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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Probabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution; Numerical weather prediction; Skewed distribution; Truncated data; Wind energy. 1. INTRODUCTION- native. Purely statistical methods have been applied to short-range forecasts for wind speed only a fewProbabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging J. Mc

Raftery, Adrian

2

Probabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to issue deterministic forecasts based on numerical weather prediction models. Uncertainty canProbabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging J. Mc discretization than is seen in other weather quantities. The prevailing paradigm in weather forecasting

Washington at Seattle, University of

3

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at larger heights above ground level? The wind resource at a wind farm can be estimated in two ways: by measurement or by modeling

4

United States- Land Based and Offshore Annual Average Wind Speed at 100 Meters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Full-size, high resolution version of the 100-meter land-based and offshore wind speed resource map.

5

Forecasting wind speed financial return  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prediction of wind speed is very important when dealing with the production of energy through wind turbines. In this paper, we show a new nonparametric model, based on semi-Markov chains, to predict wind speed. Particularly we use an indexed semi-Markov model that has been shown to be able to reproduce accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed. The model is used to forecast, one step ahead, wind speed. In order to check the validity of the model we show, as indicator of goodness, the root mean square error and mean absolute error between real data and predicted ones. We also compare our forecasting results with those of a persistence model. At last, we show an application of the model to predict financial indicators like the Internal Rate of Return, Duration and Convexity.

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

7

VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind energy is currently the fastest-growing renewable source of energy in India; India is a key market for the wind industry, presenting substantial opportunities for both the international and domestic players. In India the research is carried out on wind energy utilization on big ways.There are still many unsolved challenges in expanding wind power, and there are numerous problems of interest to systems and control researchers. In this paper we study the pitch control mechanism of wind turbine. The pitch control system is one of the most widely used control techniques to regulate the output power of a wind turbine generator. The pitch angle is controlled to keep the generator power at rated power by reducing the angle of the blades. By regulating, the angle of stalling, fast torque changes from the wind will be reutilized. It also describes the design of the pitch controller and discusses the response of the pitch-controlled system to wind velocity variations. The pitch control system is found to have a large output power variation and a large settling time.

Chatinderpal Singh

8

Surface wind speed distributions| Implications for climate and wind power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Surface constituent and energy fluxes, and wind power depend non-linearly on wind speed and are sensitive to the tails of the wind distribution. Until… (more)

Capps, Scott Blair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wind Speed Prediction Via Time Series Modeling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Projected construction of nearby wind farms motivates this study of statistical forecasting of wind speed, for which accurate prediction is critically important to the fluid… (more)

Alexander, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

11

Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

Zhu, Xinxin

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Microsoft Word - idaho_wind_speed_summary.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ft. Hall, ID Sites Wheat Grass Ridge Average Wind Speeds Site 0001 (66 ft. (20m) tower, erected week of 11101, data started on 11201) N. 42 deg. 44.762', W. 112 deg. 41.011'...

13

Microsoft Word - utah_wind_speed_summary.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jeff Anderson Site Castle Valley, Utah Average Wind Speeds Site 0006 (66 ft. (20m) tower, data started on 110601, data ended 112102) N. 38.635 deg., W. 109.397 deg. Elevation...

14

Dual-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)] [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wind Speed Data Analysis using Wavelet Transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—Renewable energy systems are becoming a topic of great interest and investment in the world. In recent years wind power generation has experienced a very fast development in the whole world. For planning and successful implementations of good wind power plant projects, wind potential measurements are required. In these projects, of great importance is the effective choice of the micro location for wind potential measurements, installation of the measurement station with the appropriate measuring equipment, its maintenance and analysis of the gained data on wind potential characteristics. In this paper, a wavelet transform has been applied to analyze the wind speed data in the context of insight in the characteristics of the wind and the selection of suitable locations that could be the subject of a wind farm construction. This approach shows that it can be a useful tool in investigation of wind potential. Keywords—Wind potential, Wind speed data, Wavelet transform.

S. Avdakovic; A. Lukac; A. Nuhanovic; M. Music

16

Average Rate Speed Scaling Nikhil Bansal1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy. In this setting, the operating system must not only have a job selection policy to determine was deadline feasibility and the objective was to minimize the energy used. More precisely, each job i has of the speed to power function, this even spreading is energy optimal if the instance consists of only one job

Bunde, David

17

Average Rate Speed Scaling Nikhil Bansal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy. In this setting, the operating system must not only have a job selection policy to determine was deadline feasibility and the objective was to minimize the energy used. More precisely, each job i has of the speed to power function, this even spreading is energy optimal if the instance consists of only one job

Bunde, David

18

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer....

19

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikScat SeaWinds scatterometer....

20

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wind speed vertical distribution at Mt. Graham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characterization of the wind speed vertical distribution V(h) is fundamental for an astronomical site for many different reasons: (1) the wind speed shear contributes to trigger optical turbulence in the whole troposphere, (2) a few of the astroclimatic parameters such as the wavefront coherence time (tau_0) depends directly on V(h), (3) the equivalent velocity V_0, controlling the frequency at which the adaptive optics systems have to run to work properly, depends on the vertical distribution of the wind speed and optical turbulence. Also, a too strong wind speed near the ground can introduce vibrations in the telescope structures. The wind speed at a precise pressure (200 hPa) has frequently been used to retrieve indications concerning the tau_0 and the frequency limits imposed to all instrumentation based on adaptive optics systems, but more recently it has been proved that V_200 (wind speed at 200 hPa) alone is not sufficient to provide exhaustive elements concerning this topic and that the vertical d...

Hagelin, S; Lascaux, F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Statistical Analysis of Environment Canada's Wind Speed Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Analysis of Environment Canada's Wind Speed Data Someshwar Singh Department Brunswick-Fredericton New Brunswick, Canada Email: jtaylor@unb.ca Abstract--Wind energy utilities use wind. This paper reports on a study of the histories of wind speed forecasts and actual wind speed data available

Taylor, James H.

23

Forecasting of wind speed using wavelets analysis and cascade-correlation neural networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the city of Perpignan (south of France). In this sense, forecasting average wind speeds was the main such as sunlight, wind, rain or geothermal heat. Wind energy is actually one of the fastest-growing forms of electricity generation because wind is a clean, indigenous and inexhaustible energy resource that can generate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

Wind speed PDF classification using Dirichlet mixtures Rudy CALIF1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind speed PDF classification using Dirichlet mixtures Rudy CALIF1 , Richard EMILION2 , Ted'Orléans), UMR CNRS 6628 Université d'Orléans, France. Abstract: Wind energy production is very sensitive to instantaneous wind speed fluctuations. Thus rapid variation of wind speed due to changes in the local

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Ris-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the spinner axis's vertical tilt and the wind turbine's yaw relative to the mean wind speed direction: Data Files 54 Appendix B: Wind Speed Vertical Profile 55 Appendix C: Sonic Cup Comparison 59Risø-R-Report LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements from a Rotating Spinner: "SpinnerEx 2009" Nikolas

26

Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Pitch-controlled variable-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the early development of wind energy, the majority of wind turbines were operated at constant speed. Recently, the number of variable-speed wind turbines installed in wind farms has increased and more wind turbine manufacturers are making variable-speed wind turbines. This paper covers the operation of variable-speed wind turbines with pitch control. The system the authors considered is controlled to generate maximum energy while minimizing loads. The maximization of energy was only carried out on a static basis and only drive train loads were considered as a constraint. In medium wind speeds, the generator and power converter control the wind turbine to capture maximum energy from the wind. In the high wind speed region, the wind turbine is controlled to maintain the aerodynamic power produced by the wind turbine. Two methods to adjust the aerodynamic power were investigated: pitch control and generator load control, both of which are employed to control the operation of the wind turbine. The analysis and simulation shows that the wind turbine can be operated at its optimum energy capture while minimizing the load on the wind turbine for a wide range of wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

1. Wind-splash erosion 4. Relationships between rainfall intensity, wind-speed, wind direction and erosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the surface but unless it corresponds to a high wind-speed (the potential to transport a single rainfall event. When high wind-speeds and heavy rainfall combine there is an increased potential1. Wind-splash erosion 4. Relationships between rainfall intensity, wind-speed, wind direction

29

The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power depends mainly on the wind speeds and the turbine make and model. Definition: Simple Payback The "Simple period of a small wind power project. All the figures are per turbine, so it can be used for a one, two

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

30

The wind speed profile at offshore wind farm sites Bernhard Lange(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wind speed profile at offshore wind farm sites Bernhard Lange(1) , Søren E. Larsen(2) , Jørgen in Europe will come from offshore sites. The first large offshore wind farms are #12;currently being built feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore compared

Heinemann, Detlev

31

Analytical Modelling of Wind Speed Deficit in Large Offshore Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Modelling of Wind Speed Deficit in Large Offshore Wind Farms Sten Frandsen*, Rebecca areas.As is often the need for offshore wind farms, the model handles a regular array geometry for offshore wind farms, the model handles a priori a regular array geometry with straight rows of wind

Pryor, Sara C.

32

0 Riso-R-434 Wind Speed and Direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meteorological statistics for the area as it was considered a possible site for a nuclear power plant. \\ \\ Duringm I 0 Riso-R-434 t Wind Speed and Direction Changes due to Terrain Effects revealed-4000 Roskilde, Denmark May 1983 #12;RISÃ?-R-434 WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION CHANGES DUE TO TERRAIN EFFECTS

33

MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind

Heinemann, Detlev

34

MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND FARM SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING THE VERTICAL WIND SPEED AND TURBULENCE INTENSITY PROFILES AT PROSPECTIVE OFFSHORE WIND important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind

Heinemann, Detlev

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - average wind shear Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wind shear Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: average wind shear Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Analysis of wind shear models and trends...

36

Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy analyzed uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up, and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy the authors analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle Matthias R. Aellig Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract We investigate the helium abundance in the solar wind of 1994 and early 2000 are analyzed. In agreement with similar work for previous solar cycles, we find

Richardson, John

40

Dominican Republic - Annual Average Wind Speed at 80 meters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnal Cycle ofDoDocuments Dominican Republic -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Haiti - Annual Average Wind Speed at 80 meters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting wasEngineeringDepartment of Energy 74°

42

MEASUREMENT OF WIND SPEED FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected thermal imagery and ground truth data at two commercial power plant cooling lakes to investigate the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and wind speed, and statistics derived from thermal imagery. SRNL demonstrated in a previous paper [1] that a linear relationship exists between the standard deviation of image temperature and surface heat flux. In this paper, SRNL will show that the skewness of the temperature distribution derived from cooling lake thermal images correlates with instantaneous wind speed measured at the same location. SRNL collected thermal imagery, surface meteorology and water temperatures from helicopters and boats at the Comanche Peak and H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant cooling lakes. SRNL found that decreasing skewness correlated with increasing wind speed, as was the case for the laboratory experiments. Simple linear and orthogonal regression models both explained about 50% of the variance in the skewness - wind speed plots. A nonlinear (logistic) regression model produced a better fit to the data, apparently because the thermal convection and resulting skewness are related to wind speed in a highly nonlinear way in nearly calm and in windy conditions.

Garrett, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Cary Tuckfield, C; Malcolm Pendergast, M

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

The amount of power in the wind is very dependent on the speed of the wind. Because the power in the wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential benefits of a wind power installation, wind speeds and other characteristics of a site's wind for potential wind power sites. However, these maps do not elimi- nate the need for more precise and thoroughThe amount of power in the wind is very dependent on the speed of the wind. Because the power

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

44

ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Probability distributions for offshore wind speeds Eugene C. Morgan a,*, Matthew Lackner b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probability distributions for offshore wind speeds Eugene C. Morgan a,*, Matthew Lackner b Wind turbine energy output Weibull distribution Extreme wind a b s t r a c t In planning offshore wind farms, short-term wind speeds play a central role in estimating various engi- neering parameters

Vogel, Richard M.

46

Mining Markov chain transition matrix from wind speed time series data Zhe Song a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Knowing how wind behaves at specific wind farms is extremely important for today's power systems in termsMining Markov chain transition matrix from wind speed time series data Zhe Song a, , Xiulin Geng Wind speed time series Wind power Evolutionary algorithms Markov chain Optimization a b s t r a c

Kusiak, Andrew

47

Adaptive pitch control for variable speed wind turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An adaptive method for adjusting blade pitch angle, and controllers implementing such a method, for achieving higher power coefficients. Average power coefficients are determined for first and second periods of operation for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is larger than for the first, a pitch increment, which may be generated based on the power coefficients, is added (or the sign is retained) to the nominal pitch angle value for the wind turbine. When the average power coefficient for the second time period is less than for the first, the pitch increment is subtracted (or the sign is changed). A control signal is generated based on the adapted pitch angle value and sent to blade pitch actuators that act to change the pitch angle of the wind turbine to the new or modified pitch angle setting, and this process is iteratively performed.

Johnson, Kathryn E. (Boulder, CO); Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Robust STATCOM Control to Augment LVRT capability of Fixed Speed Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Robust STATCOM Control to Augment LVRT capability of Fixed Speed Wind Turbines M. J. Hossain, H Compensator (STATCOM) to enhance the Low-Voltage Ride- Through (LVRT) capability of fixed-speed wind turbines cost and maintenance due to rugged brushless construction. Constant speed wind turbines equipped

Pota, Himanshu Roy

50

Control strategy of a variable speed wind turbine with multipole permanent magnet synchronous generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values. Keywords: permanent magnet synchronous generator, variable speed wind turbine, direct driven wind). A multipole synchronous generator connected to a power converter can operate at low speeds, so that a gear canControl strategy of a variable speed wind turbine with multipole permanent magnet synchronous

51

Simultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to simultaneously retrieve the vertical profile of precipitation and the near-surface wind speed. ResultsSimultaneous Retreival of Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate using Radar and Radiometer Measurements simultaneously estimates the over ocean near-surface wind speed and rain rate profile using data from a 10.7 GHz

Ruf, Christopher

52

Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Niebauer, H. J. (1982), Wind and melt driven circulation inJ. K. Moore (2007), Wind speed influence on phytoplanktonby the NASA Ocean Vector Winds Science Team. Data are

Fitch, Dillon T; Moore, J. Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Laboratory implementation of variable-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the performance of wind turbines, various control schemes such as variable speed operation have been proposed. Testing of these control algorithms on a full scale system is very expensive. To test these systems simulation, we developed programs and small scale laboratory experiments. We used this system to verify a control method that attempts to keep the turbine operating at its peak power coefficient. Both the simulations and the experiments verified the principle of operation of this control scheme.

Zinger, D.S. [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States)] [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Miller, A.A. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Robinson, M.C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Ris-PhD-Report Accounting for the speed shear in wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-PhD-Report Accounting for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement Rozenn for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement Division: Wind Energy Division Abstract: The power curve of a wind turbine is the primary char- acteristic of the machine as it is the basis

55

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data, all from 2000 to 2005. Wind speed mean, 90th percentile, standard deviation, and Weibull shape and energy fluxes depend nonlinearly on wind speed magnitude, are sensitive to the tails of the wind statistics, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere storm track, consistent with the hypothesis. These wind

Zender, Charles

56

EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE), Curtin University of Technology, WA Abstract: Variable speed wind turbine generators provide the opportunity to capture more power than fixed speed turbines. However the variable speed machine output can

57

Systematic Controller Design Methodology for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three operational regions. This paper provides a guide for controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship between the two opposing metrics is easily visualized.

Hand, M. M.; Balas, M. J.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Control strategy for variable-speed, stall-regulated wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variable-speed, constant-pitch wind turbine was investigated to evaluate the feasibility of constraining its rotor speed and power output without the benefit of active aerodynamic control devices. A strategy was postulated to control rotational speed by specifying the demanded generator torque. By controlling rotor speed in relation to wind speed, the aerodynamic power extracted by the blades from the wind was manipulated. Specifically, the blades were caused to stall in high winds. In low and moderate winds, the demanded generator torque and the resulting rotor speed were controlled to cause the wind turbine to operate near maximum efficiency. A computational model was developed, and simulations were conducted of operation in high turbulent winds. Results indicated that rotor speed and power output were well regulated. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Muljadi, E.; Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds ADAM H. MONAHAN AND YANPING HE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. 2004), wind extremes (e.g., Gastineau and Soden 2009), and wind power climatologies (e.g., Troen) and the prediction of the wind power re- source and extreme surface winds in present and future climates (e.g., TroenThe Probability Distribution of Land Surface Wind Speeds ADAM H. MONAHAN AND YANPING HE School

He, Yanping

60

Tracking an Aerodynamic Model in a Wind Tunnel with a Stereo High-speed Imaging System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking an Aerodynamic Model in a Wind Tunnel with a Stereo High-speed Imaging System Lichuan Gui in wind tunnel tests with a stereo high-speed imaging system. The imaging system includes two high angle, pitch angle and yaw angle of the aerodynamic model in the wind tunnel. Tests and simulations were

Gui, Lichuan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems B. Beltran, T. Ahmed power generation in variable speed wind energy conversion systems (VS-WECS). These systems have two (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) wind turbine simulator FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures

Boyer, Edmond

62

Ris-R-Report Analysis of vertical wind direction and speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-Report Analysis of vertical wind direction and speed gradients for data from the met. mast Cariou, Rozenn Wagner, Julia Gottschall Title: Analysis of vertical wind direction and speed gradients.): The task of this project has been to study the vertical gradient of the wind direction from experimental

63

Interpolating wind speed normals from the sparse Dutch network to a high resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we had potential wind speed time series with 30 years of data (with at least 20 yearly and monthly by Verkaik (Verkaik, 2001). The method is a five-step procedure: 1 Use series of (potential) wind to calculate (potential) normals at measuring sites 2 Calculate wind speed normals at the top of the surface

Stoffelen, Ad

64

Variable speed wind turbine generator with zero-sequence filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility. 14 figs.

Muljadi, E.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Variable speed wind turbine generator with zero-sequence filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility.

Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Variable Speed Wind Turbine Generator with Zero-sequence Filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility.

Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO)

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

Effects of turbulence on power generation for variable-speed wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the primary advantages of variable-speed wind turbines over fixed-speed turbines should be improved aerodynamic efficiency. With variable-speed generation, in order to maintain a constant ratio of wind speed to tip speed, the wind turbine changes rotor speed as the wind speed changes. In this paper we compare a stall-controlled, variable-speed wind turbine to a fixed-speed turbine. The focus of this paper is to investigate the effects of variable speed on energy capture and its ability to control peak power. We also show the impact of turbulence on energy capture in moderate winds. In this report, we use a dynamic simulator to apply different winds to a wind turbine model. This model incorporates typical inertial and aerodynamic performance characteristics. From this study we found a control strategy that makes it possible to operate a stall-controlled turbine using variable speed to optimize energy capture and to control peak power. We also found that turbulence does not have a significant impact on energy capture.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Low Wind Speed Turbine Development Project Report: November 4, 2002 - December 31, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work conducted by Clipper Windpower under the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine project. The objective of this project was to produce a wind turbine that can lower the cost of energy.

Mikhail, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The effect of wind speed fluctuations on the performance of a wind-powered membrane system for brackish water desalination   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A wind-powered reverse osmosis membrane (wind-membrane) system without energy storage was tested using synthetic brackish water (2750 and 5500 mg/L NaCl) over a range of simulated wind speeds under both steady-state and ...

Park, Gavin L.; Schäfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Low Wind Speed Turbine Developments in Convoloid Gearing: Final Technical Report, June 2005 - October 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study conducted by Genesis Partners LP as part of the United States Department of Energy Wind Energy Research Program to develop wind technology that will enable wind systems to compete in regions having low wind speeds. The purpose of the program is to reduce the cost of electricity from large wind systems in areas having Class 4 winds to 3 cents per kWh for onshore systems or 5 cents per kWh for offshore systems. This work builds upon previous activities under the WindPACT project, the Next Generation Turbine project, and Phase I of the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) project. This project is concerned with the development of more cost-effective gearing for speed increasers for wind turbines.

