the US between 1978 and 2000, due to technological improvements brought about by successful R and D. The costs of various projects were estimated by referring to the actual expenditures already incurred and the projected future budgets for these projects. In certain cases, the expected future expenditures had to be estimated on the basis of the work which would need to be done to carry a project to the commercialization stage.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Pfundstein, Richard T.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The cost of reducing utility S02 emissions : not as low as you might think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common assertion in public policy discussions is that the cost of achieving the SO2 emissions reductions under the acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act ("Title IV") has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV ...

Smith, Anne E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Costs and benefits from utility-funded commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the costs and savings of commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings. A total of 46 EEMs were commissioned for all 16 buildings and 73 deficiencies were corrected. On average, commissioning was marginally cost effective on energy savings alone, although the results were mixed among all 16 buildings. When considered as a stand-alone measure, the median simple payback time of 6.5 years under the low energy prices in the Pacific Northwest. Under national average prices the median payback time is about three years. In estimating the present value of the energy savings from commissioning we considered low and high lifetimes for the persistence of savings from deficiency corrections. Under the low- lifetime case the average present value of the energy savings ($0. 21/ft{sup 2}) were about equal to the average commissioning costs ($0. 23/ft{sup 2}). Under the high-lifetime case the savings ($0.51/ft{sup 2}) were about twice the costs. Again, the savings would be about twice as large under national average prices. The results are subject to significant uncertainty because of the small sample size and lack of metered data in the evaluation. However, the findings suggest that investments in commissioning pay off. Building owners want buildings that work as intended, and are comfortable, healthy, and efficient. It is likely that the non-energy benefits, which are difficult to quantify, are larger than the energy-savings benefits.

Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Conservation Fund: Helping Corporations Develop Energy Conservation Strategies and Reduce Utility Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation projects can save companies significant money over time and often pay for themselves very quickly. This is especially true with the dramatic increase in energy costs over the past few years. Yet convincing corporate decision makers of their value is challenging, since most plants with limited capital tend to direct resources toward projects that increase production rather than toward those that save energy. The irony is that production projects may not realize savings if markets change, while conservation improvements usually change a plant's infrastructure in ways that ensure continued savings. Establishing a business unit or department focused on energy cost reduction and investing its profits in an Energy Conservation Fund (ECF) is part of a total energy approach that helps corporations identify projects, dedicate funds and implement changes. It makes conservation improvement projects more attractive on the front end, so companies can enjoy the long-term benefits.

Swanson, G. A.; Houston, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Flat-plate solar collectors utilizing polymeric film for high performance and very low cost  

SciTech Connect

Polymeric films are used in the construction of the absorber and window portions of a flat plate solar collector. The absorber heat exchanger consists of a channeled liquid envelope constructed using a polymeric film and metal foil laminate. In addition, the composite films and light frame monocoque construction contribute to very light weight and low cost. The use of high-performance polymers permits low-loss designs with high thermal performance. The construction concepts are consistent with high speed mass production and installation with manufacturing cost projections of $15/m/sup 2/. Tests performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and elsewhere indicate performance potential consistent with applications incorporating solar absorption air conditioning.

Wilhelm, W.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Utilizing fly ash particles to produce low-cost metal matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are a blend of fine ceramic particles mixed with metals such as aluminium or magnesium. Fly ash is considerably cheaper than ceramics; aluminium-fly ash composites cost less than 60% of conventional aluminium-SiC composites making them attractive to automakers striving for lower weight and cheaper materials for brake rotors or brake drums. Ultalite.com has consulted with US researchers to to find the optimum requirements of the fly ash needed to make MMCs. Particle size 20-40 microns, low calcium oxide content and spherical particles were identified. The desired particles once extracted are stirred into molten aluminum and the resulting composite is into ingots for shipment to a casting facility. Dynamometer testing has shown that aluminium-fly ash composite brake drums have better performance and wear than cast iron drums. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Withers, G. [Ultalite.com, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Italian Association of Energy EconomistsYardstick Regulation of Electricity Distribution Utilities Based on the Estimation of an Average Cost Function *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we estimate an average-cost function for a panel of 45 Swiss electricity distribution utilities as a basis for yardstick regulation of the distribution-network access prices. Unlike the existing literature, we separate the electricity sales function of utilities from the network operation function. Several exogenous variables measuring the heterogeneity of the service areas were included in the model specification in order to allow the regulator to set differentiated benchmark prices incorporating this heterogeneity. We can identify different exogenous service area characteristics that affect average cost. These are the load factor, the customer density and the output density of different consumer groups. Moreover, the estimation results indicate the existence of significant economies of scale; i.e. most of the Swiss utilities in our sample are too small to reach minimum efficient scale. However, to give the small utilities incentives to merge the size of the utilities must not be included in the yardstick calculation. 1.

Massimo Filippini; Jrg Wild; Massimo Filippini; Jrg Wild

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultimately accepted a natural gas price projection that wasfrom the NWPPC s natural gas price forecast (basis East-about future natural gas prices, this issue really boils dow

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relevant basis for any gas price inputs in Utah. It proposedultimately accepted a natural gas price projection that wasin 2004 for this average gas price projection is $4.98/MMBtu

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

Where did the money go? The cost and performance of the largest commercial sector DSM program  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total resource cost (TRC) of energy savings for 40 of the largest 1992 commercial sector DSM programs. The calculation includes the participating customer`s cost contribution to energy saving measures and all utility costs, including incentives received by customers, program administrative and overhead costs, measurement and evaluation costs, and shareholder incentives paid to the utility. All savings are based on post-program savings evaluations. We find that, on a savings-weighted basis, the programs have saved energy at a cost of 3.2 {cents}/kWh. Taken as a whole, the programs have been highly cost effective when compared to the avoided costs faced by the utilities when the programs were developed. We investigate reasons for differences in program costs and examine uncertainties in current utility practices for reporting costs and evaluating savings.

Eto, J.; Kito, S.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Options for Reducing Environmental-Related Utility Costs Associated With Dielectric Fluids Employed in Cables and Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents results of a literature review and technical workshop on environmental management of dielectric fluids, with emphasis on those properties that strongly influence transport, fate, impacts, and costs of a dielectric fluid release into the environment. From this basis, options are presented for new or modified dielectric fluids that could reduce environmental impacts and lower management costs.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

107

Utility rate structures and distributed thermal energy storage: a cost/benefit analysis. Basic research report, October 1978-February 1979  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines three alternative methods by which electric utilities might take advantage of distributed thermal energy storage to smooth out their load profiles. These three methods are: time-specific rates, time-invariant rates with subsidized storage, and direct load controls. The optimal form of each of these policies is determined, and formulas indicating the relative desirability of each policy are developed.

Koening, E.F.; Cambel, A.B.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluating Utility Executives' Perceptions of Smart Grid Costs, Benefits and Adoption Plans To Assess Impacts on Building Design and Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Grid technology is likely to be implemented in various magnitudes across utilities in the near future. To accommodate these technologies significant changes will have to be incorporated in building design construction and planning. This research paper attempts to evaluate public utility executives plans to adopt smart grid technologies and to assess timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Telephone survey was the data collection method used to collect information from executives at cooperative and municipal utilities. The study focuses on small and medium utilities with more than five thousand customers and fewer than one hundred thousand customers. A stratified random sampling approach was applied and sample results for fifty-nine survey responses were used to predict the timing of smart grid implementation and the timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Results of this research indicate that design and construction professionals should already be developing knowledge and experience to accommodate smart grid impacts on the built environment.

Rao, Ameya Vinayak

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Price impacts of electric-utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As competition in the electricity industry increases, utilities (and others) worry more about the upward pressure on electricity prices that demand-side management (DSM) programs often impose. Because of these concerns, several utilities have recently reduced the scope of their DSM programs or focused these programs more on customer service and peak-demand reductions and less on improving energy efficiency. This study uses the Oak Ridge Financial Model (ORFIN) to calculate the rate impacts of DSM. The authors use ORFIN to examine the two factors that contribute to DSM`s upward pressure on prices: the cost of the programs themselves and the loss of revenue associated with fixed-cost recovery. This second factor reflects the reduction in revenues caused by the DSM-induced energy and demand savings that exceed the reduction in utility costs. This analysis examines DSM price impacts as functions of the following factors: the DSM program itself (cost, conservation load factor, geographic focus on deferral of transmission and distribution investments, and mix across customer classes); the utility`s cost and pricing structures (factors at least partly under the utility`s control, such as retail tariffs, fixed vs variable operating costs, and capital costs not related to kW or kWh growth); and external economic and regulatory factors (the level and temporal pattern of avoided energy and capacity costs; ratebasing vs expensing of DSM-program costs; shareholder incentives for DSM programs; load growth; and the rates for income, property, and revenue taxes).

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-year plan, 1990-1999 : 1989 Utility OM&R Comparison : A Comparison of BPA (Bonneville Power Administration) and Selected Utility Transmission, Operations and Maintenance Costs.  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, competing resource demands within BPA have forced the Agency to stretch Operations, Maintenance and Replacement (OM R) resources. There is a large accumulation of tasks that were not accomplished when scheduled. Maintenance and replacements and outages, due to material and equipment failure, appear to be increasing. BPA has made a strategic choice to increase its emphasis on OM R programs by implementing a multi-year, levelized OM R plan which is keyed to high system reliability. This strategy will require a long-term commitment of a moderate increase in staff and dollars allocated to these programs. In an attempt to assess the direction BPA has taken in its OM R programs, a utility comparison team was assembled in early January 1989. The team included representatives from BPA's Management Analysis, Internal Audit and Financial Management organizations, and operation and maintenance program areas. BPA selected four utilities from a field of more than 250 electric utilities in the US and Canada. The selection criteria generally pertained to size, with key factors including transformation capacity, load, gross revenue, and interstate transmission and/or marketing agreements, and their OM R programs. Information was gathered during meetings with managers and technical experts representing the four utilities. Subsequent exchanges of information also took place to verify findings. The comparison focused on: Transmission operations and maintenance program direction and emphasis; Organization, management and implementation techniques; Reliability; and Program costs. 2 figs., 21 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Methanation process utilizing split cold gas recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the methanation of feed gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen in multiple stages, the feed gas, cold recycle gas and hot product gas is mixed in such proportions that the mixture is at a temperature sufficiently high to avoid carbonyl formation and to initiate the reaction and, so that upon complete reaction of the carbon monoxide and hydrogen, an excessive adiabatic temperature will not be reached. Catalyst damage by high or low temperatures is thereby avoided with a process that utilizes extraordinarily low recycle ratios and a minimum of investment in operating costs.

Tajbl, Daniel G. (Evanston, IL); Lee, Bernard S. (Lincolnwood, IL); Schora, Jr., Frank C. (Palatine, IL); Lam, Henry W. (Rye, NY)

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Operational, cost, and technical study of large windpower systems integrated with an existing electric utility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed wind energy assessment from the available wind records, and evaluation of the application of wind energy systems to an existing electric utility were performed in an area known as the Texas Panhandle, on the Great Plains. The study area includes parts of Texas, eastern New Mexico, the Oklahoma Panhandle and southern Kansas. The region is shown to have uniformly distributed winds of relatively high velocity, with average wind power density of 0.53 kW/m/sup 2/ at 30 m height at Amarillo, Texas, a representative location. The annual period of calm is extremely low. Three separate compressed air storage systems with good potential were analyzed in detail, and two potential pumped-hydro facilities were identified and given preliminary consideration. Aquifer storage of compressed air is a promising possibility in the region.

Ligon, C.; Kirby, G.; Jordan, D.; Lawrence, J.H.; Wiesner, W.; Kosovec, A.; Swanson, R.K.; Smith, R.T.; Johnson, C.C.; Hodson, H.O.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Central station advanced power conditioning: technology, utility interface, and performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new concept is proposed for central station SPV power conditioning. It avoids heavy dc bus and extensive ac distribution, and so offers technical, cost, and efficiency advantages. Cost and efficiency comparisons with a more conventional approach, akin to that being implemented for the SMUD installation, are presented. Although the capital gains are not great, the simplification of site preparation and installation is considerable. The design used to generate data for this paper if fully compatible with utility transmission system requirements.

Wood, P.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

An R&D Project Management and Selection System for the Utilization Technology Branch, Division of Geothermal Energy, Volume III - Project Selection Procedure and Benefit/Cost Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report in three volumes describes an R and D project management and selection system developed for the Utilization Technology Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy, Department of Energy. The proposed project management system (PMS) consists of a project data system (PDS) and a project selection procedure (PSP). The project data system consists of a series of project data forms and project status logs, and descriptions of information pathways. The PDS emphasizes timely monitoring of the technical and financial progress of projects, maintenance of the history of the project and rapid access to project information to facilitate responsive reporting to DGE and DOE Upper Management. The project selection procedure emphasizes a R and D product-oriented approach to benefit/cost analysis of individual projects. The report includes: (a) a description of the system, and recommendations for its implementation, (b) the PDS forms and explanation of their use, (c) a glossary of terms for use on the forms, (d) a description of the benefit/cost approach, (e) a data base for estimating R and D benefits, and (f) examples of test applications of the system to nine current DGE projects. This volume describes a proposed procedure for R and D project selection. The benefit/cost analysis part of the procedure estimates financial savings expected to result from the commercial use of hardware or process products of R and D. Savings are estimated with respect to the geothermal power plants expected to come on line between 1978 and 2000.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

PRELIMINARY DESIGN AND COST ESTIMATE FOR THE PRODUCTION OF CENTRAL STATION POWER FROM AN AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR UTILIZING THORIUM-URANIUM-233  

SciTech Connect

The design and economics of the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor as basically under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. The reactor system utilizes thorium-U-233 fuel. Conditions accompanying reactor systems generating up to l080 mw of net electrical energy are covered. The study indicates that a generating station, with a net thermal efficiency of 28.l%, might be constructed for approximately 0/kw and 0/kw at the l80 mw and l080 mw electrical levels, respectively. These values result in capital expenses of approximately 4.72 and 2.86 milis/kwh. A major part of fuel cost is the expense of chemical processing. It is therefore advantageous 10 schedule fuel through a relatively large processing system since fixed charges are insensitive to chemical plant size. By handling fuel through a plant large enough for processing 200 kg of thorium per day, total fuel costa of about 1 mill/kwh result. This cost for fuel processing appears applicable to generating stations up to abeut 540 mw in size, decreasing to about 0.6 mills/kwh at the l080 mw level. Operating and maintenance expense, including heavy water cost on a lease basis, varies between l.34 and 0.89 mills/kwh for l80 and l080 megawatts respectively. If the purchase of heavy water is required, 0.3 to 0.4 mills/kwh must be added. It is concluded that the Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor may produce electrical power competitive with conventional generating systems when the remaining technical problems are solved. It is felt ihat the research and development now programed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will solve these problems and affect costs favorably. (auth)

Carson, H.G.; Landrum, L.H. eds.

1955-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Lessons Learned - The EV Project Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Avoidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Avoidance and Cost Reduction Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Award DE-EE0002194 ECOtality North America 430 S. 2 nd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona...

117

Valuing Conservation and Demand Response: Using the CPUC's Avoided...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Valuing Conservation and Demand Response: Using the CPUC's Avoided Cost Methodology Speaker(s): Ren Orans Snuller Price Date: June 29, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Background:...

118

Intelligent agent for aircraft collision avoidance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The trend of the air traffic system is toward a free flight environment. Free flight offers greater flexibility in planning for flights than the current air traffic control and management system. In free flight, operators are allowed to fly under instrument flight rules and choose their own flight path and speed in real time. One of the requirements to make the free flight environment feasible is an aircraft collision avoidance agent, also known as a traffic agent. One widely accepted concept of aircraft to aircraft communication for free flight environment is Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast. In this research, the focus is on constructing a traffic agent, utilizing aircraft to aircraft information for flight management system. The agent includes a traffic conflict detection module and collision avoidance module. The method used by the modules is a combination of knowledge based expert system and optimal control. The expert system is the primary decision-maker and determines the appropriate actions required for conflict detection and avoidance. Optimal control is used to generate the optimum avoidance trajectory that adheres to the criteria assigned by the expert system. Results of various test cases presented in the research demonstrate that the combination of the two methods provides an efficient and effective way to obtain optimal traffic avoidance trajectories.

