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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: Economic Development, Vehicles Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/PSAT/autonomie.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Autonomie[1] Rapidly evaluate new powertrain and propulsion technologies for improving fuel economy through virtual design and analysis in a math-based simulation environment. Argonne has developed a new tool, called Autonomie, to accelerate the

2

Argonne TTRDC - Modeling, Simulation & Software - Autonomie Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Autonomie Research Expertise Autonomie Research Expertise Software Tool and Process Development For more than 10 years, Argonne's Vehicle Modeling Simulation and Control group has been focusing on developing software tools to facilitate the evaluation and development of advanced vehicle technologies with the development of PSAT and more recently Autonomie. Autonomie has been designed to be used as a single tool throughout the different phases of Model Based Design of the Vehicle Development Process (VDP). Model-Based Design is a math-based visual method for designing complex control systems and is being used successfully in many motion control, industrial, aerospace, and automotive applications. Autonomie's development has been focused on allowing users to customize the tool during each phase of the Model-Based Design, including component models, controls, and processes.

3

Automotive autonomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-driving cars are inching closer to the assembly line, thanks to promising new projects from Google and the European Union.

Alex Wright

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Argonne TTRDC - Modeling, Simulation & Software - Autonomie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is expensive. Traditional design paradigms in the automotive industry often delay control system design until late in the process - in some cases requiring several costly...

5

Argonne Software Licensing: Autonomie  

AUTONOMIE OVERVIEW Background. Building hardware is expensive. Traditional design paradigms in the automotive industry often delay control system ...

6

Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Automotive soiling simulation based on massive particle tracing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the automotive industry Lattice-Boltzmann type flow solvers like PowerFlow from Exa Corporation are becoming increasingly important. In contrast to the traditional finite volume approach PowerFlow utilizes a hierachical cartesian grid for flow simulation. ...

Stefan Roettger; Martin Schulz; Wolf Bartelheimer; Thomas Ertl

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A simulation study of the transmission case line in an automotive factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transmission is a major component of a car that transmits mechanical power from the engine to the wheels. The transmission shop of an automotive factory consists of five sub-lines. They are the machining line of gears, sleeves, shaft, case and the ... Keywords: automotive, discrete event simulation, manufacturing system design, transmission case

Dug Hee Moon; Te Xu; Seung Geun Baek; Jun Seok Lee; Woo Young Shin

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

New Automotive Air Conditioning System Simulation Tool Developed in MATLAB/Simulink  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Further improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency require accurate evaluation of the vehicle's transient total power requirement. When operated, the air conditioning (A/C) system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle; therefore, accurate evaluation of the load it places on the vehicle's engine and/or energy storage system is especially important. Vehicle simulation software, such as 'Autonomie,' has been used by OEMs to evaluate vehicles' energy performance. A transient A/C simulation tool incorporated into vehicle simulation models would also provide a tool for developing more efficient A/C systems through a thorough consideration of the transient A/C system performance. The dynamic system simulation software Matlab/Simulink was used to develop new and more efficient vehicle energy system controls. The various modeling methods used for the new simulation tool are described in detail. Comparison with measured data is provided to demonstrate the validity of the model.

Kiss, T.; Chaney, L.; Meyer, J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Advanced computational simulation for design and manufacturing of lightweight material components for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational vehicle models for the analysis of lightweight material performance in automobiles have been developed through collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, and George Washington University. The vehicle models have been verified against experimental data obtained from vehicle collisions. The crashed vehicles were analyzed, and the main impact energy dissipation mechanisms were identified and characterized. Important structural parts were extracted and digitized and directly compared with simulation results. High-performance computing played a key role in the model development because it allowed for rapid computational simulations and model modifications. The deformation of the computational model shows a very good agreement with the experiments. This report documents the modifications made to the computational model and relates them to the observations and findings on the test vehicle. Procedural guidelines are also provided that the authors believe need to be followed to create realistic models of passenger vehicles that could be used to evaluate the performance of lightweight materials in automotive structural components.

Simunovic, S.; Aramayo, G.A.; Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Toridis, T.G. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Bandak, F.; Ragland, C.L. [Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

Hale, Steve

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Automotive electronics business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the automotive industry, due to the trend to introduce active safety systems, concerns about protecting the environment, and advances in information technology, key automotive manufacturers are eager to acquire new ...

Hase, Yoshiko, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: III: Castings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal fly ash, an industrial waste by-product, is produced during combustion of ... DIE CASTING FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS--A Status Report: Hubert ...

14

Integrity Automotive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrity Automotive Place Kentucky Product Joint venture between Kentucky businessman Randal Waldman of Integrity Manufacturing and...

15

Coda Automotive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Coda Automotive Place Santa Monica, California Zip 90403 Product California-based electric vehicle company which builds its cars in China. References Coda Automotive1...

16

The autonomy of the political  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines and critically assesses five arguments for the autonomy of the political. The arguments I examine are those of Niccol6 Machiavelli, Jean Bodin, Thomas Hobbes, Carl Schmitt, and John Rawls. After ...

Flaherty, Joshua, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Introduction to autonomy oriented computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examples of autonomous multi-entity systems are plentiful, both in the natural and artificial worlds. Many systems have been studied in depth and some models of these have been built in computational systems for problem solving. Central to these computational systems is the notion of autonomy. This article proposes autonomy oriented computation (AOC) as a complementary paradigm for solving hard computational problems and for characterizing the behaviors of a complex system.

Jiming Liu; Jiming Liu; Senior Member; Kwok Ching Tsui; Kwok Ching Tsui

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Automotive materials usage trends  

SciTech Connect

The materials composition of US passenger cars is traced from 1960 and projected into 1990's. Sales-weighted average vehicle-weight trends are analyzed in terms of shifts in the large/small car mix, downsizing, and downweighting. The growth in the usage of lightweight materials: -high strength steels, cast/wrought aluminum, plastics and composites - are examined in detail. Usage trends in a host of other materials such as alloy steels, zinc, lead, copper, etc. are also discussed. An approximate quantitative analysis of changes in the usage of steel by the automotive industry worldwide show that about 10% of total decline in Western-World steel consumption is accounted for by the automotive industry. An assessment is presented for automotive industry use of critical materials such as chromium in alloy steels/cast irons and the platinum group metals in exhaust-gas catalysts. 10 references, 13 figures, 9 tables.

Gjostein, N.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Automotive Lightweight Materials Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and manufacturing energy by lower energy use and cost during the vehicle operation life cycle stage. It is estimated -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 LifeCycleEnergySavings(MJ/vehicle) Manufacturing Use Recycle's (DOE's) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program (FCVT), Automotive Lightweighting

20

Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Argonne TTRDC - Modeling, Simulation & Software - Autonomie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Component-in-the-Loop Component-in-the-Loop To reduce development time and introduce technologies faster to the market, many companies have been turning more and more to Model Based Design. In Model Based Design, the development process centers around a system model, from requirements capture and design to implementation and test. Engineers can skip over a generation of system design processes on the basis of hand coding and use graphical models to design, analyze, and implement the software that determines machine performance and behavior. One of the steps of Model Based Design is Component-in-the-Loop. Engineers in Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Research have developed Component-in-the-Loop (CIL) systems and processes to evaluate the impact of vehicle energy management schemes, component control unit parameters, powertrain configurations on fuel and/or electrical consumption. Argonne has used the CIL for several components, including:

22

Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

23

AUTOMOTIVE ALLOYS: I: Fundamental Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we have analyzed the tensile behavior of a series candidate .... This analysis provides information which can be used in the die and process ... of aluminum alloys and composite materials used in the automotive market.