Genesis Partners LP

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Master's thesis: "Wind speed measurements in an offshore wind farm by remote sensing: Comparison of radar satellite TerraSAR-X and ground-based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master's thesis: "Wind speed measurements in an offshore wind farm by remote sensing: Comparison of the Offshore wind farm alpha ventus with 12 wind turbines, substation and met mast Fino1. Southerly winds cause (wake) caused by wind farms and especially for the interaction of large offshore wind farms, which can

Peinke, Joachim

72

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Investigation of the Application of Medium-Voltage Variable-Speed Drive Technology to Improve the Cost of Energy from Low Wind Speed Turbines; Behnke, Erdman and Whitaker Engineering, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Behnke, Erdman & Whitaker Engineering, Inc. to test the feasibility of applying medium-voltage variable-speed drive technology to low wind speed turbines.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A conservative control strategy for variable-speed stall-regulated wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulation models of a variable-speed, fixed-pitch wind turbine were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of constraining rotor speed and power output without the benefit of active aerodynamic control devices. A strategy was postulated to control rotational speed by specifying the demanded generator torque. By controlling rotor speed in relation to wind speed, the aerodynamic power extracted by the blades from the wind was manipulated. Specifically, the blades were caused to stall in high winds. In low and moderate winds, the demanded generator torque and the resulting rotor speed were controlled to cause the wind turbine to operate near maximum efficiency. Using the developed models, simulations were conducted of operation in turbulent winds. Results indicated that rotor speed and power output were well regulated. Preliminary investigations of system dynamics showed that, compared to fixed-speed operation, variable-speed operation caused cyclic loading amplitude to be reduced for the turbine blades and low-speed shaft and slightly increased for the tower loads. This result suggests a favorable impact on fatigue life from implementation of the proposed control strategy.

Muljadi, E.; Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Occurrence of high-speed solar wind streams over the Grand Modern Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the declining phase of the solar cycle, when the new-polarity fields of the solar poles are strengthened by the transport of same-signed magnetic flux from lower latitudes, the polar coronal holes expand and form non-axisymmetric extensions toward the solar equator. These extensions enhance the occurrence of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) and related co-rotating interaction regions in the low-latitude heliosphere, and cause moderate, recurrent geomagnetic activity in the near-Earth space. Here, using a novel definition of geomagnetic activity at high (polar cap) latitudes and the longest record of magnetic observations at a polar cap station, we calculate the annually averaged solar wind speeds as proxies for the effective annual occurrence of HSS over the whole Grand Modern Maximum (GMM) from 1920s onwards. We find that a period of high annual speeds (frequent occurrence of HSS) occurs in the declining phase of each solar cycle 16-23. For most cycles the HSS activity clearly maximizes during one year...

Mursula, Kalevi; Holappa, Lauri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Offshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore windfarms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore@globalnet.co.uk · WEB SITE: www.multi-science.co.uk #12;Offshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore windfarms R.J. Barthelmie1,2, J. Badger3, S.C. Pryor2, C.B. Hasager3, M

Pryor, Sara C.

76

Robust STATCOM control for the stabilisation of fixed-speed wind turbines during low voltages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and rotor- speed instability and more so if the wind turbine is connected to a weak grid. To prevent is still being produced by squirrel-cage induction generators (SCIGs) which are directly connected to the grid and operate at an almost fixed-speed [3]. They are advantageous as wind generators for their low

Pota, Himanshu Roy

77

An examination of loads and responses of a wind turbine undergoing variable-speed operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has recently developed the ability to predict turbine loads and responses for machines undergoing variable-speed operation. The wind industry has debated the potential benefits of operating wind turbine sat variable speeds for some time. Turbine system dynamic responses (structural response, resonance, and component interactions) are an important consideration for variable-speed operation of wind turbines. The authors have implemented simple, variable-speed control algorithms for both the FAST and ADAMS dynamics codes. The control algorithm is a simple one, allowing the turbine to track the optimum power coefficient (C{sub p}). The objective of this paper is to show turbine loads and responses for a particular two-bladed, teetering-hub, downwind turbine undergoing variable-speed operation. The authors examined the response of the machine to various turbulent wind inflow conditions. In addition, they compare the structural responses under fixed-speed and variable-speed operation. For this paper, they restrict their comparisons to those wind-speed ranges for which limiting power by some additional control strategy (blade pitch or aileron control, for example) is not necessary. The objective here is to develop a basic understanding of the differences in loads and responses between the fixed-speed and variable-speed operation of this wind turbine configuration.

Wright, A.D.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.; Bir, G.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ris0-M-2829 2 Extreme Values ofWind Speeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ris0-M-2829 2 Extreme Values ofWind Speeds overthe Great Belt Region N.O. Jensen and B. Nielsen Ris events 9 4 Extrapolation to the 50-year storm 11 5 Discussion of the 50-year wind 15 6 Crosswind extremes for extreme values of wind speeds. The data material was obtained from a 70-m mast on a small island, Sprog0

79

The Impacts of Wind Speed Trends and Long-term Variability in Relation to Hydroelectric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Impacts of Wind Speed Trends and Long- term Variability in Relation to Hydroelectric Reservoir and Long-term Variability in Relation to Hydroelectric Reservoir Inflows on Wind Power in the Pacific through diversification. In hydroelectric dominated systems, like the PNW, the benefits of wind power can

Kohfeld, Karen

80

EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind

Heinemann, Detlev

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault by Sigrid M. Bolik Institute of Energy turbine technology has undergone rapid developments. Growth in size and the optimization of wind turbines

Hansen, René Rydhof

82

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines, China mcheng@seu.edu.cn Abstract-- Grid connected wind turbines are the sources of power fluctuations presents an individual pitch control (IPC) strategy to mitigate the wind turbine power fluctuation at both

Hu, Weihao

83

SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS--Scatterometer measurements of ocean vector winds (OVW) are significantly degraded in the presence of the precipitation, especially in tropical cyclones. This paper presents a new ocean hurricane/typhoon wind vector retrieval

Hennon, Christopher C.

84

An aero-elastic flutter based electromagnetic energy harvester with wind speed augmenting funnel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An aero-elastic flutter based electromagnetic energy harvester with wind speed augmenting funnel been used to convert wind flow energy into mechanical vibration, which is then transformed-scale renewable energy generating systems such as wind turbines, thermal generators, and solar panels, energy

Stanford University

85

United States Wind Resource Map: Annual Average Wind Speed at 30 Meters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23,DiversityFeet) Year Jan30 m

86

United States Wind Resource Map: Annual Average Wind Speed at 80 Meters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23,DiversityFeet) Year Jan30 m80 m

87

Bias Correction and Bayesian Model Averaging for Ensemble Forecasts of Surface Wind Direction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from numerical weather prediction models, which is based on a state-of-the-art circular-processing techniques for forecasts from numerical weather prediction models tend to become ineffective or inapplicableBias Correction and Bayesian Model Averaging for Ensemble Forecasts of Surface Wind Direction Le

Washington at Seattle, University of

88

First and second order semi-Markov chains for wind speed modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing interest in renewable energy, particularly in wind, has given rise to the necessity of accurate models for the generation of good synthetic wind speed data. Markov chains are often used with this purpose but better models are needed to reproduce the statistical properties of wind speed data. We downloaded a database, freely available from the web, in which are included wind speed data taken from L.S.I. -Lastem station (Italy) and sampled every 10 minutes. With the aim of reproducing the statistical properties of this data we propose the use of three semi-Markov models. We generate synthetic time series for wind speed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The time lagged autocorrelation is then used to compare statistical properties of the proposed models with those of real data and also with a synthetic time series generated though a simple Markov chain.

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE) that measures wind speed and rain rate along the ground track directly beneath the aircraft. This paper presents are presented, which illustrate wind speed and rain rate measurement spatial resolutions and swath coverage. 1

Ruf, Christopher

90

Abstract--A variable speed wind turbine is presented in this paper, where multiple permanent magnet synchronous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract--A variable speed wind turbine is presented in this paper, where multiple permanent magnet synchronous generators (MPMSGs) drive-train configuration is employed in the wind turbine of this variable speed wind turbine based on multiple generators drive-train configuration. Index Terms--Wind power

Chen, Zhe

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual wind speeds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: annual wind speeds Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 This document will help you understand the...

92

Wind speed forecasting at different time scales: a non parametric approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prediction of wind speed is one of the most important aspects when dealing with renewable energy. In this paper we show a new nonparametric model, based on semi-Markov chains, to predict wind speed. Particularly we use an indexed semi-Markov model, that reproduces accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed, to forecast wind speed one step ahead for different time scales and for very long time horizon maintaining the goodness of prediction. In order to check the main features of the model we show, as indicator of goodness, the root mean square error between real data and predicted ones and we compare our forecasting results with those of a persistence model.

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ris-R-1563(EN) ACCUWIND -Accurate Wind Speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Wind Energy Department Risø-R-1563(EN) July 2006 ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN 87-550-3526-4 Contract no.: NNE5

94

Tuesday, 31 July, 2012 Rapid radiation belt losses occurring during high speed solar wind stream1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tuesday, 31 July, 2012 1 Rapid radiation belt losses occurring during high speed solar wind stream1 Raita11 Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu, Sodankylä, Finland12 Abstract. Recent geomagnetic disturbances triggered by the arrival of a Solar14 Wind Stream Interface (SWSI). In the current

Otago, University of

95

EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR THE VERTICAL EXTRAPOLATION OF WIND SPEED MEASUREMENTS AT OFFSHORE SITES important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface tested with measurements from the offshore field measurement Rødsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m

Heinemann, Detlev

96

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Implications for Climate and Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wind Power DISSERTATION submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.3 Global Ocean Wind Power and Surface Layer Stability . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.1 Global Winds . . . . . . 27 1.4 Usable Offshore Wind Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 1.4.1 Wind Turbine

Zender, Charles

97

Euler-Bernoulli Implementation of Spherical Anemometers for High Wind Speed Calculations via Strain Gauges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New measuring methods continue to be developed in the field of wind anemometry for various environments subject to low-speed and high-speed flows, turbulent-present flows, and ideal and non-ideal flows. As a result, anemometry has taken different...

Castillo, Davis

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

A study of wind-speed maxima near the surface over the south central United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1960) and the Oklahoma City radiosonde station data for the time period June, 1966 to May, 1967. They also showed that the higher the monthly, mean, wind speed, the more likely that the wind direction was from the south. Bonner (1968) states, "Strong early morning...) (Member) (Member) May 1973 ABSTRACT A Study of Wind-Speed Maxima near the Surface over the South Central United States (May 1973) Samuel K. Beckman, B. S. , Kansas State University Directed by: Professor Walter K. Henry Radiosonde and rawinsonde...

Beckman, Samuel Karl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effect of wind speed on the growth of the upper convective zone in a solar pond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIST OF FIGURES CHAPTER Page 111 Vi I INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REVIEW III EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS IV RESULTS 14 21 V ENTRAINMENT AS A FUNCTION OF RICHARDSON NUMBER 32 VI CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 44 REFERENCES APPENDIX 1 APPENDIX 2... speed. 11. Thickness of UCZ for 9. 6 m/s wind speed. 12. Thickness of UCZ for 15. 0 m/s wind speed. 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 13. Horizontal and vertical coordinates of 25 locations for measuring cross section air velocities. . . . . . 59 14. Air...

McMinn, Steven Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fixed-Speed and Variable-Slip Wind Turbines Providing Spinning Reserves to the Grid: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the level of wind penetration increases, wind turbine technology must move from merely generating power from wind to taking a role in supporting the bulk power system. Wind turbines should have the capability to provide inertial response and primary frequency (governor) response so they can support the frequency stability of the grid. To provide governor response, wind turbines should be able to generate less power than the available wind power and hold the rest in reserve, ready to be accessed as needed. This paper explores several ways to control wind turbine output to enable reserve-holding capability. This paper focuses on fixed-speed (also known as Type 1) and variable-slip (also known as Type 2) turbines.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

100-Year Return Value Estimates for Ocean Wind Speed and Significant Wave Height from the ERA-40 Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and time variability of significant wave height and wind speed on the prediction of their extreme values of this dataset makes it ideal for the study of extreme wind and wave phenomena over the whole globe. Initial100-Year Return Value Estimates for Ocean Wind Speed and Significant Wave Height from the ERA-40

Haak, Hein

102

Average Rate Speed Scaling # Nikhil Bansal 1 , David P. Bunde 2 , HoLeung Chan 3 , and Kirk Pruhs 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of such a processor to conserve energy. In this setting, the operating system must not only have a job selection to conserve energy and optimize some Quality of Service (QoS) measure of the resulting schedule. Yao, Demers is to minimize the energy used. They proposed an online speed scaling algorithm Average Rate (AVR) that runs each

Bunde, David

103

Probabilistic Forecasts of Wind Speed: Ensemble Model Output Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Over the past two decades, ensembles of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models have been developed and phrases: Continuous ranked probability score; Density forecast; Ensem- ble system; Numerical weather prediction; Heteroskedastic censored regression; Tobit model; Wind energy. 1 #12;1 Introduction Accurate

Washington at Seattle, University of

104

Self-excited induction generator for variable-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When an induction generator is connected to a utility bus, the voltage and frequency at the terminal of the generator are the same as the voltage and frequency of the utility. The reactive power needed by the induction generator is supplied by the utility and the real power is returned to the utility. The rotor speed varies within a very limited range, and the reactive power requirement must be transported through a long line feeder, thus creating additional transmission losses. The energy captured by a wind turbine can be increased if the rotor speed can be adjusted to follow wind speed variations. For small applications such as battery charging or water pumping, a stand alone operation can be implemented without the need to maintain the output frequency output of the generator. A self- excited induction generator is a good candidate for a stand alone operation where the wind turbine is operated at variable speed. Thus the performance of the wind turbine can be unproved. In this paper, we examine a self-excited induction generator operated in a stand alone mode. A potential application for battery charging is given. The output power of the generator will be controlled to improve the performance of the wind turbine.

Muljadi, E.; Gregory, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Broad, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Wind speed modeled as a semi-Markov process with memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing interest in renewable energy, particularly in wind, has given rise to the necessity of accurate models for the generation of good synthetic wind speed data. Markov chains are often used with this purpose but better models are needed to reproduce the statistical properties of wind speed data. In a previous paper we showed that semi-Markov processes are more appropriate for this purpose but to reach an accurate reproduction of real data features high order model should be used. In this work we introduce an indexed semi-Markov process that is able to fit real data. We downloaded a database, freely available from the web, in which are included wind speed data taken from L.S.I. -Lastem station (Italy) and sampled every 10 minutes. We then generate synthetic time series for wind speed by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The time lagged autocorrelation is then used to compare statistical properties of the proposed model with those of real data and also with a synthetic time series generated though a ...

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

On the relationship between temperature and wind speed in the atmospheric surface layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRAR& A AN m os??E " "" ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN T" MP. "RATURE AND WIND SPEED IN THE ATMOSPHERIC SURFACE LAYER A Thesis John Me Pierrard Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... logarithmically with height+ Also, the choice of a method of determination of the roughness length must be governed by an awareness of possible errors in the wind speed meas- urementso The system used to collect the data employed in this study is susceptible...

Pierrard, John Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Influence of Boundary Layer Processes on the Diurnal Variation of the Climatological Near-Surface Wind Speed Probability Distribution over Land*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diurnally varying vertical structure of the leading three climatological moments of near-surface wind speed-Surface Wind Speed Probability Distribution over Land* YANPING HE School of Earth and Ocean Sciences wind speed probability distribution is essential for surface flux estimation and wind power management

He, Yanping

108

NREL: Wind Research - New 100-Meter Map Keeps Pace with Growing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New 100-Meter Map Keeps Pace with Growing Wind Technology An illustrated map of the United States shows the average wind speeds of land-based and offshore wind speed The new 100-m...

109

Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

Skoug, Ruth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steinberg, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodrich, Katherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Brett R [DARTMUTH UNIV.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, The Gaussian Predictability of Wind Speeds1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wind power [e.g. Lange and Focken, 2005; Costa26 et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2009; Soman et al., 2010; Giebel et al., 2011]. Wind power predic-27 tion models may be entirely empirical, based on statistical, the vector winds contain34 information about both speed and direction and have the practical advantage

Monahan, Adam Hugh

111

Robust STATCOM Control for the Enhancement of Fault Ride-Through Capability of Fixed Speed Wind Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-slip relationships as well as through simulations. The wind generator is a highly nonlinear system, which is modelled power generation. This type of wind generator always consumes reactive power from the grid. WhenRobust STATCOM Control for the Enhancement of Fault Ride-Through Capability of Fixed Speed Wind

Pota, Himanshu Roy

112

High resolution reanalysis of wind speeds over the British Isles for wind energy integration   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The UK has highly ambitious targets for wind development, particularly offshore, where over 30GW of capacity is proposed for development. Integrating such a large amount of variable generation presents enormous challenges. ...

Hawkins, Samuel Lennon

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Wind Power | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

turbines are getting taller to reach higher altitudes where it's even windier. See the Energy Department's wind resource maps to find average wind speeds in your state or...

114

Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar Field on High Speed Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isenberg, P.A. (eds. ) Solar Wind Nine, AIP Conf. Proc. 471,AT SOLAR MINIMUM Solar Wind Sources in the Late Decliningfor their high speed solar wind streams that dominate the

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Systematic approach for PID controller design for pitch-regulated, variable-speed wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. 2 refs., 9 figs.

Hand, M.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Balas, M.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Magnetic-Driven Winds from Post-AGB Stars: Solutions for High Speed Winds and Extreme Collimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the effects of post-AGB winds driven solely by magnetic pressure from the stellar surface. It is found that winds can reach high speeds under this assumption, and lead to the formation of highly collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Bipolar knotty jets with periodic features and constant velocity are well reproduced by the models. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of $\\kms$ up to $10^3$ $\\kms$ are calculated, yielding outflows with linear momenta in the range $10^{36}-10^{40} \\gcms$, and kinetic energies in the range $10^{42}-10^{47} $ erg. These results are in accord with recent observations of proto-planetary nebulae that have pointed out serious energy and momentum deficits if radiation pressure is considered as the only driver for these outflows. Our models strengthen the notion that the large mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars, together with the short transition times from the late AGB to the planetary nebula stage, could be directly linked with the generation of strong magnetic fields during this transition stage.

Guillermo Garcia-Segura; Jose Alberto Lopez; Jose Franco

2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

117

Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Effect of Tip-Speed Constraints on the Optimized Design of a Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the effect of tip-velocity constraints on system levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results indicate that a change in maximum tip speed from 80 to 100~m/s could produce a 32% decrease in gearbox weight (a 33% reduction in cost) which would result in an overall reduction of 1%-9% in system LCOE depending on the design approach. Three 100~m/s design cases were considered including a low tip-speed ratio/high-solidity rotor design, a high tip-speed ratio/ low-solidity rotor design, and finally a flexible blade design in which a high tip-speed ratio was used along with removing the tip deflection constraint on the rotor design. In all three cases, the significant reduction in gearbox weight caused by the higher tip-speed and lower overall gear ratio was counterbalanced by increased weights for the rotor and/or other drivetrain components and the tower. As a result, the increased costs of either the rotor or drivetrain components offset the overall reduction in turbine costs from down-sizing the gearbox. Other system costs were not significantly affected, whereas energy production was slightly reduced in the 100~m/s case low tip-speed ratio case and increased in the high tip-speed ratio case. This resulted in system cost of energy reductions moving from the 80~m/s design to the 100~m/s designs of 1.2% for the low tip-speed ratio, 4.6% for the high tip-speed ratio, and 9.5% for the final flexible case (the latter result is optimistic because the impact of deflection of the flexible blade on power production was not modeled). Overall, the results demonstrate that there is a trade-off in system design between the maximum tip velocity and the overall wind plant cost of energy, and there are many trade-offs within the overall system in designing a turbine for a high maximum tip velocity.