Shandy, Surya Utama

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Confidential data in a competitive utility environment: A regulatory perspective  

SciTech Connect

Historically, the electric utility industry has been regarded as one of the most open industries in the United States in sharing information but their reputation is being challenged by competitive energy providers, the general public, regulators, and other stakeholders. As the prospect of competition among electricity power providers has increased in recent years, many utilities have been requesting that the data they submit to their utility regulatory commissions remain confidential. Withholding utility information from the public is likely to have serious and significant policy implications with respect to: (1) consumer education, the pursuit of truth, mutual respect among parties, and social cooperation; (2) the creation of a fair market for competitive energy services; (3) the regulatory balance; (4) regional and national assessments of energy-savings opportunities; (5) research and development; and (6) evaluations of utility programs, plans, and policies. In a telephone survey of all public utility commissions (PUCs) that regulate electric and gas utilities in the U.S., we found that almost all PUCs have received requests from utility companies for data to be filed as confidential, and confidential data filings appear to have increased (both in scope and in frequency) in those states where utility restructuring is being actively discussed. The most common types of data submitted as confidential by utilities dealt with specific customer data, market data, avoided costs, and utility costs.

Vine, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Climate Change and Water Resources in California: The Cost of Conservation versus Supply Augmentation for the East Bay Municipal Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009-2040: aggressive water conservation and the enlargementrationing, recycled water, conservation, and supplementalwhile meetings its costs. Water conservation versus supply

Mourad, Bessma

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Power Sales to Electric Utilities  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided costs (i.e., costs of providing both capacity and energy). Qualifying facilities (QF) include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. In Washington State, neither standard power purchase prices based upon a proxy ''avoided plant'', standard contracts, or a standard offer process have been used. Instead, a variety of power purchase contracts have been negotiated by developers of qualifying facilities with investor-owned utilities, public utility districts, and municipally-owned and operated utilities. With a hydro-based system, benefits associated with resource acquisition are determined in large part by how compatible the resource is with a utility's existing generation mix. Power purchase rates are negotiated and vary according to firm energy production, guarantees, ability to schedule maintenance or downtime, rights of refusal, power plant purchase options, project start date and length of contract; front-loading or levelization provisions; and the ability of the project to provide ''demonstrated'' capacity. Legislation was also enacted which allows PURPA to work effectively. Initial laws established ownership rights and provided irrigation districts, PUDs, and municipalities with expanded enabling powers. Financial processes were streamlined and, in some cases, simplified. Finally, laws were passed which are designed to ensure that development proceeds in an environmentally acceptable manner. In retrospect, PURPA has worked well within Washington. In the state of Washington, 20 small-scale hydroelectric projects with a combined generating capacity of 77 MW, 3 solid waste-to-energy facilities with 55 MW of electrical output, 4 cogeneration projects with 34.5 MW of generating capability, and 4 wastewater treatment facility digester gas-to-energy projects with 5 MW of electrical production have come on-line (or are in the final stages of construction) since the passage of PURPA. These numbers represent only a small portion of Washington's untapped and underutilized cogeneration and renewable resource generating potentials. [DJE-2005

None

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices in the United States: Current Drivers and Cost-Reduction Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. However, system cost reductions are not necessarily realized or realized in a timely manner by many customers. Many reasons exist for the apparent disconnects between installation costs, component prices, and system prices; most notable is the impact of fair market value considerations on system prices. To guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, it is necessary to develop a granular perspective on the factors that underlie PV system prices and to eliminate subjective pricing parameters. This report's analysis of the overnight capital costs (cash purchase) paid for PV systems attempts to establish an objective methodology that most closely approximates the book value of PV system assets.

Goodrich, A.; James, T.; Woodhouse, M.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Avoided Electricity Subsidy Payments Can Finance Substantial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Avoided Electricity Subsidy Payments Can Finance Substantial Appliance Efficiency Incentive Programs: Case Study of Mexico Title Avoided Electricity Subsidy Payments Can Finance...

126

Avoid advanced control project mistakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-line process optimization is worth working for but without robust advanced controls it will never happen. In this paper, the author evaluates how well advanced controls worked in five refineries. Having spent money on such projects, the refineries faced a situation in which there was no measurable improvement in overall plant performance. These refineries are owned by different companies, yet they share a pattern of mistakes in administrating advanced controls. Highlighting these mistakes shows ways to improve the organization of advanced control technology, to avoid obvious pitfalls.

Friedman, Y.Z. (Petrocontrol, Madison, NJ (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

129

Obstacle-avoiding navigation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for guiding an autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle through a field of operation having obstacles thereon to be avoided employs a memory for containing data which defines an array of grid cells which correspond to respective subfields in the field of operation of the vehicle. Each grid cell in the memory contains a value which is indicative of the likelihood, or probability, that an obstacle is present in the respectively associated subfield. The values in the grid cells are incremented individually in response to each scan of the subfields, and precomputation and use of a look-up table avoids complex trigonometric functions. A further array of grid cells is fixed with respect to the vehicle form a conceptual active window which overlies the incremented grid cells. Thus, when the cells in the active window overly grid cell having values which are indicative of the presence of obstacles, the value therein is used as a multiplier of the precomputed vectorial values. The resulting plurality of vectorial values are summed vectorially in one embodiment of the invention to produce a virtual composite repulsive vector which is then summed vectorially with a target-directed vector for producing a resultant vector for guiding the vehicle. In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of vectors surrounding the vehicle are computed, each having a value corresponding to obstacle density. In such an embodiment, target location information is used to select between alternative directions of travel having low associated obstacle densities.

Borenstein, Johann (Ann Arbor, MI); Koren, Yoram (Ann Arbor, MI); Levine, Simon P. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Utility Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs and usage. Screen Shots Keywords Central capture of utility data for cost and energy usage reporting and reduction ValidationTesting Software has been rigorously...

131

Counting self-avoiding walks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The connective constant \\mu(G) of a graph G is the asymptotic growth rate of the number of self-avoiding walks on G from a given starting vertex. We survey three aspects of the dependence of the connective constant on the underlying graph G. Firstly, when G is cubic, we study the effect on \\mu(G) of the Fisher transformation (that is, the replacement of vertices by triangles). Secondly, we discuss upper and lower bounds for \\mu(G) when G is regular. Thirdly, we present strict inequalities for the connective constants \\mu(G) of vertex-transitive graphs G, as G varies. As a consequence of the last, the connective constant of a Cayley graph of a finitely generated group decreases strictly when a new relator is added, and increases strictly when a non-trivial group element is declared to be a generator. Special prominence is given to open problems.

Geoffrey R. Grimmett; Zhongyang Li

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

Utility spot pricing study : Wisconsin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spot pricing covers a range of electric utility pricing structures which relate the marginal costs of electric generation to the prices seen by utility customers. At the shortest time frames prices change every five ...

Caramanis, Michael C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities Presentation covers...

134

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis Eligibility Utility Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Information...

135

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

avoided carbon costs of energy efficiency and the reducedto acquire all cost-effective energy efficiency, andacquire all cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Impact of SEMI F47 on Utilities and Their Customers: Abridged Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial and commercial end users commonly upgrade their process equipment every few years. EPRI customers can help these end users avoid costly power quality problems by insisting on proper system compatibility specifications during the equipment bidding and procurement stages. EPRI funders were instrumental in the successful effort to develop equipment immunity standards, such as SEMI F47, which has benefited the semiconductor industry and the electric utilities serving these end users. This abridged...

2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Observability-based local path planning and obstacle avoidance using bearing-only measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an observability-based local path planning and obstacle avoidance technique that utilizes an extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to estimate the time-to-collision (TTC) and bearing to obstacles using bearing-only measurements. To ensure ... Keywords: Collision avoidance, Miniature air vehicle, Observability, Path planning

Huili Yu, Rajnikant Sharma, Randal W. Beard, Clark N. Taylor

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

NIST Assists with Testing Crash Avoidance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Assists with Testing Crash Avoidance System. ... of Transportation (DOT) by developing tests for a ... has designed preliminary test procedures that ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Choose building products that avoid toxic emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Choose building products that avoid toxic emissions. ... (PVC or vinyl) products have a wide range of chlorine that ... and also the plasticizers in ...

142

Photovoltaics: New opportunities for utilities  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents information on photovoltaics. The following topics are discussed: Residential Photovoltaics: The New England Experience Builds Confidence in PV; Austin's 300-kW Photovoltaic Power Station: Evaluating the Breakeven Costs; Residential Photovoltaics: The Lessons Learned; Photovoltaics for Electric Utility Use; Least-Cost Planning: The Environmental Link; Photovoltaics in the Distribution System; Photovoltaic Systems for the Rural Consumer; The Issues of Utility-Intertied Photovoltaics; and Photovoltaics for Large-Scale Use: Costs Ready to Drop Again.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Evaluating Utility Owned Electric ESS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charge Management The avoided cost of demand charges. Simple internal models; Sandia optimization tool; ESVT Energy T&D Service Reserve Service Customer Service Future Tasks...

144

The effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 on electric utilities: An update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data and analyses related to Phase I implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendment by electric utilities. It describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on sulfur dioxide emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. The first year of Phase I demonstrated that the market-based sulfur dioxide emissions control system could achieve significant reductions in emissions at lower than expected costs. Some utilities reduced aggregate emissions below legal requirements due to economic incentives; other utilities purchased additional allowances to avoid noncompliance. More than half of the utilities switched to or blended with lower sulfur coal, due to price reductions in the coal market which were partially due to the allowance trading program. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.

Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A.; Schoenung, S.M. [Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA (United States)]|[Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Statistics on pattern-avoiding permutations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis concerns the enumeration of pattern-avoiding permutations with respect to certain statistics. Our first result is that the joint distribution of the pair of statistics 'number of fixed points' and 'number of ...

Elizalde, Sergi, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are placed into a utilitys rate base where the investmentis not technically part of the utilitys rate base. Energytechnically part of the utilitys rate base. D.2 Costs Most

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc of sufficient strength to withstand handling, transfer and long term exposure. The final phase (4) was designed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

150

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many state regulatory commissions and policymakers want utilities to aggressively pursue energy efficiency as a strategy to mitigate demand and energy growth, diversify the resource mix, and provide an alternative to building new, costly generation. However, as the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE 2007) points out, many utilities continue to shy away from aggressively expanding their energy efficiency efforts when their shareholder's fundamental financial interests are placed at risk by doing so. Thus, there is increased interest in developing effective ratemaking and policy approaches that address utility disincentives to pursue energy efficiency or lack of incentives for more aggressive energy efficiency efforts. New regulatory initiatives to promote increased utility energy efficiency efforts also affect the interests of consumers. Ratepayers and their advocates are concerned with issues of fairness, impacts on rates, and total consumer costs. From the perspective of energy efficiency advocates, the quid pro quo for utility shareholder incentives is the obligation to acquire all, or nearly all, achievable cost-effective energy efficiency. A key issue for state regulators and policymakers is how to maximize the cost-effective energy efficiency savings attained while achieving an equitable sharing of benefits, costs and risks among the various stakeholders. In this study, we modeled a prototypical vertically-integrated electric investor-owned utility in the southwestern US that is considering implementing several energy efficiency portfolios. We analyze the impact of these energy efficiency portfolios on utility shareholders and ratepayers as well as the incremental effect on each party when lost fixed cost recovery and/or utility shareholder incentive mechanisms are implemented. A primary goal of our quantitative modeling is to provide regulators and policymakers with an analytic framework and tools that assess the financial impacts of alternative incentive approaches on utility shareholders and customers if energy efficiency is implemented under various utility operating, cost, and supply conditions.We used and adapted a spreadsheet-based financial model (the Benefits Calculator) which was developed originally as a tool to support the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE). The major steps in our analysis are displayed graphically in Figure ES- 1. Two main inputs are required: (1) characterization of the utility which includes its initial financial and physical market position, a forecast of the utility?s future sales, peak demand, and resource strategy to meet projected growth; and (2) characterization of the Demand-Side Resource (DSR) portfolio ? projected electricity and demand savings, costs and economic lifetime of a portfolio of energy efficiency (and/or demand response) programs that the utility is planning or considering implementing during the analysis period. The Benefits Calculator also estimates total resource costs and benefits of the DSR portfolio using a forecast of avoided capacity and energy costs. The Benefits Calculator then uses inputs provided in the Utility Characterization to produce a ?business-as usual? base case as well as alternative scenarios that include energy efficiency resources, including the corresponding utility financial budgets required in each case. If a decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism are instituted, the Benefits Calculator model readjusts the utility?s revenue requirement and retail rates accordingly. Finally, for each scenario, the Benefits Calculator produces several metrics that provides insights on how energy efficiency resources, decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism impacts utility shareholders (e.g. overall earnings, return on equity), ratepayers (e.g., average customer bills and rates) and society (e.g. net resource benefits).

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

152

NSLS Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilities Utilities The Utilities Group, led by project engineer Ron Beauman, is responsible for providing Utilities Engineering and Technical services to NSLS, Users, and SDL including cooling water at controlled flow rates, pressures, and temperatures, compressed air and other gases. In addition, they provide HVAC engineering, technical, and electrical services as needed. Utilities systems include cooling and process water, gas, and compressed air systems. These systems are essential to NSLS operations. Working behind the scenes, the Utilities group continuously performs preventative maintenance to ensure that the NSLS has minimal downtime. This is quite a feat, considering that the Utilities group has to maintain seven very large and independent systems that extent throughout NSLS. Part of the group's

153

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

February 19, 2013 Webinar: Exploring How Municipal Utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebates with Utility Cost Savings Concord Light provides rebates to customers who install rooftop or ground-mounted solar systems on their property. The utility funds these rebates...

155

A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Examination of the Exacter Outage-Avoidance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A routine inspection program is one tool that utilities can use to reduce failures on their circuits and minimize customer outages. By identifying problems for repair before they develop into failures, an inspection program can be a cost-effective method for enhancing the quality and reliability of electric service. The present methods used to detect and locate underperforming power system hardware can be time consuming and can involve physical complexities and require line crews with bucket trucks to tr...

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Springfield Utility Board- Energy Savings Plan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Springfield Utility Board provides industrial customers with a comprehensive report to identify cost effective efficiency improvements. Eligible measures include high efficiency motors,...

158

Qualified Projects of Natural Gas Utilities (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permits a natural gas utility to construct the necessary facilities of a qualifying project and to recover the eligible infrastructure development costs necessary to develop the eligible...

159

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.aceee.org/research-report/u111 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carrots-utilities-providing-financial Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Cost Recovery/Allocation This report examines state experiences with shareholder financial incentives that encourage investor-owned utilities to provide energy

160

Edge-avoiding wavelets and their applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new family of second-generation wavelets constructed using a robust data-prediction lifting scheme. The support of these new wavelets is constructed based on the edge content of the image and avoids having pixels from both sides of an edge. ... Keywords: constraint propagation, data-dependent interpolation, edge-preserving filtering, lifting scheme, wavelets

Raanan Fattal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

USDA - High Energy Cost Grant Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Energy Cost Grant Program USDA - High Energy Cost Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential...

162

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency...

163

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on...

164

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Circofer -- Low cost approach to DRI production  

SciTech Connect

Lurgi's Circofer Process for reducing fine ores with coal in a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) is a direct approach by using a widely applied and proven reactor in commercializing a state of the art technology. The technology is in response to the demand for a direct reduction process of the future by making possible: the use of low cost ore fines and inexpensive primary energy, fine coal; production of a high grade product used as feedstock by mini mills with the additional advantage of dilution of contaminants introduced by scrap; low environmental impact; and low specific investment costs due to the closed energy circuit. With the incorporation of the latest developments in CFB technology, Circofer offers excellent heat and mass transfer conditions and, consequently, improved gas and energy utilization. High gas conversions using recycle gas have a positive influence on the process economics whereby no export gas is produced. Sticking, accretion and reoxidation problems, which have plagued all previous attempts at developing direct reduction processes using fine ore and coal as a reductant, are avoided, essentially by operating with defined amounts of excess carbon and separation of the reduction and gasifying zones.

