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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgGeoFluidTemp AvgGeoFluidTemp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgGeoFluidTemp Property Type Temperature Description Average temperature of geofluid in a geothermal area. Subproperties This property has the following 15 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area S cont. Soda Lake Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "AvgGeoFluidTemp" Showing 10 pages using this property.

2

AVG Koeln GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name AVG Koeln GmbH Place Kln, Germany Zip 50735 Product Operating a Waste-to-Energy facility in Kln, Germany. References AVG Koeln GmbH1 LinkedIn...

3

Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property Type Number Description Avg. Annual Gross Operating Capacity(MW). Pages using the property "AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty" Showing 6 pages using this property. F Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 49.5 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 81.7 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 86 + Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Power Plant + 22 + North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 50 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 11.5 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty&oldid=400186#SMWResults" Categories: Properties Geothermal Energy Generation Facilities properties What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

4

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

5

Property:IndustrialAvgRate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IndustrialAvgRate IndustrialAvgRate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IndustrialAvgRate Property Type Number Description Industrial Average Rate Subproperties This property has the following 279 subproperties: A AEP Generating Company AEP Texas Central Company AEP Texas North Company AES Eastern Energy LP APN Starfirst, L.P. Accent Energy Holdings, LLC Alabama Municipal Elec Authority Alaska Electric & Energy Coop Alaska Energy Authority Alaska Power and Telephone Co Allegheny Electric Coop Inc Alliant Energy Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Illinois Company American Electric Power Co., Inc. American Mun Power-Ohio, Inc American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Anoka Electric Coop Appalachian Power Co Aquila Inc Aquila Inc (Missouri) Arizona Electric Pwr Coop Inc

6

Property:CommercialAvgRate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CommercialAvgRate CommercialAvgRate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name CommercialAvgRate Property Type Number Description Commercial Average Rate Subproperties This property has the following 279 subproperties: A AEP Generating Company AEP Texas Central Company AEP Texas North Company AES Eastern Energy LP APN Starfirst, L.P. Accent Energy Holdings, LLC Alabama Municipal Elec Authority Alaska Electric & Energy Coop Alaska Energy Authority Alaska Power and Telephone Co Allegheny Electric Coop Inc Alliant Energy Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Illinois Company American Electric Power Co., Inc. American Mun Power-Ohio, Inc American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Anoka Electric Coop Appalachian Power Co Aquila Inc Aquila Inc (Missouri) Arizona Electric Pwr Coop Inc

7

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

8

AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient August 9, 2010 - 11:50am Addthis AcuTemp received a 900,000...

9

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

10

Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Tempe, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tempe, Arizona: Energy Resources Tempe, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.414768°, -111.9093095° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.414768,"lon":-111.9093095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Property:SanyalTempWellhead | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SanyalTempWellhead SanyalTempWellhead Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SanyalTempWellhead Property Type Page Description see Sanyal_Temperature_Classification Allows Values Extremely Low Temperature;Very Low Temperature;Low Temperature;Moderate Temperature;High Temperature;Ultra High Temperature;Steam Field Pages using the property "SanyalTempWellhead" Showing 25 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Extremely Low Temperature + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Low Temperature + C Chena Geothermal Area + Extremely Low Temperature + Coso Geothermal Area + High Temperature + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature +

13

Windows Vista vs Ubuntu Installaci: procs, temps i problemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windows Vista vs Ubuntu #12;Índex Instal·lació: procés, temps i problemes Aplicacions Temps d·lació: procés, temps i problemes Procés d'instal·lació de Windows Vista Procés d'instal·lació de Linux Ubuntu 7.04 Temps total Problemes #12;Instal·lació Windows Vista (I) #12;Instal·lació Windows Vista (II

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

14

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Maria Cadeddu

15

Property:SanyalTempReservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SanyalTempReservoir SanyalTempReservoir Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SanyalTempReservoir Property Type Page Description see Sanyal_Temperature_Classification Allows Values Extremely Low Temperature;Very Low Temperature;Low Temperature;Moderate Temperature;High Temperature;Ultra High Temperature;Steam Field Pages using the property "SanyalTempReservoir" Showing 16 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Very Low Temperature + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + High Temperature + C Chena Geothermal Area + Very Low Temperature + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + High Temperature + L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area + High Temperature +

16

Property:MeanReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanReservoirTemp MeanReservoirTemp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanReservoirTemp Property Type Temperature Description Mean estimated reservoir temperature at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Pages using the property "MeanReservoirTemp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 363.15 K90 °C 194 °F 653.67 °R + Adak Geothermal Area + 428.15 K155 °C 311 °F 770.67 °R + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + 353.15 K80 °C 176 °F 635.67 °R + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + 523.15 K250 °C 482 °F 941.67 °R + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 408.15 K135 °C 275 °F 734.67 °R + Amedee Geothermal Area + 388.15 K115 °C 239 °F 698.67 °R + Arrowhead Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 388.15 K115 °C

17

AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient August 9, 2010 - 11:50am Addthis AcuTemp received a $900,000 48C manufacturing tax credit under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to increase production of the company's ThermoCor vacuum insulation panels for more efficient ENERGY STAR appliances. | Photo courtesy of AcuTemp | AcuTemp received a $900,000 48C manufacturing tax credit under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to increase production of the company's ThermoCor vacuum insulation panels for more efficient ENERGY STAR appliances. | Photo courtesy of AcuTemp | Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE "[Refrigerator manufactures] are searching for technologies," says Doug

18

Sheet.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(lb.) 150 150 1190 1190 AC kWh Recharge 31.99 35.17 36.85 33.89 AC kWhmi. 0.409 0.456 0.480 0.490 Range (mi.) 76.5 71.4 74.8 68.8 Avg. Ambient Temp. 62 F 66 F 74 F...

19

Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

Coulter,Richard; Ritsche,Michael

20

Second order ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This text attempts to describe an imagined future of ambient intelligence. It assumes that one day most of the current issues within ambient intelligence will be solved and that a second order ambient intelligence will be formulated, one with new research ... Keywords: Critique of ambient intelligence, adaptive systems, animal machine interaction, critical futurism, long-term behavior, second order ambient intelligence, temporal design

Marc Bhlen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Showing 7 properties using this type. A Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp C Property:Combustion Intake Air Temperature F Property:FirstWellTemp G Property:GeofluidTemp M...

22

File:TempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf TempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:TempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 450 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 30 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:40, 29 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:40, 29 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 30 pages (450 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

23

Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze! Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze! Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze! November 16, 2009 - 7:42pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory I can be a strange and particular person at times. So here is a post wherein I will be strangely particular about setting the temperature on your thermostat. You often hear about how you should turn down the thermostat to save energy, and there are a slew of helpful ideas on the subject. I'm sure you've heard some of them right here on this blog: You can turn the thermostat down when you're out, when you're sleeping, and you can save about 1% on your energy bill per degree you turn your thermostat down! This is all very exciting. But before you go crazy with turning down the thermostat really low, I'd

24

Property:Building/MeanAnnualTempAtSite | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanAnnualTempAtSite MeanAnnualTempAtSite Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Mean annual temperature at the site1 Pages using the property "Building/MeanAnnualTempAtSite" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 6.6 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 6.6 +

25

Property:Building/MeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod MeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Mean annual temperature during the calculation period Pages using the property "Building/MeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 7.6 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7.6 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 7.142 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 7.6 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 7.6 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 7.733 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 7.083 +

26

Ambiental PV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambiental PV Ambiental PV Jump to: navigation, search Name Ambiental PV Place Bahia, Brazil Zip 40140-380 Sector Carbon Product Bahia-based carbon consultancy firm. References Ambiental PV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ambiental PV is a company located in Bahia, Brazil . References ↑ "Ambiental PV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ambiental_PV&oldid=342095" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 186306960

27

Imaging with ambient noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees [Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ambient Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Place Newton, Massachusetts Zip 24580 Product Ambient develops open standards-based technologies for creating smart grid communication platforms and technologies. References...

30

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

32

Moments of ambient Doppler spectra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author studied the first four moments (center of mass, standard deviation, skew, and kurtosis) of the Doppler spectra in ambient regions of LLNL-Hughes real aperture radar data collected during WCSEX91--92. The goal was to correlate trends in the moments with wind velocity and direction. Although the center of mass appears to increase when the wind is blowing into the radar antenna, no other conclusions have been drawn from the higher order moments.

Lehman, S.K.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

Review: Ambient intelligence: Technologies, applications, and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient intelligence is an emerging discipline that brings intelligence to our everyday environments and makes those environments sensitive to us. Ambient intelligence (AmI) research builds upon advances in sensors and sensor networks, pervasive computing, ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Artificial intelligence, Context awareness, Decision making, Privacy, Sensors

Diane J. Cook; Juan C. Augusto; Vikramaditya R. Jakkula

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

student_temp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

loose ends c. Are appropriate for individual student's development level, capability, gender, cultural background, technical skills, interests, language, and learning style d. Are...

35

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELEV: 7000 ft LAT: 37 54' 00" N LONG: 109 18' 00" w TEMPERATURE (OF)' RAIN (in), WIND SPEED (mph) HEAT COOL AVG MEAN DEG DEG WIND DOM DAY TEMP HIGH TTME LOW TIME DAYS DAYS...

36

ARM - Datastreams - 1twr10x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plot Example 1twr10x Archive Data Plot Datastream : 1TWR10X Sixty Meter Tower: temp, humidity & vapor pressure, 1-min avg Active Dates 1997.09.12 - 2013.07.23 Measurement...

37

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.

38

Thermoelectric Ambient Energy Harvester - Energy Innovation Portal  

A novel thermoelectric generator (TEG) design by PNNL allows the conversion of ambient thermal energy into electric power for a variety of low-power uses. These ...

39

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Jump to: navigation, search Name SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Agency/Company /Organization Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Video, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.actualidadambiental UN Region Caribbean, Central America, South America References SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental[1] SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Screenshot "SPDA current environmental journalism is a service of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) , which seeks to inform about the latest news and events related to the environment in Peru and the world in search of greater awareness and action for preservation of our planet. On this site you can also obtain and use for free videos, high resolution photos and the

40

Category:Properties | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Properties Jump to: navigation, search This category uses the form Property. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. T [×] Tech Potential Properties‎ 30 pages Pages in category "Properties" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 1,075 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:Abbreviation Property:Achievement Date Property:AdditionalRef Property:Affiliated Companies Property:Applicant Property:Area Property:AreaGeology Property:Author Property:Available Personnel Types Property:Available Sensors Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp Property:AvgReservoirDepth Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Bandwidth(kHz)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

44

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

45

Winterscape and ambient video: an intermedia border zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Ambient Video" is an emergent media form that operates in an intermedia border zone, sharing the aesthetics of cinema, video, painting, and fine art photography. Winterscape is an ambient video work that incorporates these directions. Like any ambient ... Keywords: ambient video, cinema, experimental film, moving image, poetics, post-production, video, video art, visual effects

Jim Bizzocchi

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Ambient Hydro Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambient Hydro Ltd Ambient Hydro Ltd Place Corsham, United Kingdom Zip SN13 9TZ Sector Hydro, Services Product Ambient Hydro Ltd develops small Hydroelectric projects. It also offers a range of technical and financial consultancy services. Coordinates 51.431505°, -2.187229° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.431505,"lon":-2.187229,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

The ambient wood journals: replaying the experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Wood project aims to facilitate a learning experience using an adaptive infrastructure in an outdoor environment. This involves sensor technology, virtual world orchestration, and a wide range of devices ranging from hand-held computers to ... Keywords: adaptive infrastructure, consolidation, record and replay, storytelling

Mark J. Weal; Danius T. Michaelides; Mark K. Thompson; David C. DeRoure

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Visual calibration and correction for ambient illumination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications require that an image will appear the same regardless of where or how it is displayed. However, the conditions in which an image is displayed can adversely affect its appearance. Computer monitor screens not only emit light, but can ... Keywords: Viewing conditions, ambient illumination, contrast correction, device independence, ergonomics, perceptually accurate display, reflections

Kate Devlin; Alan Chalmers; Erik Reinhard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ambient Control Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Control Systems Control Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ambient Control Systems Name Ambient Control Systems Address 1810 Gillespie Way Place El Cajon, California Zip 92020 Sector Solar Product Solar energy device with a computerized energy management Website http://www.ambientalert.com/ma Coordinates 32.8193566°, -116.981232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8193566,"lon":-116.981232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

51

Correlations between Ambient Noise and the Ocean Surface Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the ambient noise spectrum level N with simultaneous, coincident wind and wave measurements were made from RP FLIP in fall 1991. The measurements were designed to investigate the correlation between the ambient noise and relevant ...

Francis C. Felizardo; W. Kendall Melville

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ambient social tv: drawing people into a shared experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine how ambient displays can augment social television. Social TV 2 is an interactive television solution that incorporates two ambient displays to convey to participants an aggregate view of their friends' current TV-watching status. Social TV ... Keywords: ambient displays, field trial, interactive television, social presence awareness, social television

Gunnar Harboe; Crysta J. Metcalf; Frank Bentley; Joe Tullio; Noel Massey; Guy Romano

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

O estudo de impacto ambiental e sua complexidade jurdico-administrativa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O Estudo de Impacto Ambiental (EIA) como instrumento da Poltica Nacional do Meio Ambiente, imprescindvel para a gesto pblica ambiental. Contudo, so inmeras as (more)

Andria Ponciano de Moraes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Spectral analysis of ambient weather patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Fourier spectral analysis of ambient weather data, consisting of global and direct solar radiation, dry and wet bulb temperatures, and wind speed, is given. By analyzing the heating and cooling seasons independently, seasonal variations are isolated and a cleaner spectrum emerges. This represents an improvement over previous work in this area, in which data for the entire year were analyzed together. As a demonstration of the efficacy of this method, synthetic data constructed with a small number of parameters are used in typical simulations, and the results are compared with those obtained with the original data. A spectral characterization of fluctuations around the moving average is given, and the changes in the fluctuation from season to season are examined.

Anderson, J.V.; Subbarao, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ambient-pressure silica aerogel films  

SciTech Connect

Very highly porous (aerogel) silica films with refractive index in the range 1.006--1.05 (equivalent porosity 98.5--88%) were prepared by an ambient-pressure process. It was shown earlier using in situ ellipsometric imaging that the high porosity of these films was mainly attributable to the dilation or `springback` of the film during the final stage of drying. This finding was irrefutably reconfirmed by visually observing a `springback` of >500% using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Ellipsometry and ESEM also established the near cent per cent reversibility of aerogel film deformation during solvent intake and drying. Film thickness profile measurements (near the drying line) for the aerogel, xerogel and pure solvent cases are presented from imaging ellipsometry. The thickness of these films (crack-free) were controlled in the range 0.1-3.5 {mu}m independent of refractive index.

Prakash, S.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurd, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and

59

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

60

Re:Cycle - a Generative Ambient Video Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigating the Database. DVD-video. Cambridge MA: MITnetworked and more ubiquitous. Video screens are steadily [with the nature of the ambient video experience, and can be

Bizzocchi, Jim; Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Quan, Brian; Suzuki, Wakiko; Bagheri, Majid; Riecke, Bernhard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

62

Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente AIMA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Invests in projects that aim to generate energy from biodegradable residues and waste. References Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente (AIMA)1 LinkedIn Connections...

63

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

64

Learning patterns in ambient intelligence environments: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is essential for environments that aim at helping people in their daily life that they have some sort of Ambient Intelligence. Learning the preferences and habits of users then becomes an important step in allowing a system to provide such personalized ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Intelligent environments, Machine learning techniques, Pattern learning

Asier Aztiria; Alberto Izaguirre; Juan Carlos Augusto

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Extracting Key Factors to Design Applications in Ambient Intelligence Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an ambient intelligence environment, the design of applications influences the users behavior heavily. The purpose of this paper is to provide key factors considered necessary in developing those applications. We developed four applications applied ... Keywords: ambient feedback, persuasive technology, behavior modification, emotional engagement

Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Mental models of ambient systems: a modular research framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines our current research program in the fields of ambient intelligence and context-aware computing and the tools we are building to accomplish this research program. From a discussion of our conception of mental models in the domain of ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, context awareness, mental models

Felix Schmitt; Jrg Cassens; Martin Christof Kindsmller; Michael Herczeg

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Generating Ambient Behaviors in Computer Role-Playing Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computer games use custom scripts to control the ambient behaviors of nonplayercharacters. As a result, story authors mustwrite computer code for the game world'shundreds or thousands of NPCs. Creating entertaining, nonrepetitive NPC behaviors without ... Keywords: ambient behavior, nonplayer character, intelligent agents, scripting language, generative pattern, collaborative behavior, computer games

Maria Cutumisu; Duane Szafron; Jonathan Schaeffer; Matthew McNaughton; Thomas Roy; Curtis Onuczko; Mike Carbonaro

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The DFKI competence center for ambient assisted living  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area ... Keywords: ambient assisted living, intelligent environments, living labs

Jochen Frey; Christoph Stahl; Thomas Rfer; Bernd Krieg-Brckner; Jan Alexandersson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ambient intelligence technologies in support of shipping markets' operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intelligent Maritime Environment (i-MARE) framework and technological platform we introduce in our paper conceptualize an innovative, collaborative and context-aware network business model for cargo shipping. The i-MARE framework considers ambient-intelligence ... Keywords: Agent technology, Ambient intelligence, Cargo shipping operations, Enterprise modelling, Web semantics

Maria A. Lambrou; Kay Endre Fjrtoft; Efstathios D. Sykas; Nikitas Nikitakos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation submits the following comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in hopes that their contribution can highlight and further the understanding of the DOE on the key role that integrated communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation More Documents & Publications Comments of Tendril Networks Inc Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2001

71

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebración de los 20 años de justicia ambiental pasados y futuros. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 More Documents & Publications SE HAN FINALIZADO LOS PREPARATIVOS PARA LA CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE JUSTICIA MEDIOAMBIENTAL Y PROGRAMA DE FORMACIÓN 2013 2013 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish)

72

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info Start Date 11/30/1995 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average: 110 ug/m3; 30-day average: 90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean: 60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing

73

GenForecast(26yr)(avg).PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLCAIP Historical & Forecast Generation at Plant Total Range of Hydrology 0 2,000,000,000 4,000,000,000 6,000,000,000 8,000,000,000 10,000,000,000 12,000,000,000 1 9 7 0 1 9 7 2 1...

74

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project In a collaborative effort between ChemImage Biothreat, LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project will acquire the ability to discern between chemical/biological threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. The project will focus on potential background interferences, specifically from the ambient backgrounds collected at NETL-supported ambient air collection facilities. Potential substrate interferences such as pollen, insecticides and industrial PM will be addressed. Using Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) and fluorescence chemical imaging, a background - void of pathogen spores - will be collected and compared to known pathogens. Interactions causing possible false positives will be identified and studied. This study would systematically identify potential problems and provide a baseline of ambient particulates found in the mid-eastern United States .

75

Ambient pressure synthesis of nanostructured tungsten oxide crystalline films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures ...

H. X. Zhang; B. Q. Yang; P. X. Feng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the water-soluble organic car- bon (WSOC) components of ambient aerosol particles into hydrophilic and Weber [2006]. In the XAD-8 method, the WSOC components that penetrate the column are hydro- philic

Weber, Rodney

77

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Street media : ambient messages in an urban space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient street media are the media of our everyday lives in cities. Manifested in bits and fragments on the surfaces of the streetscape, these media often escape our notice - tuned out as visual clutter or dismissed as ...

Murthy, Rekha (Rekha S.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Space and Time Scales in Ambient Ozone Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the characteristic space and time scales in time series of ambient ozone data. The authors discuss the need and a methodology for cleanly separating the various scales of motion embedded in ozone time series data, namely, ...

S. T. Rao; I. G. Zurbenko; R. Neagu; P. S. Porter; J. Y. Ku; R. F. Henry

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

TV as a human interface for Ambient Intelligence environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges that Ambient Intelligent (AmI) faces is the provision of a usable interaction concept to its users, especially for those with less technical background. In this paper, we describe a new approach to integrate interactive services ... Keywords: information service, human interface, ambient intelligence environments, usable interaction concept, interactive services, television set, home environment, natural human computer interface, elderly people, graphical user interfaces, TV remote control, voice interaction, videoconference

Gorka Epelde; Xabier Valencia; Julio Abascal; Unai Diaz; Ingo Zinnikus; Christian Husodo-Schulz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fast track article: Designing an extensible architecture for Personalized Ambient Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient displays provide us with information in the background of our awareness. However, as each user has individual wishes and needs of how, which and when information is presented, the acceptance of ambient displays is low. In this paper we introduce ... Keywords: Ambient display, Ambient fixture, Notification system, Peripheral display, Ubiquitous computing

Jan-Patrick Elsholz; Guido de Melo; Marc Hermann; Michael Weber

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovcs; S. Kopcsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ambient intelligence as enabling technology for modern business paradigms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays the competition among companies, joined to the environmental protection rules, is so compelling that they should not only be on the top of technology in they area, but also run their business according to life-long models. The emphasis on the ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Extended product, Knowledge-based systems, Maintenance, Product lifecycle management, Service engineering

S. Kopcsi; G. Kovcs; A. Anufriev; R. Michelini

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The role of ambient intelligence in future lighting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LED-based lighting systems have introduced radically new possibilities in the area of artificial lighting. Being physically small the LED can be positioned or embedded into luminaires, materials and even the very fabric of a building or environment. ... Keywords: LED, ambient intelligence, lighting, user interaction

Dzmitry Aliakseyeu; Jon Mason; Bernt Meerbeek; Harm van Essen; Serge Offermans

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Turning Homes into Low-Cost Ambient Assisted Living Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today motion recognition has become more popular in areas like health care. In real-time environments, the amount of information and data required to compute the user's motion is substantial, while the time to collect and process this information are ... Keywords: Ambient Assistant Living (AAL), Depth Image, Kinect Skeletal Data, Motion, Motion Recognition System

Alexiei Dingli; Daniel Attard; Ruben Mamo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ambient functionality in MIMOSA from technology to services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MIcrosystems platform for MObile Services and Applications (MIMOSA) is an European Integrated Project in the Information Society Technology (IST) priority. The goal of MIMOSA is to make Ambient Intelligence (AmI) a reality by developing a mobile-phone ...

Pascal Ancey

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-deriv

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions  

SciTech Connect

We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Ambient/Task Lighting Low Ambient/Task Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for low ambient/task lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits The low ambient/task lighting strategy improves the visual environment by adding controllable task fixtures that provide light directly where needed for a given task, while reducing the overhead (ambient) light level. Occupancy sensors can also be incorporated into the system. Application Low ambient/task lighting is applicable in most building categories. Key Factors for Deployment Low ambient/task lighting is suitable for most office spaces, including both cubicle and private office space environments, and should be

91

TQL: a query language for semistructured data based on the ambient logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ambient logic is a modal logic that was proposed for the description of the structural and computational properties of distributed and mobile computation. The structural part of the ambient logic is, essentially, a logic of labelled trees, hence ...

Luca Cardelli; Giorgio Ghelli

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

93

Heat-Loss Testing of Solel's UVAC3 Parabolic Trough Receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For heat-loss testing on two Solel UVAC3 parabolic trough receivers, a correlation developed predicts receiver heat loss as a function of the difference between avg absorber and ambient temperatures.

Burkholder, F.; Kutscher, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Identification of dynamic properties from ambient vibration measurements  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the dynamic behavior of structures under normal dynamic loads as well as extreme loads such as those caused by seismic events or high winds, it is desirable to measure the dynamic properties (resonant frequencies, mode shapes and modal damping) of these structures. The cross-correlation function between two response measurements made on an ambiently excited structure is shown to have the same form as the system`s impulse response function. Therefore, standard time-domain curve-fitting procedures such as the complex exponential method, which are typically applied to impulse response functions, can now be applied to the cross-correlation functions to estimate the resonant frequencies and modal damping of the structure. A direct comparison of resonant frequencies identified by curve-fitting the cross-correlation functions, using traffic excitation as the ambient vibration source, and modal properties identified by standard forced vibration testing of a highway bridge, after traffic was removed, showed a maximum discrepancy of 3.63%. Similar comparisons for the average modal damping values identified by the two methods showed a 9.82% difference. This experimental verification implies that the proposed method of analyzing ambient vibration data has the potential to accurately assess the dynamic properties of large structures subjected to seismic excitations and small structures that are tested on a shake table.

Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

C:\WINDOWS\Temp\SOCpdf.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures for Implementing Standards of Conduct Under The Procedures for Implementing Standards of Conduct Under The Southwestern Power Administration Open Access Tariff (Docket Number NJ 98-2) Southwestern applies the following guidelines and procedures to assure nondiscriminatory access to its transmission system for deliveries of non-Federal power under its Tariff, to the extent that transmission capacity is available in excess of that necessary to reliably market and deliver Federal power as authorized by Section 5 of the Flood Control Act of 1944. Implementing Tariffs Employees will strictly enforce all non-discretionary provisions of Southwestern's Tariff and apply all provisions fairly and impartially to treat all customers in a nondiscriminatory manner. All requests for transmission service will be processed on a

99

C:\\TEMP\\NERACMinutesSept2002.wpd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering Technology, South Carolina State University David Wade, Director, Reactor Analysis Division, Argonne National Laboratory Ralph White, Dean, College of...

100

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Air Quality Database and Analytical Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. with Ohio University and Texas A&M University - Kingsville as subcontractors, will develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust computer application for NETL to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. Efforts will be made to include, to the greatest extent possible, ambient air data collected by other agencies in the upper Ohio River valley region, such as U.S. EPA, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP), West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WV-DEP), Ohio EPA, and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). Although emphasis will be placed on data collected in the upper Ohio River valley region, the computer application developed under this Agreement will be designed, to the greatest extent possible, to access data collected at NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring sites outside the region, such as sites operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the Great Smoky Mountains (under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI26-98FT40406) and by Southern Research Institute in North Birmingham, AL (under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40770). The data base and analytical tool development effort will also be coordinated, to the greatest extent possible, with similar tools being developed for use by U.S. EPA. This will ensure that the database and analytical tools produced under this Agreement will be readily accessible to a wide variety of stakeholders.

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101

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions The water molecule, H2O, has deceptively simple structure, but contains all the prerequisites for building complexity. The oxygen atom has a greater affinity for electrons and pulls them away from the hydrogens making them slightly positive. On the back side of molecule oxygen has a lone pair - electrons that do not assist in binding the hydrogens in the molecule, but to which the hydrogens of another water molecule can be attracted to form a so-called hydrogen bond (H-bond). Hydrogen bond is much weaker than the bonding inside water molecule, but it is still strong enough with the possibility to make from one up to four H-bonds per water molecule. The network connected by H-bonds between water molecules makes liquid water so special compared to other normal liquids with about 66 anomalies, e.g. density maximum at 4 °C and large heat capacity. The anomalies of water become extreme in the supercooled region (below freezing point), whilst they are also present at ambient conditions where most of waters' physical, chemical and biological processes of importance occur. Water at ambient conditions has traditionally been considered as a homogeneous distribution of near- tetrahedral H-bonded structures with thermal fluctuations increasing with temperature. This picture has been challenged by recent studies based on x-ray Raman (XRS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), suggesting two distinct local structures with tetrahedral as a minority and highly H-bond distorted asymmetrical as the majority. In particular, the proposed predominant asymmetrical structure has caused intense debate in the last years.