Dykes, K.; Resor, B.; Platt, A.; Guo, Y.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Parsons, T.; Petch, D.; Veers, P.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 23, NO. 2, JUNE 2008 551 Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable-Speed Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in variable-speed wind energy conversion sys- tems (VS-WECS). These systems have two operation regions de of Variable-Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems Brice Beltran, Tarek Ahmed-Ali, and Mohamed El Hachemi (newton meter). Tg Generator torque in the rotor side (newton meter). Ths High-speed torque (newton meter

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wind climatology of Schiphol Andrew Stepek, Xueli Wang and Dirk Wolters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind climatology of Schiphol Andrew Stepek, Xueli Wang and Dirk Wolters De Bilt, May 2012 #12;2 Contents Summary 2 Introduction 3 Data 3 Hourly wind measurements 3 Yearly averages of wind speed measurements 4 Quality and sources of error 6 Method 7 Trends in wind speed 7 Definition of cross and tail wind

Haak, Hein

122

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Repetitive substorms caused by Alfvenic waves of the interplanetary magnetic field during high-speed solar wind streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but they may be locally generated from stream-stream interaction effects or amplified Alfve´n waves originating-speed solar wind streams D.-Y. Lee,1 L. R. Lyons,2 K. C. Kim,1 J.-H. Baek,3 K.-H. Kim,3 H.-J. Kim,1 J. Weygand wind streams, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A12214, doi:10.1029/2006JA011685. 1. Introduction [2] During

Lyons, Larry

124

Wind Resource Assessment of Gujarat (India)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India is one of the largest wind energy markets in the world. In 1986 Gujarat was the first Indian state to install a wind power project. In February 2013, the installed wind capacity in Gujarat was 3,093 MW. Due to the uncertainty around existing wind energy assessments in India, this analysis uses the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the wind at current hub heights for one year to provide more precise estimates of wind resources in Gujarat. The WRF model allows for accurate simulations of winds near the surface and at heights important for wind energy purposes. While previous resource assessments published wind power density, we focus on average wind speeds, which can be converted to wind power densities by the user with methods of their choice. The wind resource estimates in this study show regions with average annual wind speeds of more than 8 m/s.

Draxl, C.; Purkayastha, A.; Parker, Z.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Abstract--This paper proposes a stochastic wind power model based on an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for instance to capture rare events such as extreme wind situations. Thus, stochastic wind power models1 Abstract-- This paper proposes a stochastic wind power model based on an autoregressive limits of stochastic wind power generation. The model is constructed based on wind power measurement

Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

126

Prediction of wind speed profiles for short-term forecasting in the offshore environment R.J. Barthelmie and G. Giebel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the forecast wind speed/power output might be anticipated using a directional rather than a constant bias for the calibration phase. A further advantage is that statistical techniques can predict power output directly rather than having to take the additional step of predicting power output from wind speed through the power

127

Development and Validation of WECC Variable Speed Wind Turbine Dynamic Models for Grid Integration Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes reduced-order, simplified wind turbine models for analyzing the stability impact of large arrays of wind turbines with a single point of network interconnection.

Behnke, M.; Ellis, A.; Kazachkov, Y.; McCoy, T.; Muljadi, E.; Price, W.; Sanchez-Gasca, J.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Choosing wind power plant locations and sizes based on electric reliability measures using multiple-year wind speed measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To project the US potential to meet future electricity demands with wind energy, estimates of available wind resource and costs to access that resource are critical. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) annually estimates the US market penetration of wind in its Annual Energy Outlook series. For these estimates, the EIA uses wind resource data developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for each region of the country. However, the EIA multiplies the cost of windpower by several factors, some as large as 3, to account for resource quality, market factors associated with accessing the resource, electric grid impacts, and rapid growth in the wind industry. This paper examines the rationale behind these additional costs and suggests alternatives.

Milligan, M.R.; Artig, R.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference...

Manning, Norman Willis William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate wind speed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brigham Young University Collection: Engineering 4 Mesoscale modelling for an offshore wind farm Jake Badger*, Rebecca Barthelmie, Sten Frandsen, Merete Bruun Christiansen...

131

Calibration of the Merrill-G.A.L.C.I.T. wind-tunnel, and a suggestion for a variable cross-section on a small high-speed wind-tunnel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Speed, power and flow inclination calibration tests run in the Merrill-GALCIT wind-tunnel are described and results presented. A description of the new balance-system is included.… (more)

Schwarzenbach, Jean Christophe

1942-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High-Speed Optical Spectroscopy of a Cataclysmic Variable Wind BZ Camelopardalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BZ Cam is the first cataclysmic variable star with an accretion disk wind evident in its optical spectrum. The wind was found by Thorstensen, who discovered intermittent P Cygni profiles occurring simultaneously in He I 5876 Angstroms and H alpha. We have since obtained spectra with 0.4-Angstroms/pixel dispersion and 60-s time resolution. We find a wind much faster and more rapidly variable than the radiatively accelerated winds of OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or luminous blue variables. Instead of showing blob ejection, the whole wind of BZ Cam appears to turn on and off. We use this to measure the acceleration law of a CV wind for the first time. The velocity increases linearly with time, attaining blue edge velocities near -3000 km/s, and absorption velocities near -1700 km/s, in 6 to 8 min after starting near rest. We also find a subsequent linear deceleration to nearly rest in 30 to 40 min, perhaps an effect of dilution as the wind expands. No periodicity from rotational outflow is obvious. This wind is e...

Ringwald, F A

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

High-Speed Optical Spectroscopy of a Cataclysmic Variable Wind: BZ Camelopardalis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BZ Cam is the first cataclysmic variable star with an accretion disk wind evident in its optical spectrum. The wind was found by Thorstensen, who discovered intermittent P Cygni profiles occurring simultaneously in He I 5876 Angstroms and H alpha. We have since obtained spectra with 0.4-Angstroms/pixel dispersion and 60-s time resolution. We find a wind much faster and more rapidly variable than the radiatively accelerated winds of OB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or luminous blue variables. Instead of showing blob ejection, the whole wind of BZ Cam appears to turn on and off. We use this to measure the acceleration law of a CV wind for the first time. The velocity increases linearly with time, attaining blue edge velocities near -3000 km/s, and absorption velocities near -1700 km/s, in 6 to 8 min after starting near rest. We also find a subsequent linear deceleration to nearly rest in 30 to 40 min, perhaps an effect of dilution as the wind expands. No periodicity from rotational outflow is obvious. This wind is erratic and incessantly variable, and perhaps bipolar and face-on, but not highly collimated. The P Cygni absorption events trace out sawtooth waves, occurring within 30 to 40 white dwarf radii from the disk. This is the approximate size of the disk, as well as the disk/wind transition region recently postulated by Knigge and Drew. We estimate a distance of 830 +/- 160 pc, and an orbital inclination i such that 12 < i(degrees) < 40.

F. A. Ringwald; T. Naylor

1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

135

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

136

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

137

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

138

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

139

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

140

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

142

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

143

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

144

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

145

The solar wind in the outer heliosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar wind evolves as it moves outward due to interactions with both itself and with the circum-heliospheric interstellar medium. The speed is, on average, constant out to 30 AU, then starts a slow decrease due to the ...

Richardson, John D.

146

Doppler-radar wind-speed measurements in tornadoes: A comparison of real and simulated spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bluestein and Unruh have discussed the advantages of using a portable doppler radar to map the wind field in tornadoes. during the spring of 1991 a storm-intercept team from the University of Oklahoma (OU) collected data near five supercell tornadoes in Oklahoma and Kansas. Details about the 1-W, 3-cm, 5-deg half-power beamwidth, CW/FM-CW Doppler radar we used and the methods of data collection and analysis are found in Bluestein and Unruh and Bluestein et al. Using the portable radar, we approximately doubled in only one year the number of tornado spectra that had been collected over a period of almost 20 years by NSSL`s fixed-site Doppler radar. In this paper we will compare observed tornado wind spectra with simulated wind spectra (Zmic and Doviak 1975) in order to learn more about tornado structure.

Bluestein, H.B.; LaDue, J.G.; Stein, H.; Speheger, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); Unruh, W.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Doppler-radar wind-speed measurements in tornadoes: A comparison of real and simulated spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bluestein and Unruh have discussed the advantages of using a portable doppler radar to map the wind field in tornadoes. during the spring of 1991 a storm-intercept team from the University of Oklahoma (OU) collected data near five supercell tornadoes in Oklahoma and Kansas. Details about the 1-W, 3-cm, 5-deg half-power beamwidth, CW/FM-CW Doppler radar we used and the methods of data collection and analysis are found in Bluestein and Unruh and Bluestein et al. Using the portable radar, we approximately doubled in only one year the number of tornado spectra that had been collected over a period of almost 20 years by NSSL's fixed-site Doppler radar. In this paper we will compare observed tornado wind spectra with simulated wind spectra (Zmic and Doviak 1975) in order to learn more about tornado structure.

Bluestein, H.B.; LaDue, J.G.; Stein, H.; Speheger, D. (Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)); Unruh, W.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wind pro?le assessment for wind power purposes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Preliminary estimation of wind speed at the wind turbine hub height is critically important when planning new wind farms. Wind turbine power output is proportional… (more)

Sointu, Iida

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operators of electrical grids, sometimes referred to as Balancing Authorities (BA), typically make critical decisions on how to most reliably and economically balance electrical load and generation in time frames ranging from a few minutes to six hours ahead. At higher levels of wind power generation, there is an increasing need to improve the accuracy of 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts. Forecasts on this time scale have typically been strongly dependent on short-term trends indicated by the time series of power production and meteorological data from a wind farm. Additional input information is often available from the output of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and occasionally from off-site meteorological towers in the region surrounding the wind generation facility. A widely proposed approach to improve short-term forecasts is the deployment of off-site meteorological towers at locations upstream from the wind generation facility in order to sense approaching wind perturbations. While conceptually appealing, it turns out that, in practice, it is often very difficult to derive significant benefit in forecast performance from this approach. The difficulty is rooted in the fact that the type, scale, and amplitude of the processes controlling wind variability at a site change from day to day if not from hour to hour. Thus, a location that provides some useful forecast information for one time may not be a useful predictor a few hours later. Indeed, some processes that cause significant changes in wind power production operate predominantly in the vertical direction and thus cannot be monitored by employing a network of sensors at off-site locations. Hence, it is very challenging to determine the type of sensors and deployment locations to get the most benefit for a specific short-term forecast application. Two tools recently developed in the meteorological research community have the potential to help determine the locations and parameters to measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of California's Tehachapi Pass during the warm (high generation) season. The paper is organized

Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

MAPping Foehn Winds in the Austrian Alps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the flow above mountain-top level 3. Study the vertical and cross-gap distribution of wind speed-valley horizontal wind speed ("measured") vertical wind speed (calculated) total wind speed & streamlines -20 -10 0 October 1999 ­ TEACO2 calculated 2D winds down-valley horizontal wind speed ("measured") vertical wind

Gohm, Alexander

151

Variable-speed wind power system with improved energy capture via multilevel conversion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for efficiently capturing electrical energy from a variable-speed generator are disclosed. The system includes a matrix converter using full-bridge, multilevel switch cells, in which semiconductor devices are clamped to a known constant DC voltage of a capacitor. The multilevel matrix converter is capable of generating multilevel voltage wave waveform of arbitrary magnitude and frequencies. The matrix converter can be controlled by using space vector modulation.

Erickson, Robert W.; Al-Naseem, Osama A.; Fingersh, Lee Jay

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime-Switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at a wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime. Geographically dispersed was applied to 2-hour-ahead forecasts of hourly average wind speed near the Stateline wind energy center

Genton, Marc G.

153

An application of vortex cancellation to vortex generator techniques in low speed wind tunnels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'lugs/ft-sec Axial distance between sets of vortex generators root chord lengths /Y Vertical dimension of duct cross section Tube height/Y in. none ~St i t ()i ()2 (), ( )?q Measured at station g 1 Measured at Station 0 8 Upstream srl... to accomplish these objectives. The usefulness of many of them was limited because they were either too expensive, they could not be installed easily in existing wind tunnels, or their use involved excessive energy dissipation. Vortex Generators In 1/46 a...

Mount, Glynn O., Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Structure of Turbulence in Katabatic Flows below and above the Wind-Speed Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of small-scale turbulence made over the complex-terrain atmospheric boundary layer during the MATERHORN Program are used to describe the structure of turbulence in katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured at multiple levels at four towers deployed along the East lower slope (2-4 deg) of Granite Mountain. The multi-level observations made during a 30-day long MATERHORN-Fall field campaign in September-October 2012 allowed studying of temporal and spatial structure of katabatic flows in detail, and herein we report turbulence and their variations in katabatic winds. Observed vertical profiles show steep gradients near the surface, but in the layer above the slope jet the vertical variability is smaller. It is found that the vertical (normal to the slope) momentum flux and horizontal (along the slope) heat flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The vertical momentum flux is directed...

Grachev, Andrey A; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J S; Pardyjak, Eric R; Fairall, Christopher W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Refinement of a semi-empirical model for the microwave emissivity of the sea surface as a function of wind speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the wind speed increases-instead of being switched on at 7 m/s. These changes yield an improved sea surface model that is within 2% of the sea surface emissivity given by the Wentz sea surface emissivity functions....

Kohn, David Jacob

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

WIND DATA REPORT January -December, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January - December, 2003 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric Cooperative...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

157

WIND DATA REPORT January -March, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January - March, 2004 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric Cooperative...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

158

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

159

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

160

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AIR-FLOW STRUCTURE IN THE VERY CLOSE VICINITY OF WIND GENERATED WATER-WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to : , with the air-density, u and w the horizontal and vertical components of the wind speed, u* the friction and the viscous drag at the sea sur- face, we build two new microphysical devices: 1) the wind-speed vertical of the vertical profile of the normalized phase-averaged wind-speed in the air-viscous layer (1mm above water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations, vertical wind speed profile estimation giventhe wind speed profile is reduced, increasing vertical windvertical wind shear with respect to surface layer stability. Wind speeds

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DIRECT REGULATION OF LARGE SPEED EXCURSIONS FOR VARIABLE SPEED WIND W. E. Leithead, D. J. Leith, F. Hardan, H.Markou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the rotor blades at the maximum permissible rate, thereby exploiting the maximum capability of the actuation to adjust the pitch angle of the rotor blades to maintain the peak rotor speed excursion below 15 turbine aims to maintain the rotor speed within a permitted range. However, this requirement can

Duffy, Ken

164

Ris National Laboratory DTU Wind Energy Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind speed, wind direction relative to the spinner and flow inclination angle. A wind tunnel concept anemometer is a wind measurement concept in which measurements of wind speed in the flow over a wind turbine on a modified 300kW wind turbine spinner, was mounted with three 1D sonic wind speed sensors. The flow around

165

Distributed Compression for Condition Monitoring of Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind generation is high due to high wind speeds and import of power where the speeds are low. To make

Cheng, Samuel

166

Estimating long-term mean winds from short-term wind data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The estimation of long-term mean winds from short-term data is especially important in the area of wind energy. It is desirable to obtain reliable estimates of the long-term wind speed from as short a period of on-site measurements as possible. This study examined seven different methods of estimating the long-term average wind speed and compared the performance of these techniques. Three linear, three weather pattern, and one eigenvector methods were compared for measurement periods ranging from 3 months to 36 months. Average errors, both relative and absolute, and the rms errors in the techniques were determined. The best technique for less than 12 months of measurement was the eigenvector method using weekly mean wind speeds. However, this method was only slightly better than the linear adjusted method. When 12 or more months of data were used, the difference in errors between techniques was found to be slight.

Barchet, W.R.; Davis, W.E.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height ADAM J. DEPPE AND WILLIAM A. GALLUS JR.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1. Introduction In recent years, wind energy production has under- gone rapid growth, and the U over both space and time. Therefore, the production rates of wind energy fluctuate more strongly than percentage of total power per capita coming from wind energy in 2010 (Department of Energy 2010). Even fewer

McCalley, James D.

171

Analyses of possible changes in intense and extreme wind speeds over northern Europe under climate change scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

towards increased energy density and thus wind power generation potential over the course of the C21st. Clausen Wind Energy Division, Risø-DTU National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Frederiksborgvej 399 downscaling Á Scandinavia Á Wind climates Á Energy density 1 Context and objectives 1.1 Introduction

Pryor, Sara C.

172

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Evaluation of Design and Construction Approaches for Economical Hybrid Steel/Concrete Wind Turbine Towers; BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc. to study the economic feasibility of concrete and hybrid concrete/steel wind turbine towers.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

Powell, Warren B.

174

WIND DATA REPORT December, 2003 February 29, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Orleans December, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

175

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

176

WIND DATA REPORT August 28 -December 31, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven August 28 - December 31, 2002 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

177

WIND DATA REPORT September 1, 2003 November 31, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Mt. Tom September 1, 2003 ­ November 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

178

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

179

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME September 1st 2006 to November 30th 2006.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

180

WIND DATA REPORT October 27, 2003 November 31, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Orleans October 27, 2003 ­ November 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

WIND DATA REPORT September 1 2003 November 30 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Paxton, MA September 1 2003 ­ November 30 2003 by James F. Manwell Anthony F.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

182

WIND DATA REPORT December 1 2003 February 29 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Paxton, MA December 1 2003 ­ February 29 2004 Prepared for Diane Dillman, Paxton.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

183

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

184

WIND DATA REPORT December 1, 2003 February 29, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Mt. Tom December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

185

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Camden Hills Regional High School, ME March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

186

WIND DATA REPORT March 1, 2004 May 31, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Eastham March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

187

WIND DATA REPORT January 1, 2004 December 31, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND DATA REPORT Vinalhaven January 1, 2004 ­ December 31, 2004 Prepared for Fox Islands Electric...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

188

Analysis of Alongwind Tall Building Response to Transient Nonstationary Winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

where the mean wind speed is characterized by a time-invariant vertical profile and a single time of time varying mean wind speed, mean wind speed vertical profile, and spatial correlation of wind flows in terms of its unique mean wind speed vertical profile, rapid time varying mean wind speed

Chen, Xinzhong

189

Space-time forecasting and evaluation of wind speed with statistical tests for comparing accuracy of spatial predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 11 Comparing the predictive distributions for the models when the TDD model produces the best forecast (top panel) and when the BST model produces the best forecast (bottom panel). The small vertical line on the x-axis of each plot represents... of wind to benefit humans is not a new concept. Historically, wind- mills have been used to pump water from wells or to grind grain for centuries. But fast- forwarding into the 21st century, ?windmills? are being used to generate electricity. Wind turbines...

Hering, Amanda S.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

190

ISET-Wind-Index Assessment of the Annual Available Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particularly in years with wind speeds that are clearly below average, dissatisfaction of operators and even liquidity problems are sparked through the unexpected low annual power production. An objective standard for the evaluation of the respective “wind year ” is required for the internal estimation of the performance of wind farms, and for justification to share owners and banks. The annual wind conditions are composed from such a multitude of meteorological situations, differing from location to location, that the available wind energy at every individual location develops totally differently. A single code is therefore not sufficient to describe the “wind year ” in Germany and, moreover, the evaluation of annual available wind energy must be carried out separately for the smallest areas possible. With the support of the Gothaer Rückversicherungen AG, a procedure has been developed at ISET which provides the proportion of the respective annual available wind energy, in relation to the long-term average available wind energy, for each 10 km x 10 km sized plan area in Germany. This amount, the ISET-Wind-Index, is founded on wind measurements at locations that are typical for wind energy use and therefore presents an objective standard. The measurement grid is part of the “Scientific Measurement and Evaluation Programme ” (WMEP), which accompanies the “250 MW Wind ” project of the German Federal Ministry for Economy and Labour. The ISET-Wind-Index, which will be regularly updated, provides an objective standard for the estimation of annual available

Berthold Hahn; Kurt Rohrig

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Controller Systematic Design Methodology: A Comparison of Non-Linear and Linear Model-Based Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable-speed, horizontal axis wind turbines use blade-pitch control to meet specified objectives for three regions of operation. This paper focuses on controller design for the constant power production regime. A simple, rigid, non-linear turbine model was used to systematically perform trade-off studies between two performance metrics. Minimization of both the deviation of the rotor speed from the desired speed and the motion of the actuator is desired. The robust nature of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is illustrated, and optimal operating conditions are determined. Because numerous simulation runs may be completed in a short time, the relationship of the two opposing metrics is easily visualized. Traditional controller design generally consists of linearizing a model about an operating point. This step was taken for two different operating points, and the systematic design approach was used. A comparison of the optimal regions selected using the n on-linear model and the two linear models shows similarities. The linearization point selection does, however, affect the turbine performance slightly. Exploitation of the simplicity of the model allows surfaces consisting of operation under a wide range of gain values to be created. This methodology provides a means of visually observing turbine performance based upon the two metrics chosen for this study. Design of a PID controller is simplified, and it is possible to ascertain the best possible combination of controller parameters. The wide, flat surfaces indicate that a PID controller is very robust in this variable-speed wind turbine application.