Weber, P.; Bresser, W.; Hirsch, M. (Lurgi Metallurgie GmbH, Frankfurt (Germany))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Avoiding nuclear war, Confidence-building measures for crisis stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Confidence-building measures (CBMs) may offer one way out of the contemporary arms control morass. Instead of focusing on limiting the number and types of weaponry, CBMs are designed to control how, when, where, and why military activities are employed. By clarifying military intentions and regulating the operations of military forces in times of both crisis and calm, CBMs can help diminish the opportunities for war arising from surprise attack or from miscalculation, accident, or failure of communication. This volume assembles CBM experts from government and academia to assess the utility of CBMs in a wide variety of areas. CONTENTS: Foreword; Prologue; Introduction; The World of CBMs; The Accidents Measures Agreement; Avoiding Incidents at Sea; The Stockholm CDE Conference; CBMs in the UN Setting; Soviet Views of CBMs; Beyond the Hotline: Controlling a Nuclear Crisis; CBMs for Stabilizing the Strategic Nuclear Competition; Risk Reduction and Crisis Prevention; An East-West Center for Military Cooperation; The Limits of Confidence.

Borawski, J.; Goodby, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Coal Utilization Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Coal Utilization SCienCe Program Description The Coal Utilization Science (CUS) Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in fundamental science and technology areas that have the potential to result in major improvements in the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced power generation systems using coal, the Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The challenge for these systems is to produce power in an efficient and environmentally benign manner while remaining cost effective for power providers as well as consumers. The CUS Program is carried out by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program supports DOE's Strategic Plan to:

170

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

171

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

173

Colorado Public Utility Commission's Xcel Wind Decision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 2001 the Colorado Public Utility Commission ordered Xcel Energy to undertake good faith negotiations for a wind plant as part of the utility's integrated resource plan. This paper summarizes the key points of the PUC decision, which addressed the wind plant's projected impact on generation cost and ancillary services. The PUC concluded that the wind plant would cost less than new gas-fired generation under reasonable gas cost projections.

Lehr, R. L. (NRUC/NWCC); Nielsen, J. (Land and Water Fund of the Rockies); Andrews, S.; Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Utility Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Manager Utility Manager Utility Manager logo Utility Manager™ captures data from historical and current utility bills every month into its centralized database, helping clients measure and energy costs and usage. Utility Manager™ provides energy, operational and financial managers with a series of customizable reports to help shape future decisions regarding energy costs and usage. Screen Shots Keywords Central capture of utility data for cost and energy usage reporting and reduction Validation/Testing Software has been rigorously tested internally throughout the course of its development and ongoing maintenance and enhancement (more than 15 years). Expertise Required Basic computer skills and understanding of energy accounting principles. Users 400-500 U.S. and Canada (primarily U.S.).

175

Facilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU F&A costs at NIU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project, instructional or public service activity. Such costs include utilities, buildings and facilities accrue only as projects dollars are expended. As a result, F&A costs are collected and allocatedFacilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU #12;F&A costs at NIU What are Facilities

Karonis, Nicholas T.

176

Avoiding the prisoner's dilemma of the web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Everyone talks about increasing safety, security and privacy on the web. But in spite of decades of work to achieve these ends, people still find it hard to know which individuals they meet on the Internet they can trust. Worse still, many sites, including ... Keywords: individuals, prisoner's dilemma, security, strategy, transactions, trust, utility

Peter Mortensen; Conrad Wai

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

287 Security Blunders You Should Avoid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Security Blunders ! Security Blunders ! You Should Avoid" Jon S. Warner, Ph.D. Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP Vulnerability Assessment Team Argonne National Laboratory 630-252-6168 rogerj@anl.gov http://www.ne.anl.gov/capabilities/vat Presentation for the ASIS International Annual Meeting! Anaheim, CA, September 21-24, 2009! Sponsors! *! DHS! *! DoD! *! DOS! *! IAEA! *! Euratom! *! DOE/NNSA! *! private companies! *! intelligence agencies! *! public interest organizations! The VAT has done detailed ! vulnerability assessments on! hundreds of different security! devices, systems, & programs.! Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT)" The greatest of faults, I should say, is to be conscious of none. -- Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) A multi-disciplinary team of physicists,

178

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

179

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Avoid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Avoid LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Avoid < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit‎ | Strategies(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Avoid) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Avoid, Shift, Improve Framework The avoid, shift, improve (ASI) framework enables development stakeholders to holistically design low-emission transport strategies by assessing opportunities to avoid the need for travel, shift to less carbon-intensive modes, and improve on conventional technologies, infrastructure, and policies. Avoid Trips and Reduce Travel Demand Transportation Assessment Toolkit Bikes Spain licensed cropped.jpg Avoid trips taken and reduce travel demand by integrating land use planning, transport infrastructure planning, and transport demand

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Utility Service Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Service Renovations Utility Service Renovations Utility Service Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Utility Service Renovations Photovoltaics Wind Any upgrade to utility service provides an opportunity to revisit a Federal building's electrical loads and costs, but it also may provide an economic way to bundle the upgrade with an onsite renewable electricity project during renovation. Upgrading utility service to the site may involve improving or adding a transformer, upgrading utility meters, or otherwise modifying the interconnection equipment or services with the utility. In some cases, the upgrade may change the tariff structure for the facility and may qualify the property for a different structure with lower overall costs. In all cases, the implementation of renewable energy technologies

182

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

184

Avoiding Flicker Caused by a Tire Shredder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowing that nonlinear loads or loads with significant variations can cause sudden voltage fluctuations, or flicker, a utility decided to take preemptive action before adding a large tire shredder to its system. A flicker screening study was conducted, using a software that has been developed by EPRI that allowed the modeling of the load cycle. From the modeling results, several recommendations were made to keep flicker at an acceptable level.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Utility Partnership Working  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partnership Working Group The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites. The mission and objectives of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group are to: Enhance existing or foster new partnerships between Federal agencies and their servicing utilities to identify, develop, and implement cost-effective energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects at Federal sites Identify how utilities can help Federal agencies meet energy management goals required by legislation

188

Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents Documents Update San Diego, CA November 28, 2007 Deb Beattie & Karen Thomas Overview  Legislative & Executive Actions  Legal Opinions  Agency Guidance  Contracts  Sample Documents  Resources www.eere.energy.gov/femp/pdfs/28792.pdf Enabling Legislation for Utility Programs Energy Policy Act of 1992 Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Section 152(f) - Utility Incentive Programs Agencies:  Are authorized and encouraged to participate in utility programs generally available to customers  May accept utility financial incentives, goods, and services generally available to customers  Are encouraged to enter into negotiations with utilities to design cost effective programs to address unique needs of facilities used by agency

189

Utility Conservation Programs: Opportunities and Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the use of conservation programs to achieve utility goals in an electric industry environment subject to change. First, the importance of articulating clear goals for the mission of a utility is discussed. Second, a strategic framework for analysis of utility promotion of conservation investment is presented. Third, the rationale, design and marketing of basic conservation strategies based on differences in utility capacity and cost situations are examined. Particular attention is given to evaluating the establishment of a subsidiary by a utility to offer energy management services -- a relatively new concept that: may present great opportunities for many utilities.

Norland, D. L.; Wolf, J. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Incentives: amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1 year simple payback Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Retrofits and Engineering Studies: 50% of project cost Fluorescent Lighting: $10-$50 High Bay: $70 or $100 (retrofit) Metal Halide: $50 or $70 LED Exit Signs: $12 LED Traffic Signals: $50

191

AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF COUNTERFEIT ITEMS  

SciTech Connect

In today's globalized economy, we cannot live without imported products. Most people do not realize how thin the safety net of regulation and inspection really is. Less than three percent of imported products receive any form of government inspection prior to sale. Avoid flea markets, street vendors and deep discount stores. The sellers of counterfeit wares know where to market their products. They look for individuals who are hungry for a brand name item but do not want to pay a brand name price for it. The internet provides anonymity to the sellers of counterfeit products. Unlike Europe, U.S. law does not hold internet-marketing organizations, responsible for the quality of the products sold on their websites. These organizations will remove an individual vendor when a sufficient number of complaints are lodged, but they will not take responsibility for the counterfeit products you may have purchased. EBay has a number of counterfeit product guides to help you avoid being a victim of the sellers of these products. Ten percent of all medications taken worldwide are counterfeit. If you do buy medications on-line, be sure that the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) recommends the pharmacy you choose to use. Inspect all medication purchases and report any change in color, shape, imprinting or odor to your pharmacist. If you take generic medications these attributes may change from one manufacturer to another. Your pharmacist should inform you of any changes when you refill your prescription. If they do not, get clarification prior to taking the medication. Please note that the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate supplements. The FDA only steps in when a specific supplement proves to cause physical harm or contains a regulated ingredient. Due to counterfeiting, Underwriters Laboratories (UL) changed their label design three times since 1996. The new gold label should be attached to the cord or body of most office and home electrical products (please see the picture to the left). Holiday lights may have the UL marking in red or green instead of the universal black. A red UL mark indicates the product is approved for outdoor as well as indoor service. The green UL mark indicates the product is only to be used indoors. A small number of home electrical products may bear an Interteck (ETL) approval. This label is also acceptable. An Interteck label includes black print on a white background bearing the circular ETL logo. Most manufacturers are proud of their products and strive to gain name recognition as well as foster repeat business. This is not true of counterfeiters. The very first thing most counterfeiters try to do is make their products untraceable. Their products may bear the nation of origin but that is all. This is a common practice with metal components such as pipe fittings and flanges. This is also true of hoisting and rigging equipment such as shackles, turnbuckles and chain. Sadly, this has also occurred with the purchase of some safety equipment such as arc-flash retardant coveralls. Learn the national standards associated with products you are purchasing. Clearly specify these requirements on the procurements you make.

WARRINER RD

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lidar-based Hazard Avoidance for Safe Landing on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazard avoidance is a key technology for landing large payloads safely on the surface of Mars. During hazard avoidance a lander uses onboard sensors to detect hazards in the landing zone, autonomously selects a safe landing site, and then maneuvers to the new site. Design of a system for hazard avoidance is facilitated by simulation where trades involving sensor and mission requirements can be explored. This paper describes the algorithms and models that comprise a scanning lidarbased hazard avoidance simulation including a terrain generator, a lidar model, hazard avoidance algorithms and powered landing guidance algorithms. Preliminary simulation results show that the proposed hazard avoidance algorithms are effective at detecting hazards and guiding the lander to a safe landing site. 1

Andrew Johnson; James Collier; Aron Wolf

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting: up to 70% of project cost All Custom: up to 70% of incremental energy project costs Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate...

194

On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed intention to install, provides the means for obtaining lower purchased power costs. The functionality of a standby power system and its inherent value in the coming free market purchase of electrical energy are added benefits. Project feasibility, conceptual design, on-site generation facility requirements, interconnection requirements, and operation and maintenance costs will be examined. Installation costs in the range of $350 to $400 per KW and operating costs of approximately $0.06 to $0.07 per kWhr compared to purchased power rates determine the feasibility of an on-site generation system. In some cases avoided demand charges offer an opportunity for savings such that special rates are not needed for a feasible project. Depending on the manufacturer, low capital cost diesel generators are available in 1000 to 2000 KW blocks. Capacity requirements determine the number of engines required. Large capacity installations are somewhat restricted by voltage and current ratings. Some variants for multiple engine generator installations will yield greater reliability or lower costs depending on objectives. Specific requirements for basic building blocks of an on-site generation system will be examined as well as an example of a 5,500 KW installation. IEA provides an alternative to installing and operating an on-site generation system. IEA owns and operates diesel standby generation systems for customers, with responsibility for all maintenance and operation as well as associated costs. This allows customers to focus on core business, not the generation of electrical energy.

Charles, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribes tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West mini-grid sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribes wind resources.

Hualapai Tribal Nation

2008-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse...

197

Anaheim Public Utilities- Low-Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anaheim Public Utilities offers low-cost financing for energy efficiency measures through State Assistance Fund for Enterprise, Business and Industrial Development Corporation ([http://www.safe...

198

Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant operating costs. The building owner, another engineering consultant, and the local utility representatives were confused by the rates and missed an opportunity to cut...

199

ENERGY AND UTILITIES ORNL-2219 Microorganisms Having Enhanced ...  

increases the ethanol cost due to both ethanol production rate and total ... ENERGY AND UTILITIES ... (Related Compositions and Methods of Use) ORNL-2219 Contact:

200

Most Viewed Documents - Energy Storage, Conversion, and Utilization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Most Viewed Documents - Energy Storage, Conversion, and Utilization Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III (2002)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NETL: News Release - New Projects Positioning Coal-Fired Utilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Control Standards with New, Lower Cost Technologies With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S....

202

Anaheim Public Utilities- Commercial & Industrial New Construction Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Anaheim Public Utilities (APU) offers commercial, industrial, and institutional customers the New Construction Incentives Program to offset construction and installation costs of energy efficient...

203

Economic and equity effects of transportation utility fees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Residential costs would decrease ­ Retail costs would increase substantially · Not all trips are "generated" ­ Gas stations, groceries are pass-by trips ­ Mixed-use developments internalize some trips · Not all residents use transportation equally ­ Fee should be avoidable by non-users #12;Feasibility · Fee calculated

Levinson, David M.

204

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

storage (CCS) technologies. CCSI will util  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CCS) technologies. CCSI will utilize a software infrastructure (CCS) technologies. CCSI will utilize a software infrastructure to accelerate the development and deployment of new, cost-effective CCS technologies. This will be achieved by identifying promising concepts through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; reducing the time and expense to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes through science-based optimal designs;

206

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

207

Utility Data Collection Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Data Collection Service Data Collection Service Federal-Utility Partnership Working Group 4 May 2006 Paul Kelley, Chief of Operations, 78 th CES, Robins AFB David Dykes, Industrial Segment Mgr, Federal, GPC Topics  Background  Commodities Metered  Data Collection  Cost  Results Background  Robins AFB (RAFB) needed to:  Control electricity usage and considered Demand Control  Track and bill base tenants for energy usage  Metering Project Originated in 1993  $$ requirements limited interest  Developed criteria for available $$  Energy Policy Act 2005:  All facilities sub-metered by 2012  $$ no longer restricts metering project Metering Criteria prior to EPACT 2005  All New Construction - (per Air Force Instructions)

208

Dynamic Portfolio Optimization with Transaction Costs: Heuristics ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 10, 2010 ... 1The special case with a quadratic utility and quadratic transaction costs and no portfolio .... The risk-free rate rf is assumed to be known.

209

A multiple secretary problem with switch costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we utilize probabilistic reasoning and simulation methods to determine the optimal selection rule for the secretary problem with switch costs, in which a known number of applicants appear sequentially in a ...

Ding, Jiachuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Automatic monitoring helps reduce lighting costs  

SciTech Connect

A Benton, Arkansas utility is using a dimmable ballast system to curb high-intensity-discharge (HID) lighting costs. The system also incorpoates a monitoring control system. This control automatically maintains minimum illumination levels.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The theory of deadlock avoidance via discrete control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deadlock in multithreaded programs is an increasingly important problem as ubiquitous multicore architectures force parallelization upon an ever wider range of software. This paper presents a theoretical foundation for dynamic deadlock avoidance in concurrent ... Keywords: concurrent programming, discrete control theory, dynamic deadlock avoidance, multicore processors, multithreaded programming, parallel programming

Yin Wang; Stphane Lafortune; Terence Kelly; Manjunath Kudlur; Scott Mahlke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

213

Actions You Can Take to Reduce Cooling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Cooling Costs Cooling costs can be a substantial part of your facility's annual utility bill. A number of energy savings opportunities...

214

Carbon Dioxide Transport and Storage Costs in NETL Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering and Economic Assessment. 2 This study utilized a similar basis for pipeline costs (Oil and Gas Journal's pipeline cost data up to the year 2000) but added a CO 2...

215

Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The energy and cost calculators below allow Federal agencies to enter their own input values (such as utility rates, hours of use) to estimate energy and cost savings for energy-efficient products....

216

Industry/Utility Partnerships: Formula for Success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry/utility partnerships are created when both parties work productively toward common goals. American industry faces tough global competition and to be successful must create and operate modern production facilities. Cost and energy efficient electrotechnologies play a critical role in their competitiveness. Utilities can play a central role in industrial competitiveness, not only by providing competitively priced and reliable power, but also by helping their customers to identify and implement the most appropriate technologies. When the correct environment is created, both win. Industry reduces costs and produces high quality products. The utility gains customer loyalty and achieves business success.