24

Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program  

SciTech Connect

The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by CODA Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 CODA Automotive Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2013 CODA Automotive CODA Automatic (A1), Electricity Compare 2013...

26

Gas Mileage of 2012 Vehicles by CODA Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 CODA Automotive Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 2012 CODA Automotive CODA Automatic (A1), Electricity Compare 2012...

27

Integrated automotive exhaust engineering : uncertainty management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global automotive industry has entered a stagnating period. Automotive OEMs and their tier suppliers are struggling for business growth. One of the most important strategies is to improve the engineering efficiency in ...

Fang, Xitian, 1963-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dherence to automotive manufacturers' recommended requirements ... in Flexible Fuel Vehicles (FFV) Only ... states, “Consult Vehicle Manufacturer Fuel ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization In an Integrated Concurrent Engineering Framework by Massimo Usan M. S. Aeronautical Engineering of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management at the Massachusetts Institute Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi

30

Automotive Powertrain Control - A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper surveys recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Controloriented models of gasoline and diesel engines and their aftertreatment systems are reviewed, and challenging control problems for conventional engines, hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powertrains are discussed. Fundamentals are revisited and advancements are highlighted. A comprehensive list of references is provided. 1

Jeffrey A. Cook; Jing Sun; Julia H. Buckl; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky; Huei Peng; Jessy W. Grizzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards September 8, 2011 - 11:46am Addthis Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards DOE's Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) initiative will award $6.4 million over the course of five years to support seven Centers of Excellence at American colleges, universities, and university-affiliated research institutions. The awardees will focus on three critical automotive technology areas: hybrid propulsion, energy storage, and lightweight materials. By funding curriculum development and expansion as well as laboratory work, GATE allows higher education institutions to develop multidisciplinary training. As a result, GATE promotes the development of a

32

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards September 8, 2011 - 11:46am Addthis Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards DOE's Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) initiative will award $6.4 million over the course of five years to support seven Centers of Excellence at American colleges, universities, and university-affiliated research institutions. The awardees will focus on three critical automotive technology areas: hybrid propulsion, energy storage, and lightweight materials. By funding curriculum development and expansion as well as laboratory work, GATE allows higher education institutions to develop multidisciplinary training. As a result, GATE promotes the development of a

33

Korean Automotive Research Instituiton | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Korean Automotive Research Instituiton Place Korea Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type...

34

G. Uniform Engine Fuels, Petroleum Products, and Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1.33. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG). ... LNG automotive fuel shall be labeled with its automotive fuel rating in accordance with 16 CFR Part 306. ...

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Automotive System Cost Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project Summary Full Title: Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project ID: 118 Principal Investigator: Sujit Das Purpose Estimate current and...

36

US Council for Automotive Research USCAR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Council for Automotive Research USCAR Jump to: navigation, search Name US Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) Place Southfield, Michigan Zip 48075 - Product Umbrella...

37

EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric...

38

A global modular framework for automotive diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automotive after-sales dealers lack solutions for accurate, comprehensive and efficient fault localization. However, such services in the after-sales networks are crucial to the brand value of automotive manufacturers and for client satisfaction. ... Keywords: Causal dependency graph, Diagnosis, Diagnostic algorithm, Heuristic diagnosis, Knowledge management, Model-based diagnosis

A. Azarian; A. Siadat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Architecting automotive product lines: industrial practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an in-depth view of how architects work with maintaining product line architectures in the automotive industry. The study has been performed at two internationally well-known companies, one car manufacture and one commercial vehicle ... Keywords: architecting, automotive industry, case study, process

Hĺkan Gustavsson; Ulrik Eklund

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Maintenance-free automotive battery  

SciTech Connect

Two types of maintenance-free automotive batteries were developed by Japan Storage Battery Co. to obtain a maintenance-free battery for practical use and to prevent deterioration of the battery during long storage and/or shipment. Design considerations included a special grid alloy, the separator, plate surface area, vent structure, and electrolyte. Charge characteristics, overcharge characteristics, life characteristics under various conditions, and self-discharge characteristics are presented. The characteristics of the maintenance-free battery with a Pb-Ca alloy grid are superior to those of a conventional battery. 10 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

Kano, S.; Ando, K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

IS Planning autonomy in US subsidiaries of multinational firms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research has suggested that information systems planning is an important challenge to managers of multinational firms. Although studies have examined marketing, finance, and manufacturing, limited research has considered IS planning autonomy in such ... Keywords: IS planning, agency theory, autonomy, corporate governance theory, multinational firms

Dinesh A. Mirchandani; Albert L. Lederer

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Progress Report 5 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on AddThis.com...

43

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Progress Report 3 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on AddThis.com...

44

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Progress Report 6 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on AddThis.com...

45

OpenEI/Tool/Keyword Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool + Bioenergy KDF + Energy Input Output Calculator + Energy and Cost Savings Calculators for Energy-Efficient Products + FEMP Solar Hot Water...

46

Strategic frameworks in automotive systems architecting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More often than not, large-scale engineering concepts such as those used by creative automotive manufacturing companies require the incorporation of significant capital outlays and resources for the purposes of implementation ...

Tampi, Mahesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Software Engineering for Automotive Systems: A Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first pieces of software were introduced into cars in 1976. By 2010, premium class vehicles are expected to contain one gigabyte of on-board software. We present research challenges in the domain of automotive software engineering.

Alexander Pretschner; Manfred Broy; Ingolf H. Kruger; Thomas Stauner

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Detection of arcs in automotive electrical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present time, there is no established method for the detection of DC electric arcing. This is a concern for forthcoming advanced automotive electrical systems which consist of higher DC electric power bus voltages, ...

Mishrikey, Matthew David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oscar Automotive Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscar Automotive Ltd Oscar Automotive Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Oscar Automotive Ltd Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product OSCar Automotive is working towards the commercialisation of hydrogen fuel cells in the transport sector. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Aero?acoustic predictions of automotive dashboard HVAC (heating, ventilating, and air?conditioning ducts).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow?induced noisegenerated by automotive climate control systems is today emerging as one of the main noisesources in a vehicle interior. Numerical simulation offers a good way to analyze these mechanisms and to identify the aerodynamic noisesources in an industrial context driven by permanent reduction in programs timing and development costs

Stephane Detry; Julien Manera; Yves Detandt; Diego d'Udekem

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Motor generator electric automotive vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A motor generator electric automotive vehicle is described comprising in combination, a traction drive motor coupled by a first drive shaft to a differential of an axle of the vehicle, a main battery bank electrically connected by wires to a small electric motor driving a large D.C. generator having a second drive shaft therebetween, an on-off switch in series with one of the wires to the small motor, a speed control unit attached to an accelerator pedal of the vehicle being coupled with a double pole-double throw reverse switch to the traction drive motor, a charger regulator electrically connected to the generator, a bank of solar cells coupled to the charge regulator, an electric extension cord from the charge regulator having a plug on its end for selective connection to an exterior electric power source, a plurality of pulleys on the second drive shaft, a belt unit driven by the pulley, one the belt unit being connected to a present alternator of the vehicle which is coupled to a present battery and present regulator of the vehicle, and other of the units being connected to power brakes and equipment including power steering and an air conditioner.

Weldin, W.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Design & optimization of automotive power electronics utilizing FITMOS MOSFET technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power electronics are essential to many automotive applications, and their importance continues to grow as more vehicle functions incorporate electronic controls. MOSFETs are key elements in automotive power electronic ...