102

Modal parameter extraction from large operating structures using ambient excitation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique called the Natural Excitation Technique or has been developed to response extract response parameters from large operational structure when subjected to random and unmeasured forces such as wind, road noise, aerodynamics, or waves. Six applications of NExT to ambient excitation testing and NExT analysis are surveyed in this paper with a minimum of technical detail. In the first application, NExT was applied to a controlled-yaw Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). By controlling the yaw degree of freedom an important class of rotating coordinate system effects are reduced. A new shape extraction procedure was applied to this data set with good results. The second application was to a free-yaw HAWT. The complexity of the response has prompted further analytical studies and the development of a specialized visualization package. The third application of NExT was to a parked three-bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in which traditional modal testing could not excite all modes of interest. The shape extraction process used cross-correlation functions directly in a time-domain shape-fitting routine. The fourth application was to ground transportation systems. Ongoing work to improve driver and passenger comfort in tractor-trailer vehicles and to refine automobile body and tire models will use NExT. NExT has been used to process ambient vibration data for Finite Element Model correlation and is being used to study Structural Health Monitoring with ambient excitation. Shape fitting was performed using amplitude and phase information taken directly from the cross-spectra. The final application is to an offshore structure. This work is on-going, however initial studies have found a high-modal density, high noise content, and sparse data set.

James, G.H. III; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based on Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based On Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of the enclosure overspray examined by AFM also demonstrated the presence of agglomerates for the Au QDs. The AFM system was not able to resolve individual QDs as was the STEM. Chemical fingerprinting of the QDs with STEM/EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) was performed for the Cd-Se surface deposition, but not the aerosol. Both STEM and AFM background characterization by morphology and chemical fingerprinting were performed throughout the laboratory for a period of about one year. Outdoor sources were primarily biological, combustion fume, salt and other crustal particles. Indoor sources were primarily paper/clothing fibers, spray-on insulation fragments, fiber glass, and human skin cells.

Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on superactivated carbons (by following detailed doping and activation conditions given in our publications, e.g., Ref. 12), the storage capacities are increased two-fold (doubled) while slightly more than doubled by Ru doping. The bridging technique remains highly empirical and sample-to-sample consistency is difficult to achieve; however, significant enhancements by spillover can be achieved if the synthesis and pretreatment are done properly. Pitfalls in sample syntheses for both metal doped and bridged sorbents are pointed out in the report; deviations from the synthesis and pretreatment conditions will lead to diminished or no spillover effects. Due to the high bulk densities of zeolites, metal doped zeolites are shown to be most promising for achieving high volumetric storage capacities by spillover. Kinetics of both spillover and reverse spillover (i.e., desorption) at ambient temperature are also studied. This report summarizes the progress made in the project.

Yang , Ralph T.

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ambiente di test per sistemi integrati basati su enterprise service bus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Il SIASA Enterprise Manager Testing Tool stato realizzato col compito primario di creare un ambiente di test atto a verificare la robustezza ed il (more)

Bedini, Riccardo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A territorializao da produo de biodiesel no Brasil: energia e ordem ambiental internacional.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente trabalho tem por intento principal evidenciar relao entre a produo brasileira de biodiesel e seus motivadores gerados na ordem ambiental internacional. Esta ordem (more)

Douglas Rodrigues Torres

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Climatic Model for the Prediction of Percentile Statistics for Ambient Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability density function (pdf) for ambient temperature is predicted from daily maximum and daily minimum temperature and sunshine, data by means of a climatic model.

Aleck J. Hunter

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper addresses the real-time use of ambient wet bulb temperature measurements in the optimization of building air conditioning system control as a means to (more)

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

112

X-ray radiography measurements of diesel spray structure at engine-like ambient density.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray radiography has been used to examine the dependence of the near-nozzle fuel distribution of diesel sprays on injection pressure and ambient density. Measurements of sprays from two nozzles with different geometries, one extensively hydroground and the other largely non-hydroground, have been obtained to show how nozzles of different geometries respond to changes in ambient density and rail pressure. The spray penetration near the nozzle demonstrates little dependence on ambient density but a strong dependence on rail pressure. Comparison of these results with standard correlations in the literature show that, in the near-nozzle region examined in this study, the penetration is expected to show little dependence on ambient density. The spray width becomes much larger for both nozzles as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position by the square root of the density ratio between the fuel and the ambient gas accounts for the trends in spray width with ambient density for both nozzles. The radiography data can also be examined to determine the relative trends in the steady-state, mass-averaged axial velocity of the spray. The velocity decays more rapidly with axial distance as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position also accounts for the trend of velocity decay with ambient pressure.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y.-J.; Im, K.-S.; Wang, J.; Livermore Software Technology Corp.; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

X-ray radiography measurements of diesel spray structure at engine-like ambient density,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray radiography has been used to examine the dependence of the near-nozzle fuel distribution of diesel sprays on injection pressure and ambient density. Measurements of sprays from two nozzles with different geometries, one extensively hydroground and the other largely non-hydroground, have been obtained to show how nozzles of different geometries respond to changes in ambient density and rail pressure. The spray penetration near the nozzle demonstrates little dependence on ambient density but a strong dependence on rail pressure. Comparison of these results with standard correlations in the literature show that, in the near-nozzle region examined in this study, the penetration is expected to show little dependence on ambient density. The spray width becomes much larger for both nozzles as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position by the square root of the density ratio between the fuel and the ambient gas accounts for the trends in spray width with ambient density for both nozzles. The radiography data can also be examined to determine the relative trends in the steady-state, mass-averaged axial velocity of the spray. The velocity decays more rapidly with axial distance as the ambient density increases. Rescaling the axial position also accounts for the trend of velocity decay with ambient pressure.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y.-J.; Im, K.-S.; Wang, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

115

Virtual assistant: an artificial agent for enhancing content acquisition: how ambient media elicit information from humans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a novel framework "Virtual Assistant" for enhancing content potentially procured by ambient media. The Virtual Assistant is an artificial agent simulating a human assistant shown in TV programs and prompts users to provide feedback ... Keywords: ambient media, artificial agent, content acquisition

Motoyuki Ozeki; Shunichi Maeda; Kanako Obata; Yuichi Nakamura

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Task-ambient office lighting. Final report, October 1979-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

A method is discussed for converting uniform office lighting systems to task-ambient lighting systems. The method requires only the use of a light meter and a mirror. A correlation between the method and equivalent sphere illumination is shown. Several examples of offices converted from uniform lighting to task-ambient lighting are discussed.

Pierpoint, W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DomoML: an integrating devices framework for ambient intelligence solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within an ambient intelligence context, this paper presents an approach to Human Home Interaction through the adoption of the DomoML web service based framework. This framework consists of a suite of XML based languages aiming to describe and interconnect ... Keywords: DomoML, REST, ambient intelligence, devices as services, human home interaction, integration, ontology, web services

Lorenzo Sommaruga; Tiziana Formilli; Nicola Rizzo

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Knowledge representation and case-based reasoning in a knowledge management system for ambient intelligence products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the theoretical background and realization of a KM system for the technically advanced customer and product support in the Ambient Intelligence (AmI) domain. Current products include more and more elements of AmI. AmI area is still ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, case-based reasoning, customer support system, diagnostics system, knowledge management system, knowledge representation

Ljubisa Urosevic; Sandor Kopacsi; Dragan Stokic; Ana Rita Campos; Geza Bognar

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ambient Assisted Living and Care in The Netherlands: The Voice of the User  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technology can assist older adults to remain living in the community. Within the realm of information and communication technologies, smart homes are drifting toward the concept of ambient assisted living (AAL). AAL-systems are more responsive to user ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Assistive Technology, Needs, Older Adults, Smart Homes, User Perspectives

J. van Hoof; E. J. M. Wouters; H. R. Marston; B. Vanrumste; R. A. Overdiep

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

Weston, Ken

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A review on vision techniques applied to Human Behaviour Analysis for Ambient-Assisted Living  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human Behaviour Analysis (HBA) is more and more being of interest for computer vision and artificial intelligence researchers. Its main application areas, like Video Surveillance and Ambient-Assisted Living (AAL), have been in great demand in recent ... Keywords: Action recognition, Activities of daily living (ADLs), Activity recognition, Ambient-Assisted Living, Computer vision, Human behaviour, Motion analysis

Alexandros Andr Chaaraoui; Pau Climent-Prez; Francisco Flrez-Revuelta

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

123

honda.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HONDA EV PLUS HONDA EV PLUS NIMH BATTERIES SEPTEMBER 1997 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 81.7 97.7 105.3 Payload (lb.) Maximum 860 Minimum 140 UR1 UR2 UR 3 UR4 86.9 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 140 140 860 860 AC kWh Recharge 40 43 40 45 AC kWh/mi. 0.38 0.49 0.41 0.55 Range (mi.) 105.3 86.9 97.7 81.7 Avg. Ambient Temp. 79° F 83° F 84° F 89° F State of Charge Meter (Urban Range Test) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 State of Charge Miles Driven 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Miles Remaining Miles Driven Miles Remaining Start End * * Initial " Miles Remaining" depend on driving economy before recharge Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux. Loads 90.6 89.1 Maximum 860 Minimum

124

CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January - February 2000 January - February 2000 Date Prepared: 3/24/2000 1997 GM EV1 (PANASONIC PB-A BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb) 90.3 88.9 (mi.) Range Without Aux. loads With Aux. loads Maximum 447 Minimum 185 72.6 79.7 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 185 185 447 447 AC kWh Recharge 26.91 26.61 27.69 22.80 AC kWh/mi. 0.296 0.331 0.311 0.312 Range (mi.) 90.3 79.7 88.9 72.6 Avg. Ambient Temp. 65°F 72°F 70°F 71°F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1)

125

Sheet.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHRYSLER EPIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY CHRYSLER EPIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Weight (lb.) 160 930 Max. Payload Min. Payload 63.6 82.0 without aux. loads with aux. loads 77.6 67.8 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 160 160 930 930 AC kWh Recharge 53.91 50.03 53.02 52.61 AC kWh/mi. 0.663 0.734 06.75 0.823 Range (mi.) 82.0 67.8 77.6 63.6 Avg. Ambient Temp. 75º F 80º F 79º F 85º F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1) SOC Meter Reading vs Miles Driven 0 10

126

Pack.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 1999 February 1999 Revised: 05/05/99 CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 180 180 920 920 AC kWh Recharge 54.93 57.09 54.98 51.34 AC kWh/mi. 0.78 0.91 0.87 0.85 Range (mi.) 70.4 63.0 63.0 60.4 Avg. Ambient Temp. 63°F 66°F 63°F 50°F UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On State of Charge Meter (UR1) Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Test FW1 FW2 FW3 FW4 Payload (lb.) 180 180 920 920 AC kWh Recharge

127

ford.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FORD RANGER EV FORD RANGER EV LEAD ACID BATTERIES MARCH 1998 Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Aux . Lo a ds Pay load ( lb.) Maximum 640 Minimum 140 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 58.3 58.7 60.1 72.1 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 140 140 640 640 AC kWh Recharge 29.11 28.16 28.20 28.23 AC kWh/mi. 0.40 0.47 0.48 0.48 Range (mi.) 72.1 60.1 58.7 58.3 Avg. Ambient Temp. 79° F 61° F 69° F 64° F State of Charge Meter (Urban Range Test) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 State of Charge (4=F, 0=E) Miles Driven Miles Driven Miles Remaining * * Initial "Miles Remaining" depend on driving economy before recharge Freeway Range (On Freeway Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Range (mi.) Without Aux. Loads With Au x . L o a ds 51.6 57.2 60 66.4

128

Toyota_RAV4.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1999 Inductive version tested. 1999 Inductive version tested. Test Date: June 1999 / Revised: 10/07/99 1999 TOYOTA RAV4-EV* (NIMH BATTERIES) PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION SUMMARY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Urban Range (On Urban Pomona Loop - see other side for map) Payload (lb) 92.8 89.5 84.8 Range Without Aux. loads With Aux. loads Maximum 760 Minimum 160 UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 68.9 Test UR1 UR2 UR3 UR4 Payload (lb.) 160 160 766 766 AC kWh Recharge 31.80 33.96 32.72 32.22 AC kWh/mi. 0.329 0.394 0.360 0.434 Range (mi.) 92.8 84.8 89.5 68.9 Avg. Ambient Temp. 68.5°F 75.3°F 80.0°F 87.0°F Note: A/C fluctuating and may have impacted A/C tests. UR1 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR2 Urban Range Test, Min Payload, A/C on High, Headlights on Low, Radio On UR3 Urban Range Test, Max Payload, No Auxiliary Loads UR4

129

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

130

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

131

Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization  

SciTech Connect

Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68 latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent regulations on NO, emissions are promoting the use of lean premix (LPM) combustion for industrial gas turbines. LPM combustors avoid locally stoichiometric combustion by premixing fuel and the air upstream of the reaction region, thereby eliminating the high temperatures that produce thermal NO.. Unfortunately, this style of combustor is prone to combustion oscillation. Significant pressure fluctuations can occur when variations in heat release periodically couple pressure to acoustic modes in the combustion chamber. These oscillations must be controlled because resulting vibration can shorten the life of engine hardware. Laboratory and engine field testing have shown that instability regimes can vary with environmental conditions. These observations prompted this study of the effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability. Tests are conducted on a sub-scale combustor burning natural gas, propane, and some hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixtures. A premix, swirl-stabilized fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines is used. Experimental and numerical results describe how stability regions may shift as inlet air temperature, humidity, and fuel composition are altered. Results appear to indicate that shifting instability instability regimes are primarily caused by changes in reaction rate.

Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States); Robey, E.H. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

Post, R.F.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

134

A 50 year comparison of ambient ocean noise near San Clemente Island: A bathymetrically complex coastal region off Southern California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?1993?. Wind dependence of deep ocean ambient noise at lowS. M. ?2006?. Increases in deep ocean ambient noise in theResearch Council ?2003?. Ocean Noise and Marine Mammals ?Na-

McDonald, Mark A; Hildebrand, John A; Wiggins, Sean M; Ross, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Ultra low head ambient pressure hydroturbine. Technical report, fiscal year one, fourth quarter ending June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses the testing and design of a model for a ultra head ambient pressure hydroturbine.

NONE

1998-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

Single- and few-layer graphene by ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on nickel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process is used to fabricate graphene based films consisting of one to several graphene layers across their area. Polycrystalline Ni thin films are used and the graphene ...

Reina Ceeco, Alfonso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Yungang Wang 1 , Jiaoyan Huang 2,a , Philip K. Hopke 3,* , Oliver V. Rattigan 4 , David C....

138

Modeling Ambient Carbon Monoxide Trends to Evaluate Mobile Source Emissions Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression models have been used with poor success to detect the effect of emission control programs in ambient concentration measurements of carbon monoxide. An advanced CO regression model is developed whose form is based on an understanding of ...

Robin L. Dennis; Mary W. Downton

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Effect of Ambient Stratification and Moisture on the Motion of Atmospheric Undular Bores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical model is used to examine the effects of ambient stratification on the behavior of an atmospheric undular bore. It is shown that stratification reduces the amplitude of the disturbance at low levels by allowing energy to propagate ...

N. Andrew Crook

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Influence of Bubbles on Ambient Noise in the Ocean at High Wind Speeds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of ambient noise in the ocean at high wind speeds reveal significant departures in spectral shape from previously reported values at lower wind speeds. The observations were made in open ocean conditions in Queen Charlotte Sound, ...

David M. Farmer; David D. Lemon

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An open distributed framework for adaptive user interaction in ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Challenges of handling user interaction in Ambient Intelligence environments are manifold. The systems installed in these environments are highly distributed with dynamic configurations in terms of integrated devices and installed applications. Context-awareness, ...

Mohammad-Reza Tazari

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

A Triple-Path Denuder Instrument for Ambient Particulate Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field instrument for sampling sulfate and nitrate particulate matter in a controlled chemical environment has been constructed and field tested. The instrument contains HNO3 and NH3 denuders and an ambient air path, all connected by manifold to ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Bryan J. Johnson; Robert J. Hammer

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effetti del compost sulla biodiversita in impianti di wildflowers in ambiente urbano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Con lavvento dellindustrializzazione, a partire da met ottocento, molte persone legate allambiente rurale, abbandono le campagne per dirigersi verso i centri citt. Nascevano le prime (more)

FAVERO, STEFANO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Determination of mobile source emission fraction using ambient field measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted a series of experiments in 1995 to quantify emission rates of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and speciated nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from in-use vehicles in several highway tunnels. This report describes a parallel effort in which ambient hydrocarbon samples were collected by DRI at several sites in the Boston and Los Angeles areas to determine the mobile source emissions contributed to total ambient NMHC using receptor modeling.

Fujita, E.M.; Lu, Z.; Sheetz, L.; Harshfield, G.; Zielinska, B.

1997-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Using Building Simulation and Optimization to Calculate Lookup Tables for Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ambient temperature (C) solar at weather station (W/m2) dayTRNSYS weather reader was used to calculate the solar gainsWeather disturbances used in the annual simulation ambient temp (C) solar

Coffey, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Using Building Simulation and Optimization to Calculate Lookup Tables for Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ambient temperature (C) solar at weather station (W/m2) dayTRNSYS weather reader was used to calculate the solar gainsWeather disturbances used in the annual simulation ambient temp (C) solar

Coffey, Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Time-resolved shadowgraphic study of femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures  

SciTech Connect

Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures between 1 atm and 4 x 10{sup -4} Pa is investigated using a femtosecond time-resolved shadowgraphic method. It is observed that as the ambient air pressure decreases, the contact front becomes more and more distinct for a certain pressure range, demonstrating that the confinement effect of the ambient air to the ablated target material can play a critically important role in the laser ablation process. It is also found that the concentric and semicircular stripe pattern, which results from the diffraction of the probe beam by the expanding plume of a specific material state and is typically observed in the shadowgraphs for 1-2 ns delay time, gradually blurs and disappears while the ambient air pressure decreases from 1 atm to 7000 Pa. If a prepulse or a relatively large pulse pedestal exists before the main pulse, however, the stripe pattern can still be observed even though the ambient air pressure is 5 x 10{sup -4} Pa. It is thus inferred that what contributes to the formation of the unique stripe pattern is a mixture of the ejected target material and ionized background gas induced by the femtosecond laser ablation.

Wu Zehua; Zhu Xiaonong; Zhang Nan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

4-Week Avg U.S. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

08/16 : 7,007 : 08/23 : 7,292 : 08/30 : 7,385 : 1991-Sep: 09/06 : 7,516 : 09/13 : 7,124 : 09/20 : 7,343 : 09/27 : 7,354 : 1991-Oct: 10/04 : 6,929 : ...

149

4-Week Avg U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1991-Mar : 03/08 : 6,779 : 03/15 : 6,907

150

4-Week Avg U.S. Net Imports of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9,977 : 2010-Aug: 08/06 : 10,017 : 08/13 : 9,913 : 08/20 : 9,596 : 08/27 : 9,608 : 2010-Sep: 09/03 : 9,470 : 09/10 : 9,336 : 09/17 : 9,196 : 09/24 : 9,027 : 2010-Oct:

151

4-Week Avg U.S. Imports of Total Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

413 : 1995-Jun: 06/02 : 425 : 06/09 : 399 : 06/16 : 367 : 06/23 : 409 : 06/30 : 409 : 1995-Jul: 07/07 : 408 : 07/14 : 366 : 07/21 : 343 : 07/28 : 384 : 1995-Aug: 08/04 :

152

4-Week Avg U.S. Commercial Crude Oil Imports Excluding SPR ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4,982 : 06/24 : 4,810 : 1988-Jul: 07/01 : 4,939 : 07/08 : 4,880 : 07/15 : 4,911 : 07/22 : 5,172 : 07/29 : 5,060 : 1988-Aug: 08/05 : 5,154 : 08/12 : 5,126 : 08/19 : 4,941

153

4-Week Avg Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Commercial Crude Oil Imports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4,982 : 08/16 : 5,162 : 08/23 : 5,259 : 08/30 : 5,195 : 1996-Sep: 09/06 : 5,111 : 09/13 : 4,922 : 09/20 : 4,838 : 09/27 : 4,655 : 1996-Oct: 10/04 : 4,793 : 10/11 : 4,768

154

Optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for Primary lithium/air batteries operated in Ambient Enviroment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection and optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for ambient operations of lithium/air batteries has been studied. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between lithium anode and water during discharge process. It is critical to make the electrolytes with high polarity so that it can reduce wetting and flooding of carbon based air electrode and lead to improved battery performance. For ambient operations, the viscosity, ionic conductivity, and oxygen solubility of the electrolyte are less important than the polarity of organic solvents once the electrolyte has reasonable viscosity, conductivity, and oxygen solubility. It has been found that PC/EC mixture is the best solvent system and LiTFSI is the most feasible salt for ambient operations of Li/air batteries. Battery performance is not very sensitive to PC/EC ratio or salt concentration.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Anlise poltica, econmica e ambiental da nova poltica energtica europia: um enfoque sobre a indstria brasileira de bioetanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O estudo proposto tem como objetivo conduzir uma anlise poltica, ambiental e econmica da nova poltica energtica europia em relao indstria brasileira do bioetanol. (more)

Luana Ladu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various urban sulfate aerosol production mechanisms.radius of an evaporating aerosol droplet in which oxidationEnvironment THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR:

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Characterization of Ambient Ozone Levels in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient ozone data collected at two sites in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) are summarized and compared with data from an urban and a low-elevation rural site. The ozone climatology in the park is found to be similar to that of ...

Stephen F. Mueller

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reactive transport model for the ambient unsaturated hydrogeochemical system at Yucca mountain, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist a technical review of a potential application for a geologic repository, a reactive transport model is presented for the ambient hydrogeochemical system at Yucca Mountain (YM). The model simulates two-phase, nonisothermal, advective and diffusive ... Keywords: Yucca mountain, geochemistry, groundwater chemistry, groundwater flow and transport, hydrology, reactive transport model, unsaturated zone

Lauren Browning; William M. Murphy; Chandrika Manepally; Randall Fedors

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

On gravity currents in stratified ambients V. K. Birman and E. Meiburga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On gravity currents in stratified ambients V. K. Birman and E. Meiburga Department of Mechanical August 2007 Detailed numerical simulations were conducted of gravity currents released from a lock of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2756553 I. INTRODUCTION Gravity currents represent a ubiquitous phenomenon

Meiburg, Eckart H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ronmental impact. Present technology uses steam reforming to produce synthesis gas which is converted into enhance- ment of the carbon balance of methane conversion by reforming with CO2 in order to "recycleOxygen Pathways and Carbon Dioxide Utilization in Methane Partial Oxidation in Ambient Temperature

Mallinson, Richard

162

Employing description logics in Ambient Intelligence for modeling and reasoning about complex situations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient Intelligence systems need to represent information about their environment and recognize relevant situations to perform appropriate actions proactively and autonomously. The context information gathered by these systems comes with imperfections ... Keywords: OWL DL, Situation-awareness, description logics, modeling context information, reasoning services

Thomas Springer; Anni-Yasmin Turhan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ambient dependence of the phase of nanowires grown by annealing brass  

SciTech Connect

The growth of oxide nanowires has been studied by the annealing of brass (Cu 65%, Zn 35%) at different annealing temperatures and in different ambient. The annealing temperature was varied from 400 deg. C to 650 deg. C. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results showed that the temperature has a significant effect on the density and size of the nanowires. The annealing temperature of 600 deg. C was found to be optimum for the growth of nanowires. The growth at 600 deg. C was observed in two ambient-air and moist nitrogen. Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) results on Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) showed that with changing the ambient from air to moist nitrogen, the phase of the nanowires changed from Zn doped CuO to Cu doped ZnO. This result can be of significance importance as it suggests the use of ambient for the tuning of phase of oxide nanowires and in turn for the tuning of their physical properties.

Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Deb, S. K. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced technology, Indore-452013 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

164

On the role of experiencelab in professional domain ambient intelligence research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept development for professional domain AmI solutions involves different stakeholders than those for consumer products, and puts different requirements on experience test methods and facilities. Philips ExperienceLab facility for experience research ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, experience research, healing environments, user-centered research

Evert Van Loenen; Richard Van De Sluis; Boris De Ruyter; Emile Aarts

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Capacitive sensor-based hand gesture recognition in ambient intelligence scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Input devices based on arrays of capacitive proximity sensors allow the tracking of a user's hands in three dimensions. They can be hidden behind materials such as wood, wool or plastics without limiting their functionality, making them ideal for application ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, capacitive proximity sensors, gesture recognition, input devices, smart environments, user interfaces

Andreas Braun, Tim Dutz, Felix Kamieth

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Distributed web-based management framework for ambient reconfigurable services in the intelligent environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing and emerging technologies in the areas of mobile computing, wireless communications/ networking, sensor and control devices, context awareness, user interfaces, etc., provide the ground for the support of human activities in a certain space. ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, context awareness, intelligent environment, service management

V. Stavroulaki; K. Demestichas; E. Adamopoulou; P. Demestichas

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

aWESoME: A web service middleware for ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a Web Service Middleware infrastructure for Ambient Intelligence environments, named aWESoME. aWESoME is a vital part of the Smart IHU project, a large-scale Smart University deployment. The purpose of the proposed middleware within ... Keywords: Real-time and embedded systems, Ubiquitous computing, Web services, Wireless sensor networks

Thanos G. Stavropoulos; Konstantinos Gottis; Dimitris Vrakas; Ioannis Vlahavas

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An Evaluation of the WOTAN Technique of Inferring Oceanic Winds from Underwater Ambient Sound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of the WOTAN technique to estimate oceanic winds from underwater ambient sound is thoroughly evaluated. Anemometer winds and sound spectrum levels at 11 frequencies in the range 325 kHz from the FASINEX Experiment are used to ...

Svein Vagle; William G. Large; David M. Farmer

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Opportunistic routing in wireless sensor networks powered by ambient energy harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption is an important issue in the design of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) which typically rely on portable energy sources like batteries for power. Recent advances in ambient energy harvesting technologies have made it possible for sensor ... Keywords: Energy harvesting, Opportunistic routing, Wireless sensor networks

Zhi Ang Eu; Hwee-Pink Tan; Winston K. G. Seah

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Ris Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 Risø Energy Report 3 Hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperatures and pressures, but it can be stored as a gas, a liquid or a solid. In the case of solid storage, the hydrogen exists as a chemical. Compared to fossil fuels such as gasoline, hydrogen has a very obvious shortfall in the amount of energy

171

Ambient kitchen: designing situated services using a high fidelity prototyping environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Kitchen is a high fidelity prototype for exploring the design of pervasive computing algorithms and applications for everyday environments. The environment integrates data projectors, cameras, RFID tags and readers, object mounted accelerometers, ... Keywords: kitchen tasks, multi-modal prompting, people with dementia, pervasive computing, prompting, sensor networks assistance in daily activities, ubiquitous computing

Patrick Olivier; Guangyou Xu; Andrew Monk; Jesse Hoey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Anti-counterfeiting, key distribution, and key storage in an ambient world via physical unclonable functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtually all applications which provide or require a security service need a secret key. In an ambient world, where (potentially) sensitive information is continually being gathered about us, it is critical that those keys be both securely deployed ... Keywords: Fuzzy extractor, Helper data algorithm, Intrinsic PUF, Key distribution, LC-PUFs, Physical unclonable functions, SRAMs, Sensor nodes

Jorge Guajardo; Boris kori?; Pim Tuyls; Sandeep S. Kumar; Thijs Bel; Antoon H. Blom; Geert-Jan Schrijen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Market Potential for Ambient Assisted Living Technology: The Case of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environment is an integration of stand-alone assistive technologies, with elements of smart homes, and telehealth services. Successful development of this emerging technology will promote the ability for older people ... Keywords: aging-in-place, gerontechnology, health monitoring, smart homes

Robert Savage; Yongjie Yon; Michael Campo; Ashleigh Wilson; Ravin Kahlon; Andrew Sixsmith

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ambient pressure process for preparing aerogel thin films reliquified sols useful in preparing aerogel thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing aerogel thin films by an ambient-pressure, continuous process. The method of this invention obviates the use of an autoclave and is amenable to the formation of thin films by operations such as dip coating. The method is less energy intensive and less dangerous than conventional supercritical aerogel processing techniques.

Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Prakash, Sai Sivasankaran (Minneapolis, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Handler Power - Climate Zone 16 48 hr avg 24 hr avg FarAverage Gas Power - Climate Zone 16 48 hr avg 24 hr avg NearAverage Gas Power - Climate Zone 16 48 hr avg Near Registers

Walker, Iain S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Title Effect of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6097E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wang, Yungang, Jiaoyan Huang, Philip K. Hopke, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, Mark J. Utell, and Thomas M. Holsen Journal Chemosphere Volume 92 Issue 4 Pagination 360-367 Date Published 07/2013 Abstract In the spring of 2008, a 260MWe coal-fired power plant (CFPP) located in Rochester, New York was closed over a 4 month period. Using a 2-years data record, the impacts of the shutdown of the CFPP on nearby ambient concentrations of three Hg species were quantified. The arithmetic average ambient concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate mercury (PBM) during December 2007-November 2009 were 1.6ng/m3, 5.1pg/m3, and 8.9pg/m3, respectively. The median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM significantly decreased by 12%, 73%, and 50% after the CFPP closed (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v4.1) identified six factors including O3-rich, traffic, gas phase oxidation, wood combustion, nucleation, and CFPP. When the CFPP was closed, median concentrations of GEM, GOM, and PBM apportioned to the CFPP factor significantly decreased by 25%, 74%, and 67%, respectively, compared to those measured when the CFPP was still in operation (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis showed the greatest reduction in all three Hg species was associated with northwesterly winds pointing toward the CFPP. These changes were clearly attributable to the closure of the CFPP.

177

Exploring early evaluation techniques of ambient health promoting devices in home environments of senior citizens living independently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, our goal is to explore different early evaluation techniques and their effectiveness for designing better ambient health- promoting devices for the elderly. One cannot assess the complete impact of these devices without full implementation ... Keywords: Wizard of Oz, ambient technology, early evaluation methods, health monitoring devices, senior citizens, storyboarding, technology probe

Rajasee Rege; Heekyoung Jung; William Hazelwood; Greg Orlov; Kay Connelly; Kalpana Shankar

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Argonne CNM News: Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Ambient-Stable Tetragonal Phase in Silver Nanowires Silver nanowires SEM image of randomly assembled silver nanowires and low-resolution TEM image (inset) of a cross-sectional sample of an individual nanowire. Scale bar represents 500 nm SIlver nanowire with fivefold symmetry Schematic drawing of a silver nanowire with fivefold symmetry. Cross-section of individual silver nanowire High-resolution TEM image of a cross-sectional sample of an individual silver nanowire. Scale bar represents 5 nm. A stable non-face-centered-cubic phase in noble metal nanoparticles has been reported for this first time by researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (Nanophotonics & NanoBio Interfaces Groups) working with colleagues at the Advanced Photon Source and Electron Microscopy

179

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Morton Lippmann Date: May 17, 1997 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Most scientific studies that are relevant to the setting of the NAAQS were not designed or performed with that specific application in mind, resulting in bits and pieces of the overall puzzle. Despite these limitations, the particulate matter (PM) and O3 literature reviews and analyses in the recently issued EPA Criteria documents and staff papers are the best prepared and most comprehensive ever available to an EPA Administrator as a basis for NAAQS decisions. This seminar will discuss the scientific basis

180

In Situ Experiment and Modelling of RC-Structure Using Ambient Vibration and Timoshenko Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, several experiments were reported using ambient vibration surveys in buildings to estimate the modal parameters of buildings. Their modal properties are full of relevant information concerning its dynamic behaviour in its elastic domain. The main scope of this paper is to determine relevant, though simple, beam modelling whose validity could be easily checked with experimental data. In this study, we recorded ambient vibrations in 3 buildings in Grenoble selected because of their vertical structural homogeneity. First, a set of recordings was done using a 18 channels digital acquisition system (CityShark) connected to six 3C Lennartz 5s sensors. We used the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique to extract the modal parameters of these buildings. Second, it is shown in the following that the experimental quasi-elastic behaviour of such structure can be reduced to the behaviour of a vertical continuous Timoshenko beam. A parametric study of this beam shows that a bijective relation exists bet...

Michel, Clotaire; Guguen, Philippe; Boutin, Claude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Title Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Rosseler, Olivier, Mohamad Sleiman, Nahuel V. Montesinos, Andrey Shavorskiy, Valerie Keller, Nicolas Keller, Marta I. Litter, Hendrik Bluhm, Miquel Salmeron, and Hugo Destaillats Journal J. Phys. Chem. Lett. Volume 4 Start Page 536 Issue 3 Pagination 536-541 Date Published 01/2013 Abstract Self-cleaning surfaces containing TiO2 nanoparticles have been postulated to efficiently remove NOx from the atmosphere. However, UV irradiation of NOx adsorbed on TiO2 also was shown to form harmful gas-phase byproducts such as HONO and N2O that may limit their depolluting potential. Ambient pressure XPS was used to study surface and gas-phase species formed during adsorption of NO2 on TiO2 and subsequent UV irradiation at λ = 365 nm. It is shown here that NO3-, adsorbed on TiO2 as a byproduct of NO2 disproportionation, was quantitatively converted to surface NO2 and other reduced nitrogenated species under UV irradiation in the absence of moisture. When water vapor was present, a faster NO3- conversion occurred, leading to a net loss of surface-bound nitrogenated species. Strongly adsorbed NO3- in the vicinity of coadsorbed K+ cations was stable under UV light, leading to an efficient capture of nitrogenated compounds.

183

Adsorption near ambient temperatures of methane, carbon tetrafluoride, and sulfur hexafluoride on commercial activated carbons  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption isotherms for CH{sub 4}, CF{sub 4}, and SF{sub 6} are measured at three or four temperatures near ambient on three commercial activated carbons. The data are reduced using a virial-type equation of adsorption. Using this equation, isosteric heats of adsorption are calculated. It is shown that this fundamental thermodynamic quantity provides a basis for differentiating between the carbons` micropore structures.

Jagiello, J.; Bandosz, T.J.; Putyera, K.; Schwarz, J.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded probes for sampling at higher speeds and omni-directional inlets for low speed ambient sampling. The two systems operate at 780 L/min and 90 L/min. Another system was designed and tested for medium speed ambient sampling. This unit will be used as a reference sampler for speed ranges from zero to 20.12 m/s. This system consists of a Sierra-Andersen SA-246 inlet for sampling at speeds up-to 6.71 m/s (15 mph) and a shrouded probe operating at variable flow rate for sampling in speed range of 6.71 m/s and 20.12 m/s. An aircraft-borne shrouded probe was also tested at wind speeds as high as 50 m/s in an upgraded high speed wind tunnel.

Irshad, Hammad

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Projected compliance with the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the State of Maryland had no available ambient Federal Reference Method data on particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) but did have annual ambient data for particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM10) at twenty-four sites. The PM10 data was analyzed in conjunction with local annual and seasonal ZIP code-level emission inventories and with speciated PM2.5 data from four nearby monitors in the IMPROVE network (located in the national parks and wilderness areas) in an effort to predict annual average and seasonal high PM2.5 concentrations at the twenty-four PM10 monitor sites operated from 1992 to 1996. All seasonal high concentrations were predicted to be below the 24-hour PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at the sites operated in Maryland between 1992 and 1996. A geographic analysis of the emission inventories was also performed to evaluate the impact of PM2.5 emissions from Maryland`s power plants on fourteen monitor locations that were predicted to have a reading exceeding the annual NAAQS for any year.

Walsh, K.; Gardner, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

C:\TEMP\Jan2001Minutes.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting January 10-11, 2001, Crystal City Marriott, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Robert Long Thomas Cochran Sekazi Mtingwa Joseph Comfort Lura Powell Jose Luis Cortez Richard Reba Maureen S. Crandall Joy Rempe Allen Croff Allen Sessoms James Duderstadt (Chair) John Taylor Marvin Fertel Ashok Thadani (ad hoc) Steve Fetter Charles E. Till Beverly Hartline Neil Todreas Andrew Klein Joan Woodard Dale Klein NERAC members absent: Michael L. Corradini Warren F. Miller, Jr. Leslie Hartz Benjamin F. Montoya J. Bennett Johnston Daniel C. Sullivan Linda C. Knight C. Bruce Tarter Also present: Thomas Blejwas, Director, Nuclear and Risk Technologies Center, Sandia National Laboratories Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff

187

BREAKOUT GROUP 3: HIGH TEMP (SOFC) SYSTEM AND BOP PARTICIPANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Objective: Develop an improved SOFC for APUs ­ SOFC advantages · High power density and efficiency · Fuel versatility/simplified fuel processing · Well-suited to duty cycle of APU ­ SOFC issues · Startup time;Metallic Bipolar-Plate-Supported SOFC Design (TuffCell) Fuel flow field (metal) Air flow field (metal

188

Temp-Controlled 'Nanopores' May Allow Detailed Blood ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... that flows through the pore, which allows us to measure ... so many similar molecules in the mix, it is ... absorb light and quickly convert its energy to heat ...

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

C:\\DOCUME~1\\DeCastro\\LOCALS~1\\Temp\  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and doors and fiberboard to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and furniture and gallantry were the main products are Bosnia and Herzegovina, Hungary and Italy. Imports from these three countries represent 52.9% of the total imports, with the greatest import quantity coming from Bosnia and Herzegovina. The value

190

Magnetic Ties May Explain High-Temp Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... storing and distributing electric energy, superconducting digital routers for high-speed communications, and more efficient generators and motors. ...

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

191

Microsoft Word - Final Temp Route _9_23_08_  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE sites use Interstate 20 through Texas, then travel north on U.S. 285 to the nation's nuclear waste disposal site. A section of U.S. 285 in Texas is undergoing repair,...

192

C:\\WINDOWS\\Temp\\agreementtomediate.PDF | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C:WINDOWSTempagreementtomediate.PDF&0; C:WINDOWSTempagreementtomediate.PDF&0; C:WINDOWSTempagreementtomediate.PDF&0; More Documents & Publications C:DOCUME1mc48427...

193

Microsoft Word - 20110811 Hamilton Sundstrand Hi Temp Cap-Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The "dc-link" capacitor is a fundamental building block of a voltage source inverter (VSI). Similarly, AC capacitors are required to be within close proximity of the...

194

MEMS Fuel Cells Low Temp High Power Density  

The miniature fuel-cell technology uses thin-film fuel ... Reduced life cycle cost in comparison to ... for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security ...

195

D:\TEMP\~ME0000F.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minutes for the Minutes for the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Meeting July 29-30, 1999, Embassy Suites Hotel, Arlington, Virginia NERAC members present: John Ahearne Warren Miller Thomas Cochran (Friday only) Sekazi Mtingwa Joseph Comfort Richard Reba Jose Luis Cortez Joy Rempe Maureen S. Crandall Miguel Rios (Friday only) Allen Croff Allen Sessoms James Duderstadt (Chair) Robert Socolow Marvin Fertel Daniel C. Sullivan Dale Klein Ashok Thadoni (Ad hoc) Linda Knight Charles E. Till Robert Long Neil Todreas NERAC members absent: Thomas Boulette C. Paul Robinson Beverly Hartline John Taylor J. Bennett Johnston Bruce Tarter William Kastenberg Also present: Kiyoto Aizawa, Executive Director, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki, Japan Nancy Carder, NERAC Staff

196

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Noise in the Arctic Ocean, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol.for sound speed in the oceans, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol. 70,Pritchard, R. S. , Arctic Ocean Background Noise Caused by

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Program on Technology Innovation: An Alternate Framework for the Risk Assessment of Ambient Particulate Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on the protection of human health. PM2.5 is currently regulated on a mass concentration basis (particle mass per volume of air), with the standard providing limits on both 24-hour and annual average concentrations. A fundamental tenet of this mass-based approach to regulation is its implicit assumption that all particle components are equally harmful to health. In light of the complexity of t...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy harvesting for remote sensing and transmitting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing electrical energy to an electrical device wherein the electrical energy is originally generated from temperature differences in an environment having a first and a second temperature region. A thermoelectric device having a first side and a second side wherein the first side is in communication with a means for transmitting ambient thermal energy collected or rejected in the first temperature region and the second side is in communication with the second temperature region thereby producing a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric device and in turn generating an electrical current.

DeSteese, John G

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Isolation of ambient aerosols of known critical supersaturation: the differential critical supersaturation separator (DSCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field-deployable instrument has been developed that isolates from an ambient aerosol population only those particles that have critical supersaturations, Sc, within a narrow, user-specified, range. This Differential Critical Supersaturation Separator (DScS) is designed to supply one or more particle size and/or composition analyzers to permit the direct examination of the factors that influence the activation properties of ambient aerosols. The DScS consists of two coupled parallel plate continuous flow thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers housed within a single enclosure. Descriptions of instrument operation, construction and calibration data collected, when pure ammonium sulfate aerosols were injected into the DScS for operation at 0.15%aerosol size distributions and size-resolved hygroscopicity of DScS separated aerosol. The dry diameter (Dp*) of particles sampled in the TDMA system as well as the known Sc prescribed in the DScS were combined in a modified version of K?¶hler Theory to make predictions of particle hygroscopicity. These predictions frequently overestimated the measurements. Further analysis of DScS separated aerosols compares the known particle Sc to a predicted particle Sc, providing insight into particle activation efficiency. Overall, the sampled aerosol exhibited properties that indicate they were more efficient at activation than K?¶hler Theory would predict.

Osborn, Robert John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

Zaromb, S.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

203

Effect of metal Additions on the Hydrogen Uptake of Microporous Carbon at Near-Ambient Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhancing the hydrogen sorption capacity of microporous carbon materials at near-ambient temperature continue to be a challenge and the subject of intense research. Physisorption alone on microporous carbons is not strong enough to provide the desired levels of hydrogen uptake. Modifying carbons with small amounts of metals has been proven effective to increase the amounts adsorbed. However, very different mechanisms may be involved when the promoters are transition metals or alkali metals. In this presentation we compare the effect of additions of palladium and/or alkali metals on the hydrogen uptake of microporous carbons, in an attempt to differentiate between the possible mechanisms leading to enhanced hydrogen capacity and fast kinetics.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Study of the Effects of Ambient Conditions Upon the Performance of Fan Powered, Infrared Natural Gas Burners  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to characterize the operation of a fan-powered, infrared burner (IR burner) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions, develop numerical model to simulate the burner performances, and provide design guidelines for appliances containing PIR burners for satisfactory performance.

Clark Atlanta University

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effect of solvent on the preparation of ambient pressure-dried SiO2 aerogel films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SiO2 aerogel film has a promising property as intermetal dielectrics (IMD) for its low dielectric constant. However, a stable and porous SiO2 aerogel film was not properly synthesized due to the rapid evaporation of solvent during ... Keywords: SiO2 aerogel film, ambient pressure drying, solvent, spin coating

Sang-Bae Jung; Jung-Ho Kim; Hong-Ryul Kim; Hyung-Ho Park

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effects of Hydrogen Content in Sputtering Ambient on ZnO:A1 Electrical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnO-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) thin films have received increased attention recently because of their potential to reduce production costs compared to those of the prevalent TCO indium tin oxide (ITO). Undoped ZnO and ZnO:Al (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, and 2 wt% Al2O3) polycrystalline films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. Controlled incorporation of H2 and O2 in the Ar sputtering ambient was investigated. Though optimal substrate temperature was found to be 200 C for films grown in 100% Ar, the addition of H2 permits improved electrical performance for room-temperature depositions. Temperature-dependent Hall data suggest that ionized impurity and acoustic phonon scattering dominate at high and intermediate carrier concentration levels, respectively, with evidence of temperature-activated transport at the lowest levels. Lightly doped ZnO:Al demonstrates reduced infrared absorption compared to the standard 2 wt%-doped ZnO:Al, which may be beneficial to device performance.

Duenow, J. N.; Gessert, T. A.; Wood, D. M.; Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Electromechanical Wave Green's Function Estimation from Ambient Electrical Grid Frequency Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many electrical grid transients can be described by the propagation of electromechanical (EM) waves that couple oscillations of power flows over transmission lines and the inertia of synchronous generators. These EM waves can take several forms: large-scale standing waves forming inter-area modes, localized oscillations of single or multi-machine modes, or traveling waves that spread quasi-circularly from major grid disturbances. The propagation speed and damping of these EM waves are potentially a powerful tool for assessing grid stability, e.g. small signal or rotor angle stability, however, EM wave properties have been mostly extracted from post-event analysis of major grid disturbances. Using a small set of data from the FNET sensor network, we show how the spatially resolved Green's function for EM wave propagation can be extracted from ambient frequency noise without the need for a major disturbance. If applied to an entire interconnection, an EM-wave Green's function map will enable a model-independent...

Backhaus, Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9 S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Formic Acid Dehydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts at Near-Ambient Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Formic acid (HCOOH) is a convenient hydrogen carrier in fuel cells designed for portable use. Recent studies have shown that HCOOH decomposition is catalyzed with Ru-based complexes in the aqueous phase at near-ambient temperatures. HCOOH decomposition reactions are used frequently to probe the effects of alloying and cluster size and of geometric and electronic factors in catalysis. These studies have concluded that Pt is the most active metal for HCOOH decomposition, at least as large crystallites and extended surfaces. The identity and oxidation state of surface metal atoms influence the relative rates of dehydrogenation (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) and dehydration (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2}O + CO) routes, a selectivity requirement for the synthesis of CO-free H{sub 2} streams for low-temperature fuel cells. Group Ib and Group VIII noble metals catalyze dehydrogenation selectively, while base metals and metal oxides catalyze both routes, either directly or indirectly via subsequent water-gas shift (WGS) reactions.

Ojeda, Manuel; Iglesia, Enrique

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology  

SciTech Connect

Progress in science often follows or parallels the development of new techniques. The optical microscope helped convert medicine and biology from a speculative activity in old times to today's sophisticated scientific disciplines. The telescope changed the study and interpretation of heavens from mythology to science. X-ray diffraction enabled the flourishing of solid state physics and materials science. The technique object of this review, Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy or APPES for short, has also the potential of producing dramatic changes in the study of liquid and solid surfaces, particularly in areas such as atmospheric, environment and catalysis sciences. APPES adds an important missing element to the host of techniques that give fundamental information, i.e., spectroscopy and microscopy, about surfaces in the presence of gases and vapors, as encountered in industrial catalysis and atmospheric environments. APPES brings electron spectroscopy into the realm of techniques that can be used in practical environments. Decades of surface science in ultra high vacuum (UHV) has shown the power of electron spectroscopy in its various manifestations. Their unique property is the extremely short elastic mean free path of electrons as they travel through condensed matter, of the order of a few atomic distances in the energy range from a few eV to a few thousand eV. As a consequence of this the information obtained by analyzing electrons emitted or scattered from a surface refers to the top first few atomic layers, which is what surface science is all about. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and other such techniques have been used for decades and provided some of the most fundamental knowledge about surface crystallography, composition and electronic structure available today. Unfortunately the high interaction cross section of electrons with matter also prevents them from traveling long distances unscattered in gas environments. Above the millibar pressure range this distance is reduced to less that a millimeter, effectively preventing its use in the most relevant environments, usually between millibars and atmospheric pressures. There is therefore a large gap of several orders of magnitude where information about surfaces is scarce because these powerful electron spectroscopies cannot operate. One characteristic of surfaces in ambient pressure environments is that they are covered by dense layers of molecules, even when their binding energy is weak. Water for example is known to form layers several molecules thick at room temperature in humid environments. Metals readily form oxide films several layers thick in oxygen atmospheres. Dense layers of adsorbed molecules can also be produced in ultra high vacuum, often by the simple and expedient method of cooling the sample to cryogenic temperatures. A large amount of data has been obtained in the past in UHV by surface scientists using this method. While this has provided valuable information it begs the question of whether the structures formed in this manner represent equilibrium structures or metastable ones, kinetically trapped due to high activation energies that cannot be overcome at low temperature. From a thermodynamic point of view is interesting to consider the entropic contribution to the Gibbs free energy, which we can call 'the pressure factor', equal to kT.logP. This factor amounts to a sizeable 0.3 eV difference at room temperature between UHV (<10{sup -8} Pascal) and atmospheric pressures. Such change if free energy can definitely result in changes in surface structure and stability. Entire areas of the phase diagram are out of reach due to the pressure gap. Even when cooling is not necessary, many surface treatments and most chemical reactions necessitate the presence of gases at pressures ranging from millibar to bars. What is the structure and chemical nature of the species formed on the surface in equilibrium with suc

Salmeron, Miquel; Salmeron, Miquel; Schlogl, Robert

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

STRUCTURE OF NON-FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES IN AN AMBIENT MEDIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of non-force-free equilibrium magnetic flux ropes in an ambient medium of specified pressure p{sub a} is studied. A flux rope is a self-organized magnetized plasma structure consisting of a localized channel of electric current and the magnetic field arising from this current. An analytic method is developed to obtain one-dimensional equilibrium solutions satisfying c {sup -1} J Multiplication-Sign B - {nabla}p = 0 subject to the requirements that (1) all physical quantities be nonsingular and continuous, (2) pressure p(r) be physically admissible-real and non-negative, and (3) the magnetic field profile have ''minimum complexity''. The solutions are shown to be characterized by two parameters, B{sup *}{sub t}{identical_to} B-bar{sub t}/(8{pi}p{sub a}){sup 1/2} and B*{sub p} {identical_to} B{sub pa} /(8{pi}p{sub a} ){sup 1/2}, where B-bar{sub t} is the toroidal (axial) field averaged over the cross-sectional radius a and B{sub pa} is the poloidal (azimuthal) field at the edge of the current channel (r = a). The physical constraint on pressure defines equilibrium boundaries in the B*{sub t}-B*{sub p} space beyond which no physical solutions exist. The method is illustrated with a number of families of solutions governed by distinct physical constraints. The force-free limit with p{sub a} {ne} 0 is investigated and is found to be characterized by plasma {beta} = {infinity}. The local Alfven speed V{sub A} and plasma {beta} are computed. The results are scale-invariant.

Chen, James, E-mail: James.Chen@nrl.navy.mil [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel Energy Storage Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on prior work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearings are being adapted for use in high-power flywheel energy storage systems developed at the Trinity Flywheel Power company. En route to this goal specialized test stands have been built and computer codes have been written to aid in the development of the component parts of these bearing systems. The Livermore passive magnetic bearing system involves three types of elements, as follows: (1) Axially symmetric levitation elements, energized by permanent magnets., (2) electrodynamic ''stabilizers'' employing axially symmetric arrays of permanent magnet bars (''Halbach arrays'') on the rotating system, interacting with specially wound electrically shorted stator circuits, and, (3) eddy-current-type vibration dampers, employing axially symmetric rotating pole assemblies interacting with stationary metallic discs. The theory of the Livermore passive magnetic bearing concept describes specific quantitative stability criteria. The satisfaction of these criteria will insure that, when rotating above a low critical speed, a bearing system made up of the three elements described above will be dynamically stable. That is, it will not only be stable for small displacements from equilibrium (''Earnshaw-stable''), but will also be stable against whirl-type instabilities of the types that can arise from displacement-dependent drag forces, or from mechanical-hysteritic losses that may occur in the rotor. Our design problem thus becomes one of calculating and/or measuring the relevant stiffnesses and drag coefficients of the various elements and comparing our results with the theory so as to assure that the cited stability criteria are satisfied.

Bender, D.; Post, R.

2000-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sumario Laboratorios Nacionales de Sandia/Nuevo Mexico Final Declaracion de Impacto Ambiental de Alcance Amplio (10/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documento Final de la Declaración de Impacto Ambiental de Alcance Amplio de los Laboratorios Nacionales de Sandía/Nuevo México (SWEIS SNL/NM FINAL) (DOE/EIS-2-0281). CONTACTO: Para más información sobre el documento final de la Declaración de Impacto Ambiental de Alcance Amplio (SWEIS), contacte a: Julianne Levings, NEPA Document Manager U.S. DOE, Albuquerque Operations Office P.O. Box 5400, Albuquerque, NM 87185 Teléfono: 1-888-635-7305, Fax: 505-845-6392 Para más información vía correo electrónico, contacte www.nepanet.com Para recibir información general sobre la Ley de Política Nacional del Medio Ambiente (NEPA), contacte a Carol Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42) U.S. DOE, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20585

217

Nanosecond Time Resolved and Steady State Infrared Studies of Photoinduced Decomposition of TATB at Ambient and Elevated Pressures  

SciTech Connect

The timescale and/or products of photo-induced decomposition of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) were investigated at ambient pressure and compared with products formed at elevated pressure (i.e. 8 GPa). Ultrafast time-resolved infrared and steady state Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopies were used to probe TATB and its products after photoexcitation with a 5 ns pulse of 532 nm light. At ambient pressure, transient spectra of TATB indicate that the molecule has significantly decomposed within 60 ns; transient spectra also indicate that formation of CO{sub 2}, an observed decomposition product, is complete within 30-40 s. Proof of principle time resolved experiments at elevated pressures were performed and are discussed briefly. Comparison of steady-state FTIR spectra obtained at ambient and elevated pressure (ca. 8 GPa) indicate that the decomposition products vary with pressure. We find evidence for water as a decomposition product only at elevated pressure.