Smith, W. R.; Spriggs, H. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Avoid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Strategies/Avoid < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit‎ | Strategies Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Avoid, Shift, Improve Framework The avoid, shift, improve (ASI) framework enables development stakeholders to holistically design low-emission transport strategies by assessing opportunities to avoid the need for travel, shift to less carbon-intensive modes, and improve on conventional technologies, infrastructure, and policies. Avoid Trips and Reduce Travel Demand Transportation Assessment Toolkit Bikes Spain licensed cropped.jpg

218

NET PRED UTILITY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002602IBMPC00 Normalized Elution Time Prediction Utility http://omics.pnl.gov/software/NETPredictionUtility.php

219

Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Title Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhai, Pei, Peter H. Larsen, Dev Millstein, Surabi Menon, and Eric R. Masanet Journal Energy Volume 47 Start Page 443 Date Published 2012 Abstract This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO2, SO2 and NOx assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided emissions vary significantly across the country-mainly due to three state-specific factors: the existing resource mix of power plants (power grid fuel mix), the emission intensity of existing fossil fuel power plants and the PV capacity factor within each state. The avoided emissions per solar PV capacity (g/W) - for ten U.S. states -ranged from 670 to 1500 for CO2, 0.01e7.80 for SO2 and 0.25e2.40 for NOx. In general, avoided emissions are likely to be higher in locations with 1) higher share of coal plants; 2) higher emission of existing fossil fuel plants; and 3) higher PV capacity factor. To further illustrate the quantitative relationship between avoided emissions and the three state-specific factors, we conducted a sensitivity analysis. Finally, we estimated the change in avoided emissions in a coal-intensive state by varying the operational constraints of fossil-fuel power plants. At the 10% penetration level avoided emissions were not constrained by the ramp rate limitations, but the minimum capacity requirement significantly affected the avoided emission estimates.

220

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) DEMEC Member Utilities - Green Energy Program Incentives (8 utilities) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial...

222

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. "Utility Wind Integration and Operating Impact Statethat the integration of 20% wind into US electricity marketsand integration costs, Figure 8 provides a supply curve for wind

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Report on Transmission Cost Allocation for RTOs and Others (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes in summary fashion some present transmission cost allocation methods, especially as this relates to the development of utility-scale renewable power sources.

Coles, L.; Porter, K.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Utilities Electric Utility Rates The Utilities Gateway houses OpenEI's free, community-editable utility rate repository. OpenEI users may browse, edit and add new electric utility rates to OpenEI's repository. EIA provides the authoritative list of utility companies in the United States, and thus OpenEI limits utility rates to companies listed by EIA. 43,031 rates have been contributed for 3,832 EIA-recognized utility companies. Browse rates by zip code Browse rates by utility name Create or edit a rate Number of Utility Companies by State Click on a state to view summaries for that state. See a list of all U.S. utility companies and aliases Utility Rate Database Description The Utility Rate Database (URDB) is a free storehouse of rate structure

225

Refinery Operable Utilization Rate  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum ...

226

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

227

Cost Reduction Strategies for Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for generating mixed waste is a reality at all nuclear power plants. The report provides utilities with a means for developing cost reduction strategies to minimize the volume of waste generated, optimize treatment and disposal options, and maximize overall cost savings.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

230

Estimating Renewable Energy Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Renewable Energy Costs Estimating Renewable Energy Costs Estimating Renewable Energy Costs October 16, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically require large, additional capital investments with savings accruing over the project's life. It is crucial that these systems are considered early on in the budgeting process. Early budget requests need to include a set of technologies that could be used to meet the project's design requirements and their associated implementation costs. The design team may respond with a different set of feasible technologies, but it is wise to have an existing placeholder in the budget. Federal agencies can continue to update the budget as decisions

231

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC`S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Renewable energy and utility regulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC'S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

Not Available

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nome Joint Utility Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Joint Utility Systems Joint Utility Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Nome Joint Utility Systems Place Alaska Utility Id 13642 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electrical Charge Residential Power Cost Equalization Average Rates Residential: $0.3600/kWh Commercial: $0.3310/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Nome_Joint_Utility_Systems&oldid=411195

234

Utility Locating in the DOE Environment  

SciTech Connect

Some advances have been made in utility locating in recent years and standards have been recently published to try and categorize the level of information known about the utility in the subsurface. At the same time some characterization about the level of effort or technology in the geophysicist approach to utility locating may be generalized. The DOE environment poses some added difficulties and this presentation covers these issues, costs and the technical approach that has been developed at the INEEL to prevent utility hits and how it fits into the generalized classification of effort.

Clark Scott; Gail Heath

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Specialties [solar wings, oil spill avoidance, on-line patents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author briefly describes the development of the solar wing, a solar powered prototype aircraft named Pathfinder. The author also describes a navigation system to help ships avoid oil-spills and other obstacles. The author also briefly describes access ...

J. A. Adam

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of ...

237

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

240

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production(abovetheutilityratefor electricitysoldlocalenergycostsandutilityrate structures. NetZero1:BaseCaseInputs Theutilityratesusedshouldalsobe

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Funding » Utility Energy Service Contracts » Federal Project Funding » Utility Energy Service Contracts » Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Federal Utility Partnership Working Group October 7, 2013 - 2:31pm Addthis The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites. The mission and objectives of the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group are to: Enhance existing or foster new partnerships between Federal agencies and their servicing utilities to identify, develop, and implement cost-effective energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy

242

Low Cost Emergency VAR Compensator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The barriers to commercialization of the Capacitor Bank Group Shorting (CAPS) concept were investigated in this study. Also, the application of mechanically switched CAPS systems was examined from the technical and cost points of view. In addition, a semiconductor (thyristor) switched or controlled CAPS arrangement was studied. Although only three utilities were surveyed in the market assessment part of the study, it was concluded that if there is a need for additional shunt compensation systems or a nee...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

243

Public Service Commission Authorization to Utilize an Alternative Method of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Service Commission Authorization to Utilize an Alternative Public Service Commission Authorization to Utilize an Alternative Method of Cost Recovery for Certain Base Load Generation (Mississippi) Public Service Commission Authorization to Utilize an Alternative Method of Cost Recovery for Certain Base Load Generation (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Green Power Purchasing Industry Recruitment/Support Performance-Based Incentive Public Benefits Fund Provider Public Service Commission The Senate Bill 2793 authorizes the Public Service Commission (PSC) to

244

Utilization of Composite Materials in Low Cost Motor Rehabilitation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on...

245

Rising Electricity Costs: A Challenge For Consumers, Regulators, And Utilities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Electricity: 30 Years of Industry Change Industry Change David K. Owens Executive Vice President Edison Electric Institute 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 7, 2008 EIA Key to Policy Development and EIA Key to Policy Development and Advocacy Activities Advocacy Activities EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving EIA Has Kept Pace With an Evolving Energy Industry Energy Industry n EIA clearly provides more with less budgetary support l 1979: $347 million l 2007: $91 million (both in Real $2007) n EIA staff resource distribution has tracked changing energy markets and information needs Resource Management Oil & Gas Coal, Nuclear, Electric, Alt Fuels Energy Markets & End Use Integrated Analysis / Forecasting Information Technology

246

The Cost and Performance of Utility Commercial Lighting Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Christopher T. Payne Date Published 051994 Institution LBNL Keywords demand-side management (dsm), energy efficiency Abstract The objective of the Database on Energy...

247

Reducing Power Production Costs by Utilizing Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke. It is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance, and is generally less reactive than coal. Therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the comb...

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Direct Costs and Benefits of US Electric Utility Divestitures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We find that divestiture reduces distribution efficiency but increases power sourcing efficiency. Both effects depend on the amount of own nuclear generation output but not fossil-fuel or hydro output. The net present value for all divestitures in our...

Triebs, Thomas P.; Pollitt, Michael G.; Kwoka, John E.

249

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and juvenile progeny will be sampled and genotyped for 16 microsatellite markers (0). Estimate Connectivity altered the routes and conditions resident salmonids must undertake to connect with neighboring for the status of mountain whitefish. Population connectivity is a measurement of interbreeding among arbitrary

250

Doing business with business: Municipal utility energy audits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a review of the ways in which municipal utilities can use energy audits to identify the energy efficiency measures that are most effective for themselves and their customers. Two examples, Osage Municipal Utilities in Iowa and Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, are used to illustrate the strategies that are most cost effective.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Using consensus building to improve utility regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry and its regulatory environment are at a crossroads. Utilities, intervenors and even public utility commissions are no longer able to initiate and sustain changes unilaterally. Traditional approaches to regulation are often contentious and costly, producing results that are not perceived as legitimate or practical. Consensus building and alternative dispute resolution have the potential to help utilities, intervenors and regulators resolve a host of regulatory issues. This book traces the decline of consensus in utility regulation and delineates current controversies. It presents the theory and practice of alternative dispute resolution in utility regulation and offers a framework for evaluating the successes and failures of attempts to employ these processes. Four regulatory cases are analyzed in detail: the Pilgrim nuclear power plant outage settlement, the use of DSM collaboratives, the New Jersey resource bidding policy and the formation of integrated resource management rules in Massachusetts.

Raab, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Utility Data Accessibility Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Data Accessibility Map Utility Data Accessibility Map Jump to: navigation, search Residential Commercial Benchmarking Energy Efficiency Delivery of Data Time Period Frequency of Data Access to Data Residential frequency of data access Ua Utility Data Access Map Having access to your electricity use data is a very important step in understanding your overall energy usage. Comparing historical data to your current usage is one way to see trends and determine ways for reducing electricity costs and improving overall efficiency. We asked all U.S. electric utility companies to tell us how accessible their electricity use data is for both residential and commercial customers. The results are updated live based on the responses we have to date. As more utilities provide information, the utility boundaries will be automatically colored

254

Solving the problems facing the electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

The dimensions of the current problems of attracting capital for utilities investment, of achieving more efficient utilization of capacity, of siting and construction of new power plants, and of utilities receiving a return on their investment large enough to enable them to continue their service to American consumers are examined. Federal actions that are being taken to help get the utilities out of their current state of malaise are described. The author concludes that positive electric power load management, through a system of cost-based pricing incentives and load controls, can achieve a balanced future both for total electricity usage and for peak demand. This would minimize the consumption of scarce fossil fuels in electricity generation, moderate the future need for construction of new capacity, improve utility revenues, and eventually reduce the need for rate increases to maintain utility viability. The FEA feels that is a reasonable, attainable objective for substantial electrification of the economy beyond 1985. (MCW)

Hill, J.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Small turbines in distributed utility application: Natural gas pressure supply requirements  

SciTech Connect

Implementing distributed utility can strengthen the local distribution system and help avoid or delay the expense of upgrading transformers and feeders. The gas turbine-generator set is an attractive option based on its low front-end capital cost, reliable performance at unmanned stations, and environmental performance characteristics. This report assesses gas turbine utilization issues from a perspective of fuel supply pressure requirements and discusses both cost and operational factors. A primary operational consideration for siting gas turbines on the electric distribution system is whether the local gas distribution company can supply gas at the required pressure. Currently available gas turbine engines require gas supply pressures of at least 150 pounds per square inch gauge, more typically, 250 to 350 psig. Few LDCs maintain line pressure in excess of 125 psig. One option for meeting the gas pressure requirements is to upgrade or extend an existing pipeline and connect that pipeline to a high-pressure supply source, such as an interstate transmission line. However, constructing new pipeline is expensive, and the small volume of gas required by the turbine for the application offers little incentive for the LDC to provide this service. Another way to meet gas pressure requirements is to boost the compression of the fuel gas at the gas turbine site. Fuel gas booster compressors are readily available as stand-alone units and can satisfactorily increase the supply pressure to meet the turbine engine requirement. However, the life-cycle costs of this equipment are not inconsequential, and maintenance and reliability issues for boosters in this application are questionable and require further study. These factors may make the gas turbine option a less attractive solution in DU applications than first indicated by just the $/kW capital cost. On the other hand, for some applications other DU technologies, such as photovoltaics, may be the more attractive option.

Goldstein, H.L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Role of wind power in electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

Current estimates suggest that the cost of wind-generated power is likely to be competitive with conventionally generated power in the near future in regions of the United States with favorable winds and high costs for conventionally generated electricity. These preliminary estimates indicate costs of $500 to 700 per installed kW for mass-produced wind turbines. This assessment regarding competitiveness includes effects of reduced reliability of wind power compared to conventional sources. Utilities employing wind power are likely to purchase more peaking capacity and less baseload capacity than they would have otherwise to provide the lowest-cost reserve power. This reserve power is needed mainly when wind outages coincide with peak loads. The monetary savings associated with this shift contribute substantially to the value of wind energy to a utility.

Davitian, H

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Agency/Company /Organization Government of Costa Rica, Peace with Nature Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.paxnatura.org/pax_n Country Costa Rica UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Costa Rica[1] Overview References ↑ "Costa Rica" Retrieved from

259

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Avoided Through Weatherization October 5, 2010 - 10:56am Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this mean for me? Getting your heating pipes fixed can not only save you money, but also improve your health. "If we'd had a couple cold nights where I would've had to use my heat more than usual, it probably would've put me to sleep and left me there -- it was just too much carbon monoxide coming out in the house," says Mark Pickartz, of Van Buren, Ark. Pickartz's home was weatherized in February by his local community action agency, Crawford-Sebastian Community Development Council (C-SCDC). When energy auditors arrived to his house, they found that his home's heater was severely leaking the poisonous gas. C-SCDC, based in Fort Smith, Ark.,

260

UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Sacramento power utility experience in solar  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the development of three solar power technologies for use in Sacramento, California is provided. A central receiver power plant, Solar One, is being converted to a molten salt design with thermal energy storage by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and six other utilities. SMUD is also investigating a solar dish/sterling engine system and technologies to reduce photovoltaic conversion costs.

Smeloff, E. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Substation Equipment Asset Management: Utility Experience Sharing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have been maintaining substation equipment reliably since the industrys inception, but now many are facing increased challenges to reduce operating and maintenance costs without adversely affecting service levels. In this setting, utilities may benefit from knowing which programs and techniques their peers have implemented. To that end, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a series of industry surveys assessing key substation equipment maintenance practices. As ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electric utilities and residential solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-run incremental cost (LRIC) of providing electricity for solar heating and hot water systems is estimated for three utilities using a utility capacity expansion model and compared to the cost of providing electricity to electric-only systems. All investment, fuel and operating costs are accounted for. Hot water systems and combined heating and hot water systems are analyzed separately. It is found that the LRIC for solar backup is no more than the LRIC of electricity used for purely electric heating and hot water devices and also no more than the incremental cost of normal load growth. For the three utilities studied, there appears to be little basis for rate distinctions between solar devices using electric backup and electric-only heating and hot water devices. Off-peak storage heating and hot water devices have a much lower LRIC than the standard systems; again, there appears to be no basis for distinguishing between solar and electric off-peak devices. Compared to average cost pricing, incremental cost pricing offers considerable benefits to customers using solar and electric heat and hot water, especially if a separate lower rate is adopted for off-peak storage devices; these benefits can amount to several hundred dollars per year. Substantial savings in the use of oil and gas fuels can be achieved if residences using these fuels convert to solar systems, savings not necessarily achievable by a shift, instead, to electric systems.

Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Distribution of the spacing between two adjacent avoided crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the frequency at which avoided crossings appear in an energy level structure when an external field is applied to a quantum chaotic system. The distribution of the spacing in the parameter between two adjacent avoided crossings is investigated. Using a random matrix model, we find that the distribution of these spacings is well fitted by a power-law distribution for small spacings. The powers are 2 and 3 for the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble and Gaussian unitary ensemble, respectively. We also find that the distributions decay exponentially for large spacings. The distributions in concrete quantum chaotic systems agree with those of the random matrix model.

Manabu Machida; Keiji Saito

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Financing for Utility Energy Service Contracts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financing for Utility Energy Service Contracts Financing for Utility Energy Service Contracts Financing for Utility Energy Service Contracts October 7, 2013 - 2:21pm Addthis Financing is a significant portion of utility energy service contract (UESC) costs. Experience shows several things the Federal Government can do to get the best value by reducing UESC financial transaction costs and interest. Interest Rates Interest rates are based on the sum of an index rate on the date the transaction is signed and a "premium" or "adders" usually measured in basis points where 100 basis points is equal to 1%. The premium reflects the costs of obtaining the financing under prevailing market conditions, financial risk, transaction costs, and profit for the finance company. The cost of financing varies depending upon a number of factors. Optimizing

266

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

267

Energy utilization analysis of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the energy requirements and heating and cooling equipment sizes for buildings is one of the most important, as well as one of the most difficult, problems facing the engineer. The fundamental principles utilized in the procedures developed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) are explained and brief descriptions of the computer programs using these procedures are given. Such computer programs generally are capable of: simulating the thermal response of a building to all sources of heat gains and losses, accounting for all non-thermal energy requirements in the building or on the sites, translating the building operating schedules into energy demand and consumption, identifying the peak capacity requirements of heating and cooling equipment, and performing an economic analysis that would select the most economical overall owning and operating cost equipment and energy source that minimize the building's life cycle cost.