Hand, M. M.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to swish and thump amplitude modulation, the noise of wind turbines cause more annoyance than other environmental noise of the same average level. The wind shear accounts for the thump modulation (van den Berg effect). Making use of the wind speed measurements at the hub height, as well as at the top and the bottom of the rotor disc (Fig.1), the non-standard wind profile is applied. It causes variations in the A-weighted sound pressure level, LpA. The difference between the maximum and minimum of LpA characterizes thump modulation (Fig.2).

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Strong wind forcing of the ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1. Introduction 2. Modelparameterization at high wind speeds 1. Introduction 2. DataSupplementary Formulae 1. Wind Stress 2. Rankine Vortex A .

Zedler, Sarah E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Low Speed Virtual Wind Tunnel Simulation For Educational Studies In Introducing Computational Fluid Dynamics And Flow Visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................... 25 3.2.4. Starting FlowLab ...................................................................................................................... 26 3.2.5. Geometry Settings... OF THE PROGRAMMING....................................................................... 52 v List of Figures FIGURE 2.1 ? COST AND TIME RELATIONSHIP WITH RESPECT TO CFD AND WIND TUNNELS............................. 5 FIGURE 2.2 - BOEING 777 DESIGN...

Yang, Cher-Chiang

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Subhourly wind forecasting techniques for wind turbine operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three models for making automated forecasts of subhourly wind and wind power fluctuations were examined to determine the models' appropriateness, accuracy, and reliability in wind forecasting for wind turbine operation. Such automated forecasts appear to have value not only in wind turbine control and operating strategies, but also in improving individual wind turbine control and operating strategies, but also in improving individual wind turbine operating strategies (such as determining when to attempt startup). A simple persistence model, an autoregressive model, and a generalized equivalent Markhov (GEM) model were developed and tested using spring season data from the WKY television tower located near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The three models represent a pure measurement approach, a pure statistical method and a statistical-dynamical model, respectively. Forecasting models of wind speed means and measures of deviations about the mean were developed and tested for all three forecasting techniques for the 45-meter level and for the 10-, 30- and 60-minute time intervals. The results of this exploratory study indicate that a persistence-based approach, using onsite measurements, will probably be superior in the 10-minute time frame. The GEM model appears to have the most potential in 30-minute and longer time frames, particularly when forecasting wind speed fluctuations. However, several improvements to the GEM model are suggested. In comparison to the other models, the autoregressive model performed poorly at all time frames; but, it is recommended that this model be upgraded to an autoregressive moving average (ARMA or ARIMA) model. The primary constraint in adapting the forecasting models to the production of wind turbine cluster power output forecasts is the lack of either actual data, or suitable models, for simulating wind turbine cluster performance.

Wegley, H.L.; Kosorok, M.R.; Formica, W.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and HydropowerSpeed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” Energy

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” EnergyThe Economics of Wind Energy. ” Renewable and Sustainable

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Cost of Wind Energy in the United States: Trends from 2007 to 2012 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of recent technology trends observed in the United States including project size, turbine size, rotor diameter, hub height, annual average wind speed, and annual energy production. It also highlights area where system analysis is required to fully understand how these technology trends relate to the cost of wind energy.

Hand, M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - ac adjustable speed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

speed wind turbine concept 50 4.1 Variable speed wind turbine... of a variable speed wind turbine with DFIG 54 4.4 Doubly-fed induction generator control 57 4.4.1 System......

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable speed ac Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

speed wind turbine concept 50 4.1 Variable speed wind turbine... of a variable speed wind turbine with DFIG 54 4.4 Doubly-fed induction generator control 57 4.4.1 System......

204

Towards a reliability assessment of the Cn2 and wind speed vertical profiles retrieved from GeMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of a new generation of Adaptive Optics systems called Wide Field AO (WFAO) mark the beginning of a new era. By using multiple Guide Stars (GSs), either Laser Guide Stars (LGSs) or Natural Guide Stars (NGSs), WFAO significantly increases the field of view of the AO-corrected images, and the fraction of the sky that can benefit from such correction. Different typologies of WFAO have been studied over the past years. They all require multiple GSs to perform a tomographic analysis of the atmospheric turbulence. One of the fundamental aspects of the new WFAO systems is the knowledge of the spatio-temporal distribution of the turbulence above the telescope. One way to get to this information is to use the telemetry data provided by the WFAO system itself. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that WFAO systems allows one to derive the Cn2 and wind profile in the main turbulence layers (see e.g. Cortes et al. 2012). This method has the evident advantage to provide information on the turbulence stratification t...

Neichel, Benoit; Guesalaga, Andrés R; Lascaux, Franck; Béchet, Clémentine

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

On the measurement of wind speeds in tornadoes with a portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the formation mechanism and structure of tornadoes are not yet well understood. The Doppler radar is probably the best remote-sensing instrument at present for determining the wind field in tornadoes. Although much has been learned about the non-supercell tornado from relatively close range using Doppler radars at fixed sites, close-range measurements in supercell tornadoes are relatively few. Doppler radar can increase significantly the number of high-resolution, sub-cloud base measurements of both the tornado vortex and its parent vortex in supercells, with simultaneous visual documentation. The design details and operation of the CW/FM-CW Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and used by storm-intercept teams at the Univ. of Oklahoma are described elsewhere. The radar transmits 1 W at 3 cm, and can be switched back and forth between CW and FM-CW modes. In the FM-CW mode the sweep repetition frequency is 15.575 kHz and the sweep width 1.9 MHz; the corresponding maximum unambiguous range and velocity, and range resolution are 5 km, {plus minus} 115 m s{sup {minus}1}, and 78 m respectively. The bistatic antennas, which have half-power beamwidths of 5{degree}, are easily pointed wit the aid of a boresighted VCR. FM-CW Data are recorded on the VCR, while voice documentation is recorded on the audio tape; video is recorded on another VCR. The radar and antennas are easily mounted on a tripod, and can be set up by three people in a minute or two. The purpose of this paper is to describe the signal processing techniques used to determine the Doppler spectrum in the FM-CW mode and a method of its interpretation in real time, and to present data gathered in a tornadic storm in 1990. 15 refs., 7 figs.

Bluestein, H.B. (Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (USA). School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Correlations in thermal comfort and natural wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the average wind velocity and power spectrum exponent (?-of natural wind more accurately, power spectral analysisdata of natural wind versus the power spectral analysis

Kang, Ki-Nam; Song, Doosam; Schiavon, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - average power ratio Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a wind turbine Summary: of pairs of poles over the average power is also studied. Index Terms-- average wind power, battery... charging, permanent magnet synchronous machine. I....

208

Vertical axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with rotational speed control systems. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotating shaft by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the shaft and being provided with aerodynamic control elements operating manually or automatically to control the rotational speed of the turbine.

Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Limits to the power density of very large wind farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple analysis is presented concerning an upper limit of the power density (power per unit land area) of a very large wind farm located at the bottom of a fully developed boundary layer. The analysis suggests that the limit of the power density is about 0.38 times $\\tau_{w0}U_{F0}$, where $\\tau_{w0}$ is the natural shear stress on the ground (that is observed before constructing the wind farm) and $U_{F0}$ is the natural or undisturbed wind speed averaged across the height of the farm to be constructed. Importantly, this implies that the maximum extractable power from such a very large wind farm will not be proportional to the cubic of the wind speed at the farm height, or even the farm height itself, but be proportional to $U_{F0}$.

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PG&E 4:00 p.m. Summer Wind Generator Model Wind Array ELCCexpect from an array of wind generators spread over a largean array of dispersed wind generators will be. wind speed

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Wind energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 88, 042146 (2013) Uncovering wind turbine properties through two-dimensional stochastic modeling of wind dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 88, 042146 (2013) Uncovering wind turbine properties through two, such as the rated speed of the wind turbine or the descriptive wind speed statistics, can be related to the equations describing the evolution of power production and wind speed at single wind turbines. DOI: 10

Peinke, Joachim

215

A Stochastic DEVS Wind Turbine Component Model for Wind Farm Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Stochastic DEVS Wind Turbine Component Model for Wind Farm Simulation Eduardo P´erez, Lewis, wind turbine, DEVS, STDEVS Abstract Wind farms use several wind turbines to generate electricity variations in wind speed and direction, wind turbines experience stochastic loading that of- ten lead

Ding, Yu

216

On prediction of wind-borne plumes with simple models of turbulent transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of x, and the vertical wind speed of gas above ground wass x 10 Vertical gas velocity, horizontal wind speed = 1 m/ss x 10 Vertical gas velocity, horizontal wind speed = 5 m/s

Schwarz, Katherine; Patzek, Tad; Silin, Dmitriy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Wind energy conversion system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a wind energy conversion system comprising: a propeller rotatable by force of wind; a generator of electricity mechanically coupled to the propeller for converting power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load; means coupled between the generator and the electric load for varying the electric power drawn by the electric load to alter the electric loading of the generator; means for electro-optically sensing the speed of the wind at a location upwind from the propeller; and means coupled between the sensing means and the power varying means for operating the power varying means to adjust the electric load of the generator in accordance with a sensed value of wind speed to thereby obtain a desired ratio of wind speed to the speed of a tip of a blade of the propeller.

Longrigg, P.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas prices), pushed wind energy from the bottom toover the cost and price of wind energy that it receives. Asweighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was $65/MWh (

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weighted-average price of wind energy in 1999 was roughly $reduced near-term price expectations, wind energy?s primaryelectricity prices in 2009 pushed wind energy to the top of

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A new method to estimate annual solar wind parameters and contributions of different solar wind structures to geomagnetic activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study two sets of local geomagnetic indices from 26 stations using the principal component (PC) and the independent component (IC) analysis methods. We demonstrate that the annually averaged indices can be accurately represented as linear combinations of two first components with weights systematically depending on latitude. We show that the annual contributions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and high speed streams (HSSs) to geomagnetic activity are highly correlated with the first and second IC. The first and second ICs are also found to be very highly correlated with the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind speed, respectively, because solar wind speed is the most important parameter driving geomagnetic activity during HSSs while IMF strength dominates during CMEs. These results help in better understanding the long-term driving of geomagnetic activity and in gaining information about the long-term evolution of solar wind parameters and the different sol...

Holappa, Lauri; Asikainen, Timo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases to zero when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. The presented results would be useful in practical applications to give a quick estimate of the effect of refraction on wind turbine noise.

Makarewicz, Rufin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Vertical axis wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Viryd CS8 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the Viryd CS8 is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Acoustic Noise Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine in Boulder, CO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and utilized binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optimization of Wind Turbine Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of Wind Turbine Operation by Use of Spinner Anemometer TF Pedersen, NN Sørensen, L Title: Optimization of Wind Turbine Operation by Use of Spinner Anemometer Department: Wind Energy prototype wind turbine. Statistics of the yaw error showed an average of about 10°. The average flow

226

Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project: June 17, 1997--April 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the technical results of the Next Generation Turbine Development Project conducted by GE Wind Energy LLC. This project is jointly funded by GE and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.The goal of this project is for DOE to assist the U.S. wind industry in exploring new concepts and applications of cutting-edge technology in pursuit of the specific objective of developing a wind turbine that can generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy of $0.025/kWh at sites with an average wind speed of 15 mph (at 10 m height).

GE Wind Energy, LLC

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. 2013; 00:112  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. 2013; 00:1­12 DOI: 10.1002/we RESEARCH ARTICLE Model predictive control in wind speed, ensuring certain power gradients, with an insignificant loss in energy production rejection, model predictive control, convex optimization, wind power control, energy storage, power output

228

EXPERIENCES WITH SONIC WIND SENSORS IN OPERATIONAL CONDITIONS Wiel M.F. Wauben  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) uses conventional cup anemometers and wind vanes to measure wind speed and direction. Although the KNMI sonic considered in the previous evaluation. The advanced sensor has the required wind speed range up. An uncertainty of the wind speed of maximally 2 % at all wind directions is required for the wind profile

Wauben, Wiel

229

Design and Test of DC Voltage Link Conversion System and Brushless Doubly-Fed Induction Generator for Variable-Speed Wind Energy Applications: August 1999--May 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes four low-cost alternative power converters for processing the power developed by a doubly fed wound-rotor induction generator for wind energy conversion systems.

Lipo, T.A.; Panda, D.; Zarko, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Design and Test of a Variable Speed Wind Turbine System Employing a Direct Drive Axial Flux Synchronization Generator: 29 October 2002 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this funded research project is the definition, analytical investigation, modeling, and prototype realization of a current-source conversion topology tailored to high-power wind turbines.

Lipo, T. A.; Tenca, P.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Wind Technology Advancements and Impacts on Western Wind Resources (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robi Robichaud made this presentation at the Bureau of Land Management West-wide Wind Opportunities and Constraints Mapping (WWOCM) Project public meeting in Denver, Colorado in September 2014. This presentation outlines recent wind technology advancements, evolving turbine technologies, and industry challenges. The presentation includes maps of mean wind speeds at 50-m, 80-m, and 100-m hub heights on BLM lands. Robichaud also presented on the difference in mean wind speeds from 80m to 100m in Wyoming.

Robichaud, R.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices are high-force, low-speed machines, similar to wind turbines that convert the kinetic energy of a moving fluid into electrical energy....

235

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corresponding to extreme winds for di?erent stations andin turn would lead to extreme downscaled wind speed changeextreme quintiles or more exacting classi?cations of wind

Mansbach, David K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Modeling of wind farm controllers Poul Srensen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dead band. Two types of wind farms are presented. The first using variable speed wind turbines with doubly fed induction generators and fixed speed wind turbines with active stall control. Keywords: wind the wind turbines have increased in size, the costs have been reduced, and the controllability developed

237

Fig. 1. One hour measured irradiance and wind speed data with 0.2 seconds, 3 seconds and 1 minute (interpolated) sampling time.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new power plants based on renewable energy, with wind and photovoltaic (PV) representing the main Studies Catalin I. Ciontea, Dezso Sera, Florin Iov Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University cic of the renewable energy based generators on the distribution network is related to the voltage variations due

Sera, Dezso

238

International Statistical Review (2012), 80, 1, 223 doi:10.1111/j.1751-5823.2011.00168.x Short-Term Wind Speed Forecasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@stat.tamu.edu Summary The emphasis on renewable energy and concerns about the environment have led to large-scale wind mix and develop diverse sources of clean, renewable energy. Cost-effective energy that can be produced to 1990), to increase the amount of renewable energy to 20% of the energy supply, and to reduce

Genton, Marc G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

accretion disk winds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and can obtain radiatively driven winds accelerated up to the it relativistic speed. For less luminous cases, disk winds are transonic types passing through saddle type...

240

accretion disk wind: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and can obtain radiatively driven winds accelerated up to the it relativistic speed. For less luminous cases, disk winds are transonic types passing through saddle type...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design of PM generator for avertical axis wind turbine.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The task in this project is to design a generator for a vertical axis wind turbine withpower rated to 20kW at a wind speed… (more)

Rynkiewicz, Mateusz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Statistical Features of the Wind Field over the Indian Ccean for the period 1998-2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have done a statistical analysis of the wind field from the archive of NCEP/NOAA over the Indian Ocean for the period 1998-2008yy, which is given on a grid 1x1.25 of latitude-longitude with 3h time-step. Initial analysis includes mapping the average wind fields and fields of mean density of the wind-kinetic-energy flux , obtained with different periods of time averaging T, as well as the assessment of 11-year trends in these fields. The subsequent analysis is concerned with partition of the Indian ocean area into 6 zones, provided by the spatial inhomogeneity of the analyzed wind field. This analysis includes: a) an assessment of temporal variations for the wind speed field averaged over the Ocean and the zones and for the field of wind-energy flux; b) construction of time history series of these fields averaged with different scales, and estimating frequency spectra of these series; c) finding the extremes of the wind field (in the zones of Indian Ocean); d) construction of histograms of the wind field; ...

Polnikov, Vladislav; Sannasiraj, S A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

Multiple

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Optimization of a Small Passive Wind Turbine Generator with Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Multiobjective Optimization, Genetic Algorithms, Wind Energy, Vertical Axis Wind Turbine hal-00763673,version1 achieved by controlling the speed of a Wind Turbine Generator (WTG). In particular, the rotor speed should vary in accordance with the wind speed by maintaining the tip speed ratio to the value that maximizes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

245

agb stellar winds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

variations in the location and appearance of the critical curves where the wind speed equals the slow, Alfven, and fast speed. Larger dead zones cause effective, fairly...

246

Wind motor applications for transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motion equation for a vehicle equipped with a wind motor allows, taking into account the drag coefficients, to determine the optimal wind drag velocity in the wind motor`s plane, and hence, obtain all the necessary data for the wind wheel blades geometrical parameters definition. This optimal drag velocity significantly differs from the flow drag velocity which determines the maximum wind motor power. Solution of the motion equation with low drag coefficients indicates that the vehicle speed against the wind may be twice as the wind speed. One of possible transportation wind motor applications is its use on various ships. A ship with such a wind motor may be substantially easier to steer, and if certain devices are available, may proceed in autonomous control mode. Besides, it is capable of moving within narrow fairways. The cruise speed of a sailing boat and wind-motored ship were compared provided that the wind velocity direction changes along a harmonic law with regard to the motion direction. Mean dimensionless speed of the wind-motored ship appears to be by 20--25% higher than that of a sailing boat. There was analyzed a possibility of using the wind motors on planet rovers in Mars or Venus atmospheric conditions. A Mars rover power and motor system has been assessed for the power level of 3 kW.

Lysenko, G.P.; Grigoriev, B.V.; Karpin, K.B. [Moscow Aviation Inst. (Russian Federation)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA’s High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Operational behavior of a double-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greater efficiency in wind turbine systems is achieved by allowing the rotor to change its rate of rotation as the wind speed changes. The wind turbine system is decoupled from the utility grid and a variable speed operation ...

Reddy, Sivananda Kumjula

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

th percentiles of daily wind speeds (vertical axis) largelyand warm SST. Mean vertical pro?les of wind speed from EPICspeed at the wind farm sites, since inversion strength is largely controlled by the vertical

Mansbach, David K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ris R 1068EN Extreme Winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ris R 1068EN Extreme Winds in Denmark Leif Kristensen and Ole Rathmann Ris National Laboratory of this investigationis to study, on basis of climatologicalrecords, how large extreme wind speeds are in various parts;Abstract Wind-speed data from four sites in Denmark have been analyzed in order to obtain estimates

252

A doubly-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimum extraction of energy from a wind turbine requires that turbine speed vary with wind speed. Existing solutions to produce constant-frequency electrical output under windspeed variations are undesirable due to ...

Thomas, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

Nikandrou, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Models for Assessing Power Fluctuations from Large Wind Farms N. A. Cutululis1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

typical and worst case power fluctuations using the geographical sitting of wind turbines as an input comprehensive, with one year of wind speeds and power from all individual wind turbines in the wind farms of the fluctuating nature of wind speeds, the increasing use of wind turbines for power generation has caused more

255

Real-time solar wind prediction based on SDO/AIA coronal hole data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an empirical model based on the visible area covered by coronal holes close to the central meridian in order to predict the solar wind speed at 1 AU with a lead time up to four days in advance with a 1hr time resolution. Linear prediction functions are used to relate coronal hole areas to solar wind speed. The function parameters are automatically adapted by using the information from the previous 3 Carrington Rotations. Thus the algorithm automatically reacts on the changes of the solar wind speed during different phases of the solar cycle. The adaptive algorithm has been applied to and tested on SDO/AIA-193A observations and ACE measurements during the years 2011-2013, covering 41 Carrington Rotations. The solar wind speed arrival time is delayed and needs on average 4.02 +/- 0.5 days to reach Earth. The algorithm produces good predictions for the 156 solar wind high speed streams peak amplitudes with correlation coefficients of cc~0.60. For 80% of the peaks, the predicted arrival matches within ...