Glascoe, E A; Zaug, J M; Armstrong, M R; Crowhurst, J C; Grant, C D; Fried, L E

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

Characterization Testing of H20-SO2 Electrolyzer at Ambient Pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports work performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that resulted in a major accomplishment by demonstrating the proof-of-concept of the use of a proton exchange membrane or PEM-type electrochemical cell to produce hydrogen via SO{sub 2}-depolarized water electrolysis. For the first time sulfur dioxide dissolved in liquid sulfuric acid was used to depolarize water electrolysis in a modern PEM cell. The use of such a cell represents a major step in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The HyS Process is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid, that is sent to the acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests in order to prove the concept of SO{sub 2}-depolarization and to determine how the results can be used to evaluate the performance of key components of the HyS Process. A test facility for conducting SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) testing was designed, constructed and commissioned. The maximum cell current is 50 amperes, which is equivalent to a hydrogen production rate of approximately 20 liters per hour. The test facility was designed for operation at room temperature with pressures up to 2 bar. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer can be water, sulfuric acid of various concentrations, or sulfuric acid containing dissolved sulfur dioxide. Provisions are included to allow variation of the operating pressure in the range of 1 to 2 bar. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell can be collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to operate, versatile, and reliable. Two slightly different SDE's were designed, procured and tested. The first electrolyzer was based on a commercially available PEM water electrolyzer manufactured by Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (PES). The PES electrolyzer was built with Hastelloy B and Teflon wetted parts, a PEM electrolyte, and porous titanium electrodes. The second electrolyzer was assembled for SRNL by the University of South Carolina (USC). It was constructed with platinized carbon cloth electrodes, a Nafion 115 PEM electrolyte, carbon paper flow fields, and solid graphite back plates. Proof-of-concept testing was performed on each electrolyzer at near-ambient pressure and room temperature under various feed conditions. SDE operation was evidenced by hydrogen production at the cathode and sulfuric acid production at the anode (witnessed by the absence of oxygen generation) and with cell voltages substantially less than the theoretical reversible voltage for simple water electrolysis (1.23 V). Cell performance at low currents equaled or exceeded that achieved in the two-compartment cells built by Westinghouse Electric Corporation during the original development of the HyS Process. Performance at higher currents was less efficient due to mass transfer and hydraulic issues associated with the use of cells not optimized for liquid feed. Test results were analyzed to determine performance trends, improvement needs, and long-term SDE potential. The PES cell failed after several days of operation due to internal corrosion of the titanium electrodes in the presence of sulfuric acid. Although it was anticipated that the titanium would react in the presence of acid, the rapid deterioration of the electrodes was unexpected. The USC cell was constructed of carbon-based components and had excellent corrosion resistance. Howeve

Steimke, J

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vitrification of high level nuclear waste inside ambient temperature disposal containers using inductive heating: The SMILE system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach, termed SMILE (Small Module Inductively Loaded Energy), for the vitrification of high level nuclear wastes (HLW) is described. Present vitrification systems liquefy the HLW solids and associated frit material in large high temperature melters. The molten mix is then poured into small ({approximately}1 m{sup 3}) disposal canisters, where it solidifies and cools. SMILE eliminates the separate, large high temperature melter. Instead, the BLW solids and frit melt inside the final disposal containers, using inductive heating. The contents then solidify and cool in place. The SMILE modules and the inductive heating process are designed so that the outer stainless can of the module remains at near ambient temperature during the process cycle. Module dimensions are similar to those of present disposal containers. The can is thermally insulated from the high temperature inner container by a thin layer of refractory alumina firebricks. The inner container is a graphite crucible lined with a dense alumina refractory that holds the HLW and fiit materials. After the SMILE module is loaded with a slurry of HLW and frit solids, an external multi-turn coil is energized with 30-cycle AC current. The enclosing external coil is the primary of a power transformer, with the graphite crucible acting as a single turn ``secondary.`` The induced current in the ``secondary`` heats the graphite, which in turn heats the HLW and frit materials. The first stage of the heating process is carried out at an intermediate temperature to drive off remnant liquid water and water of hydration, which takes about 1 day. The small fill/vent tube to the module is then sealed off and the interior temperature raised to the vitrification range, i.e., {approximately}1200C. Liquefaction is complete after approximately 1 day. The inductive heating then ceases and the module slowly loses heat to the environment, allowing the molten material to solidify and cool down to ambient temperature.

Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ambient Backscatter: Wireless Communication Out of Thin Air Vincent Liu, Aaron Parks, Vamsi Talla, Shyamnath Gollakota, David Wetherall, Joshua R. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Backscatter: Wireless Communication Out of Thin Air Vincent Liu, Aaron Parks, Vamsi Talla owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise. Request permissions from permissions@acm.org. SIGCOMM'13, August 12­16, 2013, Hong Kong, China. Copyright

Hochberg, Michael

223

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ambient Measurements of the NOx Reservoir Species N2O5 using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The regulated control of pollutants is essential to maintaining good air quality in urban areas. A major concern is the formation of tropospheric ozone, which can be especially harmful to those with lung conditions and has been linked to the occurrence of asthma. Ozone is formed through reactions of oxidized volatile organic compounds with nitrogen oxides, and the accurate modeling of the process is necessary for smart and effective regulations. Ambient measurements are important to understanding the mechanisms involved in tropospheric chemistry. This dissertation describes the characterization of a novel instrument for the ambient measurement of dinitrogen pentoxide, N2O5, and the results of several field studies. This is an important intermediate in the major nighttime loss pathway of nitrogen oxides. The understanding of this process requires correct modeling formation, as any nitrogen oxides not removed at night will result in increased ozone formation at sunrise. Calibration studies have been performed in order to quantify the loss of reactive species within the instrument, and the sampling flow and N2O5 detection have been well characterized. The results of the laboratory measurements are presented. Results are presented from the SHARP Field Study in Houston, TX in the spring of 2009. N2O5 measurements are compared to measurements of other species, including nitric acid and nitryl chloride, which were performed by other research groups. Mixing ratios exceeding 300 ppt were observed following ozone exceedance days, and a dependence of the concentration on both wind speed and direction was noticed. There was a strong correlation determined between N2O5 with HNO3 and ClNO2 indicating both a fast heterogeneous hydrolysis and N2O5 as the primary source of the species. Observed atmospheric lifetimes for N2O5 were short, ranging from several seconds to several minutes. We have also investigated the presence of N2O5 in College Station, TX. Low mixing ratios peaking at approximately 20 ppt were observed, with longer atmospheric lifetimes of up to several hours. The role of biogenic emissions in the NO3-N2O5 equilibrium is discussed.

Geidosch, Justine Nicole

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

ARM - Datastreams - aeriengineer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaeriengineer Datastreamsaeriengineer Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025145 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERIENGINEER Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI): engineering data Active Dates 1997.10.21 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Ambient blackbody temperature - apex K ABBapexTemp ( time ) Ambient Blackbody apex temperature weight /1 ABBapexTempWeight ( time ) Ambient blackbody temperature K ABBbottomTemp ( time )

226

ARM - Datastreams - aeri01summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

summary summary Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025141 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERI01SUMMARY Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) 01: summary data Active Dates 1995.07.22 - 2014.01.02 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Ambient blackbody temperature - apex K ABBapexTemp ( time ) Ambient blackbody temperature K ABBbottomTemp ( time ) Ambient blackbody temperature - rim top K ABBtopTemp ( time )

227

In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of water on metals and oxides at ambient conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing the elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. Conventional XPS experiments have been limited to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions due to a short mean free path of electrons in a gas phase. The recent advances in instrumentation coupled with third-generation synchrotron radiation sources enables in-situ XPS measurements at pressures above 5 Torr. In this review, we describe the basic design of the ambient pressure XPS setup that combines differential pumping with an electrostatic focusing. We present examples of the application of in-situ XPS to studies of water adsorption on the surface of metals and oxides including Cu(110), Cu(111), TiO2(110) under environmental conditions of water vapor pressure. On all these surfaces we observe a general trend where hydroxyl groups form first, followed by molecular water adsorption. The importance of surface OH groups and their hydrogen bonding to water molecules in water adsorption on surfaces is discussed in detail.

Salmeron, Miquel; Yamamoto, S.; Bluhm, H.; Andersson, K.; Ketteler, G.; Ogasawara, H.; Salmeron, M.; Nilsson, A.

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pilot project of biogas production from pig manure and urine mixture at ambient temperature in Ventanilla (Lima, Peru)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parque Porcino de Ventanilla has an extension of 840 ha with 2200 farmers dedicated to pig production. There is a lack of services in the area (i.e., water supply, electricity, or waste collection). Anaerobic treatment of pig manure would replace current dumping and incineration, reducing environmental pollution and hazards to public health, as well as providing an organic fertilizer and biogas. The objective of the present work was to study the viability of ambient temperature anaerobic digestion of pig manure diluted in urine, by means of on-site pilot scale reactors. The final goal was to establish design parameters for anaerobic digesters to be implemented; since it was part of a project to improve life conditions for the farmers through the incorporation of better management techniques. Experiments were carried out in a low-cost pilot plant, which consists of three anaerobic digesters (225 L total volume), without heating or agitation, placed in a greenhouse. The start-up of the digestion process was performed with a mixture of temperature adapted pig manure-sludge and fresh rumen, and showed a good performance regardless of the dilution of pig manure with water or urine, which is a key parameter due to the scarcity of water in the area under study.

Ferrer, I. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); GIRO Technological Center, Rambla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100 Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: ivet.ferrer@upc.edu; Gamiz, M. [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic Maritime and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Modul D1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Almeida, M.; Ruiz, A. [Ciudad Saludable NLO, Av. Jorge Basadre 255, Of. 401, Lima 27 (Peru)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hazard surveillance for workplace magnetic fields. 1: Walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient field magnitude; 2: Field characteristics from waveform measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent epidemiologic research has suggested that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) may be associated with leukemia, brain cancer, spontaneous abortions, and Alzheimer`s disease. A walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient ELF-MF levels was developed for use in conducting occupational hazard surveillance. This survey was designed to determine the range of MF levels at different industrial facilities so they could be categorized by MF levels and identified for possible subsequent personal exposure assessments. Industries were selected based on their annual electric power consumption in accordance with the hypothesis that large power consumers would have higher ambient MFs when compared with lower power consumers. Sixty-two facilities within thirteen 2-digit Standard Industrial Classifications (SIC) were selected based on their willingness to participate. A traditional industrial hygiene walkaround survey was conducted to identify MF sources, with a special emphasis on work stations.

Methner, M.M.; Bowman, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

In Situ Electrostatic Separation of Ambient PM2.5 into Source-Specific Fractions During Collection in a FRM Sampler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion is generally viewed as a major source of PM2.5 emissions into the atmosphere. For some time, toxicologists have been asking for an exposure environment enriched with the coal combustion source specific PM{sub 2.5} to conduct meaningful exposure studies to better understand the mechanisms of the adverse health effects of coal combustion specific PM2.5 in the ambient environment. There are several unique characteristics of primary PM generated from coal combustion. In this research project, an attempt has been made to exploit some of the unique properties of PM generated from coal fired power plants to preferentially separate them out from the rest of the primary and secondary PM in the ambient environment. An existing FRM sampler used for monitoring amount of PM{sub 2.5} in the ambient air is modified to incorporate an electrostatic field. A DC corona charging device is also installed at the ambient air inlet to impart positive or negative charge to the PM. Visual Basic software has been written to simulate the lateral movement of PM as it passes through the electrostatic separator under varying operating conditions. The PM samples collected on polycarbonate filters under varying operating conditions were extensively observed for clustering and/or separation of PM in the direction parallel to the electric field. No systematic PM separation was observed under any of the operating conditions. A solution to overcome this kind of turbulence caused remixing has been offered. However, due to major programmatic changes in the DOE UCR program, there are no venues available to further pursue this research.

Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Usage Number of trips 773,602 Total distance traveled (mi) 5,558,155 Avg trip distance (mi) 7.2 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 30.2 Avg...

233

Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preheat Energy Preheat Time Total Energy Usage Avg number ofPreheat Energy Preheat Time Total Energy Usage Avg number ofPreheat Energy Preheat Time Total Energy Usage Avg number of

Sanchez, Marla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microsoft Word - How Does Temp Affect Resist - Teacher Notes_edited.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOTES NOTES The Effect of Temperature on Electrical Resistance Abstract: This project allows students to experimentally discover the temperature dependence of resistance using a copper wire, a standard 1 Ω resistor, and a piece of BSCCO 2223 superconducting tape. Using liquid nitrogen as the refrigerant, students will measure electrical resistance over a temperature range from -196 °C (77 K) to room temperature, approximately 22 °C (295 K). Introduction to Research: In 1911, while investigating the conductivity of various metals at temperatures near the boiling point of liquid helium (-269 °C, 4 K), H. Kamerlingh Onnes found that the electrical resistance of mercury dropped to a value so small that it was indistinguishable from zero. This phenomenon

235

C:\DOCUME~1\wei\LOCALS~1\Temp\WEI13737.loc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEI13737 S.L.C. WEI13737 S.L.C. AMENDMENT NO.llll Calendar No.lll Purpose: To modify the efficiency standards for grid-enabled water heaters. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES-113th Cong., 1st Sess. S. 1392 To promote energy savings in residential buildings and industry, and for other purposes. Referred to the Committee on llllllllll and ordered to be printed Ordered to lie on the table and to be printed AMENDMENT intended to be proposed by Mr. HOEVEN (for himself and Mr. PRYOR) Viz: On page 48, after line 16, add the following: 1 SEC. 4ll. GRID-ENABLED WATER HEATERS. 2 Part B of title III of the Energy Policy and Conserva- 3 tion Act (42 U.S.C. 6291 et seq.) is amended- 4 (1) in section 325(e), by adding at the end the 5 following: 6 ''(6) ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR GRID-EN-

236

MEMS Fuel Cells--Low Temp--High Power Density - Energy Innovation ...  

Rechargeable batteries presently provide limited energy ... as well as to manufacture the fuel cell via a continuous integration ... Microfluidic systems with ...

237

Evaluation of the Transient Electromagnetic Probing (TEMP) System for Detection of Wall Thinning Through Insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nondestructive techniques to more efficiently examine piping and components for wall thinning are being developed in response to the expressed desire of utilities to perform these examinations without removing insulation. EPRI has conducted a feasibility study to determine the utility application of one system used to examine storage tanks and large pipes in the petrochemical industry.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Microsoft Word - How Does Temp Affect Resist_Lab_edited.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

broaden our definition of a 'resistor' to include anything you put into the circuit-a wire . . . a motor . . . even a hot dog With this broader definition of a resistor, let's...

239

Microsoft PowerPoint - Francfort AVTA-INL EDVs - IWC Tempe Dec...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based U S Department of Energy (DOE) * Eastern Idaho based U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal laboratory * 890 square mile site with 4,000 staff S t DOE' t t i l Bio-mass...

240

ARM - Datastreams - mettiptwr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmettiptwr Datastreamsmettiptwr Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1046206 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example mettiptwr Archive Data Plot Example mettiptwr Archive Data Plot Datastream : METTIPTWR Ten Meter Tower: meteorological data, 2 & 6 m, 1-min avg Active Dates 2001.04.01 - 2003.10.25 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State Originating Instrument Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA (METTWR) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Atmospheric pressure atmos_pressure Atmospheric moisture dew_pt_temp_max Atmospheric moisture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ARM - Datastreams - mettwr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsmettwr Datastreamsmettwr Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1046207 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example mettwr Archive Data Plot Example mettwr Archive Data Plot Datastream : METTWR Forty Meter Tower: meteorological data, 2, 10, 20, & 40 m, 1-min avg Active Dates 1998.03.20 - 2003.10.22 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State Originating Instrument Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA (METTWR) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Atmospheric pressure atmos_pressure Atmospheric moisture dew_pt_temp_max Atmospheric moisture

242

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TES Avg. DA Wholesale Price PV Penetration (% Annual Load) (Generation Sold at Low Prices PV Penetration (% AnnualTES Avg. DA Wholesale Price PV Penetration (% Annual Load) (

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This Final Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 1998 through December 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This semi-annual Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 2003 through March 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Notification to Mirant by the Commonwealth of Virginia of Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2005 9, 2005 Lisa D. Johnson, President Mirant Potomac River, LLC 8711 Westphalia Road Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20774 Dear Ms. Johnson: DEQ is in receipt of the results of Mirant's "downwash" modeling provided by Mirant to DEQ pursuant to the consent special order between the State Air Pollution Control Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC. A cursory review of the modeling reveals that emissions from the Potomac River Generating Station result in, cause or substantially contribute to serious violations of the primary national ambient air quality standards or "NAAQS" for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and PM 10 . NAAQS are established by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at concentrations necessary to protect human health with an adequate margin of safety.

246

Study of the effects of ambient conditions upon the performance of fan powdered, infrared, natural gas burners. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation is to characterize the operation of fan powered infrared burner (PER) at various gas compositions and ambient conditions and develop design guidelines for appliances containing PER burners for satisfactory performance. During this past quarter, a porous radiant burner testing facility consisting of a commercial deep-fat fryer, an FTIR based spectral radiance measurement system, a set of flue gas analysis components, and a fuel gas mixing station was constructed. The measurement capabilities of the system were tested using methane and the test results were found to be consistent with the literature. Various gas mixtures were tested. Results indicated that the stability limits of the burner and emissions vary with fuel gas composition and air/fuel ratio. However, the maximum radiant efficiency of the burner remained constant. Results obtained from this study can be useful to develop optimum design guidelines for PER burner manufacturers.

Bai, T.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Sampath, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Reactive Oxide Overlayer on Rh Nanoparticles during CO Oxidation and Its Size Dependence Studied by in Situ Ambient Pressure XPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CO oxidation is one of the most studied heterogeneous reactions, being scientifically and industrially important, particularly for removal of CO from exhaust streams and preferential oxidation for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. The precious metals Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au are most commonly used for this reaction because of their high activity and stability. Despite the wealth of experimental and theoretical data, it remains unclear what is the active surface for CO oxidation under catalytic conditions for these metals. In this communication, we utilize in situ synchrotron ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to monitor the oxidation state at the surface of Rh nanoparticles during CO oxidation and demonstrate that the active catalyst is a surface oxide, the formation of which is dependent on particle size. The amount of oxide formed and the reaction rate both increase with decreasing particle size.

Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Park, Jeong Y.; Li, Yimin; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Zhang, Tianfu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

http://baltoferretclub.com/travel.html http://baltoferretclub.com/evacuation.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole eggs Liver Fish Fish oil Fat Chicken Fat Turkey Fat Poultry Fat Other Beet Pulp Brewer's Yeast;Nutritional Requirements Protein: 32-38% avg 35% Fat: 18-25% avg. 20% Fiber: Less than 3% avg. 2% Carbs than 12% avg 10% Accepted Good Ingredients Meats Chicken Turkey Lamb Chicken Meal Turkey Meal Lamb Meal

Selmic, Sandra

249

Dynamic parameters of structures extracted from ambient vibration measurements: an aid for the seismic vulnerability assessment of existing buildings in moderate seismic hazard regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past two decades, the use of ambient vibrations for modal analysis of structures has increased as compared to the traditional techniques (forced vibrations). The Frequency Domain Decomposition method is nowadays widely used in modal analysis because of its accuracy and simplicity. In this paper, we first present the physical meaning of the FDD method to estimate the modal parameters. We discuss then the process used for the evaluation of the building stiffness deduced from the modal shapes. The models considered here are 1D lumped-mass beams and especially the shear beam. The analytical solution of the equations of motion makes it possible to simulate the motion due to a weak to moderate earthquake and then the inter-storey drift knowing only the modal parameters (modal model). This process is finally applied to a 9-storey reinforced concrete (RC) dwelling in Grenoble (France). We successfully compared the building motion for an artificial ground motion deduced from the model estimated using ambien...

Michel, Clotaire; Bard, Pierre-Yves

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

On the Accuracy of van der Waals Inclusive Density-Functional Theory Exchange-Correlation Functionals for Ice at Ambient and High Pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Density-functional theory (DFT) has been widely used to study water and ice for at least 20 years. However, the reliability of different DFT exchange-correlation (xc) functionals for water remains a matter of considerable debate. This is particularly true in light of the recent development of DFT based methods that account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces. Here, we report a detailed study with several xc functionals (semi-local, hybrid, and vdW inclusive approaches) on ice Ih and six proton ordered phases of ice. Consistent with our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 185701 (2011)] which showed that vdW forces become increasingly important at high pressures, we find here that all vdW inclusive methods considered improve the relative energies and transition pressures of the high-pressure ice phases compared to those obtained with semi-local or hybrid xc functionals. However, we also find that significant discrepancies between experiment and the vdW inclusive approaches remain in the cohesive properties of the various phases, causing certain phases to be absent from the phase diagram. Therefore, room for improvement in the description of water at ambient and high pressures remains and we suggest that because of the stern test the high pressure ice phases pose they should be used in future benchmark studies of simulation methods for water.

Biswajit Santra; Ji? Klime; Alexandre Tkatchenko; Dario Alf; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides; Roberto Car; Matthias Scheffler

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Thermoelectric Ambient Energy Harvester - Available ...  

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of ... including building energy management, ... in the environment of ...

253

Ambient-pressure organic superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Ambient Temperature Synthesis of Ba  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthesis and Characterization of Plasma Polymerized Thin Films Deposited from Benzene and Hexamethyldisiloxane Using (PECVD) Method Synthesis and...

255

PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicles large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95F) and low (20F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95F, 75F, and 20F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300400C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A new ambient-pressure organic superconductor,. kappa. -(ET) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br, with the highest transition temperature yet observed (inductive onset T sub c = 11. 6 K, resistive onset = 12. 5 K)  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of a new ambient-pressure organic superconductor, {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br (BEDT-TTF or ET = bis(ethylenedithio)tetrafulvalene) is reported. This compounds exhibits the highest inductive onset temperature, T{sub c} = 11.6K (resistive onset = 12.5K) yet reported. The crystallographic and bond electron structure, ESR characteristics, and its superconductivity transition have all been measured, and the results are reported. 28 refs., 3 figs.

Kini, A.M.; Geiser, U.; Wang, H.H.; Carlson, K.D.; Williams, J.M.; Kwok, W.K.; Vandervoort, K.G.; Thompson, J.E.; Stupka, D.L. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Jung, D.; Whangbo, Myunghwan (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1990-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

self-guided tour of the tempe campus "Sustainability is larger than one person, one company, or one country.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rooftop Solar This rooftop solar installation produces enough electricity to supply 16 average Arizona consequences. Hayden Library Rooftop Solar This rooftop solar installation is expected to produce more than 460 here at ASU. By following this 1.2-mile walking tour you will see LEED*-certified buildings, solar

Hall, Sharon J.

259

J Low Temp Phys (2008) 151: 800805 DOI 10.1007/s10909-008-9741-6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Evidently, as in field from the isothermal steps involving nuclear spin any refrigerator isolation between these two steps. This does not auto- matically imply that the other two steps are adiabatic, however. Thus, and its neighbouring local nuclear spins. However, it does not induce such transitions involv- ing

260

The elusive faces of modernity : the invention of the 1937 Paris Exhibition and the Temps Nouveaux pavilion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1937 Paris Exhibition, the "final European enactment of the ritual of peace and progress before the deluge," remains the least researched and most misunderstood in the history of the World's Exhibitions in France. This ...

Udovicki-Selb, Danilo

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

J Low Temp Phys (2011) 162: 121126 DOI 10.1007/s10909-010-0250-z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy baths. The spin-lattice relaxation times depend directly on the heat capacities of the energy · Energy · Zeolite 1 Introduction An intense effort has been devoted to exploring materials that have a high capacity for hydrogen storage with the goal of meeting required standards for a viable hydro- gen

McQuade, D. Tyler

262

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the following conclusions: (1) The TEOM equipment performed as well as the sequential filter samplers in accounting for ambient PM{sub 2.5} levels; however, the FRM-obtained data was consistently lower than the averages from the TEOM/DRI-SFS measurements; (2) The trending in the PM{sub 2.5} levels was similar for Lawrenceville and Holbrook, which represent an urban and a rural site sixty-five miles apart. This implies that the PM{sub 2.5} levels appear to be impacted more by regional than by local effects; (3) The absolute median PM{sub 2.5} levels were slightly higher for Lawrenceville than for Holbrook, implying that local urban environmental contributions had a minor but measurable effect on total PM{sub 2.5} mass concentration; (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels were consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels observed in the spring and fall; (5) Sulfate levels predominated in the speciation data obtained from both the Holbrook and the Lawrenceville sites during winter and summer intensive sampling. Sulfate level measured at Holbrook were higher than those taken at Lawrenceville regardless of the season; (6) Ammonium levels remained relatively constant between seasons and between sites; (7) Nitrate levels measured at Lawrenceville were higher than those measured at Holbrook during winter intensive sampling. Nitrate levels measured during the summer intensive period were found to be very low at both locations; (8) In general, the predominant inorganic fraction of the samples analyzed could be described as being composed of a mixture of ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate with minor amounts of ammonium nitrate; (9) The PM10 fraction had a larger percentage of geological material and a smaller percentage of condensable material (ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate and total carbon species) than the PM{sub 2.5} fraction for samples collected in winter at Lawrenceville; and (10) Most high PM{sub 2.5} episodes occurred when the predominating wind direction was from the South-West. (11) Plots of ozone vs. NO{sub x} suggest chemical reaction between these molecules since a high concentration of one always results in a low concentration of the other. The analysis of the acquired data has so far addressed three of the four scientific questions originally posed. More data analysis is on-going including the correlation between O{sub 3} and PM{sub 2.5} levels and the correlation of mass data with meteorological observations.

Unknown

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Novel Approaches to Soft X-ray Spectroscopy: Scanning TransmissionX-ray Microscopy and Ambient Pressure X-Ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop focused on novel spectroscopies at Beamlines 11.0.2, 5.3.2 and 9.3.2 at the ALS. The workshop brought together users from a wide range of fields to highlight recent experimental and technical developments both in scanning transmission X-ray spectroscopy (STXM) and ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES). The morning session featured talks on experiments involving new developments at the STXM, while the afternoon session was devoted to those using APXPS. In the morning session, Tolek Tyliszczak discussed the improved detector developments at the STXM, such as an avalanche photodiode detector and fluorescence and electron detection, as well as the continued development of in situ cells for heating, gas flow, and electrochemical cells. Of these, only the avalanche photodiode in combination with a novel multichannel photon-counting system is in routine use in time-resolved studies. Bartel Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University) presented results of magnetic imaging with a time resolution of 70-100 ps combined with a lateral resolution of 20-40 nm performed with the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). As a complement to the time-domain ''pump-and-probe'' measurements, they developed a frequency-domain ''sine-excitation'' technique in order to study specific eigenmodes of these ferromagnetic patterns with high spatial resolution. This new approach was used to study the gyrotropic vortex motions in micron-sized ferromagnetic patterns. Adam Hitchcock (McMaster University) presented the development, in collaboration with Daniel Guay (INRS, Varennes) and Sherry Zhang, of the apparatus and techniques for applying STXM to in-situ studies of electrochemistry, in particular electrochromism in polyaniline. In addition, substantial progress was reported on a joint project to develop substrates and methods for chemically selective lithography of multilayer polymer systems. Selective patterns, such as that displayed in the figure, can now be written efficiently with the bend magnet STXM on Beamline 5.3.2. Yves Acremann (SSRL) discussed time and spatially resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments on spin transfer devices at the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). These elegant experiments explore time resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics within a 100 x 150 nm sample influenced by a spin-polarized current. This experiment shows that the magnetization in these magnetic nanostructures are not uniform, as they are influenced by the Oersted field of the charge current needed to generate the spin current. The implementation of a novel multichannel photon counting system in combination with an avalanche photon detector decreased the data-acquisition time by a factor of 10, owing to its ability to resolve the structure of multi bunch mode. Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University and SSRL) described ''Applications of STXM to Microbial Bioweathering and Biomineralization''. In the interaction of bacteria with ferrihydrite nanoparticles, microenvironments that were very different than the bulk material were observed, showing that bulk thermodynamics may not be useful for predicting micro phases. Gordon also presented work showing that iron nanoparticles are attracted to the negatively charged bacteria and form a coating that reduces iron oxide minerals. The afternoon session started with presentations by Simon Mun and Hendrik Bluhm, who discussed the current status and the future plans for the two APPES end-stations at the ALS, which are located at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2, respectively. In both end-stations, samples can be measured in gaseous environments at pressures of up to several Torr, which makes possible the investigation of numerous phenomena, in particular in the fields of atmospheric and environmental science as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Specific examples of the application of APPES were shown in the following presentations. John Hemminger (University of California, Irvine) reported on APPES investigations at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 of the interaction of alkali halide surfaces with water. The m

Bluhm, Hendrik; Gilles, Mary K.; Mun, Simon B.; Tyliszczak, Tolek

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

ARM - Datastreams - aoscpc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaoscpc Datastreamsaoscpc Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025152 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AOSCPC AOS: condensation particle counter Active Dates 2011.03.09 - 2014.01.09 Measurement Categories Aerosols Originating Instrument Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Ambient temperature C ambient_temp ( time ) Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Cabinet temperature C cabinet_temp ( time ) Aerosol concentration Particle concentration parts/cc concentration ( time )

267

DOE-1 BDL SUMMARY. DOE-1 GROUP.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTEM-CONTROL SYSTEM-FANS SYSTEM DESIGN-HEAT-TEMP HEAT-SYSTEM-AIR SYSTEM-FANS Keyword DESIGN-HEAT-TEMP HEAT-TEMP-AIR SYSTEM-FANS HEAT-TEMP-SCHED DESIGN-COOL-TEMP COOL-TEMP-

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 WASTE STREAM CODE: 01582 STREAM NAME:Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 MPC NAME:Inorganic Sludges TOTAL CURIES: 26.000 Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Sludges & Treatment Residues - 1 Isotopes Scandium-46 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Tin-113 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Strontium-85 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Tantalum-182 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Californium-250 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Lead-212 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Americium-244 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:

269

Application of multirate flowing fluid electric conductivity ...  