Lokmanhekim, M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Utilization of a fuel cell power plant for the capture and conversion of gob well gas. Final report, June--December, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study has been made to determine if a 200 kW fuel cell power plant operating on variable quality coalbed methane can be placed and successfully operated at the Jim Walter Resources No. 4 mine located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The purpose of the demonstration is to investigate the effects of variable quality (50 to 98% methane) gob gas on the output and efficiency of the power plant. To date, very little detail has been provided concerning the operation of fuel cells in this environment. The fuel cell power plant will be located adjacent to the No. 4 mine thermal drying facility rated at 152 M British thermal units per hour. The dryer burns fuel at a rate of 75,000 cubic feet per day of methane and 132 tons per day of powdered coal. The fuel cell power plant will provide 700,000 British thermal units per hour of waste heat that can be utilized directly in the dryer, offsetting coal utilization by approximately 0.66 tons per day and providing an avoided cost of approximately $20 per day. The 200 kilowatt electrical power output of the unit will provide a utility cost reduction of approximately $3,296 each month. The demonstration will be completely instrumented and monitored in terms of gas input and quality, electrical power output, and British thermal unit output. Additionally, real-time power pricing schedules will be applied to optimize cost savings. 28 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

Przybylic, A.R.; Haynes, C.D.; Haskew, T.A.; Boyer, C.M. II; Lasseter, E.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Costs to build Fermilab in 1984 dollars  

SciTech Connect

It is of current interest to examine the costs incurred to date to build Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and to determine what those costs are when stated in FY 1984 constant dollars. The appended tables are in support of this exercise and are based on all costs for Equipment items (reduced by obsolescence) and all Plant Projects which have been appropriated through FY 1984. Also included are non-plant costs which are required to complete the Energy Saver, Tevatron I and II projects (i.e., Equipment and R and D in support of Construction). This study makes the assumption that all funding through FY 1984 will have been costed by the end of FY 1986. Those costs incurred in FY 1985 and FY 1986 have been deflated to FY 1984 dollars. See Appendix A for the DOE inflation factors used in the conversion to FY 1984 dollars. The costs are identified in three categories. The Accelerator Facilities include all accelerator components, the buildings which enclose them and utilities which support them. The Experimental Facilities include all beam lines, enclosures, utilities and experimental equipment which are usable in current experimental programs. The Support Facilities include lab and office space, shops, assembly facilities, roads, grounds and the utilities which do not specifically support the Accelerator or Experimental Facilities, etc.

Jordan, N.G.; Livdahl, P.V.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

271

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

272

Packet Drop Avoidance for High-speed network transmission protocol  

SciTech Connect

As network bandwidth continues to grow and longer paths are used to exchange large scientific data between storage systems and GRID computation, it has become increasingly obvious that there is a need to deploy a packet drop avoidance mechanism into network transmission protocols. Current end-to-end congestion avoidance mechanisms used in Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) have worked well on low bandwidth delay product networks, but with newer high-bandwidth delay networks they have shown to be inefficient and prone to unstable. This is largely due to increased network bandwidth coupled with changes in internet traffic patterns. These changes come from a variety of new network applications that are being developed to take advantage of the increased network bandwidth. This paper will examine the end-to-end congestion avoidance mechanism and perform a step-by-step analysis of its theory. In addition we will propose an alternative approach developed as part of a new network transmission protocol. Our alternative protocol uses a packet drop avoidance (PDA) mechanism built on top of the maximum burst size (MBS) theory combined with a real-time available bandwidth algorithm.

Jin, Guojun

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A heuristic method for obstacle avoiding group Steiner tree construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very large scale integration (VLSI) global routing is typically performed on a rectangular die space amidst multiple IP cores and gates, typically treated as obstacles during net routing. In this paper, we address the global routing problem ... Keywords: VLSI routing, algorithm, group Steiner tree, obstacle avoiding rectilinear steiner tree

Tuhina Samanta; Raka Sardar; Hafizur Rahaman; Parthasarathi Dasgupta; Bhargab B. Bhattacharya

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell: a model of a central utility plant.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This central utilities plant model details the major elements of a central utilities plant for several classes of users. The model enables the analyst to select optional, cost effective, plant features that are appropriate to a fuel cell application. These features permit the future plant owner to exploit all of the energy produced by the fuel cell, thereby reducing the total cost of ownership. The model further affords the analyst an opportunity to identify avoided costs of the fuel cell-based power plant. This definition establishes the performance and capacity information, appropriate to the class of user, to support the capital cost model and the feasibility analysis. It is detailed only to the depth required to identify the major elements of a fuel cell-based system. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

276

Launching Agency and Utility Participation and Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launching Agency and Utility Launching Agency and Utility Participation and Projects (UESC Lessons Learned & Breaking Down the Barriers) [Direct Assistance] Working Session: Facilitated Group Discussion Cape Canaveral, Florida May 1, 2007 Objectives of this Working Session Outcomes of the San Francisco working session * Increase awareness of UESC vehicles * Better promote FUPWG * Improve communication among partners and stakeholders * Educate key stakeholders * Provide technical assistance to kick-start projects * Reach out to new partners * Make UESC website easier to find Overview of FEMP UESC Assistance Utility Energy Services Contract (UESC) Direct Assistance provides guidance, training and direct support to agencies so that they may accomplish cost effective, sensible, and comprehensive

277

FEMP Utility Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Services Utility Services Karen Thomas & Deb Beattie  SPONSORED BY THE FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM  Overview  UESC Project Support  Agency / Utility Partnerships  Renewable Project Support  Design Assistance  Agency Energy Implementation Plans * * * * * * UESC Project Support Education UESC Workshops Agency Briefings Utility Briefings On-site team training Communications Web site Enabling documents * Case studies UESC Project Support Direct Project Assistance Project facilitation Advise & Consult In depth Contract development Technical Proposal review Performance Verification Agency / Utility Partnerships Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Strategic Partnering Meeting Renewable Projects  Resource Screening: - PV - Solar Hot Water

278

" Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts" Federal Utility Energy Service Contracts" "*KEY ON SHEET 2*" "Agency","Facility","Utility","Contract Type","Contract Term","Task Order/Delivery Order","Award Date","Completion Date","Energy Conservation Measures Implemented In Project (Enter as many as applicable - See Key)","Project's Capital Cost ($)","Percent of Total Cost 3rd Party Financed","Rebate Amount ($)","Estimated Annual Cost Savings ($)","Estimated Annual kWh Saved","Estimated Annual KW Saved","Estimated Annual Natural Gas savings (please specify cubic feet, therms or MMBtu)","Estimated Annual Oil savings (gallons)","Estimated Annual water savings (gallons)"

279

Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparing the costs of renewable energy across ownershipof low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy productionCost Recovery System Non-Utility Generator Power Purchase Agreement Public Power Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Clark Public Utilities - Residential Weatherization Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weatherization Loan Program Weatherization Loan Program Clark Public Utilities - Residential Weatherization Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount up to $15,000 Provider Clark Public Utilities Loans of up to $15,000 at a 5.25% interest are available through Clark Public Utilities' Weatherization Loan Program. The loans can pay for the average local cost of eligible measures, based on recently completed projects. Customers have up to seven years to repay the loans, but monthly payments will be at least $25. The utility charges a $225 or $350 loan set-up fee, depending on the loan amount, which can be paid up front or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Industry: Utility Roles and Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper identifies the factors that influence industrial firms' decisions to invest in energy efficiency and notes how the emerging wave of electric utility 'demand-side' planning and marketing can help industry control costs of production and also improve utility operations. The external and internal influences on electric utility demand-side management are identified, along with typical objectives of utility marketing programs. The concept of 'strategic marketing' is also introduced. Finally, a summary of selected electric utility experiences with industrial programs is provided, along with emerging trends in utility marketing.

Limaye, D. R.; Davis, T. D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Utility Brownfields Resource Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established a program designed to assist utilities wishing to participate in local Brownfields redevelopment projects. EPRI developed this Brownfields guide to educate utility economic and real estate development personnel in identifying, screening, and supporting Brownfields projects.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Avista Utilities- Net Metering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Idaho does not have a statewide net-metering policy. However, each of the state's three investor-owned utilities -- Avista Utilities, Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power -- has developed a net...

284

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

285

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

286

City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Varies by equipment and type of residence Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with Energy Star: $250 - $800 Energy Star Home Rating: 50% of certification cost, up to $400 Programmable Thermostat: $15 Insulation Upgrade: 20% of cost up $300 Natural Gas Furnace: $400 Natural Gas Furnace Tune-Up: $30

287

Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Washing Machines: $35 - $100 Dishwashers: $25 - $60 Refrigerators: $25 - $35 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Water Heaters: $65 Ductwork: 80% of the cost up to $300 Insulation: Up to 70% of the cost Windows: $6.00 per square foot High-Efficiency Heat Pumps: $600

288

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of Project Cost Cannot exceed 100% of a single energy efficient measure's cost. Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: Not Specified Lighting Fluorescent Lighting: $2 - $50/fixture HID Lighting: $20 - $25/fixture Induction Bulb: $10 Metal Halide PAR Bulb: $20

289

Multi-channel CSMA/CA based smart utility networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE 802.15.4g is a recent standard for Smart Utility Networks (SUN). SUN is a house-to-house level subordinate network in the Smart Grid network. IEEE 802.15.4g uses a Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance (CSMA/CA) algorithm for channel ...

Jiyoung Cha; Hu Jin; Dan Keun Sung

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Actinide partitioning-transmutation program. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks, Appendix 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Fabrication Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contributing to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed. Shipping cask costs are provided.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

293

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Colorado Program Type Line Extension Analysis Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission At the request of a customer or a potential customer, Colorado electric utilities are required to conduct a cost comparison of a photovoltaic (PV) system to any proposed distribution line extension if the customer or potential customer provides the utility with load data (estimated monthly kilowatt-hour usage) requested by the utility to conduct the comparison, and if the customer's or potential customer's peak demand is estimated to be less than 25 kilowatts (kW). In performing the comparison analysis, the

294

Price caps for standard offer service: A hidden stranded cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some utility commissions or legislatures, concerned about mis-estimating the market line when calculating stranded costs, are choosing to require a price-capped standard offer service (SOS) to be offered by utilities in the competitive marketplace. This grants to customers the flexibility to switch from a fixed-price alternative with the utility to (or even to and from) a non-utility power supplier. Given the enormous uncertainty in future power market prices, this flexibility, which is being bestowed free-of-charge to customers, may prove to be of considerable value. Valuation of this SOS flexibility using call option techniques shows that this can be a non-trivial fraction of total stranded costs. The costs of price-capped SOS can be ameliorated through the structure of the price cap. This article describes the option-based techniques for valuing SOS and some approaches to limiting its cost to utilities.

Graves, F.; Liu, P. [Brattle Group, Cambridge, MA (United States)]|[Brattle Group, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Brattle Group, London (United Kingdom)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

296

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

297

Sustained utility implementation of photovoltaics. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SMUD is a leader in utility grid-connected applications of PVs with the world`s largest distributed PV power system. SMUD is continuing its ambitious sustained, orderly development (SOD) commercialization effort of the grid-connected, utility PV market. This program is aimed at developing the experience needed to successfully integrate PV as distributed generation into the utility system, develop market and long-term business strategies and to stimulate the collaborative processes needed to accelerate the cost-reductions necessary for PV to be cost-competitive in these applications by about the year 2002. This report documents the progress made in the 1994/1995 SMUD PV Program under this contract and the PV projects partially supported by this contract. This contract has been considered a Pre-cursor to the TEAM-UP program implemented the following year.

Osborn, D.E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The pathogen transmission avoidance theory of sexual selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current theory that sexual selection results from female preference for males with good genes suffers from several problems. An alternative explanation, the pathogen transmission avoidance hypothesis, argues that the primary function of showy traits is to provide a reliable signal of current disease status, so that sick individuals can be avoided during mating. This study shows that a significant risk of pathogen transmission occurs during mating and that showy traits are reliable indicators of current disease status. The origin of female choosiness is argued to lie in a general tendency to avoid sick individuals, even in the absence of showy traits, which originate as exaggerations of normal traits that are indicative of good health (bright feathers, vigorous movement, large size). Thus, in this new model the origins of both showy traits and female choosiness are not problematic and there is no threshold effect. This model predicts that when the possession of male showy traits does not help to reduce disease in the female, showy traits are unlikely to occur. This case corresponds to thorough exposure of every animal to all group pathogens, on average, in large groups. Such species are shown with a large data set on birds to be less likely to exhibit showy traits. The good-genes model does not make this prediction. The pathogen transmission avoidance model can also lead to the evolution of showy traits even when selection is not effective against a given pathogen (e.g., when there is no heritable variation for resistance), but can result in selection for resistance if such genes are present. Monogamy is argued to reduce selection pressures for showy traits; data show monogamous species to be both less parasitized and less showy. In the context of reduction of pathogen transmission rates in showy populations, selection pressure becomes inversely frequency-dependent, which makes showy traits likely to be self-limiting rather than runaway.

Loehle, C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

To avoid population issue, cable car transports, pedestrian bridge, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Like today in many buildings. Also there will be foam insulations to regulate the temperature in side.jpg&imgrefurl=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Building_insulation&h=3440&w=4718&sz=1353&tbnid=w2OgN8cN60dOHM:&tbnh=96&tbnw=132&zoom=1&usg=__FsZMi_sVs93av the building, avoiding the temperature of outside the building and also there will be the building membrane

Farritor, Shane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Chapter 41 Acquisition of Utility Services - This Chapter has...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 41 Acquisition of Utility Services - This Chapter has been revised and updated. The changes are editorial in nature. Chapter 42.1 Indirect Cost Rates - This Chapter has...

303

A Survey of Utility Experience with Real Time Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charge. Energy charges are calculated by Duke Power based onenergy costs, and to promote efficient utilization of DukesDuke Power77 Exelon (Commonwealth Edison)79 Exelon (Commonwealth Edison) and The Community Energy

Barbose, Galen; Goldman, Charles; Neenan, Bernie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) Legislative Findings: Least-Cost Energy Sources (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Nebraska Public Power District

305

Utility downsizings pose a dilemma for regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility's job-generating potential is critical to most local economies. At the same time, however, high utility employment levels maintain an upward pressure on rates, an effect that does not escape regulators' notice, especially during an economic slowdown. More than on regulator has been heard to say that hard-hit ratepayers should not be called on to support what some may seen as a bloated utility workforce scaled to better times. To complicate things even more, popular cost-cutting goals that include improving productivity and relying more on conservation could mean fewer jobs, at least at the utility. What's more, utility rates play a significant role in how local industries and businesses respond to an economic slowdown. This interplay of economic forces has complicated the ratemaking process. The size of a utility's workforce is an issue of growing significance in rate hearings. Forecasts for test-period salary and wage expenses are less reliable. Early retirement plans promise future savings for ratepayers, but at a cost today.

Cross, P.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specify for maximum energy savings Specify for maximum energy savings Windows must meet local energy code requirements. For even higher energy performance, consider ENERGY STAR windows, which are recommended for low-rise dwellings and are often suitable for mid-rise dwellings as well. For window and storm window options with superior performance in cold climates, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's highly insulating windows purchasing program (see next page). Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost Government or utility incentives and financing may be available for energy efficiency in low-income housing. Check www.dsireusa.org for up-to-date information on incentive

307

Wireless Product Applications for Utilities: Technical Services for Power Utilities in Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless technology applications are abundant, with products and services ranging from two-way paging to Personal Communications Services (PCS) to low cost satellite data transmission. With this in mind, utilities are encouraged to develop relationships and business arrangements with telecommunication companies--relationships that can benefit both industries. These arrangements promise to streamline utility operations and, in selected cases, create new businesses and provide sources of revenue for utilit...