Rotter, T; Temmer, M; Vrsnak, B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Using satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(no wind) Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Blaavandshuk Met. mast N #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from · Wake near large offshore wind farms is quantified in space and time · Software for usersUsing satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete

257

Analysis of the effects of integrating wind turbines into a conventional utility: a case study. Revised final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact on a utility incorporating wind turbine generation due to wind speed sampling frequency, wind turbine performance model, and wind speed forecasting accuracy is examined. The utility analyzed in this study was the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, and the wind turbine assumed was the MOD-2. The sensitivity of the economic value of wind turbine generation to wind speed sampling frequency and wind turbine modeling technique is examined as well as the impact of wind forecasting accuracy on utility operation and production costs. Wind speed data from San Gorgonio Pass, California during 1979 are used to estimate wind turbine performance using four different simulation methods. (LEW)

Goldenblatt, M.K.; Wegley, H.L.; Miller, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Dynamic analysis of a 5 megawatt offshore floating wind turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbine. Rating Control Rotor Radius Rated Wind Speed Towerwind turbine is used in this design, however there are slight modifications of the tower.of the tower. Figure 2.3: NREL 5 MW Reference Wind Turbine [

Harriger, Evan Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Influence of wind characteristics on turbine performance Ioannis Antoniou (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(2) , Peder Enevoldsen (2) , Leo Thesbjerg (3) (1): Wind Energy Department, Risø of measuring the power curve is by using the wind speed at hub height. The assumption behind this is that the wind speed is representative of the wind over the whole turbine rotor. While this assumption

260

Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observa- tions, vertical wind speed profile estimation givenspeed differences compared to over the Gulf Stream, 80 m wind power is relatively smaller because of reduced verticalvertical momentum transfer over the Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Current results in sub-logarithmic wind profiles, reduced 80 – 10 m wind speed

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 90 (2002) 201221  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due largely to lower surface roughness [1]. An additional benefit to offshore location of wind farms characteristics in the near-shore and offshore environment using data from the Danish wind monitoring network. In this relatively high wind speed environment the temporal auto-correlation of wind speeds measured in the offshore

Pryor, Sara C.

262

Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

Bruce A. Wright

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-GeneratedElectricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this paper, we use wind speed data from three different sources to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwestern United States. By ''value'', we refer to either the contribution of wind power to meeting the electric system's peak loads, or the financial value of wind power in electricity markets. Sites for wind power projects are often screened or compared based on the annual average power production that would be expected from wind turbines at each site (Baban and Parry 2001; Brower et al. 2004; Jangamshetti and Rau 2001; Nielsen et al. 2002; Roy 2002; Schwartz 1999). However, at many locations, variations in wind speeds during the day and year are correlated with variations in the electric power system's load and wholesale market prices (Burton et al. 2001; Carlin 1983; Kennedy and Rogers 2003; Man Bae and Devine 1978; Sezgen et al. 1998); this correlation may raise or lower the value of wind power generated at each location. A number of previous reports address this issue somewhat indirectly by studying the contribution of individual wind power sites to the reliability or economic operation of the electric grid, using hourly wind speed data (Fleten et al.; Kahn 1991; Kirby et al. 2003; Milligan 2002; van Wijk et al. 1992). However, we have not identified any previous study that examines the effect of variations in wind timing across a broad geographical area on wholesale market value or capacity contribution of those different wind power sites. We have done so, to determine whether it is important to consider wind-timing when planning wind power development, and to try to identify locations where timing would have a more positive or negative effect. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in California and the Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming) with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. We also assess whether modeled wind data from TrueWind Solutions, LLC, can help answer such questions, by comparing results found using the TrueWind data to those found using anemometers or wind farm power production data. This paper summarizes results that are presented in more detail in a recent report from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Fripp and Wiser 2006). The full report is available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/re-pubs.html.

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Use of synthetic aperture radar for offshore wind resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The UK has an abundant offshore wind resource with offshore wind farming set to grow rapidly over the coming years. Optimisation of energy production is of the utmost importance and accurate estimates of wind speed distributions are critical...

Cameron, Iain Dickson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wind farm electrical system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

266

Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The effects of energy storage properties and forecast accuracy on mitigating variability in wind power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity generation from wind power is increasing worldwide. Wind power can offset traditional fossil fuel generators which is beneficial to the environment. However, wind generation is unpredictable. Wind speeds have ...

Jaworsky, Christina A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relationship between potential wind speed and theoreticalfirm contracts. Potential wind investors face considerable15 with optimism the potential that wind, photovoltaic, and

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Influence of Thermal Stratification on Wind Profiles for Heights up to 140 m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.energiemeteorologie.de The vertical wind speed profile has to be know for many wind power applications. Although the large effect speeds are not measured or predicted in the hubheight of the wind turbine. For the vertical trans stratification of the boundary layer has also an important influence on the vertical wind speed profile. Only

Heinemann, Detlev

271

Measured wind turbine loads and their dependence on inflow parameters L. Manuel & L. D. Nelson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the hub-height horizontal wind speed as well as secondary pa- rameters such as Reynolds stresses, vertical to other previous studies, but we do not bin the data sets by wind speed since dependen- cies in one wind turbine loads. Inflow parameters might include, for example, mean wind speed, turbu- lence intensity

Manuel, Lance

272

Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 29 April 2009 , CD zU ln~ #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme wind speeds , CD ? #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme wind speeds ­ Dynamics Sensitivity High and/or extreme wind speeds ­ Dynamics Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface

Vries, Hans de

273

Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Measured effect of wind generation on the fuel consumption of an isolated diesel power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Block Island Power Company (BIPCO), on Block Island, Rhode Island, operates an isolated electric power system consisting of diesel generation and an experimental wind turbine. The 150-kW wind turbine, designated MOD-OA by the U.S. Department of Energy is typically operated in parallel with two diesel generators to serve an average winter load of 350 kW. Wind generation serves up to 60% of the system demand depending on wind speed and total system load. Results of diesel fuel consumption measurements are given for the diesel units operated in parallel with the wind turbine and again without the wind turbine. The fuel consumption data are used to calculate the amount of fuel displaced by wind energy. Results indicate that the wind turbine displaced 25,700 lbs. of the diesel fuel during the test period, representing a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of 6.7% while generating 11% of the total electrical energy. The amount of displaced fuel depends on operating conditions and system load. It is also shown that diesel engine throttle activity resulting from wind gusts which rapidly change the wind turbine output do not significantly influence fuel consumption.

Stiller, P.; Scott, G.; Shaltens, R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Verification of hourly forecasts of wind turbine power output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A verification of hourly average wind speed forecasts in terms of hourly average power output of a MOD-2 was performed for four sites. Site-specific probabilistic transformation models were developed to transform the forecast and observed hourly average speeds to the percent probability of exceedance of an hourly average power output. (This transformation model also appears to have value in predicting annual energy production for use in wind energy feasibility studies.) The transformed forecasts were verified in a deterministic sense (i.e., as continuous values) and in a probabilistic sense (based upon the probability of power output falling in a specified category). Since the smoothing effects of time averaging are very pronounced, the 90% probability of exceedance was built into the transformation models. Semiobjective and objective (model output statistics) forecasts were made compared for the four sites. The verification results indicate that the correct category can be forecast an average of 75% of the time over a 24-hour period. Accuracy generally decreases with projection time out to approx. 18 hours and then may increase due to the fairly regular diurnal wind patterns that occur at many sites. The ability to forecast the correct power output category increases with increasing power output because occurrences of high hourly average power output (near rated) are relatively rare and are generally not forecast. The semiobjective forecasts proved superior to model output statistics in forecasting high values of power output and in the shorter time frames (1 to 6 hours). However, model output statistics were slightly more accurate at other power output levels and times. Noticeable differences were observed between deterministic and probabilistic (categorical) forecast verification results.

Wegley, H.L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Uncovering wind turbine properties through two-dimensional stochastic modeling of wind dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a method for stochastic data analysis, borrowed from statistical physics, we analyze synthetic data from a Markov chain model that reproduces measurements of wind speed and power production in a wind park in Portugal. From the theoretical point of view we argue that our methods can be used to extract unknown functional relations between two variables. We first show that indeed our analysis retrieves the power performance curve, which yields the relationship between wind speed and power production and discuss how such procedure can be extended for extracting functional relationships between pairs of physical variables in general. Second, we show how specific features, such as the turbine rated wind speed or the descriptive wind speed statistics, can be related with the equations describing the evolution of power production and wind speed at single wind turbines.

Raischel, Frank; Lopes, Vitor V; Lind, Pedro G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Evaluation of global wind power Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of global wind power Cristina L. Archer and Mark Z. Jacobson Department of Civil the world's wind power potential for the first time from data. Wind speeds are calculated at 80 m, the hub% of all reporting stations experience annual mean wind speeds ! 6.9 m/s at 80 m (i.e., wind power class 3

278

Is the Weibull distribution really suited for wind statistics modeling and wind power evaluation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind speed statistics is generally modeled using the Weibull distribution. This distribution is convenient since it fully characterizes analytically with only two parameters (the shape and scale parameters) the shape of distribution and the different moments of the wind speed (mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis). This distribution is broadly used in the wind energy sector to produce maps of wind energy potential. However, the Weibull distribution is based on empirical rather than physical justification and might display strong limitations for its applications. The philosophy of this article is based on the modeling of the wind components instead of the wind speed itself. This provides more physical insights on the validity domain of the Weibull distribution as a possible relevant model for wind statistics and the quantification of the error made by using such a distribution. We thereby propose alternative expressions of more suited wind speed distribution.

Drobinski, Philippe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Winds of change?: Projections of near-surface winds under climate change scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a downscaling technique to generate probability distributions of wind speeds at sites in northern Europe on renewable energy resources including wind-power. 2. Data [4] Ten coupled Global Climate Models (GCMs) fromWinds of change?: Projections of near-surface winds under climate change scenarios S. C. Pryor,1 J

Pryor, Sara C.

280

MSU-Wind Applications Center: Wind Resource Worksheet Theoretical Power Calculation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSU-Wind Applications Center: Wind Resource Worksheet Theoretical Power Calculation Equations: A= swept area = air density v= velocity R= universal gas constant Steps: 1. Measure wind speed from fan. = ___________/(________*________)= _________kg/m3 5. Theoretical Power a. Low Setting Theoretical Wind Power i. Power= ½*______*______*______*.59

Dyer, Bill

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind resources and wind farm wake effects offshore observed from satellite Charlotte Bay Hasager, Wind Energy Department, Roskilde, Denmark Charlotte.hasager@risoe.dk, poul.astrup@risoe.dk, merete.bruun.Christiansen@risoe.dk, morten.Nielsen@risoe.dk, r.barthelmie@risoe.dk Abstract: Satellite observations of ocean wind speed

282

Analysis of Wind Power Ramping Behavior in ERCOT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the wind power ramping behavior using 10-minute and hourly average wind power data from ERCOT and presents statistical properties of the large ramp events.

Wan, Y. H.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

PSO (FU 2101) Ensemble-forecasts for wind power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSO (FU 2101) Ensemble-forecasts for wind power Wind Power Ensemble Forecasting Using Wind Speed the problems of (i) transforming the meteorological ensembles to wind power ensembles and, (ii) correcting) data. However, quite often the actual wind power production is outside the range of ensemble forecast

284

Wind Farm Power Prediction: A Data-Mining Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a wind power plant. A number of different approaches have been used in forecasting wind speed and windWind Farm Power Prediction: A Data-Mining Approach Andrew Kusiak*, Haiyang Zheng and Zhe Song, IA 52242­1527, USA In this paper, models for short- and long-term prediction of wind farm power

Kusiak, Andrew

285

RisR1238(EN) Extreme Winds over Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø­R­1238(EN) Extreme Winds over Denmark from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Helmut P. Frank Wind Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark May 2001 #12;Abstract An extreme wind analysis of wind speed calculatedPa, and geostrophic winds at 850 hPa, 1000 hPa, and at the sea level are analyzed. At 10 m height the expected extreme

286

Optimum propeller wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Prandtl-Betz-Theodorsen theory of heavily loaded airscrews has been adapted to the design of propeller windmills which are to be optimized for maximum power coefficient. It is shown that the simpler, light-loading, constant-area wake assumption can generate significantly different ''optimum'' performance and geometry, and that it is therefore not appropriate to the design of propeller wind turbines when operating in their normal range of high-tip-speed-to-wind-speed ratio. Design curves for optimum power coefficient are presented and an example of the design of a typical two-blade optimum rotor is given.

Sanderson, R.J.; Archer, R.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

George, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effect of high penetration of wind power on primary frequency control of power systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work, a power system with wind power units and hydro power units are considered. The hydro power unit and variable speed wind turbine… (more)

Motamed, Bardia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - aggregated wind power Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the increased wind power penetration in power systems the main trend for modern wind turbines is clearly... variable speed operation and grid connection via ... Source: Ris...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric wind sensor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to measure wind speed, wind direction, air... temperature, atmospheric pressure and solar radiation. The sensors and data-logger are mounted on 25-m high... calibration of...

291

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid… (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

293

Multivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics based on machine learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are often described by time-dependent statistical parameters such as mean wind speed, turbulence intensity, mean wind direction and vertical mean wind profile, which depends on the surface roughness (e.g. landMultivariate analysis and prediction of wind turbine response to varying wind field characteristics

Stanford University

294

Active control system for high speed windmills  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

Avery, Don E. (45-437 Akimala St., Honolulu, HI 96744)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Active control system for high speed windmills  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

Avery, D.E.

1988-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

Microphysical Structure of the Marine Boundary Layer under Strong Wind and Spray Formation as Seen from Simulations Using a 2D Explicit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the vertical profiles of wind speed occurring with in- creasing wind speeds were attributed to a decrease generation is de- termined by a source function depending on the background wind speed assumed in the surface roughness and the drag coefficient for wind speeds exceeding about 33 m s21 . This decrease

Mark, Pinsky

297

Wind derivatives: hedging wind risk:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wind derivatives are financial contracts that can be used to hedge or mitigate wind risk. In this thesis, the focus was on pricing these wind… (more)

Hoyer, S.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNC’s technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

Vaught, Douglas J.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Mathematical and Computational Applications, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 408-420, 2013 MODELING AND CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as variable speed variable pitch angle wind turbine due to its advantages in efficiency and the structure that is close to the ideal power curve where the energy efficiency is maximized below the nominal wind speed of 11 / and the power is limited to the nominal value above the nominal wind speed. Turbsim

Yanikoglu, Berrin

300

Wind velocity measurements using a pulsed LIDAR system: first results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A laser beam of 1.54 µm wavelength takes measurements of the wind speed in beamwise direction. To obtain the three-dimensinal wind vector, the beam is inclined by 30 from vertical direction and measurements 12345 t [s] vh[m/s] Figure 2. Segment of measured time series of the horizontal wind speed magnitude vh

Peinke, Joachim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observed and CAM3 GCM Sea Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Characterization, Comparison, and Bias climatological surface wind speed probability density functions (PDFs) estimated from observations and use them to evaluate, for the first time, contemporaneous wind PDFs predicted by a GCM. The ob- servations include NASA

Zender, Charles

302

On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using available observations, focusing on the role of the synoptically ...

Zhai, Xiaoming

303

Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

304

Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine connection to grid is a real  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine and the generator design. The fixed-speed wind turbine has the advantage of the low cost of A. F. Abdou and H. R advantages over the fixed-speed operation, such as maximum power capture, less mechanical stresses, and less

Pota, Himanshu Roy

305

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; St. Paul, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in St. Paul, Alaska. Data provided for this project include load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, dump (controlling) load, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Wind power generating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normally feathered propeller blades of a wind power generating system unfeather in response to the actuation of a power cylinder that responds to actuating signals. Once operational, the propellers generate power over a large range of wind velocities. A maximum power generation design point signals a feather response of the propellers so that once the design point is reached no increase in power results, but the system still generates power. At wind speeds below this maximum point, propeller speed and power output optimize to preset values. The propellers drive a positive displacement pump that in turn drives a positive displacement motor of the swash plate type. The displacement of the motor varies depending on the load on the system, with increasing displacement resulting in increasing propeller speeds, and the converse. In the event of dangerous but not clandestine problems developing in the system, a control circuit dumps hydraulic pressure from the unfeathering cylinder resulting in a predetermined, lower operating pressure produced by the pump. In the event that a problem of potentially cladestine consequence arises, the propeller unfeathering cylinder immediately unloads. Upon startup, a bypass around the motor is blocked, applying a pressure across the motor. The motor drives the generator until the generator reaches a predetermined speed whereupon the generator is placed in circuit with a utility grid and permitted to motor up to synchronous speed.

Schachle, Ch.; Schachle, E. C.; Schachle, J. R.; Schachle, P. J.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA INVESTIGATION OF HOW ANGLE OF ATTACK AFFECTS ROTOR SPEED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-pitch blades is tested in UCSC's wind tunnel. The turbine is used to test how varying the blade angle affects the turbine's rotational speed at different wind speeds. The data are used to determine how the blade angle 27 Appendix A Wind Turbine Data 29 Appendix B Converting Blade Pitch to Needle Angle 33 Appendix C

Belanger, David P.

308

OPERATIONAL TEST OF SONIC WIND SENSORS AT KNMI Wiel M.F. Wauben  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transfer functions for wind direction, - speed and - gust that account for the change from one sensor vanes to measure wind speed and direction. Although the KNMI cup and vane meet WMO requirements into account by a wind direction and - speed dependent correction that is applied in the sensor software

Wauben, Wiel

309

Simulated performance of an airborne lidar wind shear detection system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the microburst test case. Journal model is Applied Optics. CHAPTER II THE WIND SHEAR HAZARD 2. 1 The Wind Shear Phenomenon Wind shear can be defined as a change in wind direction and/or speed over relatively short distances. i Wind shear can occur at any... and sea ? breeze fronts. These clear air winds move at speeds of 15 to 40 knots over large distances. rhtrrM~s Prost i ? arhiog the ar e of t a sitio bet eea t o separate ai masses having different temperatures and humidities. The change in wind...

Griffith, Kenneth Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Real time grid congestion management in presence of high penetration of wind energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real time grid congestion management in presence of high penetration of wind energy A. Vergnol1 , J », « Wind energy », « Variable speed drive » Abstract With the increased use of wind energy the power

Boyer, Edmond

311

Pitfalls of modeling wind power using Markov chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An increased penetration of wind turbines have given rise to a need for wind speed/power models that generate realistic synthetic data. Such data, for example, might be used in simulations to size energy storage or spinning ...

Kirtley, James L., Jr.

312

Simulation and Optimization of Wind Farm Operations under Stochastic Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation model, wind speed model, and maintenance model. We provide practical insights gained by examining di erent maintenance strategies. To the best of our knowledge, our simulation model is the rst discrete-event simulation model for wind farm...

Byon, Eunshin

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Ris National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø National Laboratory Satellite SAR applied in offshore wind ressource mapping: possibilities is to quantify the regional offshore wind climate for wind energy application based on satellite SAR ·Study of 85SAR(m/s) Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps

314

Wind Power Plant Prediction by Using Neural Networks: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces a method of short-term wind power prediction for a wind power plant by training neural networks based on historical data of wind speed and wind direction. The model proposed is shown to achieve a high accuracy with respect to the measured data.

Liu, Z.; Gao, W.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Dynamic Simulation of DFIG Wind Turbines on FPGA Boards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Simulation of DFIG Wind Turbines on FPGA Boards Hao Chen, Student Member, IEEE, Song Sun is a friction coefficient. The wind turbine model is based on the relation between the upstream wind speed V w + 1 where p is the air density; Rw is the wind turbine radius; cp (A, (3) is the performance

Zambreno, Joseph A.