P i P avg P avg P 1 wb ... H. H., and C. E. Jacob (1946), A generalized graphical method for evaluating formation constants and summarizing well field history, Eos

270

Tracking the Sun III; The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VT Renewable Energy Incentive 10-100 kW Avg. Cost Programlevel cost data from Wisconsins Focus on Energy RenewableRenewable WI Energy Cash-Back Rewards 10-100 kW Avg. Cost

Barbose, Galen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avg. Cost Avg. Incentive NY State Energy Research andState Energy Research and Development Authority: PV IncentiveState Energy Research and Development Authority: PV No. Systems Incentive

Wiser, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Behavior of two capstone 30kW microturbines operating in parallel with impedance between them  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Average of 96 Samples: Va = 3.52% THD, 270.0 Volts Vb =3.49% THD, 270.2 Volts Vc =3.51% THD, 271.6 Volts Percent of Fundamental Va Avg Vb Avg

Yinger, Robert J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dr. Tracie Sempier Coastal Storms Outreach Coordinator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Gas -54% of US total Crude Oil Production (based on avg. 2008-2010) -52% of US total Natural Gas Production (based on avg. 2007-2009) -47% of US total Crude Oil Refinery Capacity (based on avg. 2008 In 2009, the Gulf of Mexico accounted for over 44% of the US marine recreational fishing catch Oil

274

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage Usage Overall fuel economy (mpg) 139 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 293 Number of trips¹ 76,425 Total distance traveled (mi) 609,737 Avg trip distance (mi) 8.0 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 36.4 Avg number of trips between charging events 3.0 Avg distance traveled between charging events (mi) 24.1 Avg number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.5

275

Fracture and fatigue properties of Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} refractory intermetallic alloys at ambient to elevated temperatures (25-1300 degrees Centigrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for structural materials with high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance coupled with adequate lower-temperature toughness for potential use at temperatures above {approx} 1000 degrees C has remained a persistent challenge in materials science. In this work, one promising class of intermetallic alloys is examined, namely boron-containing molybdenum silicides, with compositions in the range Mo (bal), 12-17 at. percentSi, 8.5 at. percentB, processed using both ingot (I/M) and powder (P/M) metallurgy methods. Specifically, the oxidation (''pesting''), fracture toughness and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of four such alloys, which consisted of {approx}21 to 38 vol. percent a-Mo phase in an intermetallic matrix of Mo3Si and Mo5SiB2 (T2), were characterized at temperatures between 25 degrees and 1300 degrees C. The boron additions were found to confer superior ''pest'' resistance (at 400 degrees to 900 degrees C) as compared to unmodified molybdenum silicides, such as Mo5Si3. Moreover , although the fracture and fatigue properties of the finer-scale P/M alloys were only marginally better than those of MoSi2, for the I/M processed microstructures with coarse distributions of the a-Mo phase, fracture toughness properties were far superior, rising from values above 7 MPa sqrt m at ambient temperatures to almost 12 MPa sqrt m at 1300 degrees C.

Choe, Heeman; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sludge, Salt, Liquid Sludge, Salt, Liquid WASTE STREAM CODE: 02113 STREAM NAME:Sludge, Salt, Liquid MPC NAME:Aqueous Liquids/Slurries TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Sludge, Salt, Liquid Isotopes Americium-241 Avg Concentration: 3.4967E-001 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Cadmium-113m Avg Concentration: 8.4542E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Niobium-93m Avg Concentration: 1.8159E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Protactinium-231 Avg Concentration: 7.8039E-004 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Europium-152 Avg Concentration: 7.4037E-003 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Plutonium-240 Avg Concentration: 4.4672E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:

277

Adjudicatory Triggers of Enhanced Ambient Environment Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the early days of NEPA and the CAA are still used today, in updated and improved form. The CWA entitled, Missing Information: The Environmental Data Gaps in Conservation and Chemical Regulation, held, or remains missing-as did the conference on "data gaps" that led to this paper--does it become evident

Ruttan, Lore

278

Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

279

Fundo Global para o Meio Ambiente  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to capture solar energy during the entire year [6, 7]. Solar power utilization brings long term benefits-contained systems up to large plants using concentrated solar power, or hydrogen generating systems to be used space survey of the solar energy potential; · long time series of ground data with temporal and spatial

280

Energy efficient cooperative multimodal ambient monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Video Sensor Networks (WVNs) are lively interest in the research community as flexible means for monitoring isolated areas. WVN effectiveness can be augmented when coupled with a network of low-power, low-cost Pyroelectric InfraRed (PIR) detectors ... Keywords: multimodal surveillance, power aware design, pyroelectric infrared, solar harvester, wireless video sensor network

Michele Magno; Davide Brunelli; Piero Zappi; Luca Benini

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Primary and secondary ambient temperature lithium batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings collect papers on the subject of batteries. Topics include: lithium-oxygen batteries, lithium-sulphur batteries, metal-metal oxide batteries, metal-nonmetal batteries, spacecraft power supplies, electrochemistry, and battery containment materials.

Gabano, J.P.; Takehara, Z.; Bro, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Mechano-freezing of the ambient water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

Xi Zhang; Tingting Yan; Bo Zou; Chang Q Sun

2013-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Intelligent ambient technology: friend or foe?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a part of findings from a study carried out to gain insight on user understanding of smart environments and preferred ways and places for interaction with smart services therein. Here we concentrate on qualitative interview data discussing ... Keywords: acceptance of technology, intelligence, smart environments, ubiquitous computing, user expectations, user studies

Minna Kynsilehto; Thomas Olsson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Improved Ambient Ionization Source for Mass Spectrometry ...  

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy. Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; ...

285

Greenvision Ambiente Spa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Italy Zip 42020 Sector Solar Product Italian engineering company focussed on building waste-to-energy plants, as well as solar PV and thermal project development. References...

286

Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the field of diffusive sampling, and other stakeholders. The following (in alphabetical order) actively or vapour phase pollutant directly from the surrounding air by means of diffusion, without actively drawing

Short, Daniel

287

Polymeric electrolytes for ambient temperature lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new type of highly conductive Li{sup +} polymer electrolyte, referred to as the Innovision polymer electrolyte, is completely amorphous at room temperature and has an ionic conductivity in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm. This report discusses the electrochemical characteristics (lithium oxidation and reduction), conductivity, and physical properties of Innovision electrolytes containing various dissolved salts. These electrolytes are particularly interesting since they appear to have some of the highest room-temperature lithium ion conductivities yet observed among polymer electrolytes. 13 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Farrington, G.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Harvesting mechanical energy for ambient intelligent devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with mechanical energy harvesters, power management and energy storage devices as important building blocks for wireless autonomous sensor networks. The basic task of the harvester is to convert vibrational into electrical energy. As ... Keywords: Electromagnetic, Electrostatic, Energy harvester, Energy storage, Impedance matching, Piezoelectric, Power management

Bert Op Het Veld; Dennis Hohlfeld; Valer Pop

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

C:\Documents and Settings\Laura\Local Settings\temp\_15do1e84r3930b1ph.pdf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . OMB Number: 4040-0007 Expiration Date: 06/30/2014 ASSURANCES - NON-CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 15 minutes per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0348-0040), Washington, DC 20503. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR COMPLETED FORM TO THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET. SEND IT TO THE ADDRESS PROVIDED BY THE SPONSORING AGENCY.

290

C:\Documents and Settings\Laura\Local Settings\temp\_11co1e84r3903c5ph.pdf  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SECTION SECTION A - BUDGET SUMMARY $ BUDGET INFORMATION - Non-Construction Programs OMB Number: 4040-0006 Expiration Date: 06/30/2014 Grant Program Function or Activity (a) Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number (b) Estimated Unobligated Funds New or Revised Budget Federal (c) Non-Federal (d) Federal (e) Non-Federal (f) Total (g) 5. Totals 4. 3. 2. 1. $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Standard Form 424A (Rev. 7- 97) Prescribed by OMB (Circular A -102) Page 1 SECTION B - BUDGET CATEGORIES 7. Program Income d. Equipment e. Supplies f. Contractual g. Construction h. Other j. Indirect Charges k. TOTALS (sum of 6i and 6j) i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) (1) Authorized for Local Reproduction Prescribed by OMB (Circular A -102) Page 1A Standard Form 424A (Rev. 7- 97) GRANT PROGRAM, FUNCTION OR ACTIVITY

291

Approche Multicrit\\`ere pour le Probl\\`eme de Ramassage et de Livraison avec Fen\\^etres de Temps \\`a Plusieurs V\\'ehicules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, the transport goods problem occupies an important place in the economic life of modern societies. The pickup and delivery problem with time windows (PDPTW) is one of the problems which a large part of the research was interested. In this paper, we present a a brief literature review of the VRP and the PDPTW, propose our multicriteria approach based on genetic algorithms which allows minimize the compromise between the vehicles number, the total tardiness time and the total travel cost. And this, by treating the case where a customer can have multiple suppliers and one supplier can have multiple customers

Dridi, Imen Harbaoui; Ksouri, Mekki; Borne, Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

grandidentata in the field at ambient and twice ambient CO2 in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

repeated application of 6% oil resulted in less damage than a single application of 12% oil. 526 Dhakhwa, G.B., and C.L. Campbell. 1998. Potential effects of differential...

293

Evaluation of a Geogrid-Reinforced Slope Subjected to Differential Settlements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Trnsfer Officer III0368U 2B1 Temp Salary Supp With Exec Ttl0198U 1A1 Temp Salary Suppl With Mgt

Zornberg, Jorge G.

294

ARM - Datastreams - swacrvad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

( time ) Antenna top temperature degrees C TempAntennaTop ( time ) Chiller temperature degrees C TempChiller ( time ) Chiller return temperature degrees C...

295

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mexico Mexico SITE: LosAlamos PROGRAM: DP WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Albuquerque Operations Office % of Stream LosAlamos - Low Level Waste - LLW-PCB WASTE STREAM CODE: 02015 STREAM NAME:LLW-PCB MPC NAME:Soil/Debris TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 LLW -PCB Isotopes Plutonium-239 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+002 nCi/g Americium-241 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+002 nCi/g Cesium-137 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:8.6400E+002 nCi/g Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:4.8900E+002 nCi/g Plutonium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+002 nCi/g

296

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

South Carolina South Carolina SITE: Savannah PROGRAM: DP WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Savannah River Operations Office % of Stream Savannah - Low Level Waste - Intermediate Level Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 00539 STREAM NAME:Intermediate Level Waste MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Intermediate Level W aste Isotopes Nickel-59 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:8.3000E-002 Ci/ft3 Uranium-234 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:4.7000E-004 Ci/ft3 Carbon-14 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:4.7000E-004 Ci/ft3 Hydrogen-3 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:3.0000E+001 Ci/ft3 Technetium-99 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent:

297

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Colorado Colorado SITE: GrJuncOff PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: 11e(2) Byproduct Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Idaho Operations Office % of Stream GrJuncOff - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Soil WASTE STREAM CODE: 01091 STREAM NAME:RRM Contaminated Soil MPC NAME:Soil TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 30.000 Future Volume Avg: 0.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 RRM Contaminated Soil Isotopes Radium-226 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-234 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Thorium-230 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-235 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream GrJuncOff - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Rubble/Debris

298

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Cs/Sr Capsules Cs/Sr Capsules WASTE STREAM CODE: 02115 STREAM NAME:Cs/Sr Capsules MPC NAME:Salt Waste TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Cs/Sr Capsules Isotopes Barium-137m Avg Concentration: 2.5941E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Cesium-137 Avg Concentration: 2.7391E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Yttrium-90 Avg Concentration: 1.1840E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Strontium-90 Avg Concentration: 1.1840E+007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream Hanford - High Level Waste - HLW to Treatment WASTE STREAM CODE: 03857 STREAM NAME:HLW to Treatment MPC NAME:Aqueous Liquids/Slurries TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit:

299

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 14% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 380 Number of trips 106 Distance traveled (mi) 237 Percent...

300

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 414 Number of trips 152 Distance traveled (mi) 131 Percent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 410 Number of trips 94 Distance traveled (mi) 307 Percent of...

302

ARM - Instrument - ecmwfdiag  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

entire coverage ecmwften : ECMWF: total and physical tendencies for met and cloud vars, entire coverage, 1-hr avg ecmwfvar : ECMWF: model met. and cloud variables at...

303

postkwonTable1.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

programsCSEQterrestrialpostkwon2000postkwon2000.html Site history Years since agriculture Soil sample depth (cm) Rate of change (g m -2 y -1 ) Reference MAX AVG Cool...

304

Applying Psychology to Economic Policy Design: Using Incentive Preserving Rebates to Increase Acceptance of Critical Peak Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type model avg. daily use Summer 2002, kWh climate zone2 climate zone3 climate zone 4 apartment intercept N R 2 iv. I tested a

Letzler, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Power Grid Proposal Motivation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Aggregation Line, Curve, Cluster representat ion (min,max,avg,v ar) Direct Query Alarm correlation Aggregated alarm 15 Technical Accomplishments: Protocols *...

306

Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avg. Total Science Sites PNNL Brookhaven FY2003 FY2004National Laboratory PLF PNNL PPPL R&D SLAC SNAP SNL SPO

Fernandez, Jeffrey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

ARE Update Volume 10, Number 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Global Biofuel Production by Feedstock Avg. YieldAs land devoted to biofuel production increases, it willas they move into biofuel production. They may uncertain.

Sumner, Dan; Sexton, Steven E.; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D; Roland-Holst, David; Martin, Philip

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Imports and Exports Form...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Imports and Exports Form FE-746R Expiration Date: 7312016 AVG Burden: 3.0 hours MonthYear: Exporter (Authorization Holder):...

309

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices at the Chicago Citygate normally are very close to Henry Hub prices; ... *Avg. of NGI's reported prices for: Malin, PG&E citygate, and ...

310

ARM - Instrument - okm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Oklahoma Mesonet (OKM): 15-min averages, meteorological data from 111 stations 30okm : Oklahoma Mesonet (OKM): meteorological data from 111 stations, 30-min avg Primary...

311

New ambient pressure organic superconductors:. alpha. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 (NH sub 4 )Hg(SCN) sub 4 ,. beta. m-(BEDO-TTF) sub 3 Cu sub 2 (NCS) sub 3 , and. kappa. -(BEDT-TTF) sub 2 Cu(N(CN) sub 2 )Br  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than one hundred and twenty conducting salts based on the organic donor-molecule BEDT-TTF are known, where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene (abbreviated herein as ET). Several of the early salts possessed tetrahedral and octahedral anions, such as (ET){sub 2}ClO{sub 4}(TCE), (ET){sub 2}PF{sub 6}, (ET){sub 2}ReO{sub 4}, and (ET){sub 2}BrO{sub 4}. The perchlorate salt is metallic to 1.4 K,{sup 1} and the perrenate derivative was the first ET based organic superconductor ({Tc} 2 K, 4.5 kbar). Since the discovery of ambient pressure superconductivity in {beta}-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} ({Tc} 1.4 K),{sup 5} other isostructural {beta}-(ET){sub 2}X salts have been prepared with higher {Tc}'s. A structure-property correlation for the {beta}-type salts has been reviewed in this volume; it predicts that {Tc}'s higher than 8K are possible if {beta}-salts with linear anions longer than I{sub 3}{sup {minus}} can be synthesized. During the search for new linear anions, a variety of compounds with discovered with polymeric anions. The report of superconductivity in {kappa}-(ET){sub 4}Hg{sub 3}X{sub 8} (X = Cl, {Tc} 5.4 K 29 kbar and X = Br, {Tc} 4.3 K ambient pressure and 6.7 K 3.5 kbar) and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} ({Tc} 10.4 K) further stimulated the search for novel polymeric anions. A general synthetic strategy for preparing new salts containing polymeric anions is to couple a coordinatively unsaturated neutral transition metal halide/pseudohalide with a simple halide or pseudohalide during an electrocrystallization synthesis. In this article, the authors discuss three new ambient pressure organic superconductors with novel polymeric anions, {alpha}-(ET){sub 2}(NH{sub 4})Hg(SCN){sub 4}, {beta}m-(BO){sub 3}Cu{sub 2}(NCS){sub 3} and {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(N(CN){sub 2})Br. 48 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Wang, H.H.; Beno, M.A.; Carlson, K.D.; Geiser, U.; Kini, A.M.; Montgomery, L.K.; Thompson, J.E.; Williams, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ARM - Datastreams - aoscpcu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaoscpcu Datastreamsaoscpcu Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1046186 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AOSCPCU AOS: Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter Active Dates 2012.06.24 - 2013.04.02 Measurement Categories Aerosols Originating Instrument Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Ambient pressure kPa ambient_pressure ( time ) Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Cabinet temperature degC cabinet_temp ( time ) Aerosol concentration Particle concentration parts/cc concentration ( time )

313

ARM - Datastreams - aoscpcf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsaoscpcf Datastreamsaoscpcf Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1046184 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AOSCPCF AOS: Condensation Particle Counter Active Dates 2010.10.14 - 2014.01.09 Measurement Categories Aerosols Originating Instrument Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Ambient pressure kPa ambient_pressure ( time ) Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Cabinet temperature degC cabinet_temp ( time ) Aerosol concentration Particle concentration parts/cc concentration ( time )

314

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6893,36894,36894,83,83,83,800,1,2 6893,36894,36894,83,83,83,800,1,2 "Entergy",36894,36895,36895,93,93,93,800,1,2 "Entergy",36895,36896,36896,83,78.5,80.83,7200,9,4 "Entergy",36896,36899,36899,78,67,74.25,3200,4,5 "Entergy",36899,36900,36900,57,54,55.5,1600,2,4 "Entergy",36900,36901,36901,53,53,53,1600,1,2 "Entergy",36902,36903,36903,67.5,65,66.5,4000,5,3 "Entergy",36903,36906,36906,52.5,48,50.25,1600,2,3 "Entergy",36907,36908,36908,52,45,48.86,8800,11,4 "Entergy",36908,36909,36909,56,51,51.95,16800,21,6 "Entergy",36909,36910,36910,50,48.5,49.33,24000,30,7 "Entergy",36910,36913,36913,56.5,54,55.25,11200,13,7 "Entergy",36913,36914,36914,63,57,58.38,6400,8,3 "Entergy",36914,36915,36915,61.5,42,55.75,15200,19,9

315

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

449,39450,39450,180,158,161.65,26400,33,22 449,39450,39450,180,158,161.65,26400,33,22 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39450,39451,39451,123,108,114.27,36800,46,28 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39451,39454,39454,77,75.5,76.31,21600,26,17 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39454,39455,39455,68.25,66,67.1,41600,51,26 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39455,39456,39456,69.5,68,68.71,21600,27,18 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39456,39457,39457,81,74,75.75,30400,35,17 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39457,39458,39458,75,69.75,71.18,24800,31,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39458,39461,39461,80.5,77,79.38,17600,19,17 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39461,39462,39462,102,95,98.76,52000,64,24 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39462,39463,39463,90.5,87.5,88.59,34400,43,25 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39463,39464,39464,85,83.5,84.21,20800,26,14

316

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

815,39818,39818,43,42.5,42.75,5.17,1600,2,4 815,39818,39818,43,42.5,42.75,5.17,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",39818,39819,39819,40,39.5,39.88,-2.87,3200,4,3," " "ERCOT-South",39819,39820,39820,39,38,38.73,-1.15,8800,9,9 "ERCOT-South",39820,39821,39821,41.5,39,39.82,1.09,8800,11,9 "ERCOT-South",39821,39822,39822,38.75,37.5,38.03,-1.79,6400,8,10 "ERCOT-South",39822,39825,39825,43.5,43.5,43.5,5.47,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39825,39826,39826,55,50.5,52.95,9.45,8800,11,12,,," " "ERCOT-South",39826,39827,39827,45.5,43.5,44.44,-8.51,14400,18,18 "ERCOT-South",39827,39828,39828,45,44.25,44.68,0.24,12000,14,12 "ERCOT-South",39828,39829,39829,44,42.75,43.18,-1.5,8000,10,10 "ERCOT-South",39833,39834,39834,33,32.5,32.75,-10.43,9600,12,8

317

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

54.5,53.4,53.98,5.44,3200,4,7 54.5,53.4,53.98,5.44,3200,4,7 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49,47.25,48.27,-5.71,8000,10,12 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56,53.5,54.75,6.48,4800,6,10 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",97,87,89.96,35.21,20800,18,16 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56.25,51,53.71,-36.25,16800,19,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.75,46,46.33,-7.38,17600,22,17

318

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39815,39818,39818,65.55,65,65.44,-5.89,12000,15,9 Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39815,39818,39818,65.55,65,65.44,-5.89,12000,15,9 "Nepool MH Da Lmp",39818,39819,39819,67,65,66.22,0.78,39200,46,22 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39819,39820,39820,65,63.25,63.83,-2.39,20000,24,18 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39820,39821,39821,67.5,65.75,66.47,2.64,28000,33,16 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39821,39822,39822,78.5,76,77.31,10.84,21600,27,16 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39822,39825,39825,100,90,94.19,16.88,28800,35,19 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39825,39826,39826,81,72.75,74.76,-19.43,36000,44,24 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39826,39827,39827,101,98,99.83,25.07,16000,20,18 "Nepool MH Da Lmp",39827,39828,39828,130,117,120.32,20.49,40000,50,27 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39828,39829,39829,120,106,109.76,-10.56,72800,91,35

319

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SP 15",39449,39450,39450,74.6,69.25,73.56,97200,234,36 SP 15",39449,39450,39450,74.6,69.25,73.56,97200,234,36 "SP 15",39450,39451,39452,70,63,68.49,291200,275,37 "SP 15",39451,39454,39454,75,68,69.2,140000,326,39 "SP 15",39454,39455,39455,73.25,69,71.52,144800,329,37 "SP 15",39455,39456,39456,72.25,70.25,71.32,198000,425,35 "SP 15",39456,39457,39457,73.75,70.75,72.79,157600,351,37 "SP 15",39457,39458,39459,70.25,67.25,68.46,226400,268,33 "SP 15",39458,39461,39461,75,73.25,73.77,184000,366,38 "SP 15",39461,39462,39462,78.25,75,75.77,110800,235,34 "SP 15",39462,39463,39464,88,77.5,79.42,323200,351,36 "SP 15",39463,39465,39466,79,74.25,77.52,259200,302,36 "SP 15",39464,39468,39468,84.45,77,82.35,126400,287,36

320

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

54.55,54.05,54.37,1.9,8800,20,11 54.55,54.05,54.37,1.9,8800,20,11 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",53.25,52.75,53.09,-1.28,35200,64,16 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52,51.25,51.51,-1.58,13600,28,17 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56.5,53.25,54.08,2.57,65600,71,17 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51.15,50.8,51.01,-3.07,27600,53,19 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",50.75,50,50.18,-0.83,23200,39,11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

084,39085,39085,62,55,55.98,10400,13,10 084,39085,39085,62,55,55.98,10400,13,10 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39085,39086,39086,54.75,52.75,53.53,30400,38,20 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39086,39087,39087,56,55,55.35,24800,31,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39087,39090,39090,58,56.5,57.08,8000,10,12 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39090,39091,39091,58.75,57.25,57.86,34400,41,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39091,39092,39092,60.5,59,59.8,20800,25,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39092,39093,39093,65,63.5,64.04,13600,16,15 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39093,39094,39094,61.25,59.75,60.82,15200,19,14 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39094,39097,39097,62,59,60.95,16800,21,16 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39097,39098,39098,69.25,67,68.25,22400,28,15 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39098,39099,39099,89,84.5,86.33,34400,43,26

322

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

53.5,48,50.93,,13600,17,11 53.5,48,50.93,,13600,17,11 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57.5,52.75,55,4.07,31200,39,15 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51.5,49.5,50.38,-4.62,3200,4,4 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52,49.5,51.25,0.87,19200,24,12 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.75,45.25,45.8,-5.45,21600,27,14 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43,39.5,41.3,-4.5,10400,13,8

323

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,28.5,26.5,27.76,-0.16,63200,141,25 1246,41247,41247,28.5,26.5,27.76,-0.16,63200,141,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41247,41248,41248,28.5,27,27.86,0.1,79200,187,26 "Mid Columbia Peak",41248,41249,41249,28,23.5,27.02,-0.84,76000,170,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41249,41250,41251,23.25,21.25,22.44,-4.58,159200,191,23 "Mid Columbia Peak",41250,41253,41253,25.25,21.25,23.45,1.01,74800,176,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41253,41254,41254,23.75,20.75,22.51,-0.94,92800,209,26 "Mid Columbia Peak",41254,41255,41255,24.5,23,23.84,1.33,100800,222,27 "Mid Columbia Peak",41255,41256,41256,28,25.5,26.88,3.04,80800,182,26 "Mid Columbia Peak",41256,41257,41258,27.75,26.5,27.13,0.25,152000,171,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41257,41260,41260,25.75,23.25,24.43,-2.7,76000,180,25

324

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38.75,37.25,37.95,-2.02,13600,17,14 38.75,37.25,37.95,-2.02,13600,17,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43.5,40,42.39,4.44,10000,25,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.5,37.75,38.26,-4.13,9200,23,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",40.25,37.25,38.46,0.2,7600,19,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41,38,38.93,0.47,9200,23,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",38.25,36.5,37.29,-1.64,13600,17,17