1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner Operating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner Operating Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner Operating Costs and Societal Environmental Issues Speaker(s): Don Aumann Date: March 21, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney Don Aumann, a Senior Consultant from BKi in Oakland, will present an overview of two projects he completed for the electric utility industry. The first, a case study evaluation of a hybrid chiller plant in Jefferson City, Missouri, demonstrates the importance of carefully evaluating the impact of utility rate structures on plant operating costs. The building owner, another engineering consultant, and the local utility representatives were confused by the rates and missed an opportunity to cut chiller-plant operating costs by about 20%, totaling $15,000 per year. In

309

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K. [US DOE, Office of Project Planning and Controls, EM-32, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Mallick, P. [US DOE, Office of Performance Assessment, EM-43, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Bierman, G. [Legin Group, Inc., P.O. Box 3788, Gaithersburg, MD 20885-3788 (United States); Marshall, H.E. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8603, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8603 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

312

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

315

OpenEI Community - Utility+Utility Access Map  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finding Utility Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id  Here's a quick way to find all the utility company pages under a given utility id.  From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: [[Category:Utility Companies]][[EiaUtilityId::15248]] substituting your utility id of interest for 15248, and click "Find results". http://en.openei.org/community/blog/finding-utility-companies-under-given-utility-id#comments

316

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Name Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns...

317

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many utilities are initiating business plans that enable them to play a more integral role in the solar power value chain. This report summarizes research completed to identify and track utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. EPRI and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort to evaluate the expanding range of utility activities in acquiring solar energy, including photovoltaic (PV) asset ownership. Throughout 2011, USBMs have been ca...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

Utilities weather the storm  

SciTech Connect

Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

Lihach, N.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Impact of Large Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs and Utility Finances in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Energy Efficiency Programs On Consumer Tariffs andtariffs of implementing utility-funded cost-effective energyaverage tariff depends on the percentage reduction in energy

Abhyankar, Nikit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings: Electric Utility Costs 4: ... motor drive) with less electricity. Examples include high-efficiency appliances, ... advanced electric motor drives, and

323

Strategies to address transition costs in the electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Transition costs are the potential monetary losses that electric- utility shareholders, ratepayers, or other parties might experience because of structural changes in the electricity industry. Regulators, policy analysts, utilities, and consumer groups have proposed a number of strategies to address transition costs, such as immediately opening retail electricity markets or delaying retail competition. This report has 3 objectives: identify a wide range of strategies available to regulators and utilities; systematically examine effects of strategies; and identify potentially promising strategies that may provide benefits to more than one set of stakeholders. The many individual strategies are grouped into 6 major categories: market actions, depreciation options, rate-making actions, utility cost reductions, tax measures, and other options. Of the 34 individual strategies, retail ratepayers have primary or secondary responsibility for paying transition costs in 19 of the strategies, shareholders in 12, wheeling customers in 11, taxpayers in 8, and nonutility suppliers in 4. Most of the strategies shift costs among different segments of the economy, although utility cost reductions can be used to offset transition costs. Most of the strategies require cooperation of other parties, including regulators, to be implemented successfully; financial stakeholders must be engages in negotiations that hold the promise of shared benefits. Only by rejecting ``winner-take-all`` strategies will the transition-cost issue be expeditiously resolved.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

325

Microsoft Word - January 2012 Utility Incentives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incentives and Rebates for Energy-Efficient Windows Incentives and Rebates for Energy-Efficient Windows offered through utility and state programs Presented by the Efficient Windows Collaborative, January 2012  Do you intend to equip your home with high-performance, energy-efficient windows?  Do you plan to improve your home in a way that lowers energy costs and provides for a comfortable interior?  Are you looking for utility programs within your state that can help you finance such an investment in efficient windows? The following pages give an overview of utility and state programs to help finance improvements in window energy efficiency. Programs are listed by state and by the specific utility companies that administer the programs. For detailed information about each program, please refer to the web links in the list.

326

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

327

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

328

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

329

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

330

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

331

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities use more electricity for distribution (48 millionthe most electricity for distribution. For the utilitiesUse Treatment electricity cost Distribution electricity use

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

333

A Review of Coal Mine Methane Recovery for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovery of methane from coal mines might be a cost-effective offset method for some utilities looking for ways to reduce or offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This report provides an evaluation of potential recovery amounts and costs for U.S. mines along with a discussion of technical and legal issues.

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

334

Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Small Business Energy Management Assistance Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate T8 Fluorescent lights, electronic ballasts and controls: 5,000 Programmable thermostats: 800 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T8 Fluorescent lights, electronic ballasts and controls: 75% of the cost Refrigeration and A/C tune-up: free Programmable thermostats: free Expert energy survey: free Provider Anaheim Public Utilities The Small Business Energy Management System Program provides participating

335

EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Case against private utility involvement in solar/insulation programs  

SciTech Connect

The arguments against private utility involvement are arranged under the following headings: excessive profit-taking, monopolization/favoritism, increased cost to consumers, homeowners would pay twice, the lack of accountability, the lack of commitment to solar by utilities, solar/political/ethical considerations, solar/conservation technologies are inherently decentralized, and the other alternatives. (MHR)

Bossong, K.

1977-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $5,000 or 50% of system cost, whichever is less Commercial: $23,000 or 50% of system cost, whichever is less. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $3.00/W-AC Commercial: $2.10/W-AC Provider Lassen Municipal Utility District Lassen Municipal Utility District (LMUD) is providing incentives for its customers to purchase solar electric photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the program. Through June 30, 2014, rebates of $3.00 per watt-AC up to $5,000 are available for

338

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program Moreno Valley Electric Utility - Solar Electric Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential systems 30 kW or less: $14,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Small commercial systems 30 kW or less: $50,000 or 50% of cost, whichever is less Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Systems 30 kW or less: $2.00 per W-AC Systems larger than 30 kW: $0.06 per kWh for 5 years Provider Moreno Valley Electric Utility Moreno Valley Electric Utility provides rebates to its electric customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. System must be on the same premises as the customer to qualify. Systems 30 kilowatts (kW) or less can

339

Utility+Utility Access Map | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248...

340

NREL EFM DATA: Disaggregated Residential Load Cost Data The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EFM DATA: Disaggregated Residential Load Cost Data The followingdata-setis for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Bringing Energy Efficiency and Cost of Ownership to Online Shopping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

no easy way to calculate how much it will cost to operate a product based on one's local electricity rate (there are over 3,000 different US utilities) and personalized usage...

342

Research on Chronological Cost Simulation of Demand-Side Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many electric power utilities use Direct Load Control (DLC) to reduce operational costs and peak capacity requirements. This report proposes a very effective and unique method for DLC dispatch.

1999-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded Technology Slashes NOx, Costs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 7, 2005 DOE-Funded Technology Slashes NOx, Costs in Coal-Fired Cyclone Boiler Utility Reconsiders Plans to Install Standard NOx-control Technology After Successful Field...

344

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Potential Effects of Climate Change on Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, increasing attention has been focused on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions to modify the global climate system. Significant climate change could affect utility operations and costs through impacts on electricity demand and on generation and delivery systems. Utilities, moreover, may be called upon to take actions to reduce their emissions of CO2, an important greenhouse gas. This report summarizes an assessment of the long-term risks to individual utilities posed by the potentia...

1995-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Utility battery storage systems program report for FY 94  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1994.

Butler, P.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

An Innovative Approach to Plant Utility Audits Yields Significant Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents innovative methods to conduct powerhouse audits when applying advanced energy management to utility systems. Specifically, a new class of Energy Management and Reporting Systems (EMRS) applied to plant wide utility control systems is a cost effective method to improve overall system efficiency and reliability. Typical returns for an industrial CHP fuel-switching powerhouse utilizing an EMRS range from $150K/Month to $450K/Month based on the facility size, functionality, and fuel types.

Robinson, J. E.; Moore, D. A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cost Maps for Fossil Assets Management: Based on a Case Study With Minnesota Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to effective management of utility assets is determining the benefits and costs of options over various timeframes. This report describes and illustrates a structured approach to asset management decision making using cost maps.

1995-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Cost and quality of fuels for electric plants 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, and plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision-makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on issues regarding electric power.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A utility`s perspective of the market for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

I believe, in the short-term U. S. market that IGCC`s primary competition is, natural gas-fired combined cycle technology. I believe that in order for IGCC to compete on a commercial basis, that natural gas prices have to rise relative to coal prices, and that the capital cost of the technology must come down. While this statement may seem to be somewhat obvious, it raises two interesting points. The first is that while the relative pricing of natural gas and coal is not generally within the technology supplier`s control, the capital cost is. The reduction of capital cost represents a major challenge for the technology suppliers in order for this technology to become commercialized. The second point is that the improvements being achieved with IGCC efficiencies probably won`t help it outperform the effects of natural gas pricing. This is due to the fact that the combined cycle portion of the IGCC technology is experiencing the most significant improvements in efficiency. I do see, however, a significant advantage for IGCC technology compared to conventional pulverized coal-fired units. As IGCC efficiencies continue to improve, combined with their environmentally superior performance, I believe that IGCC will be the ``technology of choice`` for utilities that install new coal-fired generation. We have achieved economic justification of our project by virtue of the DOE`s funding of $120 million awarded in Round III of their Clean Coal Technology Program. This program provides the bridge between current technology economics and those of the future. And Tampa Electric is pleased to be taking a leadership position in furthering the IGCC knowledge base.

Black, C.R. [Tampa Electric Co., FL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Estimating and understanding DOE waste management costs`  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines costs associated with cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities, with particular emphasis on the waste management program. Life-cycle waste management costs have been compiled and reported in the DOE Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Waste management costs are a critical issue for DOE because of the current budget constraints. The DOE sites are struggling to accomplish their environmental management objectives given funding scenarios that are well below anticipated waste management costs. Through the BEMR process, DOE has compiled complex-wide cleanup cost estimates and has begun analysis of these costs with respect to alternative waste management scenarios and policy strategies. From this analysis, DOE is attempting to identify the major cost drivers and prioritize environmental management activities to achieve maximum utilization of existing funding. This paper provides an overview of the methodology DOE has used to estimate and analyze some waste management costs, including the key data requirements and uncertainties.

Kang, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sherick, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Anaheim Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaheim Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Anaheim Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Anaheim Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Heat Pump Incentives: $50,000 per meter, per project or 50% of cost Lighting Incentives: $50,000 per meter, per project or 50% of cost Efficient Exit Sign Program: $10,000 per project Program Info

353

The Sunk-cost Effect as an Optimal Rate-maximizing Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

indefinitely provides the optimal long-term rate of gain; the entry cost of each new task is so great that the forager avoids ever returning to search. ..... when most encountered patches are costly to enter, exploitation time in each of these...

354

Load-curve responsiveness to weather and the cost-effectiveness of conservation  

SciTech Connect

A cost-benefit analysis of home-weatherization projects using average incremental power costs instead of peak or off-peak costs shows that some programs are no longer cost-effective. Weatherization improves the energy efficiency of houses and reduces demand on the utility, but a study of how monthly load curves at a Pacific Northwest utility responded to weather over a 12-month period indicates that abnormal weather shifts the entire load curve. 1 figure. (DCK)

Hellman, M.M.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

FY 1995 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 challenged us to dramatically reduce costs at Hanford. We began the year with an 8 percent reduction in our Environmental Management budget but at the same time were tasked with accomplishing additional workscope. This resulted in a Productivity Challenge whereby we took on more work at the beginning of the year than we had funding to complete. During the year, the Productivity Challenge actually grew to 23 percent because of recissions, Congressional budget reductions, and DOE Headquarters actions. We successfully met our FY 1995 Productivity Challenge through an aggressive cost reduction program that identified and eliminated unnecessary workscope and found ways to be more efficient. We reduced the size of the workforce, cut overhead expenses, eliminated paperwork, cancelled construction of new facilities, and reengineered our processes. We are proving we can get the job done better and for less money at Hanford. DOE`s drive to do it ``better, faster, cheaper`` has led us to look for more and larger partnerships with the private sector. The biggest will be privatization of Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System, which will turn liquid tank waste into glass logs for eventual disposal. We will also save millions of dollars and avoid the cost of replacing aging steam plants by contracting Hanford`s energy needs to a private company. Other privatization successes include the Hanford Mail Service, a spinoff of advanced technical training, low level mixed waste thermal treatment, and transfer of the Hanford Museums of Science and history to a private non-profit organization. Despite the rough roads and uncertainty we faced in FY 1995, less than 3 percent of our work fell behind schedule, while the work that was performed was completed with an 8.6 percent cost under-run. We not only met the FY 1995 productivity challenge, we also met our FY 1995-1998 savings commitments and accelerated some critical cleanup milestones. The challenges continue. Budgets remain on the decline, even while the expectations increase. Yet we are confident in our ability to keep our commitments and goals by identifying new efficiencies in the Hanford cleanup program. We will also pursue new contracting arrangements that will allow us to foster greater competition and use more commercial practices while maintaining our commitment to the safety and health of the public, our workers, and the environment.

Andrews-Smith, K.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modeling On-Site Utility Systems Using "APLUS"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most energy saving schemes on industrial sites lead to reductions in the steam and/or power demands on an on-site utility system. Accurate knowledge of the marginal and incremental costs of the available levels of steam and shaft power from such systems is, therefore, essential for the correct economic evaluation of proposed retrofit schemes. Knowledge of marginal costs is also essential for continuous optimal operation of on-site utility systems. "APLUS" is an IBM-PC based software package developed for evaluation of marginal and incremental costs of on-site utilities. "APLUS" allows the user to configure steam/power systems using sets of predefined icons. Once a flowsheet has been configured, the program can be used to solve the heat and mass balance and to generate accurate marginal costs. An overview of the package and examples illustrating its applications are presented in this paper.

Ranade, S. M.; Jones, D. H.; Shrec, S. C.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Actinide Partitioning-Transmutation Program Final Report. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks (appendix 3)  

SciTech Connect

This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Reprocessing Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contribution to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Clark Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clark Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Clark Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Clark Public Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial/Industrial Lighting: Up to 50% project costs Custom Industrial Retrofit: $0.25/kWh up to 50% of cost Custom Industrial New Construction: $0.20 - $0.27/kWh up to 50% of cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Unit Cost Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281532 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Natural Gas Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

362

Unit Cost Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281518 Varnish cache server Unit Cost Electricity Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005 through 2010. Source University of Texas (UT) at Austin, Utilities & Energy Management Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Texas Unit Cost Electricity Unit Cost Natural Gas University Water Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy and Water Use Data for UT-Austin (xls, 32.8 KiB) Quality Metrics

363

Low Cost, High Performance, 50-year Electrode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an extremely durable, highly active, conductive, and inexpensive electrode for flow batteries. Flow batteries offer one of the most exciting opportunities for affordable grid storage, however electrodes are costly and are the single largest cost component in a well integrated design. Grid storage can yield numerous benefits in utility and customer- owned applications:  renewable firming  peak load reduction  load shifting  capital deferral  frequency regulation By incorporating volume production practices from the chlorine, filter media, and electroplating industries, Primus Power will effectively reduce electrode costs to exceed GRIDS cost targets while providing the durability essential for widespread grid-scale adoption.

364

Factors Associated with Photovoltaic System Costs (Topical Issues Brief)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of factors can affect the cost of photovoltaic systems. This report analyses the relationship among such factors by using information entered into a voluntary registry of PV systems and performing regression analyses. The results showed statistically significant relationships between photovoltaic system cost and (a) grid connection, (b) installation year, (c) areas where the utility had entered into volume purchasing agreements.

Mortensen, J.

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Estimates of Production Cost Variance Using Chronological Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts of production costs are key inputs in the operational planning decisions of electric power utilities. This report describes the effects of uncertainty in annual load variation and uncertainty in generation availability on the variance of cost in an electrical power system.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

366

Life-cycle cost analysis project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to demonstrate the impact of life-cycle costing in Ohio's residential building sector. Typical single-family, townhouse, and multifamily housing units were modeled using sophisticated computer programs to predict annual energy comsumption. Energy conservation techniques were applied to the typical units and the resulting utility savings were computed. Installed costs were estimated for each energy conservation technique.

Davies, G.R.; Temming, S.J.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Adsorbed self-avoiding walks subject to a force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a self-avoiding walk model of polymer adsorption where the adsorbed polymer can be desorbed by the application of a force. In this paper the force is applied normal to the surface at the last vertex of the walk. We prove that the appropriate limiting free energy exists where there is an applied force and a surface potential term, and prove that this free energy is convex in appropriate variables. We then derive an expression for the limiting free energy in terms of the free energy without a force and the free energy with no surface interaction. Finally we show that there is a phase boundary between the adsorbed phase and the desorbed phase in the presence of a force, prove some qualitative properties of this boundary and derive bounds on the location of the boundary.