316

Wind resource assessment with a mesoscale non-hydrostatic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind resource assessment with a mesoscale non- hydrostatic model Vincent Guénard, Center for Energy is developed for assessing the wind resource and its uncertainty. The work focuses on an existing wind farm mast measurements. The wind speed and turbulence fields are discussed. It is shown that the k

Boyer, Edmond

317

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cambridge Danehy Park Wind Turbine Preliminary Project Assessment Overview MIT Wind Energy Projects 4 / 25 2.5 / 25 Rated Wind Speed (m/s) 13 10 14.5 ~15 12 The above turbines were chosen to provide, several recent studies examining birds and wind turbines have observed that most birds usually avoid

318

Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ris-R-1330(EN) Wind Turbine Power Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 Background 8 2.2 Problems 8 2.3 Input by the Manufacturers 9 2.4 Methods 10 2.4.1Method A 10 2.4.1.1 Site.2 Experiences from production assessments - The Questionable On-site Power Curve Measurement 4.2.1Background wind speed 5.7 Types of wind speed sensors 35 5.7.1Vector scalar wind speed cup anemometer 35 5

320

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary Correspondence M. Wächter, ForWind-Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, Carl Von Ossietzky on the operation of wind energy converters (WECs) imposing different risks especially in terms of highly dynamic

Peinke, Joachim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wind Spires as an Alternative Energy Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discloses the design and development of an innovative wind tower system having an axisymmetric wind deflecting structure with a plurality of symmetrically mounted rooftop size wind turbines near the axisymmetric structure. The purpose of the wind deflecting structure is to increase the ambient wind speed that in turn results in an overall increase in the power capacity of the wind turbines. Two working prototypes were constructed and installed in the summer of 2009 and 2012 respectively. The system installed in the Summer of 2009 has a cylindrical wind deflecting structure, while the tower installed in 2012 has a spiral-shape wind deflecting structure. Each tower has 4 turbines, each rated at 1.65 KW Name-Plate-Rating. Before fabricating the full-size prototypes, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses and scaled-down table-top models were used to predict the performance of the full-scale models. The performance results obtained from the full-size prototypes validated the results obtained from the computational models and those of the scaled-down models. The second prototype (spiral configuration) showed at a wind speed of 11 miles per hour (4.9 m/s) the power output of the system could reach 1,288 watt, when a typical turbine installation, with no wind deflecting structure, could produce only 200 watt by the same turbines at the same wind speed. At a wind speed of 18 miles per hour (8 m/sec), the spiral prototype produces 6,143 watt, while the power generated by the same turbines would be 1,412 watt in the absence of a wind deflecting structure under the same wind speed. Four US patents were allowed, and are in print, as the results of this project (US 7,540,706, US 7,679,209, US 7,845,904, and US 8,002,516).

Majid Rashidi, Ph.D., P.E.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES AND THE ECMWF MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF WIND AND WIND SHEAR CLIMATOLOGIES DERIVED FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIOSONDES wind and its vertical gradient, i.e. wind-shear, is characterized as a function of climate region. For a better representation of the average atmospheric wind and shear and their variabilities, high

Stoffelen, Ad

323

Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@et.aau.dk, csu@et.aau.dk, zch@et.aau.dk Abstract ­ Grid connected wind turbines are fluctuating power sources due on the power system small signal stability of wind turbines based on fixed-speed induction generators, doubly two interconnected power systems [9]. The wind power fluctuations produced by grid connected variable

Hu, Weihao

324

Stability Improvement of Wind Farms using Shunt and Series Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air density, Rotor effective wind speed. A Swept area of the turbine blade. Tip speed ratio. Cp, Torsion damping. Tm, Tae, Te Mechanical, Aerodynamic, and Electrical torque. Lm, Lrr Mutual inductance

Pota, Himanshu Roy

325

South Carolina Opens Nation's Largest Wind Drivetrain Testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carolina. The facility will help test and validate new turbines, particularly for offshore wind- helping to speed deployment of next generation energy technology, reduce...

326

South Carolina Opens Nation's Largest Wind Drivetrain Testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Institute, the facility will help test and validate new turbines, particularly for offshore wind-helping to speed deployment of next generation energy technology, reduce costs...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - average mass approach Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

averaged. We... see that when the rate of mass injection dominates the mass flux of the wind (i.e. 1) the average... the nature of the interaction of a flow with discrete ......

328

Land-Based Wind Turbine Transportation and Logistics Barriers and Their Effects on U.S. Wind Markets (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The average size of land based wind turbines installed in the United States has increased dramatically over time. As a result wind turbines are facing new transportation and logistics barriers that limit the size of utility scale land based wind turbines that can be deployed in the United States. Addressing these transportation and logistics barriers will allow for even further increases in U.S. turbine size using technologies under development for offshore markets. These barriers are important because larger taller turbines have been identified as a path to reducing the levelized cost of energy for electricity. Additionally, increases in turbine size enable the development of new low and moderate speed markets in the U.S. In turn, wind industry stakeholder support, market stability, and ultimately domestic content and manufacturing competitiveness are potentially affected. In general there is very little recent literature that characterizes transportation and logistics barriers and their effects on U.S. wind markets and opportunities. Accordingly, the objective of this paper is to report the results of a recent NREL study that identifies the barriers, assesses their impact and provides recommendations for strategies and specific actions.

Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J.O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Review of Wind Energy Forecasting Methods for Modeling Ramping Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tall onshore wind turbines, with hub heights between 80 m and 100 m, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere since they generally encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complexity of boundary layer flows. This complexity of the lowest layers of the atmosphere, where wind turbines reside, has made conventional modeling efforts less than ideal. To meet the nation's goal of increasing wind power into the U.S. electrical grid, the accuracy of wind power forecasts must be improved. In this report, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of California at Berkeley, and Colorado School of Mines, evaluates innovative approaches to forecasting sudden changes in wind speed or 'ramping events' at an onshore, multimegawatt wind farm. The forecast simulations are compared to observations of wind speed and direction from tall meteorological towers and a remote-sensing Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instrument. Ramping events, i.e., sudden increases or decreases in wind speed and hence, power generated by a turbine, are especially problematic for wind farm operators. Sudden changes in wind speed or direction can lead to large power generation differences across a wind farm and are very difficult to predict with current forecasting tools. Here, we quantify the ability of three models, mesoscale WRF, WRF-LES, and PF.WRF, which vary in sophistication and required user expertise, to predict three ramping events at a North American wind farm.

Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N; Williams, J L; Rhodes, M; Chow, T K; Maxwell, R

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

The dominant X-ray wind in massive star binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate which shocked wind is responsible for the majority of the X-ray emission in colliding wind binaries, an issue where there is some confusion in the literature, and which we show is more complicated than has been assumed. We find that where both winds rapidly cool (typically close binaries), the ratio of the wind speeds is often more important than the momentum ratio, because it controls the energy flux ratio, and the faster wind is generally the dominant emitter. When both winds are largely adiabatic (typically long-period binaries), the slower and denser wind will cool faster and the stronger wind generally dominates the X-ray luminosity.

J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Sandia National Laboratories: increasing average wind turbine power rating  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing the viability offuelincreased

332

Sandia National Laboratories: increasing average wind-turbine rotor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing the viability offuelincreaseddiameter

333

Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence I: Wind Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run ...

Johnstone, C P; Lüftinger, T; Toth, G; Brott, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical T.S. Nielsen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical Methods T.S. Nielsen1 , H. Madsen1 , H considered in the ANEMOS project for short-term fore- casting of wind power. The total procedure typically in for prediction of wind power or wind speed, estimating the uncertainty of the wind power forecast, and finally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems a review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems ­ a review Authors Na Abstract of wind farms are using variable speed wind turbines equipped with doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) due to their advantages over other wind turbine generators. Therefore, the analysis of wind power

Pota, Himanshu Roy

337

Abstract--This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS) which involve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract-- This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS-inverter. The goal of control is to maximize wind energy extraction and this needs letting the wind turbine rotor wind energy extraction) only for one wind speed value depending on the considered value of turbine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Prediction, operations, and condition monitoring in wind energy Andrew Kusiak a,*, Zijun Zhang b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Prediction, operations, and condition monitoring in wind energy Andrew Kusiak a,*, Zijun 2013 Available online 23 August 2013 Keywords: Wind energy Wind speed prediction Wind turbine control Condition monitoring and fault detection a b s t r a c t Recent developments in wind energy research

Kusiak, Andrew

339

The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance , J. Chapman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance A. Swift1 , J wind speed measurements on the TTU WISE 200m and 78m towers. A hypothetical wind turbine is shown. At potential wind turbine sites, it is uncommon to have wind measurements available at multiple heights. Then

Manuel, Lance

340

RAIN AND WIND ESTIMATION FROM SEAWINDS IN HURRICANES AT ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function (GMF) which relates wind to backscatter (0 ) is not well understood for extremely high wind speedsRAIN AND WIND ESTIMATION FROM SEAWINDS IN HURRICANES AT ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION Brent A. Williams method for estimating wind and rain in hurricanes from SeaWinds at ultra-high resolution is developed. We

Long, David G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NIST BUILDING SCIENCE SERIES 180 Database-Assisted Design for Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climatological information on extreme wind speeds and their direction-dependence can be used in conjunction; aerodynamics; extreme winds; database-assisted design; structural dynamics; wind directionality; wind forcesNIST BUILDING SCIENCE SERIES 180 Database-Assisted Design for Wind: Concepts, Software

342

The determination of stochastic loads on horizontal axis wind turbine blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads of a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees-of-freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and the code models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good.

Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighborof Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on NeighborWind Speed (m/s) 3 Turbines (in operation at the time) Noise

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2004), 130, pp. 120 Using mesocale model winds for correcting wind-drift errors in radar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the vertical shear of the horizontal wind. We assume the shear and the fall speed in the layer are constant rain because of the low fall speed of around 1 m s-1. Sampling these wind-induced fall streak patterns vertical profile of reflectivity shear fall streak wind drift 1. Introduction Operational radars around

Reading, University of

345

Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs R. C levels and waves are generated by low atmospheric pressure and severe wind speeds during storm events. As a result of the geometry of the North Sea, not only the maximum wind speed is relevant, but also wind

Haak, Hein

346

A Combined High Gain Observer and High-Order Sliding Mode Controller for a DFIG-Based Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulator FAST. Index Terms--Wind turbine (WT), Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), high gain observer using the NREL wind turbine simulator FAST. II. WIND TURBINE MODELING The global scheme for a grid-connected shaft speed and thus maintaining optimal power generation. The more variable speed wind turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

WindTurbineGenerator Introduction of the Renewable Micro-Grid Test-Bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulator Wind Turbine: PMSM, 3kW, 8.3A Wind Generator: PMSM, 3kW, 8.3A 3 AC/DC Converter & DC/AC Inverter Wind Turbine: Torque or Speed Control Wind Generator: PQ Control Cubicle #4: Energy Storage Generator #1 3kW, 8.3A Wind Turbine #1 3kW, 8.3A Wind Turbine #2 3kW Wind Generator #2 3kW RS232

Johnson, Eric E.

348

Small solar wind transients: Stereo-A observations in 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Year 2009 was the last year of a long and pronounced solar activity minimum. In this year the solar wind in the inner heliosphere was for 90% of the time slow (< 450 km s{sup -1}) and with a weaker magnetic field strength compared to the previous solar minimum 1995-1996. We choose this year to present the results of a systematic search for small solar wind transients (STs) observed by the STEREO-Ahead (ST-A) probe. The data are from the PLASTIC and IMPACT instrument suites. By 'small' we mean a duration from {approx}1 to 12 hours. The parameters we search for to identify STs are (i) the total field strength, (ii) the rotation of the magnetic field vector, (iii) its smoothness, (iv) proton temperature, (v) proton beta, and (vi) Alfven Mach number. We find 45 examples. The STs have an average duration of {approx}4 hours. Ensemble averages of key quantities are: (i) maximum B = 7.01 nT; (ii) proton {beta}= 0.18; (iii) proton thermal speed = 20.8 km s{sup -1}; and (iv) Alfven Mach number = 6.13. No distinctive feature is found in the pitch angle distributions of suprathermal electrons. Our statistical results are compared with those of STs observed near Earth by Wind during 2009.

Yu, W.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Popecki, M. A.; Lugaz, N. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kilpua, E. K. J. [Dept. of Physics, Division of Geophysics and Astronomy, University of Helsinki (Finland); Moestl, C. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria and Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.-A. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (CNRS-UPS), Universite de Toulouse, F-31038, Toulouse (France)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Wind Farm  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

351

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

352

Wind Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

353

QUIKSCAT MEASUREMENTS AND ECMWF WIND FORECASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. (2004) this forecast error was encountered when assimilating satellite measurements of zonal wind speeds between satellite measurements and meteorological forecasts of near-surface ocean winds. This type of covariance enters in assimilation techniques such as Kalman filtering. In all, six residual fields

Malmberg, Anders

354

QUIKSCAT MEASUREMENTS AND ECMWF WIND FORECASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. (2004) this forecast error was encountered when assimilating satellite measurements of zonal wind speeds between satellite measurements and meteorological forecasts of near­surface ocean winds. This type of covariance enters in assimilation techniques such as Kalman filtering. In all, six residual fields

Malmberg, Anders

355

Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between surface wind speed and vertical velocity thusaveraged surface wind speeds and total vertical transportvertical upwelling velocity based on average surface wind speed.

Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Rotationally sampled wind characteristics and correlations with MOD-OA wind turbine response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a comprehensive wind and wind turbine measurement program: the Clayton, New Mexico, vertical plane array/MOD-OA project. In this experiment, the turbulent wind was measured for a large array of fixed anemometers located two blade diameters upwind of a 200-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). Simultaneously, key wind turbine response parameters were also measured. The first of two major objectives of this experiment was to determine the turbulent wind, rotationally sampled to emulate the motion of the wind turbine blade, for the range of different wind speeds and stability classes actually experienced by the wind turbine. The second major objective was to correlate this rotationally sampled wind with the wind turbine blade stress and power, in order to assess the usefulness of the wind measurements for wind turbine loads testing a prediction. Time series of rotationally sampled winds and wind turbine blade bending moments and power were converted to frequency spectra using Fourier transform techniques. These spectra were used as the basis for both qualitative and quantitative comparisons among the various cases. A quantitative comparison between the rotationally sampled wind input and blade bending response was made, using the Fourier spectra to estimate the blade transfer function. These transfer functions were then used to calculate an approximate damping coefficient for the MOD-OA fiberglass blade.

George, R.L.; Connell, J.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC): M2 Tower; Boulder, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado, is a world-class research facility managed by NREL for the U.S. Department of Energy. NWTC researchers work with members of the wind energy industry to advance wind power technologies that lower the cost of wind energy through research and development of state-of-the-art wind turbine designs. NREL's Measurement and Instrument Data Center provides data from NWTC's M2 tower which are derived from instruments mounted on or near an 82 meter (270 foot) meteorological tower located at the western edge of the NWTC site and about 11 km (7 miles) west of Broomfield, and approximately 8 km (5 miles) south of Boulder, Colorado. The data represent the mean value of readings taken every two seconds and averaged over one minute. The wind speed and direction are measured at six heights on the tower and air temperature is measured at three heights. The dew point temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, totalized liquid precipitation, and global solar radiation are also available.

Jager, D.; Andreas, A.

358

Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures; (2) Updated and improved application guidelines and manuals from associations and manufacturers; (3) Launched certified product installer programs; and (4) Submitted building code changes to improve product installation. Estimated wind speeds at the damage locations came from simulated hurricane models prepared by Applied Research Associates of Raleigh, North Carolina. A dynamic hurricane wind field model was calibrated to actual wind speeds measured at 12 inland and offshore stations. The maximum estimated peak gust wind speeds in Katrina were in the 120-130 mph range. Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, and traveled almost due north across the city of New Orleans. Hurricane winds hammered the coastline from Houma, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida. The severe flooding problems in New Orleans made it almost impossible for the investigating teams to function inside the city. Thus the WIP investigations were all conducted in areas east of the city. The six teams covered the coastal areas from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, on the west to Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the east. Six teams involving a total of 25 persons documented damage to both low slope and steep slope roofing systems. The teams collected specific information on each building examined, including type of structure (use or occupancy), wall construction, roof type, roof slope, building dimensions, roof deck, insulation, construction, and method of roof attachment. In addition, the teams noted terrain exposure and the estimated wind speeds at the building site from the Katrina wind speed map. With each team member assigned a specific duty, they described the damage in detail and illustrated important features with numerous color photos. Where possible, the points of damage initiation were identified and damage propagation described. Because the wind speeds in Katrina at landfall, where the investigations took place, were less than code-specified design speeds, one would expect roof damage to be minimal. One team speculated that damage to all roofs in the area they examined was les

Desjarlais, A. O.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

On the limiting aerodynamic roughness of the ocean in very strong winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the limiting aerodynamic roughness of the ocean in very strong winds M. A. Donelan,1 B. K. Haus January 2004; accepted 13 August 2004; published 28 September 2004. [1] The aerodynamic friction between, the ``aerodynamic roughness'') increases with the wind speed. Can one merely extrapolate this wind speed tendency

Saltzman, Eric

360

Dynamic behaviour of a DFIG wind turbine subjected to power system faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the dynamic interaction between variable speed DFIG wind turbines and the power system subjected by the Danish Transmission System Operator Energinet.dk. Keywords: doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), wind turbines, the variable speed DFIG wind turbine with its dynamic behaviour and its ride-through capabil- ity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Quality Control and Verification of Weather Radar Wind Profiles IWAN HOLLEMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tions of the vertical velocity, which is a sum of the vertical wind velocity and the hydrometeor fall. 1986). Profiles of wind speed and direction, hydrometeor fall speed, and divergence have been obtainedQuality Control and Verification of Weather Radar Wind Profiles IWAN HOLLEMAN Royal Netherlands

Stoffelen, Ad

362

Upper Ocean Response to Tropical Cyclone Wind Asymmetries S. Daniel Jacob and Lynn K. Shay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images of SST. As a storm intensifies, the increasing wind speed may. However, the significant SST reduction induced by the increasing wind speed leads to reduced air to the atmosphere ( 20%) and vertical mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer ( 80%) induced by wind stress

Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

363

Discrepancies in the Prediction of Solar Wind using Potential Field Source Surface Model: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies in the Prediction of Solar Wind using Potential Field Source Surface Model. This inverse relation has been made use of in the prediction of solar wind speed at 1 AU using a potential between the magnetic flux tube expansion factor (FTE) at the source surface and the solar wind speed

Zhao, Xuepu

364

Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R, Bloomington, IN47405, USA. Tel: 1-812-855-5155. Fax: 1-812-855-1661 Email: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Dept. of Wind an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because in principle they also offer

365

Soft-stall control versus furling control for small wind turbine power regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall control method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reducing furling noise, and reduced thrust.

Muljadi, E.; Forsyth, T.; Butterfield, C.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Soft-Stall Control versus Furling Control for Small Wind Turbine Power Regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many small wind turbines are designed to furl (turn) in high winds to regulate power and provide overspeed protection. Furling control results in poor energy capture at high wind speeds. This paper proposes an alternative control strategy for small wind turbines -- the soft-stall method. The furling and soft-stall control strategies are compared using steady state analysis and dynamic simulation analysis. The soft-stall method is found to offer several advantages: increased energy production at high wind speeds, energy production which tracks the maximum power coefficient at low to medium wind speeds, reduced furling noise, and reduced thrust.

Muljadi, E.; Forsyth, T.; Butterfield, C. P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Surpassing Expectations: State of the U.S. Wind Power Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, new large-scale wind turbines were installed in 18The average size of wind turbines installed in the Uniteddominant manufacturer of wind turbines supplying the U.S.