Li, Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Life cycle cost modeling of automotive paint systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle coating is an important component of automotive manufacturing. The paint shop constitutes the plurality of initial investment in an automotive assembly plant, consumes the majority of energy used in the plant's ...

Leitz, Christopher W. (Christopher William), 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Aluminum Tailor-welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Strength Aluminum Brazing Sheets for Condenser Fins of Automotive Heat Exchangers · High Temperature Creep Characterization of A380 Cast ...

55

greenhouse gas balance of magnesium parts for automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... GREENHOUSE GAS BALANCE OF MAGNESIUM PARTS FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS by Simone Ehrenberger, Horst E. Friedrich ...

56

Fisker Automotive Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fisker Automotive Inc Fisker Automotive Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Fisker Automotive Inc Place Irvine, California Zip 92606 Product Irvine-based hybrid vehicle manufacturer. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Automotive ethernet: in-vehicle networking and smart mobility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses novel communication network topologies and components and describes an evolutionary path of bringing Ethernet into automotive applications with focus on electric mobility. For next generation in-vehicle networking, the automotive ... Keywords: EV communication architecture, automotive, domain based commuication, electric vehicle, ethernet, in-vehicle networking, smart grid, vehicle network topology

Peter Hank, Steffen Müller, Ovidiu Vermesan, Jeroen Van Den Keybus

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mod I automotive Stirling engine mechanical development  

SciTech Connect

The Mod I Stirling engine was the first automotive Stirling engine designed specifically for automotive application. Testing of these engines has revealed several deficiencies in engine mechanical integrity which have been corrected by redesign or upgrade. The main deficiencies uncovered during the Mod I program lie in the combustion, auxiliary, main seal, and heater head areas. This paper will address each of the major area deficiencies in detail, and describe the corrective actions taken as they apply to the Mod I and the next Stirling-engine design, the Upgraded Mod I (a redesign to incorporate new materials for cost/weight reduction and improved performance).

Simetkosky, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Past experiences with automotive external combustion engines  

SciTech Connect

GMR (General Motors Research Laboratories, now GM R and D Center) has a history of improving the internal combustion engine, especially as it relates to automotive use. During the quarter century from 1950--75, considerable effort was devoted to evaluating alternative powerplants based on thermodynamic cycles different from those on which the established spark-ignition and diesel engines are founded. Two of these, the steam engine and the Stirling engine, incorporated external combustion. Research on those two alternatives is reviewed. Both were judged to fall short of current needs for commercial success as prime movers for conventional automotive vehicles.

Amann, C.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design and development of an automotive propulsion system utilizing a Rankine cycle engine (water based fluid). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under EPA and ERDA sponsorship, SES successfully designed, fabricated and tested the first federally sponsored steam powered automobile. The automobile - referred to as the simulator - is a 1975 Dodge Monaco standard size passenger car with the SES preprototype Rankine cycle automotive propulsion system mounted in the engine compartment. In the latter half of 1975, the simulator successfully underwent test operations at the facilities of SES in Watertown, Massachusetts and demonstrated emission levels below those of the stringent federally established automotive requirements originally set for implementation by 1976. The demonstration was accomplished during testing over the Federal Driving Cycle on a Clayton chassis dynamometer. The design and performance of the vehicle are described.

Demler, R.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program: A success  

SciTech Connect

The original 5 y Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program has been stretched to a 10 y program due to reduced annual funding levels. With an estimated completion date of April 1988, the technical achievements and the prospectives of meeting the original program objectives are reviewed. Various other applications of this developed Stirling engine technology are also discussed.

Tabata, W.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

CarMA: towards personalized automotive tuning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless sensing and actuation have been explored in many contexts, but the automotive setting has received relatively little attention. Automobiles have tens of onboard sensors and expose several hundred engine parameters which can be tuned (a ... Keywords: automobile, engine control unit, scanning, tuning

Tobias Flach; Nilesh Mishra; Luis Pedrosa; Christopher Riesz; Ramesh Govindan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: December 27, 2: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on AddThis.com...

64

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

65

Ultrahigh carbon steel for automotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs), which contain 1--2.1% carbon, have remarkable structural properties for automotive application when processed to achieve fine ferrite grains with fine spheroidized carbides. When processed for high room temperature ductility, UHCS can have good tensile ductility but significantly higher strength than current automotive high strength steels. The material can also be made superplastic at intermediate temperatures and exhibits excellent die fill capability. Furthermore, they can be made hard with high compression ductility. In wire form it is projected that UHCS can exhibit extremely high strengths (5,000 MPa) for tire cord applications. Examples of structural components that have been formed from fine-grained spheroidized UHCSs are illustrated.

Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sherby, O.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

66

Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho [Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, 699, Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Effect of automotive electrical system changes on fuel consumption using incremental efficiency methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been a continuous increase in automotive electric power usage. Future projections show no sign of it decreasing. Therefore, the automotive industry has a need to either improve the current 12 Volt automotive ...

Hardin, Christopher William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09242008FCTT Review Sep2008.ppt 2008 TIAX LLC Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications Jayanti Sinha Stephen Lasher Yong Yang Peter...

69

Final report: U.S. competitive position in automotive technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Patent data are presented and analyzed to assess the U.S. competitive position in eleven advanced automotive technology categories, including automotive fuel cells, hydrogen storage, advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles and others. Inventive activity in most of the technologies is found to be growing at a rapid pace, particularly in advanced batteries, automotive fuel cells and ultracapacitors. The U.S. is the clear leader in automotive fuel cells, on-board hydrogen storage and light weight materials. Japan leads in advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles, ultracapacitors, and appears to be close to overtaking the U.S. in other areas of power electronics.

Albert, Michael B.; Cheney, Margaret; Thomas, Patrick; Kroll, Peter

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Advanced Cruciform Testing in the Center for Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new high capacity cruciform machine has been recently installed and commissioned in the Center for Automotive Lightweighting at NIST.

71

Lean product development for the automotive niche vehicle marketplace.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The automotive low volume niche vehicle marketplace is growing, evidenced by increasing media coverage and fierce competition between original equipment manufacturers. Development of niche vehicles… (more)

Kupczewski, Celeste D., 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Warm Bending Magnesium Sheet for Automotive Closure Panels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For automotive production, hemming equipment would be augmented with a rapid heating technology to locally heat the bend region, complete the hem and ...

73

Recycling alloy for structural applications in the automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Strength Aluminum Brazing Sheets for Condenser Fins of Automotive ... predictions for the phase formation in a wide range of commercial aluminum alloys.

74

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNLTM-2013222 Energy and Transportation Science Division Center for Transportation Analysis STATUS AND PROSPECTS OF THE GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE FUEL CELL INDUSTRY AND PLANS FOR...