325

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

623,37624,37624,37.45,33.75,35.69,28800,36,19 623,37624,37624,37.45,33.75,35.69,28800,36,19 "PJM West",37624,37627,37627,48,47,47.58,28800,32,20 "PJM West",37627,37628,37628,50.5,48,49.53,33600,42,19 "PJM West",37628,37629,37629,47,44.25,45.39,35200,44,20 "PJM West",37629,37630,37630,39,37,37.73,27200,33,19 "PJM West",37630,37631,37631,43.5,41.75,42.44,25600,27,17 "PJM West",37631,37634,37634,64,56.5,58.31,20800,26,19 "PJM West",37634,37635,37635,56,54.8,55.52,19200,24,19 "PJM West",37635,37636,37636,56.5,54.9,55.51,28000,33,19 "PJM West",37636,37637,37637,53,50.25,51.89,32000,40,22 "PJM West",37637,37638,37638,54,52,52.63,30400,38,23 "PJM West",37638,37641,37641,48.25,47,47.48,26400,33,17

326

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

258,37259,37259,33.75,32.5,33.23,10400,13,12 258,37259,37259,33.75,32.5,33.23,10400,13,12 "NEPOOL",37259,37260,37260,36.25,35,35.98,24800,31,18 "NEPOOL",37260,37263,37263,34,33.25,33.66,8800,11,12 "NEPOOL",37263,37264,37264,34,33.5,33.67,10400,13,11 "NEPOOL",37264,37265,37265,32.6,31,32.04,9600,11,13 "NEPOOL",37265,37266,37266,29.5,28.7,29.1,10400,13,11 "NEPOOL",37266,37267,37267,29.25,28.25,28.75,12000,15,12 "NEPOOL",37267,37270,37270,31,30,30.24,16800,17,13 "NEPOOL",37270,37271,37271,30.5,29.75,30.09,30400,36,15 "NEPOOL",37271,37272,37272,29.5,28.65,28.98,23200,28,15 "NEPOOL",37272,37273,37273,30.4,29.8,30.02,32800,39,16 "NEPOOL",37273,37274,37274,30,29.1,29.37,11200,14,15 "NEPOOL",37274,37277,37277,30,29.25,29.72,6400,8,9

327

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

182,40183,40183,89,82.75,86.08,20.49,214400,242,55 182,40183,40183,89,82.75,86.08,20.49,214400,242,55 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40183,40184,40184,80.65,74.5,77.16,-8.92,270400,295,56 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40184,40185,40185,80.5,77.5,78.92,1.76,93600,111,47 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40185,40186,40186,86,78.25,80.64,1.72,278400,316,62 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40186,40189,40189,82.75,72,80.64,0,81600,98,36 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40189,40190,40190,73,65.75,67.86,-12.78,178400,205,50 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40190,40191,40191,55.25,53,53.89,-13.97,162400,180,50 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40191,40192,40192,49.75,48,48.84,-5.05,97600,109,45 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40192,40193,40193,46.25,43.5,44.65,-4.19,99200,117,46 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40193,40196,40196,46,44.95,45.38,0.73,59200,71,35

328

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8721,38722,38722,57.5,57.5,57.5,-22.5,800,1,2 8721,38722,38722,57.5,57.5,57.5,-22.5,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38748,38749,38749,57,57,57,-0.5,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38751,38754,38754,59,59,59,2,1600,2,3 "ERCOT-South",38786,38789,38789,48,48,48,-11,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38803,38804,38804,52.5,50.5,51.06,3.06,6400,8,7 "ERCOT-South",38804,38805,38805,54.75,54.75,54.75,3.69,3200,2,3 "ERCOT-South",38805,38806,38806,55.25,53.5,54.21,-0.54,4800,6,5 "ERCOT-South",38806,38807,38807,58,58,58,3.79,800,1,2,,,,," " "ERCOT-South",38810,38811,38811,60,60,60,2,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38811,38812,38812,64,64,64,4,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38812,38813,38813,63,62.5,62.63,-1.37,3200,4,6 "ERCOT-South",38813,38814,38814,62,62,62,-0.63,800,1,2

329

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

546,40547,40547,51,47.5,48.71,-0.32,96800,116,39 546,40547,40547,51,47.5,48.71,-0.32,96800,116,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40547,40548,40548,49.25,47.45,48.14,-0.57,64000,67,40 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40548,40549,40549,53.5,51.5,52.27,4.13,55200,66,37 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40549,40550,40550,60.5,57,58.43,6.16,80000,93,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40550,40553,40553,63.5,57,60.43,2,105600,124,41 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40553,40554,40554,69.5,64.25,66.98,6.55,128800,145,44 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40554,40555,40555,72.25,62,67.54,0.56,158400,194,51 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40555,40556,40556,84,75,80.13,12.59,92800,116,46 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40556,40557,40557,89.5,80.5,84.09,3.96,108800,133,42 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40557,40560,40560,57.55,55,56.11,-27.98,88800,105,40

330

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40182,40183,40183,52.5,51.5,51.85,0.9,67600,116,25 40182,40183,40183,52.5,51.5,51.85,0.9,67600,116,25 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40183,40184,40184,51.75,50.5,51.01,-0.84,61600,115,25 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40184,40185,40185,53,50.5,51.39,0.38,59600,115,24 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40185,40186,40187,58.5,55,56.79,5.4,394400,381,29 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40186,40189,40189,51.25,50.75,51,-5.79,59200,116,26 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40189,40190,40190,50.25,49,49.8,-1.2,53600,102,25 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40190,40191,40192,51.5,50.75,51.12,1.32,59200,61,19 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40191,40193,40194,49,48.25,48.35,-2.77,77600,71,20 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40192,40196,40196,50.5,50,50.3,1.95,38800,71,18 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40193,40197,40197,51.35,50,50.93,0.63,66800,84,19

331

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

084,39085,39085,43,43,43,4800,6,6 084,39085,39085,43,43,43,4800,6,6 "Entergy",39085,39086,39086,40,34,38.3,4000,5,6 "Entergy",39086,39087,39087,38,37,37.5,1600,2,2 "Entergy",39087,39090,39090,41,41,41,800,1,2 "Entergy",39090,39091,39091,49,46,48.14,5600,6,6 "Entergy",39091,39092,39092,48,48,48,2400,3,4 "Entergy",39092,39093,39093,49,47,48,1600,2,3 "Entergy",39093,39094,39094,45,44,44.5,1600,2,4 "Entergy",39094,39097,39097,51,47,49.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39097,39098,39098,58.5,53.5,56.06,6400,8,8 "Entergy",39098,39099,39099,62,56,58.97,7200,9,9 "Entergy",39099,39100,39100,54.5,53,53.6,4000,5,5 "Entergy",39100,39101,39101,50.75,50,50.15,4000,5,9 "Entergy",39101,39104,39104,55,53,54,2400,3,3

332

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

546,40547,40547,55.25,54,54.67,7.01,27200,29,18 546,40547,40547,55.25,54,54.67,7.01,27200,29,18 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40547,40548,40548,50,48.75,49.39,-5.28,14400,16,14 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40548,40549,40549,54.25,53,53.44,4.05,24800,31,23 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40549,40550,40550,55.5,53.25,54.05,0.61,84800,80,24 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40550,40553,40553,65.5,64.75,65.01,10.96,21600,25,18 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40553,40554,40554,71,68.5,69.33,4.32,15200,18,17 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40554,40555,40555,79,72,77.51,8.18,68800,85,29 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40555,40556,40556,100.5,88,94.96,17.45,40000,49,23 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40556,40557,40557,92.25,87,87.7,-7.26,25600,31,23 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40557,40560,40560,66,63.5,65.03,-22.67,28000,30,17

333

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

355,38356,38356,41,39,40.13,6.73,12000,14,13 355,38356,38356,41,39,40.13,6.73,12000,14,13 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38356,38357,38357,41,40,40.57,0.44,13600,15,15 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38357,38358,38358,44,42,43.23,2.66,30400,35,16 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38358,38359,38359,46.25,44,45.07,1.84,17600,22,12 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38359,38362,38362,39.5,38.75,39.17,-5.9,9600,12,11 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38362,38363,38363,45,41.5,43.31,4.14,26400,32,17 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38363,38364,38364,44,41.25,41.8,-1.51,16000,19,15 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38364,38365,38365,39.5,38.5,39.1,-2.7,10400,13,13 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38365,38366,38366,51.5,47,48.26,9.16,57600,58,17 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38366,38369,38369,65,63,63.48,15.22,23200,21,14

334

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

182,40183,40183,100.5,95,97,19.88,33600,42,27 182,40183,40183,100.5,95,97,19.88,33600,42,27 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40183,40184,40184,95,90,92.96,-4.04,39200,49,25 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40184,40185,40185,94,83,86.45,-6.51,33600,42,30 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40185,40186,40186,90,81.5,83.19,-3.26,47200,53,27 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40186,40189,40189,91,88.75,89.88,6.69,42400,53,30 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40189,40190,40190,71,67.75,68.95,-20.93,78400,95,30 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40190,40191,40191,61.25,58.75,59.99,-8.96,52800,64,31 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40191,40192,40192,56.25,54.75,55.33,-4.66,71200,82,32 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40192,40193,40193,53.75,53,53.36,-1.97,44000,55,25 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40193,40196,40196,55.75,54.75,55.64,2.28,21600,25,12

335

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Rt Peak",41246,41247,41247,31.5,31.5,31.5,-1.5,1600,2,3 Indiana Rt Peak",41246,41247,41247,31.5,31.5,31.5,-1.5,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41247,41248,41248,34,33.5,33.75,2.25,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41248,41249,41249,37.25,37,37.13,3.38,8000,10,9 "Indiana Rt Peak",41249,41250,41250,34.25,33.25,33.67,-3.46,2400,3,6 "Indiana Rt Peak",41250,41253,41253,38.25,37,37.5,3.83,12800,16,13 "Indiana Rt Peak",41253,41254,41254,37.75,37.5,37.63,0.13,1600,2,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41254,41255,41255,34,34,34,-3.63,2400,3,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41255,41256,41256,32.25,32,32.19,-1.81,3200,4,6 "Indiana Rt Peak",41256,41257,41257,31,31,31,-1.19,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41257,41260,41260,33,32,32.5,1.5,1600,2,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41260,41261,41261,33.9,33.5,33.66,1.16,3200,4,7

336

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40911,40912,40912,35.25,34,34.38,-13.52,6400,8,9 40911,40912,40912,35.25,34,34.38,-13.52,6400,8,9 "Indiana",40912,40913,40913,31,30.45,30.73,-3.65,4800,6,7 "Indiana",40913,40914,40914,31,28.75,30.27,-0.46,20000,25,14 "Indiana",40917,40918,40918,29.05,29,29.03,-1.24,1600,2,4 "Indiana",40918,40919,40919,29.5,28.5,29.02,-0.01,5600,7,8 "Indiana",40919,40920,40920,32.25,30.75,31.59,2.57,6400,8,7 "Indiana",40920,40921,40921,35,33.25,33.92,2.33,30400,37,19 "Indiana",40921,40924,40924,29.5,29,29.25,-4.67,1600,2,4 "Indiana",40924,40925,40925,31.5,29.75,30.52,1.27,7200,9,8 "Indiana",40925,40926,40926,30.25,29.5,30,-0.52,3200,4,6 "Indiana",40926,40927,40927,33.75,32,32.61,2.61,13600,17,16 "Indiana",40927,40928,40928,33.5,32.5,33,0.39,9600,12,12

337

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

37.25,35.5,36.16,3.13,27200,25,16 37.25,35.5,36.16,3.13,27200,25,16 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",32,31,31.63,-4.53,12800,15,14 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",26.25,25.5,25.86,-5.77,7200,7,10 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.5,38.5,39.21,13.35,20000,24,13 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.75,45,46.51,7.3,27200,32,19 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43.5,42,42.79,-3.72,39200,46,20

338

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26,25.25,25.71,-1.15,6800,16,15 26,25.25,25.71,-1.15,6800,16,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",24,23.25,23.63,-2.08,14400,17,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",23.85,22,23.36,-0.27,8800,22,16 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",21.85,19.25,20.77,-2.59,10000,25,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",21.75,20,21.32,0.55,9600,23,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",21.25,19,20.42,-0.9,7200,16,14

339

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40.5,40.35,40.43,2.67,3200,8,3 40.5,40.35,40.43,2.67,3200,8,3 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41,40.85,40.97,0.54,2000,2,3 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.25,36.25,36.25,-4.72,3200,1,2 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.05,39,39.02,2.77,1200,2,2 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.25,36.25,36.25,-2.77,3200,2,3 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.75,36.5,36.63,0.38,1600,4,3

340

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

258,37259,37259,31,27.5,29.51,108000,101,28 258,37259,37259,31,27.5,29.51,108000,101,28 "PJM West",37259,37260,37260,28.25,26.95,27.38,107200,96,32 "PJM West",37260,37263,37263,26.7,26.25,26.45,102400,106,29 "PJM West",37263,37264,37264,26.25,25.45,25.75,87200,81,27 "PJM West",37264,37265,37265,24.85,24.2,24.45,53600,58,27 "PJM West",37265,37266,37266,23.6,22.5,23.05,88000,87,25 "PJM West",37266,37267,37267,23.05,22.75,22.91,72000,79,24 "PJM West",37267,37270,37270,25.1,24.55,24.88,75200,82,29 "PJM West",37270,37271,37271,23.65,22.6,23.44,47200,44,22 "PJM West",37271,37272,37272,23.05,22.85,22.95,42400,47,21 "PJM West",37272,37273,37273,23.6,23.1,23.33,68000,76,27 "PJM West",37273,37274,37274,23.8,23.3,23.47,72800,73,28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50.25,49,49.68,2.51,19200,46,20 50.25,49,49.68,2.51,19200,46,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49.5,48.5,49.1,-0.58,18000,43,18 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49.25,47,48.32,-0.78,27200,63,23 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",55,50.5,52.65,4.33,23200,29,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.75,46.5,47.18,-5.47,13600,34,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.75,44.75,45.82,-1.36,13600,28,18

342

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,50.33,2.26,87200,193,30 8,50.33,2.26,87200,193,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.5,48.4,-1.93,70400,154,29 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,46.48,-1.92,62000,146,28 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49,51.48,5,90400,108,29 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.5,45.53,-5.95,38800,94,28

343

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,44.25,43.5,43.87,2.68,16400,29,14 1246,41247,41247,44.25,43.5,43.87,2.68,16400,29,14 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41247,41248,41248,43,42,42.36,-1.51,36800,59,23 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41248,41249,41249,40.25,39.75,40,-2.36,17200,24,11 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41249,41250,41251,37,36.5,36.56,-3.44,31200,28,13 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41250,41253,41253,41.25,40,40.84,4.28,12000,26,16 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41253,41254,41254,39.5,38.5,39.08,-1.76,12400,26,15 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41254,41255,41255,39.45,39,39.11,0.03,15600,26,13 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41255,41256,41256,43.75,42,43.02,3.91,16000,32,20 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41256,41257,41258,43,40.5,42.17,-0.85,38400,32,18 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41257,41260,41260,42,41.5,41.62,-0.55,6400,10,11

344

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,49.6,0.49,22400,56,24 7,49.6,0.49,22400,56,24 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",54,56.09,6.49,29200,73,27 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57.5,60.07,3.98,28400,71,26 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",50,55.19,-4.88,32800,41,20 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.5,56.14,0.95,20800,52,22

345

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

084,39085,39085,43.25,43.25,43.25,-1.79,800,1,2 084,39085,39085,43.25,43.25,43.25,-1.79,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39086,39087,39087,42.5,42.25,42.38,-0.87,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",39087,39090,39090,43.25,43.25,43.25,0.87,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39090,39091,39091,45,45,45,1.75,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39091,39092,39092,44.5,44.5,44.5,-0.5,800,1,2,,,," " "ERCOT-South",39099,39100,39100,62,62,62,17.5,3200,4,6 "ERCOT-South",39100,39101,39101,56.5,56,56.17,-5.83,2400,3,5 "ERCOT-South",39101,39104,39104,55,55,55,-1.17,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39104,39105,39105,57.25,57,57.08,2.08,2400,3,4 "ERCOT-South",39105,39106,39106,59,58,58.54,1.46,4800,6,5 "ERCOT-South",39106,39107,39107,58,57.75,57.81,-0.73,3200,4,5 "ERCOT-South",39107,39108,39108,54.5,54.5,54.5,-3.31,800,1,2

346

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

720,38721,38721,69,68,68.6,1.54,74400,63,23 720,38721,38721,69,68,68.6,1.54,74400,63,23 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38721,38722,38722,74.25,69,70.77,2.17,68000,68,33 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38722,38723,38723,77.75,73.5,76.91,6.14,61600,70,35 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38723,38726,38726,74,69,70.06,-6.85,55200,57,22 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38726,38727,38727,63,61.75,62.52,-7.54,60800,72,29 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38727,38728,38728,55,51,53.51,-9.01,68800,55,30 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38728,38729,38729,50.5,49,49.37,-4.14,56000,55,25 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38729,38730,38730,50.6,49.5,50.17,0.8,54400,55,25 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38730,38733,38733,63.5,59,60.85,10.68,36800,37,23 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38733,38734,38734,65,64,64.63,3.78,12000,10,13

347

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

449,39450,39450,74,72,73,1600,2,4 449,39450,39450,74,72,73,1600,2,4 "Entergy",39450,39451,39451,64,64,64,800,1,2 "Entergy",39451,39454,39454,47.5,46.5,47,2400,3,3 "Entergy",39454,39455,39455,41.5,41,41.17,2400,3,3 "Entergy",39455,39456,39456,43,43,43,800,1,2 "Entergy",39456,39457,39457,52,49,50.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39457,39458,39458,49,49,49,800,1,2 "Entergy",39458,39461,39461,67,67,67,800,1,2 "Entergy",39461,39462,39462,73,73,73,800,1,2 "Entergy",39462,39463,39463,69,68,68.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39463,39464,39464,70,64,68,2400,3,3 "Entergy",39464,39465,39465,65,65,65,1600,2,2 "Entergy",39465,39468,39468,79,75,76.67,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39468,39469,39469,74,73,73.7,4000,5,8

348

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8720,38721,38721,51,50,50.625,3200,4,4 8720,38721,38721,51,50,50.625,3200,4,4 "Entergy",38721,38722,38722,56.5,53.5,55.3,4000,5,7 "Entergy",38722,38723,38723,60,60,60,5600,6,5 "Entergy",38723,38726,38726,59,58,58.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy",38726,38727,38727,55.5,53,54.1,4000,5,5 "Entergy",38727,38728,38728,53.5,52,53.0938,6400,8,9 "Entergy",38728,38729,38729,49,46,47.6667,9600,11,8 "Entergy",38729,38730,38730,49,47.5,48.0417,4800,6,7 "Entergy",38730,38733,38733,54.25,54.25,54.25,800,1,2 "Entergy",38733,38734,38734,53.75,53.75,53.75,800,1,2 "Entergy",38734,38735,38735,62,58,60.1,4000,5,6 "Entergy",38735,38736,38736,60,58,58.875,4800,4,5 "Entergy",38736,38737,38737,55,50,53.1944,7200,9,8

349

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

623,37624,37624,32.5,29,30.16,20800,26,20 623,37624,37624,32.5,29,30.16,20800,26,20 "Entergy",37624,37627,37627,36.75,34.75,35.54,28800,27,18 "Entergy",37627,37628,37628,38,35.5,36.31,45600,53,26 "Entergy",37628,37629,37629,35,31.25,33.69,26400,33,21 "Entergy",37629,37630,37630,33.55,32.75,33.19,22400,26,20 "Entergy",37630,37631,37631,37.75,34.5,35.51,36000,45,24 "Entergy",37631,37634,37634,43.75,38.25,41.62,36800,46,20 "Entergy",37634,37635,37635,42.5,38,40.72,17600,22,18 "Entergy",37635,37636,37636,43,42,42.61,16800,21,17 "Entergy",37636,37637,37637,43,41.25,42.02,12000,15,15 "Entergy",37637,37638,37638,50,44.15,45.85,8800,10,13 "Entergy",37638,37641,37641,41,39.25,40.1,31200,29,16 "Entergy",37641,37642,37642,41.75,38,40.09,25600,27,15

350

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43.75,40,42.24,2.81,10000,25,19 43.75,40,42.24,2.81,10000,25,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",40,38.75,39.35,-2.89,12400,31,16 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,41.5,43.54,4.19,16000,38,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44,42.25,43.09,-0.45,13600,34,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41.5,40,40.64,-2.45,20000,25,16 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.25,41,41.35,0.71,14000,34,17

351

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6894,36895,36895,74.5,74,74.25,1600,2,3 6894,36895,36895,74.5,74,74.25,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36899,36900,36900,83,81,82,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36900,36901,36901,89,88,88.67,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL",36901,36902,36902,77.5,73,75.25,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36902,36903,36903,75.75,75.75,75.75,800,1,2 "NEPOOL",36903,36906,36906,75,74,74.5,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL",36906,36907,36907,80,76.5,77.75,3200,4,3 "NEPOOL",36907,36908,36908,79.5,76,78.38,3200,4,4 "NEPOOL",36908,36909,36909,75.5,74.5,75,3200,3,4 "NEPOOL",36909,36910,36910,71.75,70.75,71.25,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36910,36913,36913,74.75,74,74.4,4000,5,3 "NEPOOL",36914,36915,36915,67.5,66.5,67,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL",36915,36916,36916,67,65.75,66.33,2400,3,2 "NEPOOL",36916,36917,36917,65,61.25,63.38,3200,4,3

352

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,47,48.2,3.37,9600,24,17 1,47,48.2,3.37,9600,24,17 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56,53,55.36,7.17,9600,24,17 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58.2,55,57.22,1.85,9200,23,17 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.25,49,50.04,-7.18,8400,21,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,43.5,44.24,-5.8,26400,28,22 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.5,50,51.46,7.22,7600,19,15

353

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48,45.75,46.49,-0.96,30000,63,25 48,45.75,46.49,-0.96,30000,63,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.5,45,46.75,0.26,31600,79,22 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51,45,45.83,-0.92,40000,50,24 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51.25,47.75,48.43,2.6,26000,51,22 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.75,49.25,50.5,2.07,27200,68,23 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.5,51.5,52.02,1.52,46400,55,20

354

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

62,66.21,-0.74,44400,109,30 62,66.21,-0.74,44400,109,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",60,64.12,-2.09,45200,113,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",59,60.9,-3.22,99200,123,29 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62,63.2,2.3,50400,114,31 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",61.75,62.98,-0.22,48800,122,31

355

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43.25,42,42.63,4.13,1600,2,4 43.25,42,42.63,4.13,1600,2,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.65,42.65,42.65,0.02,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.25,44,44.86,2.21,5600,7,8 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.5,45.75,46.08,1.22,2400,3,6 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,45,45,-1.08,4000,4,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.75,44.75,44.75,-0.25,1600,2,4

356

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

355,38356,38356,56.85,56.25,56.7,6400,7,7 355,38356,38356,56.85,56.25,56.7,6400,7,7 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38356,38357,38357,55.25,55,55.0833,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38357,38358,38358,59,59,59,800,1,2 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38358,38359,38359,57.5,57,57.25,2400,3,5 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38359,38362,38362,55.5,55.5,55.5,3200,4,6 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38362,38363,38363,58.75,58,58.575,9600,11,10 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38363,38364,38364,57.75,57.5,57.625,1600,2,4 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38364,38365,38365,55.75,55.25,55.4688,12800,15,11 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38365,38366,38366,58.5,58.25,58.4583,4800,5,6 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38366,38369,38369,92,85,88.7143,5600,7,8 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38369,38370,38370,97.5,97,97.1667,2400,3,5

357

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

22.6,23.25,-1.53,6400,14,16 22.6,23.25,-1.53,6400,14,16 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",18.25,18.97,-4.28,6400,8,9 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",18,19.32,0.35,5600,14,10 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",17,17.24,-2.08,7200,12,10 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",18,18.61,1.38,7200,17,17

358

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

988,37991,37991,38.5,38,38.29,10400,13,11 988,37991,37991,38.5,38,38.29,10400,13,11 "Entergy",37991,37992,37992,56,50.5,51.79,15200,19,13 "Entergy",37992,37993,37993,60,56,58.95,12000,15,9 "Entergy",37993,37994,37994,55,51,52.44,16800,21,14 "Entergy",37994,37995,37995,43,40.5,41.28,7200,9,9 "Entergy",37995,37998,37998,45,39,40.86,5600,7,8 "Entergy",37998,37999,37999,39.5,38,38.42,8000,10,7 "Entergy",37999,38000,38000,39,36,37.48,10400,12,9 "Entergy",38000,38001,38001,40.25,38,38.66,14400,17,10 "Entergy",38001,38002,38002,39,36.25,36.98,10400,12,9 "Entergy",38002,38005,38005,39,37,37.44,13600,12,9 "Entergy",38005,38006,38006,55,48,52.64,5600,7,10 "Entergy",38006,38007,38007,54,47,50.58,12000,15,11

359

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65.25,63,64.48,0.53,9600,12,15 65.25,63,64.48,0.53,9600,12,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",59,57,57.68,-6.8,20000,23,13 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58,57,57.45,-0.23,8800,9,9 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57,55.75,56.53,-0.92,8000,10,12 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57.5,56,56.46,-0.07,10400,13,10 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",59.25,56.75,58.09,1.63,20000,25,17

360

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7988,37991,37991,62,62,62,800,1,2 7988,37991,37991,62,62,62,800,1,2 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37991,37992,37992,70,69,69.5,1600,2,2 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37992,37993,37993,75.25,72,73.81,3200,4,6 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37993,37994,37994,81,76,78.3,8000,10,11 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37994,37995,37995,85.75,81.5,84.24,12800,16,12 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37998,37999,37999,77,72.5,74.12,6400,8,9 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37999,38000,38000,120,92,104.81,16800,21,11 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38000,38001,38001,375,270,311.75,6400,8,8 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38001,38002,38002,175,170,171,4000,5,5 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38005,38006,38006,90,84,86.78,7200,9,7 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38006,38007,38007,94,81.5,87.42,10400,13,13 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38007,38008,38008,76,72,74.69,6400,8,8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

31.9,30.75,31.02,,14000,34,10 31.9,30.75,31.02,,14000,34,10 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",28.85,28,28.3,-2.72,52000,59,13 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",31.5,31,31.22,2.92,20000,41,13 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",34.25,33.4,33.8,2.58,22000,47,13 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",30,29.75,29.9,-3.9,52800,54,16 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",28.25,27.85,27.95,-1.95,48000,57,11

362

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59.05,59,59.03,2.03,1600,2,3 59.05,59,59.03,2.03,1600,2,3 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63,63,63,3.97,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62.5,60,61,-2,2400,3,6 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63.75,63,63.32,2.32,5600,7,8 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56,55,55.5,-7.82,3200,4,5 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",55.5,55.5,55.5,0,800,1,2

363

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

815,39818,39818,58.5,55.25,56.28,5.13,40000,45,27 815,39818,39818,58.5,55.25,56.28,5.13,40000,45,27 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39818,39819,39819,60.25,57.75,58.92,2.64,109600,119,41 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39819,39820,39820,58,55,56.66,-2.26,49600,60,29 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39820,39821,39821,55.55,55,55.21,-1.45,48000,56,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39821,39822,39822,63,60.75,61.9,6.69,38400,46,28 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39822,39825,39825,69,66,67.63,5.73,62400,74,37 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39825,39826,39826,66.5,61,64.03,-3.6,91200,107,40 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39826,39827,39827,85.5,80,82.91,18.88,103200,124,50 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39827,39828,39828,100,88,93.22,10.31,110400,135,51 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39828,39829,39829,110,93,98.58,5.36,77600,93,37