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena, Hugo Eduardo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Ris-PhD-Report Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAs;#12;Author: Ferhat Bingöl Title: Complex terrain and wind lidars Division: Wind Energy Division Risø-PhD-52 and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated

372

Space-Time Prediction of Ocean Winds Anders Malmberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Temporal Dynamic Modelling #12;Ocean Wind Data Near-surface ocean winds are considered, since satellite grid; blue dots: satellite grid. #12;Meteorological Data - ECMWF Analyses and Forecasts FORECAST m/s 0 10 20 The images illustrate the east-west wind speed. #12;Satellite Data - Quik

Malmberg, Anders

373

SODAR Wind Resource Measurement Results at Falmouth, MA Prepared for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Massachusetts at Amherst. The data were collected to estimate the wind resource for possible wind turbines to well over 100 m. The operation of a SODAR and the SODAR data are described in this report. SODAR Technology The UMass ART VT-1 SODAR measures wind speed and direction at multiple heights using an acoustic

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

374

Control of Wind Turbines for Power Regulation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Wind Turbines for Power Regulation and Load Reduction Juan Jose Garcia Quirante Kongens regulation and load reduction and their ensemble in a variable-speed wind turbine. The power regulation aspects of mathematical modelling of wind turbines, and especially the control methods suited for power

375

Taming Hurricanes With Arrays of Offshore Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming Hurricanes With Arrays of Offshore Wind Turbines Mark Z. Jacobson Cristina Archer, Willet #12;Representation of a vertically-resolved wind turbine in model Lines are model layers) or 50 m/s (destruction) speed. Can Walls of Offshore Wind Turbines Dissipate Hurricanes? #12;Katrina

Firestone, Jeremy

376

NACA0015 Measurements in LM Wind Tunnel and Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NACA0015 Measurements in LM Wind Tunnel and Turbulence Generated Noise Franck Bertagnolio Risø, Denmark November 2008 #12;Author: Franck Bertagnolio Title: NACA0015 Measurements in LM Wind Tunnel on its surface and measured in the wind tunnel at LM Glasfiber at various inflow speeds, angles of attack

377

The Solar Wind, CMEs and the Origins of Heliospheric Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

release o Coronal holes o Source of high-speed solar wind #12;peter.gallagher@tcd.ie #12;#12;peter Parker => Parker Spiral: r - r0 = -(v/ )( - 0) o Winding angle: o Inclined at ~45º at 1 AU and ~90º by 10The Solar Wind, CMEs and the Origins of Heliospheric Activity Peter T. Gallagher School of Physics

378

Wind Power Resource Assessment in Ohio and Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Power Resource Assessment in Ohio and Puerto Rico: A Motivational and Educational Tool Juan University, Athens, Ohio Abstract This paper presents an educational guide and example of a wind resource calculations. New data representing wind speed and direction for locations in Ohio and Puerto Rico

Womeldorf, Carole

379

IMPLEMENTATION OF WIND TURBINE CONTROLLERS W.E.Leithead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPLEMENTATION OF WIND TURBINE CONTROLLERS D.J.Leith W.E.Leithead Department of Electronic-speed wind turbines are considered, namely, (1) accommodation of the strongly nonlinear rotor aerodynamics derived and extended to cater for all wind turbine configurations. A rigorous stability analysis

Duffy, Ken

380

Effects of Changing Atmospheric Conditions on Wind Turbine Performance (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-megawatt, utility-scale wind turbines operate in turbulent and dynamic winds that impact turbine performance in ways that are gradually becoming better understood. This poster presents a study made using a turbulent flow field simulator (TurbSim) and a Turbine aeroelastic simulator (FAST) of the response of a generic 1.5 MW wind turbine to changing inflow. The turbine power output is found to be most sensitive to wind speed and turbulence intensity, but the relationship depends on the wind speed with respect to the turbine's rated wind speed. Shear is found to be poorly correlated to power. A machine learning method called 'regression trees' is used to create a simple model of turbine performance that could be used as part of the wind resource assessment process. This study has used simple flow fields and should be extended to more complex flows, and validated with field observations.

Clifton, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Disturbance Margin For Quantifying Limits on Power Smoothing by Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind variation a wind turbine can absorb in variable speed mode while still being guaranteed to operate speed and generator torque to store and release energy. This ability must be constrained by turbine speed and generator torque limits. To date, work in the literature is conceptual and does not indicate

Maggiore, Manfredi

382

Atmospheric chemistry results from the ANTCI 2005 Antarctic plateau airborne study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wind speed can influence the daily course of temperature and verticalby vertical arrows. (c) Daily average wind speed (small

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Performance Indicators of Wind Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling wind speed is one of the key element when dealing with the production of energy through wind turbines. A good model can be used for forecasting, site evaluation, turbines design and many other purposes. In this work we are interested in the analysis of the future financial cash flows generated by selling the electrical energy produced. We apply an indexed semi-Markov model of wind speed that has been shown, in previous investigation, to reproduce accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed. The model is applied to the evaluation of financial indicators like the Internal Rate of Return, semi-Elasticity and relative Convexity that are widely used for the assessment of the profitability of an investment and for the measurement and analysis of interest rate risk. We compare the computation of these indicators for real and synthetic data. Moreover, we propose a new indicator that can be used to compare the degree of utilization of different power plants.

D'Amico, G; Prattico, F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

PowerJet Wind Turbine Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PROJECT OBJECTIVE The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energy�s objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds. The test model will continue to operate beyond the time frame of the project, with the ultimate goal of manufacturing and marketing the PowerJet worldwide. Increased Understanding of Electronic & Mechanical Controls Integrated With Electricity Generator The PowerJet back plate begins to open as wind speed exceeds 13.5 mps. The pressure inside the turbine and the turbine rotational speed are held constant. Once the back plate has fully opened at approximately 29 mps, the controller begins pulsing back to the generator to limit the rotational speed of the turbine. At a wind speed in excess of 29 mps, the controller shorts the generator and brings the turbine to a complete stop. As the wind speed subsides, the controller releases the turbine and it resumes producing electricity. Data collection and instrumentation problems prevented identification of the exact speeds at which these events occur. However, the turbine, controller and generator survived winds in excess of 36 mps, confirming that the two over-speed controls accomplished their purpose. Technical Effectiveness & Economic Feasibility Maximum Electrical Output The output of electricity is maximized by the integration of an electronic controller and mechanical over-speed controls designed and tested during the course of this project. The output exceeds that of the PowerJet�s 3-bladed counterparts (see Appendix). Durability All components of the PowerJet turbine assembly�including the electronic and mechanical controls designed, manufactured and field tested during the course of this project�proved to be durable through severe weather conditions, with constant operation and no interruption in energy production. Low Cost Materials for the turbine, generator, tower, charge controllers and ancillary parts are available at reasonable prices. Fabrication of these parts is also readily available worldwide. The cost of assembling and installing the turbine is reduced because it has fewer parts and requires less labor to manufacture and assemble, making it competitively priced compared with turbines of similar output manufactured in the U.S. and Europe. The electronic controller is the unique part to be included in the turbine package. The controllers can be manufactured in reasonably-sized production runs to keep the cost below $250 each. The data logger and 24 sensors are for research only and will be unnecessary for the commercial product. Benefit To Public The PowerJet wind-electric system is designed for distributed wind generation in 3 and 4 class winds. This wind turbine meets DOE�s requirements for a quiet, durable, bird-safe turbine that eventually can be deployed as a grid-connected generator in urban and suburban settings. Results As described more fully below and illustrated in the Appendices, the goals and objectives outlined in 2060 SOPO were fully met. Electronic and mechanical controls were successfully designed, manufactured and integrated with the generator. The turbine, tower, controllers and generators operated without incident throughout the test period, surviving severe winter and summer weather conditions such as extreme temperatures, ice and sustained high winds. The electronic controls were contained in weather-proof electrical boxes and the elec

Bartlett, Raymond J

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Effectiveness of speed trailers on low-speed urban roadways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efforts are being made to use speed management methods to match operating speeds to posted speeds and to reduce the variability in vehicle speeds. The effectiveness of many different methods of speed management has not been documented. This thesis...

Perrillo, Kerry Victoria

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

756 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 4, NO. 3, JULY 2013 Minimization of Wind Farm Operational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

756 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 4, NO. 3, JULY 2013 Minimization of Wind Farm) of wind turbine at time , denoted as 0 or 1. Energy consumed by an idle wind turbine. Electricity spot, and Guanglin Xu Abstract--Scheduling a wind farm in the presence of uncertain wind speed conditions

Kusiak, Andrew

387

Method and apparatus for reducing rotor blade deflections, loads, and/or peak rotational speed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing at least one of loads, deflections of rotor blades, or peak rotational speed of a wind turbine includes storing recent historical pitch related data, wind related data, or both. The stored recent historical data is analyzed to determine at least one of whether rapid pitching is occurring or whether wind speed decreases are occurring. A minimum pitch, a pitch rate limit, or both are imposed on pitch angle controls of the rotor blades conditioned upon results of the analysis.

Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Abstract--In this paper, we present the voltage build up process and the terminal voltage control of an isolated wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an isolated wind powered induction generator driven by a variable speed wind turbine using rotor flux oriented, but they can be set to operate within a given variation of speed. Unlike a grid connected induction generator and the speed, torque and fluxes as its outputs. Key words-- Wind energy system, Induction generator, Saturation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

389

Wind turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The improvement in a wind turbine comprises providing a tower with a freely liftable mount and adapting a nacelle which is fitted with a propeller windwheel consisting of a plurality of rotor blades and provided therein with means for conversion of wind energy to be shifted onto said mount attached to the tower. In case of a violent wind storm, the nacelle can be lowered down to the ground to protect the rotor blades from breakage due to the force of the wind. Required maintenance and inspection of the nacelle and replacement of rotor blades can be safely carried out on the ground.

Abe, M.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Analysis of wind power for battery charging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One type of wind-powered battery charging will be explored in this paper. It consists of a wind turbine driving a permanent magnet alternator and operates at variable speed. The alternator is connected to a battery bank via a rectifier. The characteristic of the system depends on the wind turbine, the alternator, and the system configuration. If the electrical load does not match the wind turbine, the performance of the system will be degraded. By matching the electrical load to the wind turbine, the system can be improved significantly. This paper analyzes the properties of the system components. The effects of parameter variation and the system configuration on the system performance are investigated. Two basic methods of shaping the torque-speed characteristic of the generator are presented. The uncompensated as well as the compensated systems will be discussed. Control strategies to improve the system performance will be explored. Finally, a summary of the paper will be presented in the last section.

Muljadi, E.; Drouilhet, S.; Holz, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, V. [University of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia). State Engineering

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Averaging Hypotheses in Newtonian Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Average properties of general inhomogeneous cosmological models are discussed in the Newtonian framework. It is shown under which circumstances the average flow reduces to a member of the standard Friedmann--Lema\\^\\i tre cosmologies. Possible choices of global boundary conditions of inhomogeneous cosmologies as well as consequences for the interpretation of cosmological parameters are put into perspective.

T. Buchert

1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Analysis of Wind Power Generation of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from Jul 2002 to Jan 2003 Degradation Analysis - On average, no degradation observed for nine wind farms analyzed over 4-year period. Application of Method 1 to New Site- Sweetwater I Wind Farm ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 3... (ANN). Future Work ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 4 Example: Sweetwater I Wind Farm (37.5 MW) ? Completed and commenced operation in late December 2003. ? Wind Turbines : GE Wind Energy 1.5s 1500 kW ? Tower Height: 80 m...

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

393

Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

Cordes, J A; Johnson, B A

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

TURBULENT HEATING OF THE DISTANT SOLAR WIND BY INTERSTELLAR PICKUP PROTONS IN A DECELERATING FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Previous models of solar wind heating by interstellar pickup proton-driven turbulence have assumed that the wind speed is a constant in heliocentric radial position. However, the same pickup process, which is taken to ...

Isenberg, Philip A.

395

Influence of large scale oscillations on upwelling-favorable coastal wind off central Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Along the central coast of Chile is typically equatorward, upwelling-favorable wind associated with the southeast Pacific anticyclone. A coastal low-level jet often develops, and its wind speed is mostly controlled by the ...

Rahn, David A.

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coordination of Voltage and Frequency Feedback in Load-Frequency Control Capability of Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordination of Voltage and Frequency Feedback in Load-Frequency Control Capability of Wind Turbine-Frequency Control (LFC) is gradually shifted to Variable Speed Wind Turbines (VSWTs). In order to equip VSWT

Silva, Filipe Faria Da

397

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Definition of a 5-MW Reference Wind Turbine for Offshore System Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a three-bladed, upwind, variable-speed, variable blade-pitch-to-feather-controlled multimegawatt wind turbine model developed by NREL to support concept studies aimed at assessing offshore wind technology.

Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

around buildings. The software model has been used to evaluate the wind energy potential on the campus-site. Comparisons between the measurements and the predicted wind speeds allowed validation of the software results of Technology, 2Meteodyn Objectives Conclusions References [1] TopoWind software, User Manual [2] Wind Resource

400

Ris-PhD-24(EN) Stability and Control of Wind Farms in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wind turbines substitute the power production of conventional power plants. Therefore, wind turbines. The project is based on simulations of wind turbines in a power system simulations tool. Some of the models speed turbine and its controls. To simulate realistic grid operation the wind turbine models

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lidars in Wind Energy Jakob Mann, Ferhat Bingöl, Torben Mikkelsen, Ioannis Antoniou, Mike Courtney, Gunner Larsen, Ebba Dellwik Juan Jose Trujillo* and Hans E. Jørgensen Wind Energy Department Risø of the presentation · Introduction to wind energy · Accurate profiles of the mean wind speed · Wakes behind turbines

402

Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Bank Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara December 2010 Keywords: Wind Wind speed Energy Capacity factor Electricity Chile a b s t r a c t Bearing role in any future national energy generation matrix. With a view to understanding the local wind

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

403

A Unified Framework for Reliability Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Unified Framework for Reliability Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems Sebastian S a framework for assessing wind energy conversion systems (WECS) reliability in the face of external based on wind energy are: the impact of wind speed variability on system reliability [1]; WECS' reaction

Liberzon, Daniel

404

1 Introduction The development of wind energy use has led to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Introduction The development of wind energy use has led to a noticeable contribution in of electricity by wind energy acts as a negative load leading to an increase in fluctuations of net load patterns conventional reserves have to be kept ready to replace the wind energy share in case of decreasing wind speeds

Heinemann, Detlev

405

Wind forces on isolated and grouped mobile homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The roof is required by the Mobile Home Manufacturers Association's construction stand- ards to withstand an uplift wind load that is only 60X of the hori- zontal wind load. Therefore, if a mobile home is subjected to de- sign maximum wind speeds... to be vul- nerable to wind loads. The vulnerability of mobile homes to high winds can be attested by numerous reports of mobile home damage as a result of hurricane 1-4 and tornadic winds. The homes are damaged by being turned over, sliding into other...

Oldham, Gary Albert

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Preliminary design and viability consideration of external, shroud-based stators in wind turbine generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal-axis wind turbine designs often included gearboxes or large direct-drive generators to compensate for the low peripheral speeds of the turbine hub. To take advantage of high blade tip speeds, an alternative ...

Shoemaker-Trejo, Nathaniel (Nathaniel Joseph)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced wind turbine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models and advanced control strategies... .139) Track: Technical VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINES - FAULT RIDE-THROUGH AND GRID SUPPORT CAPABILITIES... is on the fault ride through...

408

Aeroacoustic Testing of Wind Turbine Airfoils: February 20, 2004 - February 19, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), working through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve the understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. The motivation for this effort is the desire to exploit the large expanse of low wind speed sites that tend to be close to U.S. load centers. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. NWTC researchers are working hand in hand with engineers in industry to ensure that research findings are available to support ongoing design decisions.

Devenport, W.; Burdisso, R. A.; Camargo, H.; Crede, E.; Remillieux, M.; Rasnick, M.; Van Seeters, P.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Operational risk of a wind farm energy production by Extreme Value Theory and Copulas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we use risk management techniques to evaluate the potential effects of those operational risks that affect the energy production of a wind farm. We concentrate our attention on three major risk factors: wind speed uncertainty, wind turbine reliability and interactions of wind turbines due mainly to their placement. As a first contribution, we show that the Weibull distribution, commonly used to fit recorded wind speed data, underestimates rare events. Therefore, in order to achieve a better estimation of the tail of the wind speed distribution, we advance a Generalized Pareto distribution. The wind turbines reliability is considered by modeling the failures events as a compound Poisson process. Finally, the use of Copula able us to consider the correlation between wind turbines that compose the wind farm. Once this procedure is set up, we show a sensitivity analysis and we also compare the results from the proposed procedure with those obtained by ignoring the aforementioned risk factors.

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

411

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m above  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay, OR) JumpPhoto from AlstomHomeSri

412

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above surface  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay, OR) JumpPhoto from AlstomHomeSriand 0.25

413

192 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, VOL. 4, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 Monitoring Wind Farms With Performance Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to varying loads, which in turn lead to wind turbine faults, e.g., spalled bearings and fractured gears--Three different operational curves--the power curve, rotor curve, and blade pitch curve--are presented the reference curves of wind power, rotor speed, and blade pitch angle, with wind speed as an input variable

Kusiak, Andrew

414

Discrepancies in the prediction of solar wind using potential field source surface model: An investigation of possible sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies in the prediction of solar wind using potential field source surface model expansion factor (FTE) at the source surface and the solar wind speed (SWS) observed at Earth, which has been made use of in the prediction of solar wind speed near the Earth with reasonable accuracy. However

California at Berkeley, University of

415

Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analysis of a teetered, variable-speed rotor: final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HOOT) with four structural degrees of freedom has been derived and verified. The four degrees of freedom include flapwise motion of the blades, teeter motion, and variable rotor speed. Options for the variable rotor speed include synchronous, induction, and constant-tip speed generator models with either start, stop, or normal operations. Verification is made by comparison with analytical solutions and mean and cyclic ESI-80 data. The Veers full-field turbulence model is used as a wind input for a synchronous and induction generator test case during normal operation. As a result of the comparison, it is concluded that the computer model can be used to predict accurately mean and cyclic loads with a turbulent wind input. 47 refs., 19 figs.

Weber, T.L.; Wilson, R.E.; Walker, S.N. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering) [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluations of average level spacings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The average level spacing for highly excited nuclei is a key parameter in cross section formulas based on statistical nuclear models, and also plays an important role in determining many physics quantities. Various methods to evaluate average level spacings are reviewed. Because of the finite experimental resolution, to detect a complete sequence of levels without mixing other parities is extremely difficult, if not totally impossible. Most methods derive the average level spacings by applying a fit, with different degrees of generality, to the truncated Porter-Thomas distribution for reduced neutron widths. A method that tests both distributions of level widths and positions is discussed extensivey with an example of /sup 168/Er data. 19 figures, 2 tables.

Liou, H.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Speed estimation using single loop detector outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................10 2.1 Introduction ........................................................................................10 2.2 Vehicle Detectors ...............................................................................10 2.3 Description of the Speed....4 Hourly traffic volumes from the IH-35 test bed in Austin on Oct. 27, 2004 38 Fig 3.5 Layout of the simulated freeway section ...................................................... 41 Fig. 4.1 Average vehicle lengths over time...

Ye, Zhirui

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Speed estimation using single loop detector outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................10 2.1 Introduction ........................................................................................10 2.2 Vehicle Detectors ...............................................................................10 2.3 Description of the Speed....4 Hourly traffic volumes from the IH-35 test bed in Austin on Oct. 27, 2004 38 Fig 3.5 Layout of the simulated freeway section ...................................................... 41 Fig. 4.1 Average vehicle lengths over time...

Ye, Zhirui

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Irregular wave runup and overtopping of revetments in the presence of wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies on the effects of wind on various wave characteristics including runup and overtopping. Resio (1987) divides the action of winds on overtopping into two distinct physical processes: (1) the increase of runup and overtopping due to wind energy... wind speeds. The difference in total energy between the spectra of Figure 4. 1 and Figures 4. 2 (and 4. 3) also increases with increasing wind speed because of the addition of the wind energy to the mechanical energy at the same peak. 30? 25 s u...

Cinotto, Charles Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A PARALLEL-PROPAGATING ALFVENIC ION-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE HIGH-BETA SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron waves are driven unstable by an isotropic (T{sub {alpha}} = T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}) population of alpha particles drifting parallel to the magnetic field at an average speed U{sub {alpha}} with respect to the protons. We derive an approximate analytic condition for the minimum value of U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability and refine this result using numerical solutions to the hot-plasma dispersion relation. When the alpha-particle number density is {approx_equal} 5% of the proton number density and the two species have similar thermal speeds, the instability requires that {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 1, where {beta}{sub p} is the ratio of the proton pressure to the magnetic pressure. For 1 {approx}< {beta}{sub p} {approx}< 12, the minimum U{sub {alpha}} needed to excite this instability ranges from 0.7v{sub A} to 0.9v{sub A}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. This threshold is smaller than the threshold of {approx_equal} 1.2v{sub A} for the parallel magnetosonic instability, which was previously thought to have the lowest threshold of the alpha-particle beam instabilities at {beta}{sub p} {approx}> 0.5. We discuss the role of the parallel Alfvenic drift instability for the evolution of the alpha-particle drift speed in the solar wind. We also analyze measurements from the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups and show that the U{sub {alpha}} values measured in solar-wind streams with T{sub {alpha}} Almost-Equal-To T{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} are approximately bounded from above by the threshold of the parallel Alfvenic instability.

Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A., E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu, E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: bmaruca@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

423

The effect of rainfall on freeway travel speeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies on the effect of rainfall on freeway capacity found that capacity during wet conditions was 8 percent to 24 percent lower than average capacity during dry conditions. Based on these findings, Greenshield's speed-flow model was calibrated...

Holdener, Douglas Joseph

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

Turtle Mountain Community College

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Characteristics of Wind Turbines Under Normal and Fault Conditions: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the characteristics of a variable-speed wind turbine connected to a stiff or weak grid under normal and fault conditions and the role of reactive power compensation.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.; Ellis, A.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Energy Department Releases New Land-Based/Offshore Wind Resource...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

shows the predicted mean annual wind speeds at 80-m height produced from AWS Truepower's data at a spatial resolution of 2.5 km and interpolated to a finer scale. Read more about...

427

Experimental Investigation of Wind-Forced Drop Stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aluminum (RA = 3.26 micrometers) floor of a tiltable wind tunnel and brought to critical conditions, when the drop begins to run downstream. Various combinations of drop size, inclination angle, and flow speed were employed. A measurement technique capable...

Schmucker, Jason

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Passive aeroelastic tailoring of wind turbine blades : a numerical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research aims to have an impact towards a sustainable energy supply. In wind power generation losses occur at tip speed ratios which the rotor was not designed for. Since the ideal blade shape changes nonlinearly with ...

Deilmann, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that includes wind turbine towers. 2011 Wind TechnologiesSets Other Wind Turbine Components Towers Wind-Poweredselected wind turbine components includes towers as well as

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that includes wind turbine towers. 2010 Wind TechnologiesImports : Other Wind Turbine Components Towers Wind-Poweredselected wind turbine components includes towers as well as

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Balancing of Wind Power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In the future, renewable energy share, especially wind power share, in electricity generation is expected to increase. Due to nature of the wind, wind… (more)

Ülker, Muhammed Akif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Energy 101: Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy 101: Wind Turbines  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

NREL: Wind Research - Events  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Events Below are upcoming events related to wind energy technology. January 2015 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop January 14 - 15, 2015 Boulder, CO The third NREL Wind...

435

Wind power and Wind power and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

436

NREL Develops New Controls that Proactively Adapt to the Wind (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until now, wind turbine controls that reduce the impacts of wind gusts and turbulence were always reactive-responding to the wind rather than anticipating it. But with today's laser-based sensors that measure wind speed ahead of the turbine, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their industry partners are developing more intelligent controls. The world's first field tests of these controls are currently underway at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL, with plans for future commercialization.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NREL Develops New Controls that Proactively Adapt to the Wind (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until now, wind turbine controls that reduce the impacts of wind gusts and turbulence were always reactive -- responding to the wind rather than anticipating it. But with today's laser-based sensors that measure wind speed ahead of the turbine, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their industry partners are developing more intelligent controls. The world's first field tests of these controls are currently underway at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL, with plans for future commercialization.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Performance of propeller wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented herein is a parametric study of the performance of propeller wind turbines with realistic drag/lift ratios. Calculations were made using the complete Glauert vortex blade element theory in annular streamtube elements with the complete turbine performance being the sum of the elemental results up to a specified tip speed ratio. The objective here is to exhibit a new computational technique which yields performance directly when tangential speed ratio and section aerodynamic characteristics are specified. It was found that for a tip speed ratio of 4, turbines with drag/lift ratios of 0.00 and 0.01 had power coefficients of 0.575 and 0.55, respectively. The off-design performance of the finite drag/lift was far better than that of their zero drag counterparts, except in a + or - 20% region about the design conditions. Tolerance to off-design operation increased with decreasing tip speed ratios so that the annual energy capture for tip speed ratios between 2 and 4 was about 87% of the ideal turbine value. The results are intended to provide a basis for re-evaluation of the power range classes of fixed pitch turbines and design tip speed ratios.

Wortman, A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Statistical Methods for Quantifying the Effect of the El NioSouthern Oscillation on Wind Power in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Methods for Quantifying the Effect of the El Niño­Southern Oscillation on Wind Power­Southern Oscillation on Wind Power in the Northern Great Plains of the United States Bret R. Harper1, Richard W. Katz2 of the United States. In order to determine if ENSO has similar impacts on wind speed and wind power, we applied

Katz, Richard

440

1112 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 25, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2010 Short-Horizon Prediction of Wind Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(wind energy in particular) has grown sig- nificantly in the last years. As a relatively new industry, wind energy must address numerous questions, including providing accurate short-term prediction of wind of the generated power [1]. Long-term wind speed and power prediction is of interest to management of energy

Kusiak, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN* AND DAVID S. NOLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN independent of both the maximum wind speed and the radius of maximum winds (RMW). This can be seen winds change with height. Above 2-km height, vertical profiles of Vmaxnorm are nearly independent

Nolan, David S.

442

Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

K Y Patil; D S Chavan

443

Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

aisi m2 high-speed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occur. Although current ... SooHoo, Kimberly E 2008-01-01 44 High speed air pneumatic wind shield wiping design MIT - DSpace Summary: In this creative design process a number of...

446

Toward Controlled Wind Farm Output: Adjustable Power Filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind energy is extracted by the turbine blades. CP depends on the tip-speed ratio, , defined as = Rh structure for a fully-rated converter interfaced wind turbine. A singular perturbations decomposition the static curve that describes the aerodynamic conversion of energy by the bladed turbine rotor

Lehn, Peter W.

447

Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI Atmospheric, Oceanic January 2012, in final form 3 May 2012) ABSTRACT The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using

Johnson, Helen

449

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed: preliminary full scale experiments By: Kim Klaka of experiment were conducted ­ free roll decay tests and irregular wave tests. An inclining test was also with and without the mainsail hoisted, in very light winds. The irregular wave tests were conducted again in very

450

Balancing of high speed, flexible rotating shafts across critical speeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this is equivalent to eliminating certain sen- sors. Once the influence coefficient matrix is square, the solution procedure is exactly that of the single speed case. The computed balance weights should now null the rotor vibration at the sensor ports which were... critical speed, The Sin- gle Speed and the Exact Point-Speed techniques were determined to be relatively ineffective over this speed range; however, the Least Squares procedure yields a dramatic decrease in rotor vibration over the entire speed range...

White, Gary Paul

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The National Wind Technology Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy research began at the Rocky Flats test site in 1976 when Rockwell International subcontracted with the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Rocky Flats Plant was competitively selected from a number of ERDA facilities primarily because it experienced high instantaneous winds and provided a large, clear land area. By 1977, several small wind turbines were in place. During the facility`s peak of operation, in 1979-1980, researchers were testing as many as 23 small wind turbines of various configurations, including commercially available machines and prototype turbines developed under subcontract to Rocky Flats. Facilities also included 8-kW, 40-kW, and 225-kW dynamometers; a variable-speed test bed; a wind/hybrid test facility; a controlled velocity test facility (in Pueblo, Colorado); a modal test facility, and a multimegawatt switchgear facility. The main laboratory building was dedicated in July 1981 and was operated by the Rocky Flats Plant until 1984, when the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and Rocky Flats wind energy programs were merged and transferred to SERI. SERI and now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to conduct wind turbine system component tests after 1987, when most program personnel were moved to the Denver WEst Office Park in Golden and site ownership was transferred back to Rocky Flats. The Combined Experiment test bed was installed and began operation in 1988, and the NREL structural test facility began operation in 1990. In 1993, the site`s operation was officially transferred to the DOE Golden Field Office that oversees NREL. This move was in anticipation of NREL`s renovation and reoccupation of the facility in 1994.

Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R.R.; Cadogon, J.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Methods and apparatus for twist bend coupled (TCB) wind turbine blades  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for controlling a wind turbine having twist bend coupled rotor blades on a rotor mechanically coupled to a generator includes determining a speed of a rotor blade tip of the wind turbine, measuring a current twist distribution and current blade loading, and adjusting a torque of a generator to change the speed of the rotor blade tip to thereby increase an energy capture power coefficient of the wind turbine.

Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; LeMieux, David Lawrence; Pierce, Kirk Gee

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

453

Ancillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presents a simulation model of a wind power plant based on a MW-level variable speed wind turbineAncillary Frequency Control of Direct Drive Full-Scale Converter Based Wind Power Plants Weihao Hu with a full-scale back-to-back power converter developed in the simulation tool of DIgSILENT Power Factory

Chen, Zhe

454

Ris-R-1464(EN) Wind farm models and control strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional description of wind power plant 18 3.1 Power and frequency control 18 3.2 Reactive power of opportunities. Then simulation models are described, including wind turbine models for a fixed speed wind. Finally, some simulation examples and conclusions are presented. Risø National Laboratory Information

455

Supplying Baseload Power and Reducing Transmission Requirements by Interconnecting Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplying Baseload Power and Reducing Transmission Requirements by Interconnecting Wind Farms is not used to supply baseload electric power today. Interconnecting wind farms through the transmission grid farms are interconnected in an array, wind speed correlation among sites decreases and so does

456

Wind Power Production in the Urban Environment S.J. Kooiman, S.W. Tullis*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Power Production in the Urban Environment S.J. Kooiman, S.W. Tullis* Department of Mechanical are typical deterrents to operating wind turbines. However, with the aerodynamic performance advantages and the heightened wind speeds around buildings, the application for these turbines may be more advantageous than

Tullis, Stephen

457

LQG control of horizontal wind turbines for blades and tower loads alleviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LQG control of horizontal wind turbines for blades and tower loads alleviation A. Pintea*, N of power produced by two bladed horizontal variable speed wind turbines. The proposed controller ensures oscillations and with the tower bending tendency. Keywords: LQG control, Wind turbines, Multi-objective control

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

458

Optimal Wind Conditions for the Survival of Larval Northern Anchovy, Engraulis mordax  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There is a statistically sig- nificant relation between larva mortality rate and the frequency of calm, low wind speed periOptimal Wind Conditions for the Survival of Larval Northern Anchovy, Engraulis mordax: A Modeling- puter modeling. The hypothesis was as follows. While wind events dissipate layers of planktonic food

459

Powering Up With Space-Time Wind Forecasting Amanda S. HERING and Marc G. GENTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Powering Up With Space-Time Wind Forecasting Amanda S. HERING and Marc G. GENTON The technology to harvest electricity from wind energy is now advanced enough to make entire cities powered by it a reality be more realistically assessed with a loss measure that depends upon the power curve relating wind speed

Genton, Marc G.

460

High-Order Sliding Mode Control of a DFIG-Based Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Order Sliding Mode Control of a DFIG-Based Wind Turbine for Power Maximization and Grid Fault tolerance of a Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG)-based Wind Turbine (WT). These variable speed systems have several advantages over the traditional wind turbine operating methods, such as the reduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Comparative Study of Time-Frequency Representations for Fault Detection in Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparative Study of Time-Frequency Representations for Fault Detection in Wind Turbine El of wind energy, minimization and prediction of maintenance operations in wind turbine is of key importance. In variable speed turbine generator, advanced signal processing tools are required to detect and diagnose

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

462

Developing a Practical Wind Tunnel Test Engineering Course for Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the development and assessment of an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course utilizing the 7ft by 10ft Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Only 5 other universities in the United States have a wind tunnel...

Recla, Benjamin Jeremiah

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Advanced Signal Processing Techniques for Fault Detection and Diagnosis in a Wind Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rotor bars and bearing damages. Index Terms--Wind turbines, motor current signature analy- sis, time factors, such as wind speed and acoustic noise, wind parks are being mainly constructed offshore. Studies. Different methods of fault detection exist. These include monitoring of the acoustic vibration, internal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

464

Vibration Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade , S.Tullis 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vibration Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade K. Mc Laren 1 , S.Tullis 2 and S.Ziada 3 1 vibration source of a small-scale vertical axis wind turbine currently undergoing field-testing. The turbine at a blade-tip speed ratio (the ratio of the blade rotational velocity to the ambient wind velocity) of 1

Tullis, Stephen

465

The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine: (949) 824-3256 Abstract For the first time, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distri- bution

Zender, Charles

466

Estimating Wind Turbine Parameters and Quantifying Their Effects on Dynamic Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variable-speed wind turbines in grid stability studies. Often the values for model parameters are poorly parameters on the dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators. A parameter estimation process is then used [1], [2]. Accordingly, the impact of wind turbine generators (WTGs) on power system dynamic

Hiskens, Ian A.

467

Case study evaluating the potential for small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) as an integral part of the generating mix of a regional utility. Final report, ICFAR Project 05-3-7001-0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Average annual measured wind speeds in Indiana extrapolated to 30m vary from approximately 4.5 to 6.5 m/s. Stronger winds are observed in the northern part of the state than in the southern, with the central region exhibiting intermediate values. The annual array capacity factors of the three selected wind turbines operating in an Indianapolis wind regime at height 30m varied from 0.243 for the machine with rated power density (P/sub rd/) 244 W/m/sup 2/ to 0.462 for the machine with P/sub rd/ = 93 W/m/sup 2/ - a difference in power output of nearly a factor of 2. These results strongly suggest that wind turbines with low rated power densities are best suited for Indiana's wind regimes. The economic analyses of WECS break-even costs show that, given the assumptions of the analysis, a wind turbine with P/sub rd/ = 244 W/m/sup 2/ would be economically competitive with conventional generating sources were the capital cost not to exceed about $750 per rated kW (1989 dollars). This figure for a machine with P/sub rd/ = 93 W/m/sup 2/ is nearly $2000/kW. Brought back to 1980 dollars by an inflation factor of (1.08)/sup 9/ = 2.00, these values reckon to $375/kW and $1000/kW, respectively.

Brown, M.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A Study of Thermal Wind in the Vicinity of a Jet Stream  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concern ourselves only with the in- strumentation of the 8-29 since it is the aircraft which collected the data for this study. -8- The observations of wind speed and direction were obtained by the APN-66, an automatic pilot-navigator which measured..., these columns may be subdivided into nine general areas; time, position, altitude, winds, temperature, humidity, clouds, turbulence and aircraft data (indicated air speed, true air speed, drift, etc. ). This study is concerned only with the time, position...

Cunningham, Newton William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

The role of wind generation in European power sector decarbonization : a general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind generation has been growing fast, with onshore wind having a 27% average annual growth rate over the past decade. Motivated by this growth, a comprehensive analysis of both the economic and engineering implications ...

Karkatsouli, Ioanna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Wind loading on solar concentrators: some general considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey has been completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view; current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed; recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly. Wind loads, i.e., forces and moments, are proportional to the square of the mean wind velocity. Forces are proportional to the square of concentrator diameter, and moments are proportional to the cube of diameter. Thus, wind loads have an important bearing on size selection from both cost and performance standpoints. It is concluded that sufficient information exists so that reasonably accurate predictions of wind loading are possible for a given paraboloidal concentrator configuration, provided that reliable and relevant wind conditions are specified. Such predictions will be useful to the design engineer and to the systems engineer as well. Information is lacking, however, on wind effects in field arrays of paraboloidal concentrators. Wind tunnel tests have been performed on model heliostat arrays, but there are important aerodynamic differences between heliostats and paraboloidal dishes.

Roschke, E. J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

Robichaud, R.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in the United States A National Offshore Wind Strategy: Creating an Offshore Wind Energy Industry in...

473

20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development Wind Program Accomplishments...

474

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November...

475

Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource and Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook...

476

2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

477

Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded...

Irshad, Hammad

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

478

Development of a Dynamic Model of a Small High-Speed Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Dynamic Model of a Small High-Speed Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Haider N. Arafat-- A dynamic model is developed for a small, high- speed autonomous underwater vehicle. The vehicle has manner: 1) Wind angle and angle : From u = V cos , v = V sin sin , and w = V sin cos , we have tan

Virginia Tech

479

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In context of increasing use of renewable sources, it is of importance to correctly evaluate the actual sustainability of their implementation. Emergy analysis is one of the possible methods useful for such an assessment. This work aims to demonstrate how the emergy approach can be used to assess the sustainability of wind energy resource in Europe. The Emergy Index of Sustainability (EIS) and the Emergy Yield Ratio (EYR) are used to analyze 90 stations of European regions for three types of wind turbines. To do so, the simplified Chou wind turbine model is used for different set of parameters as: nominal power and size of the wind turbines, and cut-in and cut-out wind speeds. Based on the calculation of the emergy indices, a mapping is proposed to identify the most appropriate locations for an implementation of wind turbines in European regions. The influence of the wind turbine type on the sustainability is also analyzed, in link with the local wind resource. Thus, it is concluded that the emergy sustainabi...

Paudel, Subodh; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Corre, Olivier Le

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "average wind speed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Combination of Speed Stroke Grinding and High Speed Grinding with Regard to Sustainability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combination of Speed Stroke Grinding and High Speed Grindinghow the combination of speed stroke grinding and high speed4] Inasaki, I. , 1988, Speed Stroke Grinding of Advanced

Linke, Barbara; M. Duscha; F. Klocke; Dornfeld, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.41 6. Wind Power Priceat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Arizona Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study.an Order Revising the Wind Integration Rate for Wind Powered

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,an Order Revising the Wind Integration Rate for Wind PoweredPacifiCorp. 2010. 2010 Wind Integration Study. Portland,

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Twin Groves Wind Energy Facility Cut-in Speeds  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Karin Sinclair (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Christy Johnson-Hughes (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), and Laurie K. Allen (U.S. Geological Survey) for providing...

486

ARM - Lesson Plans: Observing Wind Speed and Cloudiness  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid Rain OutreachMoving Water and

487

Ris-R-Report Comparison of NWP wind speeds and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for nuclear power plants, and for Risø, the site of the Danish nuclear research reactors now being Risø 5 German nuclear power plant sites 9 Brunsbüttel 9 Brokdorf 12 Krümmel 15 Obrigheim 18 plants, and for Risø, the site of the Danish nuclear research reactors now being decommissioned

488

Microsoft Word - idaho_wind_speed_summary.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program Preliminary Needs535:UFC5,OverviewMultilayered Cloud65Ft.

489

Microsoft Word - utah_wind_speed_summary.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA TrimodalRECENTMicrophysicalRobert D. Y.

490

File:CV WindSpeed.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jump to: navigation,CV TidePotential.pdf Jump

491

Twin Groves Wind Energy Facility Cut-in Speeds  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartment of Energy andJanuaryTurn

492

Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Wind Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISPWind Industry Soars to New1Wind Power

494

Wind Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome Careers at WIPPCompletes aboutWind Energy

495

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

496

Design of a wind turbine-generator system considering the conformability to wind velocity fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conformability of the rated power output of the wind turbine-generator system and of the wind turbine type to wind velocity fluctuations are investigated with a simulation model. The authors examine three types of wind turbines: the Darrieus-Savonius hybrid, the Darrieus proper and the Propeller. These systems are mainly operated at a constant tip speed ratio, which refers to a maximum power coefficient points. As a computed result of the net extracting power, the Darrieus turbine proper has little conformability to wind velocity fluctuations because of its output characteristics. As for the other turbines, large-scale systems do not always have an advantage over small-scale systems as the effect of its dynamic characteristics. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the net extracting power of the Propeller turbine, under wind direction fluctuation, is much reduced when compared with the hybrid wind turbine. Thus, the authors conclude that the appropriate rated power output of the system exists with relation to the wind turbine type for each wind condition.

Wakui, Tetsuya; Hashizume, Takumi; Outa, Eisuke

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Energy Efficiency, Wind and Renewables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND RENEWABLES May 2008 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 2 Electricity Production from Wind Farms (2002-2007) ? Installed capacity of wind turbines was 3,026 MW (March 2007). ? Announced new project capacity is 3,125 MW by 2010. ? Lowest electricity period... Speed (MPH) T u rb in e P o w er (k W h /h ) Hourly electricity produced vs on- site wind data acceptable for hourly modeling. Issue: hourly on-site data not always available. Calculating NOx Reductions from Wind Farms Energy...

Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.