75

United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP) was formed in 1993 as a partnership between Chrysler Corporation, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors Corporation. Since then the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported its activities with funding and technical support. The mission of the USAMP is to conduct vehicle-oriented research and development in materials and materials processing to improve the competitiveness of the U.S. Auto Industry. Its specific goals are: (1) To conduct joint research to further the development of lightweight materials for improved automotive fuel economy; and (2) To work with the Federal government to explore opportunities for cooperative programs with the national laboratories, Federal agencies such as the DOE and universities. As a major component of the DOE's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program (FCVT) collaboration with the USAMP, the Automotive Lightweighting Materials (ALM) program focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. The FCVT was announced in FY 2002 and implemented in FY 2003, as a successor of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), largely addressed under the first Cooperative Agreement. This second USAMP Cooperative Agreement with the DOE has expanded a unique and valuable framework for collaboratively directing industry and government research efforts toward the development of technologies capable of solving important societal problems related to automobile transportation. USAMP efforts are conducted by the domestic automobile manufacturers, in collaboration with materials and manufacturing suppliers, national laboratories, universities, and other technology or trade organizations. These interactions provide a direct route for implementing newly developed materials and technologies, and have resulted in significant technical successes to date, as discussed in the individual project summary final reports. Over 70 materials-focused projects have been established by USAMP, in collaboration with participating suppliers, academic/non-profit organizations and national laboratories, and executed through its original three divisions: the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), the Automotive Metals Division (AMD), and Auto/Steel Partnership (A/SP). Two new divisions were formed by USAMP in 2006 to drive research emphasis on integration of structures incorporating dissimilar lightweighting materials, and on enabling technology for nondestructive evaluation of structures and joints. These new USAMP divisions are: Multi-Material Vehicle Research and Development Initiative (MMV), and the Non-Destructive Evaluation Steering Committee (NDE). In cooperation with USAMP and the FreedomCAR Materials Technical Team, a consensus process has been established to facilitate the development of projects to help move leveraged research to targeted development projects that eventually migrate to the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) as application engineering projects. Research projects are assigned to one of three phases: concept feasibility, technical feasibility, and demonstration feasibility. Projects are guided through ongoing monitoring and USAMP offsite reviews, so as to meet the requirements of each phase before they are allowed to move on to the next phase. As progress is made on these projects, the benefits of lightweight construction and enabling technologies will be transferred to the supply base and implemented in production vehicles. The single greatest barrier to automotive use of lightweight materials is their high cost; therefore, priority is given to activities aimed at reducing costs through development of new materials, forming technologies, and manufacturing processes. The emphasis of the research projects reported in this document was largely on applied research and evaluation of mass savings opportunities thro

United States Automotive Materials Partnership

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The goal of GATE is to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals to overcome technology...

77

Automotive engineering curriculum development: case study for Clemson University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automotive manufacturing industry has transitioned in the past 20 years from a central technical focus to an integrated and globally distributed supply chain. As car makers outsource not only a greater portion of their manufacturing, but also their ... Keywords: Automotive, Curriculum, Education, Manufacturing, OEM, Supplier

Laine Mears; Mohammed Omar; Thomas R. Kurfess

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Racing Ahead in Automotive Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Racing Ahead in Automotive Education Racing Ahead in Automotive Education Racing Ahead in Automotive Education February 18, 2011 - 4:52pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Helps develop the next generation of innovative auto engineers Where will the next generation of automotive innovation come from? That's a question that's driving discussion throughout the auto industry at the moment, and many hope that the answer lies in the next generation of engineers. Unfortunately, while many young engineers are eager to put their talents to work developing breakthrough transportation technologies, not many U.S. universities have multidisciplinary instructional programs that focus on cutting-edge automotive technologies.

79

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

Bridges, B. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elmer, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Carol, L. [AC Delco Systems World Headquarters, Flint, MI (United States). USCAR Low Emissions Technology Research and Development Partnership

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Potential automotive uses of wrought magnesium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available to improve automotive fuel efficiency. High-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to reduce weight significantly, but substantial additional reductions could be achieved by greater use of low-density magnesium (Mg) and its alloys. Mg alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts, generally limited to die castings (e.g., housings). Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel/aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Mg sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. This study identifies high cost as the major barrier to greatly increased Mg use in autos. Two technical R and D areas, novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, could enable major cost reductions.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Electromagnetic interference filter for automotive electrical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A filter for an automotive electrical system includes a substrate having first and second conductive members. First and second input terminals are mounted to the substrate. The first input terminal is electrically connected to the first conductive member, and the second input terminal is electrically connected to the second conductive member. A plurality of capacitors are mounted to the substrate. Each of the capacitors is electrically connected to at least one of the first and second conductive members. First and second power connectors are mounted to the substrate. The first power connector is electrically connected to the first conductive member, and the second power connector is electrically connected to the second conductive member. A common mode choke is coupled to the substrate and arranged such that the common mode choke extends around at least a portion of the substrate and the first and second conductive members.

Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Carlson, Douglas S; Tang, David; Korich, Mark D

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders December 7, 2010 - 4:23pm Addthis Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities It's no secret that when it comes to advanced vehicle technologies, the Department of Energy is kicking into high gear. We're investing more than $12 billion in grants and loans for research, development and deployment of advanced technology vehicles. These investments are helping to create a clean energy workforce. If we want to continue a leadership role in the global automotive industry, it is crucial that we take the long view and invest heavily in the next generation of innovators and critical thinkers

84

10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner 10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner 10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner June 17, 2011 - 3:30pm Addthis Argonne mechanical engineer Thomas Wallner adjusts Argonne's "omnivorous engine," an automobile engine that Wallner and his colleagues have tailored to efficiently run on blends of gasoline, ethanol and butanol. | Courtesy of: Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne mechanical engineer Thomas Wallner adjusts Argonne's "omnivorous engine," an automobile engine that Wallner and his colleagues have tailored to efficiently run on blends of gasoline, ethanol and butanol. | Courtesy of: Argonne National Laboratory. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Meet Thomas Wallner - automotive engineer extraordinaire, who hails from

85

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World April 16, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this project do? Green Racing uses motorsports competition to help educate and promote alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies that can be transferred from the race track to the consumer market. The automotive racing world has a long history of moving the car industry forward through the development and use of new technology. Seeing racing's tremendous promise, the Energy Department, U.S. Environmental

86

EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative EA-1851: Delphi Automotive Systems Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to Delphi Automotive Systems, Limited Liability Corporation (LLC) (Delphi). Delphi proposes to construct a laboratory referred to as the "Delphi Kokomo, IN Corporate Technology Center" (Delphi CTC Project) and retrofit a manufacturing facility. The project would advance DOE's Vehicle Technology Program through manufacturing and testing of electric-drive vehicle components as well as assist in the

87

Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC Jump to: navigation, search Name Automotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC) Place Zama, Kanagawa, Japan Product JV formed for development and marketing of advanced lithium-ion batteries for automotive applications. Coordinates 32.974049°, -89.371101° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.974049,"lon":-89.371101,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Racing's Impact on the Automotive World Green Racing's Impact on the Automotive World April 16, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. One of the competitors from the Michelin Green X Challenge. | Photo courtesy of Green Racing. Patrick B. Davis Patrick B. Davis Vehicle Technologies Program Manager What does this project do? Green Racing uses motorsports competition to help educate and promote alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies that can be transferred from the race track to the consumer market. The automotive racing world has a long history of moving the car industry forward through the development and use of new technology. Seeing racing's tremendous promise, the Energy Department, U.S. Environmental

89

Improved supplier selection and cost management for globalized automotive production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For many manufacturing and automotive companies, traditional sourcing decisions rely on total landed cost models to determine the cheapest supplier. Total landed cost models calculate the cost to purchase a part plus all ...

Franken, Joseph P., II (Joseph Philip)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

FY 2002 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tube 7: Vertical Furnace 8: Crucible 9: Slag 10: Platform Disk 11: Insulation Brick 12: Brass Cover Plate 13 Argon Inlet 5 2 1 4 3 6 7 8 9 10 12 5 11 13 Automotive Lightweighting...

91

Green automotive supply chain for an emerging market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM) within the automotive industry is largely based on combining lean manufacturing with mandated supplier adoption of ISO 14001-compliant Environmental Management Systems (EMS). This ...