E. J. Janse van Rensburg; S. G. Whittington

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

I/O Congestion Avoidance via Routing and Object Placement  

SciTech Connect

As storage systems get larger to meet the the demands of petascale systems, careful planning must be applied to avoid congestion points and extract the maximum performance. In addition, the large size of the data sets generated by such systems makes it desirable for all compute resources in a center to have common access to this data without needing to copy it to each machine. This paper describes a method of placing I/O close to the storage nodes to minimize contention on Cray's SeaStar2+ network, and extends it to a routed Lustre configuration to gain the same benefits when running against a center-wide file system. Our experiments show performance improvements for both direct attached and routed file systems.

Dillow, David A [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Zhang, Zhe [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 1217. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into the Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates primarily focused to improve the existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation site validate all software updates prior to release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

372

Dekker PMIS Extraction Utility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project 0907. The Extraction Utility is used for retrieving project management data from a variety of source systems for upload into Dekker PMIS(tm) (Dekker iPursuit®, Dekker iProgram(tm), or DOE PARSII). This release incorporates a number of new features and updates focused to improve existing functionality. The quality of each Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility release is a primary consideration at Dekker, Ltd. Since every customer environment is unique, Dekker strongly recommends that each implementation validate any software update prior to its release into the production environment. Dekker continually strives to enhance the features and capabilities of the Dekker PMIS(tm) Extraction Utility. We are very excited about this update and look forward to its implementation in your

373

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute  Investor-Owned Electric Companies  Membership includes  200 US companies,  More than 65 international affiliates and  170 associates  US members  Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and  Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and  Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda Significant Industry Trends Utility Infrastructure Investments Generation and Fuel Landscape

374

Gas Utilities (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

375

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

376

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Utility Solar Business Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) are conducting an ongoing joint research effort, initiated in 2011, to define, track, and evaluate the expanding range of regulated utility solar energy acquisition activities. This report provides a high-level overview of the conceptual framework by which EPRI-SEPA are classifying regulated utility solar business models (USBMs) in the United States. It then provides five case studies detailing existing ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

380

Dissecting the Cost of the Smart Grid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dissecting the Cost of the Smart Grid Dissecting the Cost of the Smart Grid Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Dissecting the Cost of the Smart Grid Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/dissecting-the-cost-of-the-smart- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/dissecting-cost-smart-grid Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: "Resource Integration Planning,Cost Recovery/Allocation,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development and Evaluation of Low Cost Mercury Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is conducting research to investigate sorbent injection for mercury removal in utility flue gas. This report describes laboratory work conducted from mid-1999 through mid-2000 to investigate the ability of low-cost sorbents to remove mercury from simulated and actual flue gas. The goal of this program is the development of effective mercury sorbents that can be produced at lower costs than existing commercial activated carbons. In this work, low-cost sorbents were prepared and then evaluated in labo...

2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

384

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy Evolution of Texture in...

386

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

387

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

388

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

390

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given companys cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

392

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

393

A game theoretic approach to controller design for cyber-physical systems: collision avoidance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A collision avoidance problem for the vehicle equipped with adaptive cruise control is considered in the context of hybrid systems with emphasis on safety verification. Keywords: adaptive cruise control, collision avoidance, game theory, hybrid systems, reachability analysis

Jaeyong Park, Arda Kurt, mit zgner

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Utilities look skeptically at rail derequlation  

SciTech Connect

Concern about the Staggers Rail Act of 1980, which deregulates rates, prompted the Tennessee Valley Authority to insert a protective clause allowing it to cancel coal contracts if rail rates go too high. Railroads will be allowed to charge an increasing amount, up to 175% of variable costs by 1984. Legislators were hoping to pass a slurry-pipeline bill to provide the competition that will protect consumers. Pipelines would carry less tha 20% of the freight, but they would provide an efficiency and cost comparison. The Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) has not been able to protect utilities, especially those relying on coal from the Powder River Basin. The new law could relieve railroads of enough regulatory cost burdens and promote competitive lines to hold down rates. (DCK)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

Walker, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Renewable Energy Planning: Multiparametric Cost Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for determining the combination of renewable energy technologies that minimize life-cycle cost at a facility, often with a specified goal regarding percent of energy use from renewable sources. Technologies include: photovoltaics (PV); wind; solar thermal heat and electric; solar ventilation air preheating; solar water heating; biomass heat and electric (combustion, gasification, pyrolysis, anaerobic digestion); and daylighting. The method rests upon the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) capabilities in characterization of technology cost and performance, geographic information systems (GIS) resource assessment, and life-cycle cost analysis. The paper discusses how to account for the way candidate technologies interact with each other, and the solver routine used to determine the combination that minimizes life-cycle cost. Results include optimal sizes of each technology, initial cost, operating cost, and life-cycle cost, including incentives from utilities or governments. Results inform early planning to identify and prioritize projects at a site for subsequent engineering and economic feasibility study.

Walker, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NREL: Continuum Magazine - The Utility-Scale Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Future Utility-Scale Future Issue 1 Print Version Share this resource Continuum Magazine Dan Says New Facility to Transform U.S. Energy Infrastructure New Facility to Transform U.S. Energy Infrastructure The nation's electricity infrastructure needs an overhaul. NREL's newest research facility will lead the way. Wind Innovation Enables Utility-Scale Wind Innovation Enables Utility-Scale NREL research will enable wind energy to make major contributions to meeting the nation's electrical demand. Leading Solar Expertise-A Launch Pad to the Future Leading Solar Expertise- A Launch Pad to the Future NREL is speeding solar devices from the lab to utility-scale operation. Paint it Black: One-Step Etch Cuts Solar Cell Costs Paint It Black: One-Step Etch Cuts Solar Cell Costs NREL's technique provides the solar cell manufacturing industry with a

398

City of Kingfisher, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingfisher, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Kingfisher, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Kingfisher Place Oklahoma Utility Id 10320 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Large Power Industrial Prepaid Power Residential Residential Rate Residential Security Light- Metered Power Lighting Security Light- No Pole (No Cost Paid) Lighting Security Light- No Pole (Pay Cost of Pole) Lighting

399

Michalis Nikiforos On the Desired Rate of Capacity Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the endogeneity (or lack thereof) of the rate of capacity utilization in the long run within the context of the controversy surrounding the Kaleckian model of growth and distribution. We argue that the proposed long-run dynamic adjustment, proposed by Kaleckian scholars, lacks a coherent economic rationale. We provide economic justification for the adjustment of the desired rate of utilization towards the actual rate on behalf of a cost-minimizing firm, after examining the factors that determine the utilization of resources. The cost minimizing firm has an incentive to increase the utilization of its capital if the rate of the returns to scale decreases as its production increases. We show that there are evidence in the theory and the empirical research that justify this behavior of returns to scale. In that way the desired rate of utilization becomes endogenous.

Michalis Nikiforos; Laura Barbosa De Carvalho; Christian Schoder; Jonathan Cogliano For Useful

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program Bryan Texas Utilities - SmartHOME Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 25% of installed cost per customer project No one customer's incentive payment can exceed 20% of BTU's annual program budget Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $900/kW reduced 10%-25% installed cost per customer project The Bryan Texas Utilities (BTU) SmartHOME Programs offers incentives to owners of single- and multi-family homes for insulation, windows, and solar screens. The incentive rate is set at $900/kW electricity reduced by implementing the efficiency measures. The incentive amount may not be less

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Public Utility Commission in the year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is about What is and What ought to be as we look to the institution of public utility commission regulation at the turn of the century. To signal my own view at the outset, I find the prospects somewhat worrisome in light of the nature and direction of much of the response to real and imaginary changes in the regulated sectors. I surely do not call for standing in place, but I strongly believe we should leave the place standing. The following items are discernable trends that will shape the PUC at the turn-of-the century: (1) dichotomy of customers into core and noncore groups, (2) unbundling and new service offerings with a menu of prices, (3) relaxed regulation and increased reliance on market solutions instead of command and control, (4) increased use of market-based pricing and incentive ratemaking, (5) large users seeking lowest-cost generation and supply services, (6) shift from old regulatory bargains regarding exclusive territorial franchises and assured recovery of costs and investments, (7) utility diversification, (8) increasing business risk for utilities, amd (9) uncertainty as to continued utility attention to social goals and a changing obligation to serve. For each of these, the author focuses on: (1) changing missions and roles of the PUC, (2) the strategies for achieving them, and (3) the implementation requirements that operationalize the strategies.

Jones, D.N.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Valuing Energy Efficiency for Utility Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Valuing Energy Efficiency Valuing Energy Efficiency For Utility Rebate Programs Dr. Valerie V. von Schramm March 1, 2012 Building America Implementation Standing Technical Committee Gap/Barrier Gap/Barrier #3: Value-Stream Map of the Retrofit Process - Core concern - Audience segmentation needs must be better understood - Goal - To improve implementation strategy processes for retrofits Value-Stream Map Segment Addressed: - Public Energy Utility Perspectives/Needs Electric Utility Concerns Fleet Design Drivers * kWh Consumed * Peak Usage * Daily & Seasonal Patterns * Building Stock Impacts Community-Scale Energy Efficiency Modeling  NREL/UTSA/CPS Energy Collaboration  Identify geographically specific least-cost retrofits using BEopt  Inputs: census, income, appraisal district,

403

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Utility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation, will test an advanced halgenated activated carbon to determine the mercury removal performance and relative costs of sorbent injection for advanced sorbent materials in large-scale field trials of a variety of combinations of coal-type and utility plant-configuration. These include one site (Detroit Edison's St. Clair Station) with a cold-side ESP using subbituminous coal, or blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal, and one site (Duke Energy's Buck Plant) with a hot-side ESP which burns a bituminous coal. Related Papers and Publications: Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period April 1 - October 31, 2004 [PDF-2275KB] Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report for the period of October 2003 - March 2004 [PDF-1108KB]

404

Conservation saves for Minnesota municipal utility  

SciTech Connect

Hibbing Public Utilities Commission operates a 19,500-kW coal-fired generating station. The utility was concerned about its peaking power capability for the cold winter forecast for 1977--1978. An infrared aerial survey was conducted over the community and homeowners were shown the results. Residents were instructed where additional insulation was needed in the homes and banks made special loans to the homeowners to add the insulation. As a result of the efforts of on-site in plant conservation as well as that of consumers, more than $88,000 annually was saved in the cost of purchased power at the utility. A turn-back thermostat campaign and use of other energy-saving devices are planned for the 1978--1979 season. (MCW)

Vumbaco, J.A.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development cost % influence on final cost Data for new aircraft engine development. Percentage of total development cost and percentage influence on the final cost. Cost breakdown...

406

OpenEI:Utility data access map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility data access map Utility data access map Jump to: navigation, search Ret Utility Data Access Map Having access to your electricity use data is a very important step in understanding your overall energy usage. Comparing historical data to your current usage is one way to see trends and determine ways for reducing electricity costs and improving overall efficiency. We asked all U.S. electric utility companies to tell us how accessible their electricity use data is for both residential and commercial customers. The results are updated live based on the responses we have to date. As more utilities provide information, the utility boundaries will be automatically colored and the overall map will become more complete. Try searching for your utility company to see your electricity data access options.

407

Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. Through interviews and a questionnaire, the authors gathered information on utility supply planning and how solar is represented. Utilities were asked to provide their resource planning process details, key assumptions (e.g. whether DG is represented as supply or negative load), modeling methodology (e.g. type of risk analytics and candidate portfolio development), capacity expansion and production simulation model software, and solar project representation (project size, capacity value and integration cost adder). This presentation aims to begin the exchange of information between utilities, regulators and other stakeholders by capturing utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.

Cory, K.; Sterling, J.; Taylor, M.; McLaren, J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

410

Proceedings: Workshop on CO2 Transport/Storage Cost Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If reductions in CO2 emissions are needed in the utility industry, one of the potential solutions is application of CO2 capture and storage. In order to make informed decisions on applying CO2 capture and storage to the utility industry, high quality estimates of the costs are needed. While significant efforts have been made to evaluate the costs of CO2 capture from power plants, relatively little has been done to develop costs of transport and storage of CO2. This report presents the results of a worksh...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Optimal cooperative collision avoidance between multiple robots based on Bernstein-Bzier curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new cooperative collision-avoidance method for multiple, nonholonomic robots based on Bernstein-Bezier curves is presented. The main contribution focuses on an optimal, cooperative, collision avoidance for a multi-robot system where the ... Keywords: Collision avoidance, Mobile robots, Path planning

Igor krjanc; Gregor Klan?ar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Utility Marketing Strategies and Pricing Trends (An Overview)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Industries and utilities alike find themselves today in a very competitive environment. Industry finds that it must defend against threats to its markets from both domestic and foreign competitors. Likewise, utilities are challenged by industry and by neighboring utility companies to achieve new levels in customer service, reliability, and pricing. The two, industry and utility, are not antagonists, but are actually partners in the same venture--the industrial customer's costs are oftentimes tied closely to the price of electric power, and the utility's economic health depends upon the continued success of its customers. To work, a utility's marketing strategy and pricing arrangements must form a cohesive whole. Electric 'power rates must be able to recover a utility's costs and provide a sound fiscal footing for the utility, and yet still be attractive to industry and encourage the economic development of the region. However, lower rates are simply not the only answer in a sound marketing strategy. Rather than merely developing plans in accordance with the lowest feasible rates, it is reasonable for the utility to promote electrical efficiency and industrial productivity to ensure that electricity becomes a decreasing economic burden on industry. The utility and its industrial customers must work together as partners for the success of any marketing strategy. In this way, new arrangements may evolve which pave the way for industrial growth. I chair this tutorial having firsthand experience of the value to a utility of fostering trusting relationships with the industrial customers it serves. Through such relationships, TVA has been able to learn at an early date the needs of the customers it serves, and to do what it can as a utility to meet those needs. This tutorial panel consists of national experts from industry, utility, and consulting firms, each having direct experience in the important area of utility marketing, pricing, and customer relations. "

Reynolds, S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and...

414

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gainesville Regional Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Gainesville Regional Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Gainesville Regional Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Nonprofit Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Duct Leak Repair: up to $375 Energy Star Home Performance: $775 - $1,400 Custom: $100,000 or 50% of project cost Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioner: $550 Natural Gas Central Heat (Rental Properties): $300 Natural Gas Water Heater (Rental Properties): $250 - $350

416

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Energy Star Home: $2000t Ceiling Insulation: $400 ($500 for income-qualified customers) Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Home: $1/square foot Ceiling Insulation: 80% of installation cost (100% for income-qualified customers) Electric Rebates Refrigerators: $75 Freezers: $40 Clothes Washers: $100 Central Air Conditioner: $100 or $350 Heat Pump: $100 - $350

417

City of Palo Alto Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palo Alto Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Palo Alto Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (California) City of Palo Alto Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $100,000 per CPAU fiscal year (July 1 - June 30) Incentives exceeding $50,000 must be pre-approved Custom: 50% of project cost Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T12 Fixtures: Custom Reduced Wattage T8: $1 - $1.50/unit

418

City of Lompoc Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program City of Lompoc Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Other Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Up to 30% of cost Clothes Washer: $120 Dishwasher: $50 Refrigerator Replacement Rebate: $144 Refrigerator Buy-Back Program: $35 LED Exit Signs: $15 Custom Rebate: $0.15 per watt saved Provider Utility Conservation City of Lompoc Utilities offers rebates to commercial customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficiency lighting, clothes washers, dishwashers, replaced refrigerators, new refrigerators, LED exit signs and

419

Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Construction Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom Measures: 75% of the incremental cost of the measure Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies by fixture type, wattage and application Central A/C: $100/ton Air-Source Heat Pumps: $150/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $200/ton Commercial Refrigeration: See Program Website

420

Truckee Donner Public Utility District - Energy Conservation Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Utility District - Energy Conservation Rebate Public Utility District - Energy Conservation Rebate Program Truckee Donner Public Utility District - Energy Conservation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Lighting (Residential): see program web site Lighting (Commercial): $10,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $100 Refrigerators/Freezers: $100 Dishwashers: $100 Electric Water Heaters: $2/gallon Geothermal Heat Pumps: $200/ton Lighting (Residential): $2/fluorescent bulb Lighting (Commercial): 1/3 of project costs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost. Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

422

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Avista Utilities (Gas) - Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Forced Air Furnaces and Boilers: $200 Programmable Thermostats: $50 Windows: $2.25/sq. ft. Insulation: 50% of cost Provider Avista Utilities Avista Utilities offers a variety of equipment rebates to Oregon residential customers. Rebates are available for boilers, furnaces, insulation measures, windows and programmable thermostats. All equipment must meet certain energy efficiency standards listed on the program web

423

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives will not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Water Heater: $30 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

424

Utility battery storage systems. Program report for FY95  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to assist industry in developing cost-effective battery systems as a utility resource option by 2000. Sandia is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of rechargeable batteries and systems for utility energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1995.