364

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

988,37991,37991,43.25,36,38.11,35200,40,16 988,37991,37991,43.25,36,38.11,35200,40,16 "PJM West",37991,37992,37992,53.5,50,51.99,33600,41,24 "PJM West",37992,37993,37993,70,66.25,67.48,34400,40,25 "PJM West",37993,37994,37994,62,59.65,60.58,36000,41,19 "PJM West",37994,37995,37995,56.75,53,54.66,32800,39,23 "PJM West",37995,37998,37998,53.75,51.25,52.44,40000,47,25 "PJM West",37998,37999,37999,54,52.55,53.14,37600,47,24 "PJM West",37999,38000,38000,65.25,61.5,63.18,30400,37,20 "PJM West",38000,38001,38001,88,77,82.58,50400,57,28 "PJM West",38001,38002,38002,90,77,80.76,31200,37,20 "PJM West",38002,38005,38005,53.25,52.75,53.03,30400,38,18 "PJM West",38005,38006,38006,70,67,68.64,36000,45,24

365

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

150,150,,400,1,2 150,150,,400,1,2 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",180,180,30,2400,3,4 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",310,310,130,400,1,2 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",350,350,40,400,1,2 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",165,165,-185,800,1,2

366

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,27.5,27.5,27.5,0.17,800,1,2 1246,41247,41247,27.5,27.5,27.5,0.17,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41247,41248,41248,28.5,28.5,28.5,1,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41248,41249,41249,30,30,30,1.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41250,41253,41253,30,29,29.5,-0.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",41253,41254,41254,30,29.75,29.88,0.38,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",41254,41255,41255,29.75,29.75,29.75,-0.13,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41269,41270,41270,32,32,32,2.25,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",41355,41358,41358,38.5,38.5,38.5,6.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41367,41368,41368,35,35,35,-3.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41425,41428,41428,37,37,37,2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41436,41437,41437,42,42,42,5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41446,41449,41449,41,41,41,-1,800,1,2

367

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

32.5,33.04,-3.33,15200,19,19 32.5,33.04,-3.33,15200,19,19 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",37,37.32,4.28,7600,19,18 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",35,35.46,-1.86,9600,24,22 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",37,38.66,3.2,14800,36,27 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.75,40.34,1.69,9200,23,22

368

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.83,-2.17,8800,11,6 0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.83,-2.17,8800,11,6 "ERCOT Houston",40912,40913,40913,28.3,28,28.18,1.35,4800,6,7 "ERCOT Houston",40913,40914,40914,26.35,26.2,26.29,-1.89,3200,4,6 "ERCOT Houston",40914,40917,40917,27.25,27,27.13,0.84,8000,10,5 "ERCOT Houston",40917,40918,40918,27.75,27.5,27.58,0.45,2400,3,3 "ERCOT Houston",40918,40919,40919,27.5,27.5,27.5,-0.08,1600,2,2 "ERCOT Houston",40919,40920,40920,31.5,31,31.33,3.83,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston",40920,40921,40921,31,30.25,30.5,-0.83,2400,2,4 "ERCOT Houston",40925,40926,40926,26,25.75,25.96,-4.54,5600,7,4 "ERCOT Houston",40926,40927,40927,23.75,23.75,23.75,-2.21,2400,3,5 "ERCOT Houston",40928,40931,40931,22.15,22.15,22.15,-1.6,800,1,2

369

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

258,37259,37259,26,22.95,24.08,51200,64,19 258,37259,37259,26,22.95,24.08,51200,64,19 "Entergy",37259,37260,37260,28.25,24.5,26.09,38400,47,17 "Entergy",37260,37263,37263,22.5,17,20.72,34400,43,16 "Entergy",37263,37264,37264,25,19,20.17,19200,24,15 "Entergy",37264,37265,37265,20,19,19.55,44000,54,19 "Entergy",37265,37266,37266,23,18.75,19.31,50400,62,18 "Entergy",37266,37267,37267,19,15,18.21,45600,56,18 "Entergy",37267,37270,37270,18.85,17.4,18.21,65600,81,17 "Entergy",37270,37271,37271,21.75,18.2,19.01,24800,28,18 "Entergy",37271,37272,37272,22.35,18.95,20.98,31200,38,16 "Entergy",37272,37273,37273,22,19,21.2,49600,62,22 "Entergy",37273,37274,37274,22.5,19.5,20.93,46400,55,20 "Entergy",37274,37277,37277,19.75,18.75,19.26,36000,45,18

370

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39904,39905,39905,30.85,30,30.44,"na",69200,129,16 SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39904,39905,39905,30.85,30,30.44,"na",69200,129,16 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39905,39906,39907,28.7,27.5,28.03,-2.41,119200,103,17 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39906,39909,39909,31.5,30.25,30.5,2.47,43200,89,17 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39909,39910,39910,33.3,32.45,32.83,2.33,40800,80,20 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39910,39911,39912,29,28,28.69,-4.14,116000,117,22 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39911,39913,39914,27.25,26.55,26.88,-1.81,96800,110,21 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39912,39916,39916,28.5,27.5,28.01,1.13,58000,119,19 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39916,39917,39917,26.65,25,26.27,-1.74,26400,51,17 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39917,39918,39918,28.25,27.7,27.97,1.7,55600,101,20

371

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43,39.05,41.9,4.15,5600,7,8 43,39.05,41.9,4.15,5600,7,8 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",40.5,38.5,39.53,-2.37,3200,4,7 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.25,38.25,38.9,-0.63,13600,17,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41.5,39,40,1.1,10400,13,11 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39,37.75,38.3,-1.7,12000,14,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.5,43,43.4,5.1,4000,5,5

372

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

62.5,65.15,3.64,62800,150,34 62.5,65.15,3.64,62800,150,34 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",54.25,61.54,-3.61,153600,172,34 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",60.5,62.02,0.48,81200,188,36 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",61.75,62.73,0.71,69600,168,34 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62.75,63.47,0.74,74400,170,34

373

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,45.5,-0.2,22800,57,25 1,45.5,-0.2,22800,57,25 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43.5,45.44,-0.06,96000,198,32 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.25,43.27,-2.17,89600,210,33 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39,42.7,-0.57,118400,261,35 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.5,43.86,1.16,169600,196,33

374

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40182,40183,40183,60.5,60.5,60.5,7.5,800,1,2 40182,40183,40183,60.5,60.5,60.5,7.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40183,40184,40184,62.25,62.25,62.25,1.75,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40189,40190,40190,63.5,60.75,62.42,0.17,2400,3,3 "Entergy Peak",40190,40191,40191,46,45,45.5,-16.92,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",40196,40197,40197,40,40,40,-5.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40197,40198,40198,40,40,40,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40198,40199,40199,38,38,38,-2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40199,40200,40200,38,38,38,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40204,40205,40205,47,47,47,9,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40205,40206,40206,45,45,45,-2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40206,40207,40207,48,48,48,3,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40210,40211,40211,43,43,43,-5,800,1,2

375

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

449,39450,39450,131,114,125.81,37.67,95200,116,49 449,39450,39450,131,114,125.81,37.67,95200,116,49 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39450,39451,39451,106,99,102.43,-23.38,78400,96,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39451,39454,39454,54,52.5,53.44,-48.99,65600,74,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39454,39455,39455,45,41,42.69,-10.75,87200,98,48 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39455,39456,39456,47.5,45,46.31,3.62,47200,57,36 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39456,39457,39457,59.5,54.25,57.53,11.22,35200,44,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39457,39458,39458,51,46.25,48.3,-9.23,72800,88,51 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39458,39461,39461,76.5,70,74.88,26.58,103200,121,42 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39461,39462,39462,80,75.5,77.94,3.06,109600,127,40 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39462,39463,39463,72,68,70.47,-7.47,78400,95,35

376

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

911,40912,40912,56,52,53.84,-11.87,161600,191,55 911,40912,40912,56,52,53.84,-11.87,161600,191,55 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40912,40913,40913,39,38,38.7,-15.14,45600,54,30 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40913,40914,40914,33.25,33,33.05,-5.65,42400,53,33 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40914,40917,40917,37.25,36.5,36.8,3.75,43200,51,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40917,40918,40918,36,35.25,35.53,-1.27,48000,57,31 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40918,40919,40919,35,34.2,34.6,-0.93,32000,40,28 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40919,40920,40920,35.5,35,35.14,0.54,43200,48,27 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40920,40921,40921,40.75,38.6,39.44,4.3,108000,111,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40921,40924,40924,43.5,41.6,42.69,3.25,61600,74,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40924,40925,40925,35.25,34.5,34.68,-8.01,36000,44,23

377

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Da LMP Peak",41246,41247,41247,48,45.75,47.16,-7.85,40000,48,21 Da LMP Peak",41246,41247,41247,48,45.75,47.16,-7.85,40000,48,21 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41247,41248,41248,58.5,55,57.81,10.65,26400,32,21 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41248,41249,41249,79.75,75,76.49,18.68,32800,39,18 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41249,41250,41250,65,50.5,51.47,-25.02,35200,42,23 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41250,41253,41253,47,45.5,46.48,-4.99,12800,16,14 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41253,41254,41254,50,46,47.3,0.82,38400,44,22 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41254,41255,41255,70,57,59.54,12.24,39200,49,19 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41255,41256,41256,50,48.25,48.97,-10.57,53600,59,29 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41256,41257,41257,39.25,38.5,38.98,-9.99,11200,14,10 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41257,41260,41260,45,45,45,6.02,3200,4,6

378

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

82,75,79.66,6.43,30400,38,26 82,75,79.66,6.43,30400,38,26 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62,58,60.11,-19.55,24000,30,22 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.05,43.75,44.81,-15.3,24000,28,17 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",38,36,36.89,-7.92,35200,39,17 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44,41.5,42.84,5.95,32000,39,23 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",48,44,46.44,3.6,22400,28,20

379

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

46,48.6,-4.22,46000,115,33 46,48.6,-4.22,46000,115,33 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.5,49.21,0.61,51600,120,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.75,46.71,-2.5,123200,150,36 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.5,49.35,2.64,63600,151,36 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.3,49.44,0.09,65600,163,34

380

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34.5,34.5,34.5,3.21,1600,2,3 34.5,34.5,34.5,3.21,1600,2,3 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",35.75,35.5,35.58,1.08,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.5,36,36.25,0.67,4000,5,7 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.25,36,36.13,-0.12,3200,4,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44,43.5,43.75,7.62,3200,4,6 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.25,43.75,44.04,0.29,5600,7,8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.63,-2.76,6400,8,6 0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.63,-2.76,6400,8,6 "ERCOT-South",40912,40913,40913,28,27.25,27.72,1.09,8000,9,7 "ERCOT-South",40913,40914,40914,25.75,25.75,25.75,-1.97,2400,3,4 "ERCOT-South",40914,40917,40917,27,27,27,1.25,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",40919,40920,40920,31,31,31,4,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40920,40921,40921,30.25,30.25,30.25,-0.75,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40925,40926,40926,25.5,25.5,25.5,-4.75,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40926,40927,40927,23.25,23.25,23.25,-2.25,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40931,40932,40932,24.5,24.5,24.5,1.25,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40932,40933,40933,26,25.75,25.96,1.46,4800,6,4 "ERCOT-South",40933,40934,40934,28,27,27.5,1.54,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",40934,40935,40935,29,28.75,28.88,1.38,1600,2,4

382

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

68.5,66,67.29,5.05,28400,71,21 68.5,66,67.29,5.05,28400,71,21 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65,62.5,63.85,-3.44,27200,66,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.25,61.75,63.39,-0.46,80800,99,26 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.75,63.5,64.58,1.19,49200,107,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.75,64,64.98,0.4,32400,81,24 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.25,62.25,63.26,-1.72,78400,96,25

383

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65.75,63,64.97,4.97,29600,55,25 65.75,63,64.97,4.97,29600,55,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62.25,59,61.4,-3.57,106400,109,24 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63,59.25,60.22,-1.18,45600,102,26 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63.5,61.75,62.26,2.04,40400,86,26 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",64.2,62,62.52,0.26,38400,75,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",66.45,62,63.19,0.67,45200,87,27

384

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PJM-West Real Time Peak",41276,41277,41277,44,41.75,42.64,-6.4,60000,72,34 PJM-West Real Time Peak",41276,41277,41277,44,41.75,42.64,-6.4,60000,72,34 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41277,41278,41278,37,36,36.53,-6.11,19200,23,23 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41278,41281,41281,36.5,36,36.17,-0.36,41600,48,32 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41281,41282,41282,33.05,32.5,32.61,-3.56,20800,26,18 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41282,41283,41283,33.75,32.5,32.91,0.3,37600,43,30 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41283,41284,41284,31,30.25,30.64,-2.27,26400,31,26 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41284,41285,41285,29.9,29.25,29.66,-0.98,38400,26,23 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41285,41288,41288,32.5,31.5,32.14,2.48,40000,50,28 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41288,41289,41289,37.5,34.5,36.5,4.36,64800,74,35

385

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

39815,39818,39818,42,39,41,4.5,2400,3,4 39815,39818,39818,42,39,41,4.5,2400,3,4 "Entergy Peak",39818,39819,39819,44.5,44.5,44.5,3.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",39819,39820,39820,44.5,44,44.25,-0.25,1600,2,4 "Entergy Peak",39820,39821,39821,46,45,45.5,1.25,2400,3,6 "Entergy Peak",39821,39822,39822,45,45,45,-0.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",39822,39825,39825,45,40,42.5,-2.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",39825,39826,39826,48,48,48,5.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",39827,39828,39828,55,53,54,6,1600,2,4 "Entergy Peak",39828,39829,39829,56,53,54.33,0.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy Peak",39832,39833,39833,42.5,42.5,42.5,-11.83,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",39833,39834,39834,43,42,42.5,0,1600,2,4 "Entergy Peak",39836,39839,39839,40,38,39,-3.5,1600,2,3

386

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,30,30,30,-2.63,1600,2,2 1246,41247,41247,30,30,30,-2.63,1600,2,2 "ERCOT Houston",41250,41253,41253,33,33,33,3,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41260,41261,41261,27,26.9,26.98,-6.02,4000,5,4 "ERCOT Houston",41263,41264,41264,28.5,28.25,28.33,1.35,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston",41270,41271,41271,26.5,26.5,26.5,-1.83,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41288,41289,41289,34.25,34,34.13,7.63,1600,2,3 "ERCOT Houston",41289,41290,41290,33.85,33.75,33.78,-0.35,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston",41338,41339,41339,34.75,34.25,34.58,0.8,2400,3,3 "ERCOT Houston",41372,41373,41373,42.75,42.75,42.75,8.17,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41381,41382,41382,35.55,35.55,35.55,-7.2,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41386,41387,41387,37.5,37.5,37.5,1.95,800,1,2

387

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60.75,57.5,59.33,7.47,34400,42,23 60.75,57.5,59.33,7.47,34400,42,23 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58.5,55,56.62,-2.71,36800,45,25 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65,62.25,63.61,6.99,76000,86,34 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",66.5,60,63.84,0.23,43200,52,26 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58.5,55,57.1,-6.74,36000,41,21 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",48,44,46.02,-11.08,33600,42,27

388

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

546,40547,40547,37,37,37,0,800,1,2 546,40547,40547,37,37,37,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40547,40548,40548,36,36,36,-1,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40548,40549,40549,33.75,33.75,33.75,-2.25,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",40550,40553,40553,42,42,42,8.25,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40555,40556,40556,52.75,49,50.88,8.88,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",40562,40563,40563,38.5,38,38.1,-12.78,4000,5,4 "Entergy Peak",40563,40564,40564,39,39,39,0.9,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40567,40568,40568,39,39,39,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40568,40569,40569,38,38,38,-1,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40571,40574,40574,36,36,36,-2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40574,40575,40575,39.5,39.5,39.5,3.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40575,40576,40576,37,36.5,36.75,-2.75,1600,2,2

389

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DA LMP",40911,40912,40912,92,84.75,87.16,-14.07,46400,56,29 DA LMP",40911,40912,40912,92,84.75,87.16,-14.07,46400,56,29 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40912,40913,40913,49,46,47.55,-39.61,78400,77,24 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40913,40914,40914,39.75,39.25,39.57,-7.98,12000,15,10 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40914,40917,40917,39,38,38.39,-1.18,8800,11,9 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40917,40918,40918,38.25,38,38.14,-0.25,8000,9,11 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40918,40919,40919,41.5,39.9,40.88,2.74,70400,83,25 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40919,40920,40920,37.25,36.75,36.83,-4.05,20000,23,16 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40920,40921,40921,44,43.5,43.73,6.9,11200,11,12 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40921,40924,40924,67,65.5,66.35,22.62,16800,21,15 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40924,40925,40925,50.75,50,50.24,-16.11,11200,14,12

390

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6893,36894,36894,65.5,64.5,65,1600,2,2 6893,36894,36894,65.5,64.5,65,1600,2,2 "PJM West",36894,36895,36895,63,59.5,61.25,3200,4,2 "PJM West",36895,36896,36896,60,58.5,59.12,4800,6,4 "PJM West",36899,36900,36900,59.5,59.5,59.5,800,1,2 "PJM West",36900,36901,36901,58,55.5,56.61,5600,7,6 "PJM West",36901,36902,36902,50.5,49,49.75,3200,4,4 "PJM West",36902,36903,36903,47,46,46.33,4800,6,3 "PJM West",36903,36906,36906,45.5,45,45.12,3200,4,6 "PJM West",36906,36907,36907,46,42,44.21,5600,7,6 "PJM West",36907,36908,36908,42.5,42,42.4,4000,4,7 "PJM West",36908,36909,36909,41,39,39.56,7200,7,6 "PJM West",36909,36910,36910,39.5,39,39.25,2400,3,5 "PJM West",36910,36913,36913,51,50,50.43,5600,5,6

391

Seagate Crystal Reports - Radcm  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Dry Active Waste Dry Active Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 01585 STREAM NAME:Dry Active Waste MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: 87,675.000 Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Dry Active W aste Isotopes Hafnium-181 Avg Concentration: 1.4222E-007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Iridium-192 Avg Concentration: 1.2220E-003 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Molybdenum-99 Avg Concentration: 3.6706E-008 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Protactinium-234m Avg Concentration: 5.1907E-009 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Lead-212 Avg Concentration: 1.6569E-009 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Silver-111 Avg Concentration: 3.2355E-007 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Arsenic-73 Avg Concentration: 1.4091E-010 Ci/m3

392

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Great Smoky Mountains National Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Smoky Mountains Project (GSMP) Great Smoky Mountains Project (GSMP) Background Fine particle annual mass concentrations in the Tennessee Valley range from 14 to20 micrograms per cubic meter. All seven urban/suburban sites exceeded the annual PM2.5 standard; only the rural Lawrence County TN site remained below the 15 µg/m3 annual standard. None of the stations exceeded the 65 µg/m3 level of the 24-hour PM2.5 standard. Summer high-winter low seasonality is evident. The current FRM PM2.5 mass measurements under-estimate the contribution of volatile/semi-volatile nitrates and organic carbon species. The semi-volatile organic fraction is both highly variable and significant, and assessments of semi-volatile and non-volatile organic carbon fractions are needed when particle composition measurements are made, especially at urban sites.

393

Nuevo Engomado de Ahorro de Combustible y Medio Ambiente  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acerca del Engomado Vehículos de Gasolina Vehiculos Híbridos Enchufables Vehículos Eléctricos Códigos QR | Comparta Aprenda más Acerca del Nuevo Engomado Vea el Vídeo Acerca de los Códigos QR. Pulse en la pestaña para ver los nuevos engomados para varios tipos de vehículos/combustibles. Mueva el cursor encima de cada parte del engomado para leer más. Veh. de Gasolina Veh. Híbrido Eléctrico Enchufable (PHEV) Veh. Eléctrico Muestra el tipo de combustible o combustibles que un vehículo puede usar. Usted verá comúnmente "Vehículo de Gasolina", "Vehículo de Combustible Flexible": Gasolina-Etanol, o Vehículo Diesel." Lea más Encuentre los cálculos de MPG de ahorro de combustible aquí. Los cálculos Combinados de Ciudad/Carretera son los más sobresalientes para

394

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

395

Ambient addition : how to turn urban noise into music  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As human civilization devises ever more powerful machines, living among them may become more difficult. We may find ourselves surrounded by incidentally created sounds and noises which are out of synchronization with our ...

Vawter, Noah (Noah Theodore)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ambient Addition: How to turn urban noise into music  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As human civilization devises ever more powerful machines, living among them may become more difficult. We may find ourselves surrounded by incidentally created sounds and noises which are out of synchronization with our momentary needs and discordant. Currently, legislating noise pollution is the only articulated solution and clearly it is not very effective. Our impression of sound, however, may be mediated and manipulated, transformed into something less jarring. So far, Walkmans and sound canceling headphones have done this, isolating us from noise but also from one another. In their place, a next generation headphone system is proposed which integrates environmental sound into a personal soundscape. It allows one to synthesize music from environmental sound using a number of digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms to create a sonic space in which the listener remains connected with his or her surroundings, is also cushioned from the most harsh and arrhythmic incursions and may also be drawn to

Noah Vawter; Noah Vawter; Noah Vawter; Chris Csikszentmihlyi; Noah Vawter; Barry Vercoe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Ambient power : the joint production of perception and space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fear and exuding a depleted-uranium rage (a rage that isfull of explosive depleted-uranium shells, another sealed

McGarvey, Matthew Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Non-ambient Diffraction in the Laboratory Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developments · Sample displacement ­ the old irritant... · DIY setups · Considerations and `mind-set' · LowK ­ Not a simple add-on #12;DIY under pressure? · Home-designed and built pressure vessels? · Space for sample) · Design concepts and validation · QC and manufacture Just one of the ASME pressure codes... #12;DIY

Magee, Joseph W.

399

Asymmetric planar gradiometer for rejection of uniform ambient magnetic noise  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An asymmetric planar gradiometer for use in making biomagnetic measurements. The gradiometer is formed from a magnetometer which is inductively-coupled to the smaller of two connected loops patterned in a superconducting film which form a flux transformer. The magnetometer is based on a SQUID formed from a high T.sub.c superconducting material. The flux transformer and magnetometer may be formed on separate substrates, allowing the baseline to be increased relative to presently available devices.

Dantsker, Eugene (Torrance, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Spatio-terminological inference for the design of ambient environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an approach to assist the smart environment design process by means of automated validation of work-in-progress designs. The approach facilitates validation of not only the purely structural requirements, but also the functional requirements ... Keywords: architecture, ontology, requirements modeling, smart environment design, spatio-terminological reasoning

Mehul Bhatt; Frank Dylla; Joana Hois

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Modeling Ambient Air Quality In The Detroit-Windsor Airshed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial variability of airborne contaminants in an international airshed was investigated using geostatistics and air dispersion modeling. Analyses were conducted on contaminant species measured (more)

Molaroni, Shannon Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Atmosphere as Culture: Ambient Media and Postindustrial Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

campaign, focused on esoteric destinations like Mount K?ya .the founder of Shingon esoteric Buddhism and a highlyspace, a passage affording an esoteric journey towards quiet

Roquet, Paul

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ni-MH battery modelling for ambient intelligence applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile devices, like sensor networks and MEMS actuators use mobile power supplies to ensure energy for their operation. These are mostly batteries. The lifetime of the devices depends on the power consumption and on the quality and capacitance of the battery. Though the integrated circuits and their power consumption improve continually, their clock frequency also increases with the time, and the resultant power consumption seems not to vary, or slightly increase. On the other hand, the properties of batteries are developing much slower, necessitating the optimization of their usage on system level.

Szente-Varga, D; Rencz, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wireless sensor networks: Enabling technology for ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensor networks are one of the most rapidly evolving research and development fields for microelectronics. Their applications are countless, and the market potentials are huge. However, many technical hurdles have to be overcome to achieve a ... Keywords: Bio-sensors, Embedded systems, Energy efficiency, Wireless sensor networks

L. Benini; E. Farella; C. Guiducci

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Shaping of Filamentary Streamers by the Ambient Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... differential preference for tip extension versus lateral ... The power-law lines for different exponents ... been lengthened to 47 grid steps, approximating ...

407

Ambient noise levels and reverberation times in Mississippi school rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine elementary school classrooms at three Mississippi public schools were selected at random for noise and reverberation time measures to monitor voluntary compliance with ANSI standard S12.60-2002 (Acoustical Performance Criteria

Edward L. Goshorn; Brett E. Kemker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ambient monitoring of pollutants around synfuel plants : final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to aid in the evaluation of Environmental Monitoring Plans (EMP) submitted to the U.S. Synfuel Corporation by prospective operators of large-scale synfuel plants who are applying for financial ...

Golomb, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Lifting of Ambient Air by Density Currents in Sheared Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two aspects of vorticity associated with cold pools are addressed. First, tilting of horizontal vortex tubes by the updraft at a gust front has been proposed as a means of getting near-ground rotation and hence a tornado. Theory and a numerical ...

Robert Davies-Jones; Paul Markowski

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P{sub 450} reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates. 1 fig. 2 tab.

Shelnutt, J.A.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Investigacin sobre acondicionamiento ambiental y sostenibilidad en las prospecciones petrolferas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??El proyecto de tesis parti del cuestionamiento de conocer los impactos medioambientales causados por las distintas actividades derivadas de la industria petrolera, siendo que las (more)

Serna Murillo, Jos Antonio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Guia para a Avaliao do Risco Ambiental de Organismos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Flora faneroga^- mica da Ilha do Cardoso (Sa~o Paulo, Brasil). Champion Papel e Celulose, Sa~o Paulo, pp

Parrott, Wayne

413

Spatial Misalignment in Studies of the Acute Effects of Ambient ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... States. Speakers: Dr. Roger Peng Department of BioStatistics Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Details: ...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nanomechanical studies of metallic glasses at ambient and elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses, though attractive for use in structural applications for their high strength and elastic limit, display several unacceptable features upon deformation, including quasi-brittle failure along shear ...

Packard, Corinne E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ambient Temperature Stress Corrosion Cracking of 304L Stainless ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Study on the Stress Test of Truck Frames for Freight Trains A Study on the ... Defect Energetics and Fission Product Transport in ZrC Deformation Field and...

416

Synthesis of Monolithic Iron Incorporated Silica Aerogels by Ambient ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Fe to Si molar ratio not exceeding 0.10, the bulk density of iron incorporated silica aerogels increased to 0.55g/cm3, while the porosity reduced to 76%...

417

Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Lars-ke Nslund (both SSRL) who presented recent dataa dedicated APXPS endstation at SSRL. The second day of the

Bluhm, Hendrik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Using ambient noise to extract coherent environmental information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Wefrom the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treatys (CTBT)of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the

Fried, Stephanie Evelyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Automatic electrochemical ambient air monitor for chloride and chlorine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical monitoring system has been provided for determining chloride and chlorine in air at levels of from about 10-1000 parts per billion. The chloride is determined by oxidation to chlorine followed by reduction to chloride in a closed system. Chlorine is determined by direct reduction at a platinum electrode in 6 M H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 electrolyte. A fully automated system is utilized to (1) acquire and store a value corresponding to electrolyte-containing impurities, (2) subtract this value from that obtained in the presence of air, (3) generate coulometrically a standard sample of chlorine mixed with air sample, and determine it as chlorine and/or chloride, and (4) calculate, display, and store for permanent record the ratio of the signal obtained from the air sample and that obtained with the standard.