Fisch, Gene (Gene Joseph)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Automotive Battery State-of-Health Monitoring Methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effective vehicular power management requires accurate knowledge of battery state, including state-of-charge (SOC) and state-of-health (SOH). An essential functionality of automotive batteries is delivering high… (more)

Grube, Ryan J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Lean product development for the automotive niche vehicle marketplace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automotive low volume niche vehicle marketplace is growing, evidenced by increasing media coverage and fierce competition between original equipment manufacturers. Development of niche vehicles must be lean and therefore ...

Kupczewski, Celeste D., 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling and torque estimation of an automotive dual mass flywheel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Mass Flywheel (DMF) is primarily used for dampening of oscillations in automotive powertrains and to prevent gearbox rattling. This paper explains the DMF mechanics along with its application and components. Afterwards a detailed ab-inltio model ...

Ulf Schaper; Oliver Sawodny; Tobias Mahl; Uli Blessing

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The dynamics of supply chains in the automotive industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis looks at how supply chains in the automotive industry operate from the perspective of the manufacturers. The study includes the industry structure, the top players in the industry, factors that drive the industry, ...

Braese, Niklas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Enhancing the conceptual design process of automotive exterior systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Product development cycles in the automotive industry are being reduced and competition is more demanding than ever before. To be successful in this environment, Original Equipment Manufacturers need a product development ...

Diaz Dominguez, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Electrical build issues in automotive product development : an analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To be competitive and successful within the automotive industry the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have to bring new products with features fast to market. The OEMs need to reduce the Product Development cycle ...

Chacko, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Market Model Simulation: The Impact of Increased Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce energy consumption of gasoline, the U.S. Congress passed the ... from information in a Solomon Smith Barney report on Australian Magnesium, United States .... The market model was used to analyze three scenarios. First ...

99

Meeting the Embedded Design Needs of Automotive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of embedded systems in driving innovation in automotive applications continues to grow. Understanding the specific needs of developers targeting this market is also helping to drive innovation in RISC core design. This paper describes how a RISC instruction set architecture has evolved to better meet those needs, and the key implementation features in two very different RISC cores are used to demonstrate the challenges of designing for real-time automotive systems.

Lyons, Wayne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Downsizing assessment of automotive Stirling engines  

SciTech Connect

A 67 kW (90 hp) Stirling engine design, sized for use in a 1984 1440 kg (3170 lb) automobile has been serving as the focal point for developing automotive Stirling engine technology under a current DOE/NASA R and D program. Since recent trends are towards lighter vehicles, an assessment was made of the appicability of the Stirling technology being developed for smaller, lower power engines. Using both the Philips scaling laws and a Lewis Research Center (Lewis) Stirling engine performance code, dimensional and performance characteristics were determined for a 26 kW (35 hp) and a 37 kW (50 hp) engine for use in a nominal 907 kg (2000 lb) vehicle. Key engine elements were sized and stressed and mechanical layouts were made to ensure mechanical fit and integrity of the engines. Fuel economy estimates indicated that the Stirling engine would maintain a 30 to 45 percent fuel economy advantage over comparable spark ignition and diesel powered vehicles in the 1984 time period. In order to maintain the performance advantage, particular attention must be paid to the Stirling engine mechanical losses and, although evaluated in this report, the cold start penalties.

Knoll, R.H.; Tew, R.C. Jr.; Klann, J.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The simol modeling language for simulation and (re-)configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From automotive and up to telecommunication industry, configuration and simulation are used for solving complex problems connected to the ever growing number of components, which have to work together. To assist these needs, many tools are nowadays available. ...

Iulia Nica; Franz Wotawa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Material handling resource utilization simulation study for stamping plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of dynamic simulation to evaluate material handling resource utilization for a stamping plant in the automotive industry. The other objective of this study was evaluation of throughput relative to press schedules, ...

Edward J. Williams; Onur M. Ulgen; Sheldon Bailiff; Ravindra Lote

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Advanced Automotive Technologies annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report serves to inform the United States Congress on the progress for fiscal year 1996 of programs under the Department of Energy`s Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies (OAAT). This document complies with the legislative requirement to report on the implementation of Title III of the Automotive Propulsion Research and Development Act of 1978. Also reported are related activities performed under subsequent relevant legislation without specific reporting requirements. Furthermore, this report serves as a vital means of communication from the Department to all public and private sector participants. Specific requirements that are addressed in this report are: Discussion of how each research and development contract, grant, or project funded under the authority of this Act satisfies the requirements of each subsection; Current comprehensive program definition for implementing Title III; Evaluation of the state of automotive propulsion system research and development in the United States; Number and amount of contracts and grants awarded under Title III; Analysis of the progress made in developing advanced automotive propulsion system technology; and Suggestions for improvements in automotive propulsion system research and development, including recommendations for legislation.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

105

Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Place Erfurt, Germany Zip D-99428 Sector Solar Product German manufacturer of PV modules and spherical solar sun roofs for the automotive industry. References Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH is a company located in Erfurt, Germany . References ↑ "Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Asola_Advanced_and_Automotive_Solar_Systems_GmbH&oldid=34237

106

U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient...

107

APPLICATION NOTE 4393 Selecting HB LED Drivers for Automotive Lighting Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This application note provides an overview of HB LED driver selection criteria for automotive lighting applications. It reviews HB LED driver topologies and recommends configurations for various automotive lighting applications, including interior lighting, exterior lighting, and display backlighting.

Brian Hedayati

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer July 13, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will join U.S. Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow on a conference call to make an announcement regarding an advanced automotive technology loan that is expected to create jobs in Michigan, increase manufacturing, and make American automakers more competitive. WHO: Secretary of Energy Steven Chu Senator Carl Levin Senator Debbie Stabenow WHAT: Press Conference Call WHEN: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 11:30 AM EDT RSVP: Please contact Karissa Marcum at karissa.marcum@hq.doe.gov to receive call-in

109

Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress April 6, 2006 - 10:12am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Greg. It's always a pleasure to be in a room full of engineers. As an engineer myself, I know there is nothing our profession likes better than plain talk and solving problems. So, I'm going to serve you up some plain talk and then some assignments. Our nation faces big challenges in the energy and transportation arena. The President put it plainly in the State of the Union message when he said America is addicted to oil. To start us on the path to recovery from this addiction, he set out the Advanced Energy Initiative which calls for increasing spending on clean energy programs by 22% in next year's budget.