Butler, P.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Sunscreens: 50% of cost, Maximum rebate of $100 Insulation (ceiling): Up to $150 per home Insulation (walls): Up to $200 per home Insulation (floor): Up to $75 per home Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $1 per sq. ft. Insulation (ceiling): $150 per home Insulation (walls): $200 per home Insulation (floor): $75 per home Sunscreens: $1 per sq. ft. Refrigerators: $100 Clothes Washers: $75

426

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

427

"List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

428

COST AND QUALITY TABLES 95  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Tables 5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) will no longer be pub- lished by the EIA. The tables presented in this docu- ment are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should be directed to: Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division

429

Proposal For Internationally Standardized Cost Item Definitions For The Decommissioning Of Nuclear Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various international decommissioning projects have shown that there are substantial variations in cost estimates for individual installations. Studies to understand the reasons for these differences have been somewhat hampered by the fact that different types of cost estimation methods are used, having different data requirements. Although some uncertainty is inevitable in any costing method, an understanding of the costing methods used in particular projects is useful to avoid key uncertainties. Difficulties of understanding can be encountered and invalid conclusions drawn in making cost comparisons without regard to the context in which the various cost estimates were made. The above-mentioned difficulties are partly due to the lack of a standardized or generally agreed-upon costing method that includes well-structured and defined cost items and an established estimation method. Such a structure and method would be useful not only for project cost comparisons but would also be a t...

Lucien Teunckens Belgoprocess; Kurt Pflugrad; Lucien Teunckens; Candace Chan-sands; Ted Lazo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

utilities | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

utilities utilities Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system interconnect regions (ASCC, FRCC, HICC, MRO, NPCC, RFC, SERC, SPP, TRE, WECC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory (LCI) forms (both xls and xml). A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included. Source US Life Cycle Inventory Database Date Released May 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords ASCC FRCC HICC interconnect region LCI life cycle inventory MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE unit process US utilities WECC Data application/zip icon interconnect_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 6.3 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

431

A primer on incentive regulation for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

In contemplating a regulatory approach, the challenge for regulators is to develop a model that provides incentives for utilities to engage in socially desirable behavior. In this primer, we provide guidance on this process by discussing (1) various models of economic regulation, (2) problems implementing these models, and (3) the types of incentives that various models of regulation provide electric utilities. We address five regulatory models in depth. They include cost-of-service regulation in which prudently incurred costs are reflected dollar-for-dollar in rates and four performance-based models: (1) price-cap regulation, in which ceilings are placed on the average price that a utility can charge its customers; (2) revenue-cap regulation, in which a ceiling is placed on revenues; (3) rate-of-return bandwidth regulation, in which a utility`s rates are adjusted if earnings fall outside a {open_quotes}band{close_quotes} around equity returns; and (4) targeted incentives, in which a utility is given incentives to improve specific components of its operations. The primary difference between cost-of-service and performance-based approaches is the latter sever the tie between costs and prices. A sixth, {open_quotes}mixed approach{close_quotes} combines two or more of the five basic ones. In the recent past, a common mixed approach has been to combine targeted incentives with cost-of-service regulation. A common example is utilities that are subject to cost-of-service regulation are given added incentives to increase the efficiency of troubled electric-generating units.

Hill, L.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Include in Column B cost of all composition produced by plant. Include in Column C cost of all operations not involving printing (Col. A)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupied (whether Government-owned or rented), utilities, etc. (14.5 cents per month per square foot. Amount spent for rental of equipment Total cost (Use col.A total from this line to compute cost per 1 units produced in plant this fiscal quarter Total units produced in plant this fiscal year Cost per 1

US Army Corps of Engineers

433

How to Avoid Overestimating Variable Speed Drive Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses eight factors that can cause incorrect and often excessive savings estimates for pump and fan variable speed drive applications. To avoid overestimating savings: 1. Identify system elements that affect head pressure independently of flow rate. 2. Identify system elements that change head pressure in proportion to less than the square of flow rate. 3. Account for dynamic system elements, especially when in systems with minimum static pressure controls. 4. Consider changes in fan efficiency. 5. Account for decreases in motor efficiency at part load, particularly for smaller motors below about 35 percent load. 6. Recognize that existing part load controls may be more efficient than expected. 7. Account for drive losses. 8. Measure full flow power, rather than assuming it is the same as motor nameplate or design power. For many pump and fan systems, none of the eight factors will apply, or their effects will be negligible. However, analysts should consider their applicability when estimating savings for a particular system. This paper provides tools for accounting for the factors.

Maxwell, J. B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Avoiding low frequency noise in packaged HVAC equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to help those involved in the design and commissioning of packaged HVAC systems to understand the root causes of low frequency noise problems and how to avoid many of them at the design stage. In the 1980's, two things happened to dramatically change the types of noise problems encountered in typical new construction. The first was the introduction of new energy regulations that favored variable air volume (VAV) distribution systems over constant volume air distribution systems. A by-product of VAV design is that mid- and high frequency sound pressure levels produced by current air terminal devices and diffusers in many applications are significantly lower than in the past. The second factor was a trend away from the use of built-up central station fan equipment in favor of packaged, floor-by-floor air handlers or rooftop units. As a result, today's HVAC system noise problems are not confined to just the roar and hiss of the past, but now include intense low frequency rumble and time modulation. Indeed, most current noise problems in modern buildings occur in the frequency range well below 250 Hz. A large fraction of these are a result of the dominant sound pressure levels in the 12 to 40 Hz region. These factors, combined with a substantial increase in the level of low frequency sound from the rest of the system, can produce a non-neutral, time modulated, rumbly sounding background noise that many people find objectionable.

Ebbing, C.E. (Carrier Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States). Commercial Unitary Division); Blazier, W.E.Jr. (Warren Blazier Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

437

Utility Stack Opacity Troubleshooting Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have become increasingly concerned about stack plume visibility, and some have been cited for excess plume opacity. This troubleshooting guide enables utilities to characterize plume opacity problems at full-scale utility sites and evaluate possible solutions.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

439

Cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary management of Tinnitus at a specialized Tinnitus centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) will be quantified using the cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses will be used to show the impact of variation in non-stochastic input parameters on the incremental cost- utility ratio, such as discount rate, unit prices, and design issues... using integral cost calcu- lations. Costs from productivity loss will be quantified using the friction cost method, as recommended in the Netherlands [28]. Ethical considerations Patients will be informed verbally and in written format about the research...

Cima, Rilana; Joore, Manuela; Maes, Iris; Scheyen, Dyon; El Refaie, Amr El; Baguley, David M; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Anteunis, Lucien

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

440

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avoided utility costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

New Berkeley Lab Report Tracks a Decade of PV Installed Cost Trends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installations of PV systems have been expanding at a rapid pace in recent years. In the United States, the market for PV is driven by national, state, and local government incentives, including upfront cash rebates, production-based incentives, requirements that electricity suppliers purchase a certain amount of solar energy, and Federal and state tax benefits. These programs are, in part, motivated by the popular appeal of solar energy and by the positive attributes of PV - e.g., modest environmental impacts, avoidance of fuel price risks, coincidence with peak electrical demand, and the location of PV at the point of use. Given the relatively high cost of PV, however, a key goal of these policies is to encourage cost reductions over time. Therefore, as policy incentives have become more significant and as PV deployment has accelerated, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of PV systems over time, by system characteristics, by system location, and by component. A new Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report, 'Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007', helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed cost (i.e., the cost paid by the system owner) of grid-connected PV systems in the U.S. The report is based on an analysis of project-level cost data from nearly 37,000 residential and non-residential PV systems completed from 1998-2007 and installed on the utility-customer-side of the meter. These systems total 363 MW, equal to 76% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the U.S. through 2007, representing the most comprehensive data source available on the installed cost of PV in the United States. The data were obtained from administrators of PV incentive programs around the country, who typically collect installed cost data for systems receiving incentives. A total of 16 programs, spanning 12 states, ultimately provided data for the study. Reflecting the broader geographical trends in the U.S. PV market, the vast majority of the systems in the data sample are located in California (83%, by capacity) and New Jersey (12%), The remaining systems are located in Arizona, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. The PV systems in the dataset range in size from 100 W to 1.3 MW, almost 90% of which are smaller than 10 kW. This article briefly summarizes some of the key findings from the Berkeley Lab study (the full report can be downloaded at http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/re-pubs.html). The article begins by summarizing trends related to the installed cost of PV systems prior to receipt of any financial incentives, and then discusses how changes in incentive levels over time and variation across states have impacted the net installed cost of PV to the customer, after receipt of incentives. Note that all cost and incentive data are presented in real 2007 dollars (2007$), and all capacity and dollars-perwatt ($/W) data are presented in terms of rated module power output under Standard Test Conditions (DC-STC).

Barbose, Galen; Peterman, Carla; Wiser, Ryan

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Transition-cost issues for a restructuring US electricity industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities regulators can use a variety of approaches to calculate transition costs. We categorized these approaches along three dimensions. The first dimension is the use of administrative vs. market procedures to value the assets in question. Administrative approaches use analytical techniques to estimate transition costs. Market valuation relies on the purchase price of particular assets to determine their market values. The second dimension concerns when the valuation is done, either before or after the restructuring of the electricity industry. The third dimension concerns the level of detail involved in the valuation, what is often called top-down vs. bottom-up valuation. This paper discusses estimation approaches, criteria to assess estimation methods, specific approaches to estimating transition costs, factors that affect transition-cost estimates, strategies to address transition costs, who should pay transition costs, and the integration of cost recovery with competitive markets.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Utility spot pricing, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the present spot pricing study carried out for SCE and PG&E is to develop the concepts which wculd lead to an experimental design for spot pricing in the two utilities. The report suggests a set of experiments ...

Schweppe, Fred C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coalCenter for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

446

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST by blending these selected conventional and clean coal ashes. Using these sixdifferent ash samples, eleven of 0 and60 percent by high-sulfurcoal ashes (Class F and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

447

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: Tarun R. Naik, Director investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

448

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the coal ash derived from SOx control technology. Up to 80% of CCA was blended with ground portland cement: blended cement, clean coal ash, sulfate resistance, time of setting #12;3 Zichao Wu is Structural EngineerCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

449

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) in the range of 0 to 60Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

450

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Test results indicated that all the blends with coal ash had lower expansion than the control mixtureCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

451

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixtures were developed using blends of wood FA and Class C coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA improved performance of wood FA to a significant extentCenter for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

452

Utility Baghouse Survey 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted comprehensive surveys of utility baghouse installations in 1981, 1991, and 2005 to summarize the state of the technology. The current survey focuses on nine selected pulse-jet baghouses to provide a better understanding of the design, performance, and operation of recent installations.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Advanced fossil energy utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 2630, 2009.

Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Economic assessment of the utilization of lead-acid batteries in electric utility systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific applications in which lead--acid batteries might be economically competitive on an electric utility system are identified. Particular attention is given to searching the Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE and G) system for installations of batteries which could defer or cancel costly transmission and/or distribution projects. Although the transmission and distribution data are based on specific applications on the PSE and G system, the generation data are based on a national reference system. The report analyzes and summarizes all costs and savings attributable to lead--acid batteries. 40 figures, 78 tables. (RWR)

Johnson, A.C.; Hynds, J.A.; Nevius, D.R.; Nunan, G.A.; Sweetman, N.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Description and cost analysis of a deluge dry/wet cooling system.  

SciTech Connect

The use of combined dry/wet cooling systems for large base-load power plants offers the potential for significant water savings as compared to evaporatively cooled power plants and significant cost savings in comparison to dry cooled power plants. The results of a detailed engineering and cost study of one type of dry/wet cooling system are described. In the ''deluge'' dry/wet cooling method, a finned-tube heat exchanger is designed to operate in the dry mode up to a given ambient temperature. To avoid the degradation of performance for higher ambient temperatures, water (the delugeate) is distributed over a portion of the heat exchanger surface to enhance the cooling process by evaporation. The deluge system used in this study is termed the HOETERV system. The HOETERV deluge system uses a horizontal-tube, vertical-plate-finned heat exchanger. The delugeate is distributed at the top of the heat exchanger and is allowed to fall by gravity in a thin film on the face of the plate fin. Ammonia is used as the indirect heat transfer medium between the turbine exhaust steam and the ambient air. Steam is condensed by boiling ammonia in a condenser/reboiler. The ammonia is condensed in the heat exchanger by inducing airflow over the plate fins. Various design parameters of the cooling system have been studied to evaluate their impact on the optimum cooling system design and the power-plant/utility-system interface. Annual water availability was the most significant design parameter. Others included site meteorology, heat exchanger configuration and air flow, number and size of towers, fan system design, and turbine operation. It was concluded from this study that the HOETERV deluge system of dry/wet cooling, using ammonia as an intermediate heat transfer medium, offers the potential for significant cost savings compared with all-dry cooling, while achieving substantially reduced water consumption as compared to an evaporatively cooled power plant. (LCL)

Wiles, L.E.; Bamberger, J.A.; Braun, D.J.; Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.; Willingham, C.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Utility Line Inspections and Audits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility Line Inspections and Audits provides utility engineers with a concise reference for the pros, cons, and how to related to performing various line inspections and audits.

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

458

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first-year 2012 cost for wind energy under a power purchaseCost Study of the 2015 Wind Challenge: An Assessment of Wind Energycosts, we assumed that the super-utility had a preference for wind energy.

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

460

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Renewable Energy Cost Modeling: A Toolkit for Establishing Cost-Based Incentives in the United States; March 2010 -- March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to serve as a resource for policymakers who wish to learn more about establishing cost-based incentives. The report will identify key renewable energy cost modeling options, highlight the policy implications of choosing one approach over the other, and present recommendations on the optimal characteristics of a model to calculate rates for cost-based incentives, feed-in tariffs (FITs), or similar policies. These recommendations will be utilized in designing the Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool (CREST). Three CREST models will be publicly available and capable of analyzing the cost of energy associated with solar, wind, and geothermal electricity generators. The CREST models will be developed for use by state policymakers, regulators, utilities, developers, and other stakeholders to assist them in current and future rate-setting processes for both FIT and other renewable energy incentive payment structures and policy analyses.

Gifford, J. S.; Grace, R. C.; Rickerson, W. H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL MANUFACTURING COST MODEL: SIMULATING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERFORMANCE, MANUFACTURING, AND COST OF PRODUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful commercialization of fuel cells will depend on the achievement of competitive system costs and efficiencies. System cost directly impacts the capital equipment component of cost of electricity (COE) and is a major contributor to the O and M component. The replacement costs for equipment (also heavily influenced by stack life) is generally a major contributor to O and M costs. In this project, they worked with the SECA industrial teams to estimate the impact of general manufacturing issues of interest on stack cost using an activities-based cost model for anode-supported planar SOFC stacks with metallic interconnects. An earlier model developed for NETL for anode supported planar SOFCs was enhanced by a linkage to a performance/thermal/mechanical model, by addition of Quality Control steps to the process flow with specific characterization methods, and by assessment of economies of scale. The 3-dimensional adiabatic performance model was used to calculate the average power density for the assumed geometry and operating conditions (i.e., inlet and exhaust temperatures, utilization, and fuel composition) based on publicly available polarizations curves. The SECA team provided guidance on what manufacturing and design issues should be assessed in this Phase I demonstration of cost modeling capabilities. They considered the impact of the following parameters on yield and cost: layer thickness (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) on cost and stress levels, statistical nature of ceramic material failure on yield, and Quality Control steps and strategies. In this demonstration of the capabilities of the linked model, only the active stack (i.e., anode, electrolyte, and cathode) and interconnect materials were included in the analysis. Factory costs are presented on an area and kilowatt basis to allow developers to extrapolate to their level of performance, stack design, materials, seal and system configurations, and internal corporate overheads and margin goals.

Eric J. Carlson; Yong Yang; Chandler Fulton

2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z