Mueller, Theodore R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

RESPIRATORY DISEASES Prenatal ambient air exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

422

Ambient Sulfate Trends and the Influence of Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on atmospheric levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate were examined to quantify changes since 1989. Changes in sulfur species were adjusted to account for meteorological variability. Adjustments were made using meteorological variables ...

Stephen F. Mueller

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in Ambient Magnetic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a healthy individual, the rate at which the heart beats exhibits continuous variability. In prior research at Midwest Research Institute (MRI), exposure to intermittent, but not continuous, magnetic fields was associated with alterations in heart rate variability (HRV). This report describes additional studies specifically designed to address the potential effects of magnetic field exposure on HRV.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification Turbines Fuel Cells FutureGen Advanced Research Contacts Industrial Capture & Storage...

425

Ambient power : the joint production of perception and space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

house of language and the Library of Congress, categorizing form is the active element descending upon a passive

McGarvey, Matthew Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Packaged Low-level Waste from SNF Activities Packaged Low-level Waste from SNF Activities WASTE STREAM CODE: 00265 STREAM NAME:Packaged Low-level Waste from SNF Activities MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: 2.900 Approved Volume : 0.000 Future Volume Avg: 18.500 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Hot Cell W aste Isotopes Strontium-90 Avg Concentration: 1.5800E+000 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Curium-244 Avg Concentration: 9.1700E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Europium-152 Avg Concentration: 4.6400E-001 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Plutonium-238 Avg Concentration: 2.4100E-002 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Europium-154 Avg Concentration: 4.0100E-001 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Plutonium-240 Avg Concentration: 8.4500E-003 Ci/m3

427

ARM - VAP Product - pblhtsonde1mcfarl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productspblhtpblhtsonde1mcfarl Productspblhtpblhtsonde1mcfarl Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095386 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : PBLHTSONDE1MCFARL Planetary Boundary Layer Height Value Added Product: Radiosonde Retrievals Active Dates 2001.04.01 - 2014.01.08 Originating VAP Process Planetary Boundary Layer Height : PBLHT Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Dry bulb ambient air temperature degC air_temp ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt Atmospheric pressure hPa atm_pres ( time )

428

Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop 1 March 2010 BREAKOUT GROUP 5: LONG TERM INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Electrolyzers · Batteries High Temp Electrochemistry · SOFC systems design · High temp FC testing · SOFC FC) ­ Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is best entry pathway > H2 Highways Initiatives (California and Illinois

429

Microsoft Word - _NT42962_ Revised NETL Report Covers.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3500 4000 depth temp'r (F) ICE METHANE HYDRATE FORMATION TEMP GRADIENT BASE PERMAFROST GAS and LIQUIDS SOLID HYDRATE 4 Log Response to Methane Hydrates Much of the published...

430

Evaluation and Recommendations for Improving the Accuracy of an Inexpensive Water Temperature Logger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Onset's HOBO U22 Water Temp Pros are small, reliable, relatively inexpensive, self-contained temperature loggers that are widely used in studies of oceans, lakes, and streams. An in-house temperature bath calibration of 158 Temp Pros indicated ...

S. J. Lentz; J. H. Churchill; C. Marquette; J. Smith

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Molecular Phylogeny Reconstruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Phylogeny Reconstruction Sudhir Kumar, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA Alan Filipski, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA Molecular phylogenetics deals with the inference molecular data. By modelling patterns of molecular change in protein and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA

Kumar, Sudhir

432

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Source: National Weather Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; available at temp on ftpprd.ncep.noaa.gov...

433

Dr. Stephen A. Wise, Technical Program Director  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Chemistry, BA (1972), Weber State University, Ogden, Utah; Analytical Chemistry, Ph.D. (1976), Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona. Contact. ...

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

David Duewer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Education: Chemistry, BS, University of Washington, Seattle 1967-1971; NDEA Graduate Research, Arizona State University, Tempe 1971-1973; ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

Electrical Protection of Cellular Radio Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... clamping voltages and energy-handling capacities ... of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590 ... "Data Book," General Semiconductor Industries, Tempe ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

TRANSIENT OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION SEMINAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... clamping voltages and energy-handling capacities ... of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590 ... Data Book, General Semiconductor Industries, Tempe ...

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

AEGIS le Libellio d' Volume 6, numro 1 Dumez Herv (2010) "Vancouver", Le Libellio d'Aegis, volume 6, n 1, printemps, pp. 53-60  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dans le Surrey, à Petersham. Il travailla durant deux ans, eut juste le temps de relire les épreuves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Electronics & Telecommunications News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... layer (top) more. Magnetic Ties May Explain High-Temp Superconductors Release Date: 07/06/2006 When it comes ...

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sequence VG Test FIELD SERVICE SIMULATED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" and "cold" stuck piston compression rings. Rate clogging of oil pump screen and piston oil rings. Measure EVALUATION Rate sludge deposits on rocker arm covers, cam baffles, timing chain cover, oil pan baffle, oil. Press., kPa Oil Temp, °C Coolant Temp, °C Rocker Cover Temp, °C E114323 PARAMETER PASS LIMIT Average

Chapman, Clark R.

440

R AdResource Adequacy Advisory CommitteeAdvisory Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel/electricity prices Fuel supply 7*Were used last year for extensive sensitivity analysis. #12Random Variables Hydro: Sequential 1929-2008Hydro: Sequential 1929 2008 Temp/Load: Random 1929-2005 Wi d Wind: ­ Lockstep with temp (1929-2005) ­ 20 wind profiles for each temp year Thermal Forced Outage: Ong 6 #12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Missouri Missouri SITE: KansasCity PROGRAM: DP WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Albuquerque Operations Office % of Stream KansasCity - Low Level Waste - Low Level Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 04442 STREAM NAME:Low Level Waste MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: 50.000 Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Low Level W aste Isotopes Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: 1.0000E-003 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Hydrogen-3 Avg Concentration: 5.0000E-003 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Nickel-63 Avg Concentration: 2.5000E-001 Ci/m3 Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: STATE: Missouri SITE: W eldon PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: 11e(2) Byproduct Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Oak Ridge Operations Office % of Stream

442

Seagate Crystal Reports - Snf10  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Stream Characteristic Detail (SNF-10) Stream Characteristic Detail (SNF-10) STATE: California SITE: GenAtomics PROGRAM: Office of Environmental Management OPERATIONS OFFICE: Oakland Operations Office GenAtomics - Spent Nuclear Fuel - TRIG A Reactor SNF STREAM CODE: 01725 Stream Fuel Types DOE Test SNF SST clad Storage Facility % of Stream Quantity GA TRIGA Reactor Facility 100 % of Stream Quantity Source Reactor GA-TRIGA MARK F 100.00 % of Stream TOTAL CURIES: ISOTOPE AND CONTAMINANT PROFILES 100 TRIGA Reactor SNF Isotopes Avg Concentration: 1.7706E-006 Ci Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Actinium-227 Avg Concentration: 2.6087E+001 Ci Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Americium-241 Avg Concentration: 1.1960E-001 Ci Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Americium-242m Avg Concentration: 5.0739E-002 Ci

443

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Iowa Iowa SITE: Ames Lab PROGRAM: SC WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office % of Stream Ames Lab - Low Level Waste - Low Level Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 00275 STREAM NAME:Low Level Waste MPC NAME:Heterogeneous Debris TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Isotopes Thorium-232 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream Ames Lab - Low Level Waste - TRU Waste WASTE STREAM CODE: 03941 STREAM NAME:TRU Waste MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: % of Stream Ames Lab - Low Level Waste - Low Level Waste FY 2046-2070

444

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Jersey Jersey SITE: Princeton PROGRAM: SC WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office % of Stream Princeton - Low Level Waste - Compactable LLW WASTE STREAM CODE: 00492 STREAM NAME:Com pactable LLW MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 Compactable LLW Isotopes Cobalt-60 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent:5.0000E-003 Ci/m3 Upper Limit Concent:5.0000E-003 Ci/m3 Hydrogen-3 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent:5.0040E-003 Ci/m3 Upper Limit Concent:1.0000E+001 Ci/m3 % of Stream Princeton - Low Level Waste - Non-Compactable LLW WASTE STREAM CODE: 00493 STREAM NAME:Non-Compactable LLW MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit:

445

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Braking Energy Recovery (%) 14% City Trips ( < 5 stopsmile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 402 Number of trips 694 Distance traveled (mi) 1,450 Percent...

446

Henning Lohse-Busch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

V6 FFV Test Cycle Fuel Usage Summary Table Test I.D. Engine 2012 Ford Fusion V6 2012 Ford Fusion V6 Estimated Shifts cycle Avg. Engine Spd rpm when moving % Total Fuel Used %...

447

Data from Table 2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processes and Potential. Global Change Biology 6:317-327. Site history Years since agriculture Soil sample depth (cm) Rate of change (g m-2 y-1) Reference MAX AVG Cool temperate...

448

American Mineralogist, Volume 88, pages 763769, 2003 0003-004X/03/0506763$05.00 763  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RT Percent 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 -QF AEK AVG DER DMV EER GER GIK GTH GTR IHY LKY PEA PEK PER PTH QER RER

Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

449

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with battery state of charge below 90% (for charging events with SOC reported) Vehicle Usage Number of trips 3,364 Total distance traveled (mi) 21,706 Avg trip distance (mi) 5.8...

450

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21,462.2 City % of miles 54% Hwy % of miles 46% Amp Hours throughput lifetime 36,249.8 Avg. energy consumption (DC Whmi) 236.4 March 5, 2012 through July 25, 2013 872013 1:58:40...

451

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

City % of miles 55% Hwy % of miles 45% Amp Hours throughput lifetime 39,508.5 Avg. energy consumption (DC Whmi) 233.9 March 5, 2012 through September 9, 2013 9132013 4:02:33 PM...

452

Application Programming Interface Documentation - Qb - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SERIES NAME: MMBTU per Unit : International Paper Courtland Mill : Wood/Wood Waste Solids : All Primemovers : Quarterly SERIES ID: ELEC.PLANT.AVG_HEAT.50245-WDS-ALL.Q

453

Holistic design for multi-core architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of event-based triggers using the sample-avgWith the individual-event trigger, a sampling phase iscontrast, with the global-event trigger, we sum the absolute

Kumar, Rakesh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31.6 million acres 9 2007 Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold 6.1 billion 19 2007 Prices Petroleum Colorado U.S. Avg. Period Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase 61.78barrel...

455

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8.5 million acres 32 2007 Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold 10.3 billion 8 2007 Prices Petroleum North Carolina U.S. Avg. Period 12 Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase -...

456

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercial IndustrialTable 16. Non-coincident peak demand by sector. growth Avg.IEPR Projected non-coincident peak demand (MW) 3.1.2. Hourly

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Wind Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avg Wind Speed 7.5 m/s 8.74 m/s GE 2.x turbine family ... 1 to 48 Hour Wind Forecasting ... Danish Transmission Grid w/ Interconnects & Offshore Sites ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Evidence of Employment Discrimination on the Basis of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity: Complaints Filed with State Enforcement Agencies 1999-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY Vermont (1991) Sexual Orientation+ Color Sex Avg. Source: Vermont Human Rights CommissionOregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

care to save as much as possible from the fully loaded condition in the upgrade. Inverse learning curve @ 90% avg. powerkW 39 100 freqMHz 2856 952 data: 150k for the last one...

460

EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

events (mi) 25.8 Avg number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.4 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ARM - Datastreams - 30twr10x  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30twr10x Archive Data Plot Datastream : 30TWR10X Sixty Meter Tower: temperature, humidity, & vapor pressure, 30-min avg Active Dates 1997.09.12 - 2013.07.23 Measurement...

462

ARM - Datastreams - 30twr60m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30twr60m Archive Data Plot Datastream : 30TWR60M Sixty Meter Tower: temperature, humidity, & vapor pressure at 60-m, 30-min avg Active Dates 1996.02.06 - 2013.07.23...

463

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PowerProjections2003(avgusing5-03water,BrokerPrices)(amended).xls SLIP Energy WY Gross Gen from Hydro LP Dolores Gen. Total SLIP Gross Gen Avg. Plant Use SLIP Net Gen @ Plant...

464

U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Imports and Exports Form...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OMB No. 1901-0294 U.S. Department of Energy Natural Gas Imports and Exports Form FE-746R Expiration Date: 7312016 AVG Burden: 3.0 hours MonthYear: Importer...

465

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26 26 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 253 Number of trips¹ 526,156 Total distance traveled (mi) 4,369,753 Avg trip distance (mi)² 8.2 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 39.4 Avg number of trips between charging events 3.4 Avg distance traveled between charging events (mi) 27.9 Avg number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.4 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: ALL Number of vehicles: 1766 Reporting period: January 2013 through March 2013 Charging Location Home charging location³ Away-from-home charging locations Unknown charging locations Total number of charging events 124,954 21,973 7,718 Percent of all charging events 81% 14% 5% 1 A trip is defined as all the driving done between consecutive "key-on" and "key-off" events when some distance was traveled.

466

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26 26 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 229 Number of trips¹ 369,118 Total distance traveled (mi) 3,001,976 Avg trip distance (mi) 8.1 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 40.5 Avg number of trips between charging events 3.5 Avg distance traveled between charging events (mi) 28.2 Avg number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.4 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: ALL Number of vehicles: 1021 Reporting period: October 2012 through December 2012 Charging Location and Type Home charging location² Away-from- home charging locations³ Unknown charging locations Number of charging events 86,264 13,547 6,698 Percent of all charging events 81% 13% 6% 1 A trip is defined as all the driving done between consecutive "key-on" and "key-off" events when some distance was traveled.

467

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Kentucky Kentucky SITE: Paducah PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Oak Ridge Operations Office % of Stream Paducah - Low Level Waste - LLW Rubble/Debris WASTE STREAM CODE: 00438 STREAM NAME:LLW Rubble/Debris MPC NAME:Debris W aste TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 LLW Debris Isotopes Neptunium-237 Avg Concentration: 1.0000E+000 pCi/g Low Limit Concent:0.0000E+000 pCi/g Upper Limit Concent:2.4000E+001 pCi/g Technetium-99 Avg Concentration: 5.0000E+001 pCi/g Low Limit Concent:0.0000E+000 pCi/g Upper Limit Concent:1.4210E+003 pCi/g Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: 5.0000E+001 pCi/g Low Limit Concent:0.0000E+000 pCi/g Upper Limit Concent:9.7800E+002 pCi/g Uranium-235 Avg Concentration: 7.0000E-001 wt%

468

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

California California SITE: EnergyTech PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Oakland Operations Office % of Stream EnergyTech - Low Level Waste - LLW-Defense D&D Waste (from ER) WASTE STREAM CODE: 01669 STREAM NAME:LLW-Defense D&D Waste (from ER) MPC NAME:Solids TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 0.000 Future Volume Avg: 221.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 LLW -Defense D&D W aste (from ER) Isotopes Americium-241 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:8.1000E-002 nCi/m l Europium-152 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:2.7000E-002 nCi/m l Plutonium-239 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:2.7000E-001 nCi/m l Cobalt-60 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent:5.4000E+002 nCi/m

469

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

55 55 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 242 Number of trips¹ 147,886 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,184,265 Avg trip distance (mi) 8.0 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 39.6 Avg number of trips between charging events 3.2 Avg distance traveled between charging events (mi) 26.0 Avg number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.5 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: ALL Number of vehicles: 408 Reporting period: April 2012 through June 2012 Charging Location and Type Home charging location² Away-from- home charging locations³ Unknown charging locations Number of charging events 36,015 6,374 3,179 Percent of all charging events 79% 14% 7% 1 A trip is defined as all the driving done between consecutive "key-on" and "key-off" events when some distance was traveled.

470

Evaluation of the Science in Support of Human Health Ambient Water Criteria Values for Boron Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the available human health water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds and critically reviewed the science that results in different water quality criteria recommended by different regulatory bodies. Currently, water quality criteria for boron and boron compounds are recommended by several regulatory bodies, including EPA, the World Health Organization, Health Canada, the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, California Department of Public Health, ...

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

471

Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kim, A. P. Seitsonen, S. Wendt, E. Lundgren, M. Schmid, P.Kim, A. P. Seitsonen, S. Wendt, J. Wang, C. Fan, K. Jacobi,

Salmeron, Miquel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

els to the solar measurements from the ebu weather stationels to the solar measurements from the ebu weather stationto the hourly solar data from the cz07 weather file. The

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Effect of seasonal variations of ambient temperatures on the performance of low temperature power cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the performance of the binary fluid system was carried out in two stages. In the first stage the ideal case was analyzed as to the effects of sinusoidal variations of the heat rejection temperature on the ideal work available from a steady flow of a geothermal brine delivered to a power plant under constant wellhead conditions. In the second stage an approximate method for analyzing actual cases was introduced. Results indicate that sink temperature fluctuations have a drastic effect on the output of low-temperature power cycles. The severe fluctuations in the output are likely to have a strong influence on the design and optimization studies of such cycles. The impact of this on the economies of electric power generation from geothermal resources should be carefully assessed before choosing among possible energy-conversion systems. (JGB)

Khalifa, H.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to fan electricity demand. All of these equationsmeasurements. The electricity demand outputs of all modelsonly overall building electricity demand measurements. The

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Elliptical Warm-Core Rings in a Two-Layer Ocean with Ambient Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rodon solution for an elliptical vortex with outcropping interface is extended from the reduced-gravity limit to the two-layer model. Motions in the lower layer consist of a reaction to the presence of the upper-layer vortex, or of an ...

Benoit Cushman-Roisin; Shabnam Merchant-Both

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

PROGRESS TOWARD BROAD-BAND AMBIENT NOISE TOMOGRAPHY IN EURASIA Michael H. Ritzwoller1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nonproliferation Research and Development Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Contract No. DE-FC52-2005NA

Ritzwolle, Mike

477

Real-time automatic interpolation of ambient gamma dose rates from the Dutch radioactivity monitoring network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of radiological accidents and monitoring the spread of the contamination is of great importance. Following the Chernobyl accident many European countries have installed monitoring networks to perform this task. Real-time availability of automatically ... Keywords: Automatic interpolation, Interoperability, Kriging, Monitoring networks, Web services

Paul H. Hiemstra; Edzer J. Pebesma; Chris J. W. Twenhfel; Gerard B. M. Heuvelink

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Node with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of harvested energy. Thanks to these energy managements, we achieve efficient energy usage and maximize. Software energy managements for WSNs are typically realized by exploiting this feature and thus the goal by aggregation of the capacitor leakage characteristics and energy shortage risk. Table 1. Energy usage in long

Tentzeris, Manos

479

Li corrosion resistant glasses for headers in ambient temperature Li batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing 10 to 50 mol% CaO, 10 to 50 mol% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 30 to 60 mol% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0 to 30 mol% MgO are provided. These compositions are capable of forming a stable glass-to-metal seal possessing electrical insulating properties for use in a lithium battery. Also provided are lithium cells containing a stainless steel body and molybdenum center pin electrically insulated by means of a seal produced according to the invention.

Hellstrom, E.E.; Watkins, R.D.

1985-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

480

Deserts are water-controlled ecosystems characterized by high ambient temperature (Ta), intense solar radiation,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Wisconsin 53706; 2 National Wildlife Research Center, P.O. Box 1086, Taif, Saudi Arabia; 3 Department. Stepane Ostrowski at the Arabian Oryx Reserve, Saudi Arabia, who provided climate data, a small fur sample on interpolations of weather- station data that are deliberately collected far enough above the ground that local

Williams, Jos. B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "avg ambient temp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Interspecific variation in gill size is correlated to ambient dissolved oxygen in the Amazonian electric fish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Saint-Paul and Soares 1987; Chapman and Liem 1995; Crampton 1998a, b; McKinsey and Chapman 1998; Kobza, 2002; Crampton 1998a, b; McKinsey and Chapman 1998), and predator­prey interactions with

Chapman, Lauren J.

482

Power/energy estimator for designing WSN nodes with ambient energy harvesting feature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) consist of spatially distributed autonomous sensors to cooperatively monitor physical conditions. Thus, the node battery autonomy is critical. To outperform it, most WSNs rely on the harvesting capability. As nodes can ...

Nicolas Ferry; Sylvain Ducloyer; Nathalie Julien; Dominique Jutel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Nombre : ECONOMA DE LA ENERGA Y EL MEDIO AMBIENTE / ENERGY ECONOMICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2010.09.119. "Mitigation of CO2 emission with CNG vehicles: "A Case Study of Delhi

Rudnick, Hugh

484

A New Portable Instrument for Continuous Measurement of Formaldehyde in Ambient Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for ...

W. Junkermann; J. M. Burger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most of the K Basin sludge characterization data is derived spent nuclear fuel corroded within the K Basins at 10-15?C. The STP process will place water-laden sludges from the K Basin in process vessels at {approx}150-180 C. Therefore, published studies with other irradiated (uranium oxide) fuel were examined. From these studies, the affinity of plutonium and americium for uranium in irradiated UO2 also was demonstrated at hydrothermal conditions (150 C anoxic liquid water) approaching those proposed for the STP process and even for hydrothermal conditions outside of the STP operating envelope (e.g., 150 C oxic and 100 C oxic and anoxic liquid water). In summary, by demonstrating that the chemical and physical behavior of 241Am in the sludge matrix is similar to that of the predominant species (uranium and for the plutonium from which it originates), a technical basis is provided for using the slow uptake transportability factor for 241Am that is currently used for plutonium and uranium oxides. The change from moderate to slow uptake for 241Am could reduce the overall analyzed dose consequences for the STP by more than 30%.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Individual Particle-Analysis of Ambient PM2.5 Using Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

communities near southwestern Detroit, MI (close to multiple combustion sources including motor vehiclediesel, incinerators, and oil and coal combustion sources) and Steubenville,...

487

Field study of the impact of a desktop task/ambient conditioning system in office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Envi- ronmental Design Research (CEDR) at U.C. Berkeley. Theand Annette Quinn, of CEDR at U.C. Berkeley. REFERENCES

Bauman, Fred; Carter, T.; Baughman, A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The Effect of Elevated Conductor and Ambient Temperatures on Polymer Insulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greater demand for power throughput on new and existing transmission lines will result in conductors being operated at progressively higher temperatures due to increased currents. The effect of these elevated conductor temperatures on polymer suspension insulators attached to the conductor is of concern. The maximum permissible conductor temperature has been generally limited by the maximum allowable conductor sag, which in turn is determined by conductor clearance regulations. Conductor sag is a functio...

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

489

Ambient-temperature superconductor symetrical metal-dihalide bis-(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K. which is high for organic superconductors.

Williams, Jack M. (Downers Grove, IL); Wang, Hsien-Hau (Willowbrook, IL); Beno, Mark A. (Woodridge, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

AVALIAO AMBIENTAL DA OCUPAO ESPACIAL DO VALE DO RIO TOCANTINS POR USINAS HIDRELTRICAS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In Brazil, due to its enormous quantity of rivers, most part of the electric energy available comes from large hydroelectric power plants. The construction of (more)

Jlio Csar Ibiapina Neres

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the ambient pressure superconductor CePt3Si  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the evolution of superconductivity (sc) and antiferromagnetism (afm) in the heavy fermion compound CePt3Si with hydrostatic pressure. We present a pressure-temperature phase diagram established by electrical transport measurements. Pressure shifts the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, to lower temperatures. Antiferromagnetism is suppressed at a critical pressure Pc ? 0.5 GPa. Key words: CePt3Si, superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, hydrostatic pressure Superconductivity (sc) is one of the most striking effects in solid state physics. In a conventional superconductor Cooper pairing is mediated by phonons. In general, magnetism destroys superconductivity. In heavy fermion systems, however, sc exists in close proximity to magnetism, promoting the suspicion that the sc is mediated by magnetic excitations. Since the discovery of sc in the heavy fermion compound CeCu2Si2 at atmospheric pressure [1], only a few Ce-based systems were found which also exhibit sc at atmospheric pressure, like CeMIn5 (M=Co, Ir) [4]. Most superconducting pure Ce-based systems show sc only under applied pressure sufficient to suppress long range magnetic order, like CeIn3 [2] or CeRh2Si2 [3]. CeIn3 displays a typical temperature-pressure phase diagram for these compounds; antiferromagnetism (afm) is suppressed to zero temperature with pressure and sc develops right in the vicinity where afm disappears [2]. Very recently another material, namely CePt3Si, was found showing magnetic order and sc at atmospheric pressure [5]. In contrast to the systems mentioned before, the crystal

M. Nicklas A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Characterization of ambient aerosol composition and formation mechanisms and development of quantification methodologies utilizing ATOFMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particles are residential wood combustion (RWC) and vehiclecompounds emitted from wood combustion [Schauer et al. ,particles emitted from wood combustion, peaked each night in

Qin, Xueying

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

The Contribution of Motor Vehicles and Other Sources to Ambient Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and alliedmainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and alliedmainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and allied

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from residential wood combustion, Environmental Science &Characterization of aging wood chip combustion aerosol in anof particles from wood chip combustion [Leskinen et al. ,

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most of the K Basin sludge characterization data is derived spent nuclear fuel corroded within the K Basins at 10-15?C. The STP process will place water-laden sludges from the K Basin in process vessels at {approx}150-180 C. Therefore, published studies with other irradiated (uranium oxide) fuel were examined. From these studies, the affinity of plutonium and americium for uranium in irradiated UO2 also was demonstrated at hydrothermal conditions (150 C anoxic liquid water) approaching those proposed for the STP process and even for hydrothermal conditions outside of the STP operating envelope (e.g., 150 C oxic and 100 C oxic and anoxic liquid water). In summary, by demonstrating that the chemical and physical behavior of 241Am in the sludge matrix is similar to that of the predominant species (uranium and for the plutonium from which it originates), a technical basis is provided for using the slow uptake transportability factor for 241Am that is currently used for plutonium and uranium oxides. The change from moderate to slow uptake for 241Am could reduce the overall analyzed dose consequences for the STP by more than 30%.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

497

Avaliao scio-econmica e ambiental do complexo hidreltrico de Belo Monte.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente trabalho tem como objetivo tratar da construo do Complexo Hidreltrico de Belo Monte, trazendo informaes sobre aspectos econmicos, de produo e consumo energtico. (more)

Neidja Cristine Silvestre Leito

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

The Predictive Uncertainty of Land Surface Fluxes in Response to Increasing Ambient Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exchange of water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO2) between the land surface and the atmosphere plays an important role in numerical weather forecasting and climate change prediction using general circulation models. In this study, a typical ...

Karsten Schulz; Andrew Jarvis; Keith Beven; Henrik Soegaard

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy: a new tool for surface science and nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Schlogl, Angewandte Chemie- International Edition 2005,R. Schlogl, Angewandte Chemie-International Edition 2004,

Salmeron, Miquel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Thermoregulatory model to predict physiological status from ambient environment and heart rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A real-time thermoregulatory model was developed for predicting real-time physiological responses of workers engaged in various tasks for prolonged time. The unique feature of the present model is primarily on metabolic activity inputs derived from minimum ... Keywords: Air temperature, Core temperature, Heart rate, Heat stress, Real-time modeling

Miyo Yokota; Larry Berglund; Samuel Cheuvront; William Santee; William Latzka; Scott Montain; Margaret Kolka; Daniel Moran

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z