110

FY2001 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION MATERIALS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

111

Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 March 11, 2011 - 4:03pm Addthis The MV-1, a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient vehicle | Photo Courtesy of Vehicle Production Group The MV-1, a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient vehicle | Photo Courtesy of Vehicle Production Group Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy Yesterday, the Department of Energy announced that we've now finalized a loan for nearly $50 million to the Vehicle Production Group - or VPG. The project will support the development and manufacturing of a new wheelchair accessible, fuel-efficient car, the MV-1, that will run on compressed natural gas instead of gasoline, produce low emissions, and create 900 jobs

112

Fault conditions classification of automotive generator using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was proposed for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of an automotive generator. Conventional fault indication of an automotive generator generally uses an indicator to inform the driver ... Keywords: Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, Automotive generator, Discrete wavelet transform, Fault diagnosis system

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ming Kuo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Steering Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Industry September 6, 2006 United States Automotive Materials Partnership, A Consortium. This material is based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE), National Energy Technology .....................................................................................................11 Chapter 2 The Expanding Role of NDE in the Automotive Industry.................................13

Knowles, David William

114

FY2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager December 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager December 2003 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1

115

Functional autonomy of distant-acting human enhancers  

SciTech Connect

Many human genes are associated with dispersed arrays of transcriptional enhancers that regulate their expression in time and space. Studies in invertebrate model systems have suggested that these elements function as discrete and independent regulatory units, but the in vivo combinatorial properties of vertebrate enhancers remain poorly understood. To explore the modularity and regulatory autonomy of human developmental enhancers, we experimentally concatenated up to four enhancers from different genes and used a transgenic mouse assay to compare the in vivo activity of these compound elements with that of the single modules. In all of the six different combinations of elements tested, the reporter gene activity patterns were additive without signs of interference between the individual modules, indicating that regulatory specificity was maintained despite the presence of closely-positioned heterologous enhancers. Even in cases where two elements drove expression in close anatomical proximity, such as within neighboring subregions of the developing limb bud, the compound patterns did not show signs of cross-inhibition between individual elements or novel expression sites. These data indicate that human developmental enhancers are highly modular and functionally autonomous and suggest that genomic enhancer shuffling may have contributed to the evolution of complex gene expression patterns in vertebrates

Visel, Axel; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels  

SciTech Connect

Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state are discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H/sub 2/ + CO and 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed methanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol. 36 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Lalk, T.R.; McCall, D.M.; McCanlies, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a new electromechanical brake system using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. The proposed brake system consists of rotating disks immersed in a MR fluid and enclosed in an electromagnet, where the yield stress of the ... Keywords: Automotive brake, Computational fluid dynamics, Electric brake actuator, Finite element analysis, Magnetorheological fluid, Multidisciplinary design optimization

Edward J. Park; Luis Falcăo da Luz; Afzal Suleman

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I design review report. Volume III  

SciTech Connect

This volume, No. 3, of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod 1 Design Review Report contains a preliminary parts list and detailed drawings of equipment for the basic Stirling engine and for the following systems: vehicular Stirling Engine System; external heat system; hot and cold engine systems; engine drive; controls and auxiliaries; and vehicle integration. (LCL)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Role of Friction in Materials Selection for Automotive Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an invited article for a special issue of the ASM International monthly magazine that concerns "Automotive Materials and Applications." The article itself overviews frictional considerations in material selection for automobiles. It discusses implications for energy efficiency (engine friction) and safety (brakes) among other topics.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tools and Techniques for Ensuring Automotive EMC Performance and Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they generate and store significant amounts of electric energy. Cars in the future ... 8 #12;9 Lighter More Systems 3 Current automotive electronics design and integration strategies are not sustainable. Cars and wireless communication Cars in the future will have ONE reliable, low-cost, lightweight network that serves

Stuart, Steven J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems at Virginia Tech  

SciTech Connect

The Virginia Tech GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems (CAFCS) achieved the following objectives in support of the domestic automotive industry: â?˘ Expanded and updated fuel cell and vehicle technologies education programs; â?˘ Conducted industry directed research in three thrust areas â?? development and characterization of materials for PEM fuel cells; performance and durability modeling for PEM fuel cells; and fuel cell systems design and optimization, including hybrid and plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicles; â?˘ Developed MS and Ph.D. engineers and scientists who are pursuing careers related to fuel cells and automotive applications; â?˘ Published research results that provide industry with new knowledge which contributes to the advancement of fuel cell and vehicle systems commercialization. With support from the Dept. of Energy, the CAFCS upgraded existing graduate course offerings; introduced a hands-on laboratory component that make use of Virginia Techâ??s comprehensive laboratory facilities, funded 15 GATE Fellowships over a five year period; and expanded our program of industry interaction to improve student awareness of challenges and opportunities in the automotive industry. GATE Center graduate students have a state-of-the-art research experience preparing them for a career to contribute to the advancement fuel cell and vehicle technologies.

Nelson, Douglas

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

Robyn Ready

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

A roadmap for parametric CAD efficiency in the automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D CAD systems are used in product design for simultaneous engineering and to improve productivity. CAD tools can substantially enhance design performance. Although 3D CAD is a widely used and highly effective tool in mechanical design, mastery of CAD ... Keywords: Automotive industry, CAD training strategy, Collaboration, Knowledge integration, PLM, Parametric CAD efficiency

Yannick Bodein, Bertrand Rose, Emmanuel Caillaud

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part 1 of this two-part paper describes the analysis and 2D finite element (FE) simulations for a capacitive incremental position sensor for nanopositioning of microactuator systems with a displacement range of 100 µm or more. Two related concepts for a capacitive incremental position sensor are presented. In an incremental capacitance measurement mode (ICMM), the periodic change in capacitance is measured to determine the relative displacement between two periodic geometries S1 and S2 with a gap distance of ?1 µm. In a constant capacitance measurement mode (CCMM), the distance between S1 and S2 is controlled to keep the capacitance between S1 and S2 constant. Analysis and 2D finite element simulations show that the signal-to-noise ratio for CCMM can be>300 × over ICMM and with less nonlinearity of the position sensor signal. This means that CCMM will perform better in accurate quadrature incremental position detection. A comparison with measurements shows that the 2D finite element simulation method is a useful tool that realistically predicts the capacitance versus displacement for different combinations of periodic geometries. (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version) 1.

A A Kuijpers; G J M Krijnen; R J Wiegerink; T S J Lammerink; M Elwenspoek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Improved Surface Quality of Exposed Automotive Sheet Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface quality of sheet steels is an important economic and technical issue for applications such as critical automotive surfaces. This project was therefore initiated to develop a more quantitative methodology for measuring surface imperfections, and to assess their response to forming and painting, particularly with respect to their visibility or invisibility after painting. The objectives were met, and included evaluation of a variety of imperfections present on commercial sheet surfaces or simulated using methods developed in the laboratory. The results are expected to have significant implications with respect to the methodology for assessing surface imperfections, development of quantitative criteria for surface inspection, and understanding and improving key painting process characteristics that influence the perceived quality of sheet steel surfaces.

John G. Speer; David K. Matlock; Noel Meyers; Young-Min Choi

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

System and method for seamless task-directed autonomy for robots  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and user interfaces are used for controlling a robot. An environment map and a robot designator are presented to a user. The user may place, move, and modify task designators on the environment map. The task designators indicate a position in the environment map and indicate a task for the robot to achieve. A control intermediary links task designators with robot instructions issued to the robot. The control intermediary analyzes a relative position between the task designators and the robot. The control intermediary uses the analysis to determine a task-oriented autonomy level for the robot and communicates target achievement information to the robot. The target achievement information may include instructions for directly guiding the robot if the task-oriented autonomy level indicates low robot initiative and may include instructions for directing the robot to determine a robot plan for achieving the task if the task-oriented autonomy level indicates high robot initiative.

Nielsen, Curtis; Bruemmer, David; Few, Douglas; Walton, Miles

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sustainability and Energy Efficiency in the Automotive Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since this year there can be no doubt that "sustainability" has become the top issue in the automotive sector. Volkswagen's CEO Prof. Dr. Martin Winterkorn attacked incumbents like BMW Group (so far the "most sustainable car manufacturer" for the 8th consecutive year) or Toyota (producer of the famous "Prius") head-on by boldly stating to become "the most profitable and most sustainable car manufacturer worldwide by 2018" . This announcement clearly shows that "sustainability" and "profitability" no longer are considered as conflicting targets. On the contrary, to Prof. Dr. Winterkorn : "climate protection is a driver for economic growth". To prime discussions, the plenary talk will give a brief overview of the entire range of energy efficiency in the automotive sector: based on the multiple drivers behind energy efficiency, practical examples are presented along the entire life-cycle of cars (R&D, production, usage and recycling). These "cases" include big automobile producers as well as their respectiv...

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program Mod I Stirling engine development  

SciTech Connect

The Automotive Stirling Engine (ASE) Development Program was established to enable research and development of alternate propulsion systems. The program was awarded to Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for the purpose of developing an automotive Stirling engine, and transferring Stirling-engine technology to the United States. MTI has fabricated and tested four Mod I engines that have accumulated over 1900 test hours to date. The engines evaluated in the test cell have achieved an average of 34.5% efficiency at their maximum efficiency point (2000 rpm), and have developed an average maximum output power (power available to the drive train) level of 54.4 kW (73.2 bhp). All engines are still operating, and are being used to develop components and control strategy for the Upgraded Mod I engine design (predicted to increase maximum power output and efficiency while reducing total engine system weight).

Simetkosky, M.A.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

REQUEST BY MERIDIAN AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Considerations Statement of Considerations REQUEST BY MERIDIAN AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER A SUBTIER CONTRACT UNDER UT-BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000010928, UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT DE-AC05- 00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-2003-037; [ORO-780] Meridian Automotive Systems, Inc. (Meridian) has made a request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under a subtier contract under UT-Battelle, LLC Subcontract No. 4000010928 with Volvo Trucks North America under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of work of this project is for the utilization of Carbon Fiber Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) Materials for

130

DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive 4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education August 29, 2005 - 2:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of eight universities that will receive $4.7 million to be Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The goal of GATE is to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals to overcome technology barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective, high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. "GATE Centers of Excellence are an exciting opportunity to equip a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies," said Douglas L. Faulkner, Acting

131

Demonstration of dissociated methanol as an automotive fuel: system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of system performance testing of an automotive system devised to provide hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by dissociating methanol on board the vehicle. The dissociation of methanol absorbs heat from the engine exhaust and increases the lower heating value of the fuel by 22%. The engine thermal efficiency is increased by raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air.

Finegold, J. G.; Karpuk, M. E.; McKinnon, J. T.; Passamaneck, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Present and Future Automotive Composite Materials Research Efforts at DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automobiles of the future will be forced to travel fi.uther on a tank of fuel while discharging lower levels of pollutants. Currently, the United States uses in excess of 16.4 million barrels of petroleum per day. Sixty-six percent of that petroleum is used in the transportation of people and goods. Automobiles currently account for just under two-thirds of the nation's gasoline consumptio~ and about one-third of the total United States energy usage. [1] By improving transportation related fiel efficiency, the United States can lessen the impact that emissions have on our environment and provide a cleaner environment for fiture generations. In 1992, The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Transportation Materials completed a comprehensive program plan entitled, The Lightweight MateriaIs (LWko Multi-Year Program Plan, for the development of technologies aimed at reducing vehicle mass [2]. This plan was followed in 1997 by the more comprehensive Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies research and development plan titled, Energy Eficient Vehicles for a Cleaner Environment [3] which outlines the department's plans for developing more efficient vehicles during the next ~een years. Both plans identi~ potential applications, technology needs, and R&D priorities. The goal of the Lightweight Materials Program is to develop materials and primary processing methods for the fabrication of lighter weight components which can be incorporated into automotive systems. These technologies are intended to reduce vehicle weight, increase fuel efficiency and decrease emissions. The Lightweight Materials program is jointly managed by the Department of Energy(DOE) and the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). Composite materiak program work is coordinated by cooperative research efforts between the DOE and the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC).

Warren, C.D.

1999-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

133

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. RESD Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report compiling a summary of the information presented and discussed at the May 1983 Automotive Stirling Engine (AES) Reference Engine System Design (RESD) review held at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The design of the engine and its auxiliaries and controls is described. Manufacturing costs in production quantity are also presented. Engine system performance predictions are discussed and vehicle integration is developed, along with projected fuel economy levels.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Automotive batteries. (Bibliography from the Global Mobility database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, manufacture, and marketing of automotive batteries. Included are nickel-cadmium, nickel metal hydride, sodium sulfur, zinc-air, lead-acid, and polymer batteries. Testing includes life-cycling, performance and peak-power characteristics, and vehicle testing of near-term batteries. Also mentioned are measurement equipment, European batteries, and electric vehicle battery development. (Contains a minimum of 76 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Automotive batteries. (Bibliography from the Global Mobility database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, manufacture, and marketing of automotive batteries. Included are nickel-cadmium, nickel metal hydride, sodium sulfur, zinc-air, lead-acid, and polymer batteries. Testing includes life-cycling, performance and peak-power characteristics, and vehicle testing of near-term batteries. Also mentioned are measurement equipment, European batteries, and electric vehicle battery development.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Automotive batteries. (Bibliography from the Global Mobility database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, manufacture, and marketing of automotive batteries. Included are nickel-cadmium, nickel metal hydride, sodium sulfur, zinc-air, lead-acid, and polymer batteries. Testing includes life-cycling, performance and peak-power characteristics, and vehicle testing of near-term batteries. Also mentioned are measurement equipment, European batteries, and electric vehicle battery development. (Contains a minimum of 71 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The status of ceramic turbine component fabrication and quality assurance relevant to automotive turbine needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) with guidance from the Ceramics Division of the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). DOE and the automotive companies have funded extensive development of ceramic materials for automotive gas turbine components, the most recent effort being under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program.

Richerson, D.W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Spot Welding of Automotive Steels and Light Metals by Friction Bit ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and light metals in automotive manufacturing is difficult, because of incompatibility of these alloys during fusion. ... Recent Trends in Cold Spray Technology.

140

ENERGY REDUCTION IN AUTOMOTIVE PAINT SHOPS A REVIEW OF HYBRID/ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY MANUFACTURING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Automotive industry is facing fundamental challenges due to the rapid depletion of fossil fuels, energy saving and environmental concerns. The need of sustainable energy development… (more)

Arenas Guerrero, Claudia Patricia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Requirements and concepts for future automotive electronic architectures from the view of integrated safety.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation, concepts of the electronic architecture of automotive Integrated Safety System are developed as a cooperative approach of engineering process, dependable hardware architecture… (more)

Chen, Xi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The design of an automotive cockpit module for European urban electric vehicles for 2015.:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This graduation project focuses on identifying how the development of new electric vehicle (EV) archetypes could affect automotive engineering and design. Changes will occur throughout… (more)

Buskermolen, S.P.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

An Experimental Study of Power Losses of an Automotive Manual Transmission.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, the influence of a variety of operating conditions on the power losses and efficiency of an automotive manual transmission was investigated experimentally.… (more)

Szweda, Timothy Andrew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR?CYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SYSTEM FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An air?cycle air conditioning system, using a typical automotive turbocharger as the core of the system, was designed and tested. Effects on engine performance were… (more)

Forster, Christopher James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

Nigle N. Clark

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Framework for use of generalized force and torque data in transitional levels of autonomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manipulation of hazardous materials requires the use of robotics to limit exposure of human operators to the danger. In order to improve manipulator effectiveness while ensuring reliability and redundancy, layers of control are implemented in increments. ... Keywords: autonomy, force control, position based force control

Kyle Schroeder; Mitch Pryor

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

Kramer, P.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Power Modulation Investigation for High Temperature (175-200 degrees Celcius) Automotive Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles were re-introduced in the late 1990s after a century dominated by purely internal combustion powered engines[1]. Automotive players, such as GM, Ford, DaimlerChrysler, Honda, and Toyota, together with major energy producers, such as BPAmoco, were the major force in the development of hybrid electric vehicles. Most notable was the development by Toyota of its Prius, which was launched in Japan in 1997 and worldwide in 2001. The shift to hybrids was driven by the fact that the sheer volume of vehicles on the road had begun to tax the ability of the environment to withstand the pollution of the internal combustion engine and the ability of the fossil fuel industry to produce a sufficient amount of refined gasoline. In addition, the number of vehicles was anticipated to rise exponentially with the increasing affluence of China and India. Over the last fifteen years, major advances have been made in all the technologies essential to hybrid vehicle success, including batteries, motors, power control and conditioning electronics, regenerative braking, and power sources, including fuel cells. Current hybrid electric vehicles are gasoline internal combustion--electric motor hybrids. These hybrid electric vehicles range from micro-hybrids, where a stop/start system cuts the engine while the vehicle is stopped, and mild hybrids where the stop/start system is supplemented by regenerative braking and power assist, to full hybrids where the combustion motor is optimized for electric power production, and there is full electric drive and full regenerative braking. PSA Peugeot Citroen estimates the increased energy efficiency will range from 3-6% for the micro-hybrids to 15-25% for the full hybrids.[2] Gasoline-electric hybrids are preferred in US because they permit long distance travel with low emissions and high gasoline mileage, while still using the existing refueling infrastructure. One of the most critical areas in which technology has been advancing has been the development of electronics that can operate in the high temperature environments present in hybrid vehicles. The temperatures under the hood for a gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle are comparable to those for traditional internal combustion engines. This is known to be a difficult environment with respect to commercial-grade electronics, as there are surface and ambient temperatures ranging from 125 C to 175 C. In addition, some hybrid drive electronics are placed in even harsher environments, such as on or near the brakes, where temperatures can reach 250 C. Furthermore, number of temperature cycles experienced by electronics in a hybrid vehicle is different from that experienced in a traditional vehicle. A traditional internal combustion vehicle will have the engine running for longer periods, whereas a mild or micro-hybrid engine will experience many more starts and stops.[3] This means that hybrid automotive electronics will undergo more cycles of a potential wider temperature cycle than standard automotive electronics, which in turn see temperature cycles of 2 to 3 times the magnitude of the {Delta}T = 50 C-75 C experienced by commercial-grade electronics. This study will discuss the effects of these harsh environments on the failure mechanisms and ultimate reliability of electronic systems developed for gasoline-electric hybrid vehicles. In addition, it will suggest technologies and components that can reasonably be expected to perform well in these environments. Finally, it will suggest areas where further research is needed or desirable. Areas for further research will be highlighted in bold, italic type. It should be noted that the first area where further research is desirable is in developing a clearer understanding of the actual hybrid automotive electronics environment and how to simulate it through accelerated testing, thus: Developing specific mission profiles and accelerated testing protocols for the underhood environment for hybrid cars, as has previously been done for gasoline-powered vehicles, is an important area for further st

McCluskey, F. P.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Integrated model-based control and diagnostic monitoring for automotive catalyst systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated model-based automotive catalyst control and diagnostic monitoring system is presented. This system incorporates a simplified dynamic catalyst model that describes oxygen storage and release in the catalyst and predicts the post-catalyst ... Keywords: automotive catalyst, model predictive control, on-board diagnostic monitoring

Kenneth R. Muske; James C. Peyton Jones

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Standardizing model-based in-vehicle infotainment development in the German automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of existing HMI development processes in the automotive domain, a reference process for software engineering has been developed. This process was used to develop a domain data model and a model-based specification language in order ... Keywords: HMI, automotive, domain data model, interaction design, model-based language, specification, user interface design

Steffen Hess; Anne Gross; Andreas Maier; Marius Orfgen; Gerrit Meixner

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cylindrical model of transient heat conduction in automotive fuse using conservative averaging method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cylindrical mathematical model of automotive fuse is considered in this paper. Initially, partial differential equations of the transient heat conduction are given to describe heat-up process in the fuse. Conservative averaging method is used to obtain ... Keywords: analytical approximation, automotive fuse, conservative averaging, heat transfer, quasi-linear, transient process

Raimonds Vilums; Hans-Dieter Liess; Andris Buikis; Andis Rudevics

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Towards improving dependability of automotive systems by using the EAST-ADL architecture description language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity of embedded automotive systems calls for a more rigorous approach to system development compared to current state of practice. A critical issue is the management of the engineering information that defines the embedded system. Development ... Keywords: architecture description language, automotive systems, systems engineering

Philippe Cuenot; DeJiu Chen; Sébastien Gérard; Henrik Lönn; Mark-Oliver Reiser; David Servat; Ramin Tavakoli Kolagari; Martin Törngren; Matthias Weber

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Electrohydraulic Forming of Near-Net Shape Automotive Panels  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near-net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures. Pulsed pressure is created via a shockwave generated by the discharge of high voltage capacitors through a pair of electrodes in a liquid-filled chamber. The shockwave in the liquid initiated by the expansion of the plasma channel formed between two electrodes propagates towards the blank and causes the blank to be deformed into a one-sided die cavity. The numerical model of the EHF process was validated experimentally and was successfully applied to the design of the electrode system and to a multi-electrode EHF chamber for full scale validation of the process. The numerical model was able to predict stresses in the dies during pulsed forming and was validated by the experimental study of the die insert failure mode for corner filling operations. The electrohydraulic forming process and its major subsystems, including durable electrodes, an EHF chamber, a water/air management system, a pulse generator and integrated process controls, were validated to be capable to operate in a fully automated, computer controlled mode for forming of a portion of a full-scale sheet metal component in laboratory conditions. Additionally, the novel processes of electrohydraulic trimming and electrohydraulic calibration were demonstrated at a reduced-scale component level. Furthermore, a hybrid process combining conventional stamping with EHF was demonstrated as a laboratory process for a full-scale automotive panel formed out of AHSS material. The economic feasibility of the developed EHF processes was defined by developing a cost model of the EHF process in comparison to the conventional stamping process.

Golovaschenko, Sergey F.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

154

Analysis of the potential for new automotive uses of magnesium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the scope of a new project, just initiated, for the Lightweight Materials Program within the Office of Transportation Materials. The Center for Transportation Research and the Energy Technology Division at Argonne National Laboratory will assess the feasibility and technical potential of using magnesium and its alloys in place of steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications in order to enable more energy-efficient, lightweight passenger vehicles. The analysis will provide an information base to help guide magnesium research and development in the most promising directions.

Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan Portfolio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan Portfolio An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan Portfolio September 17, 2013 - 5:20pm Addthis An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department’s Loan Portfolio Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Executive Director of the Loan Program Office (LPO) What are the key facts? Thanks to investments made by the Obama Administration, the U.S. auto industry has had three straight years of rapid growth after seven straight years of decline. Despite Fisker Automotive's bankruptcy setback, the DOE loan portfolio remains very strong -- and is playing a crucial role in helping America's auto industry thrive, innovate and compete. When the President took office, America's auto industry was on the brink

156

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Issue 3 1 Issue 3 Plug and Play with Autonomie autonomie diagram Plug and play with Autonomie Argonne National Laboratory recently unveiled Autonomie, a new "plug and play" software modeling tool that complements the automotive industry's interest in reducing costs by accelerating the development and introduction of advanced automotive technologies. Autonomie allows the virtual simulation of vehicle powertrains and components and their operation without the expense of building a real-time system. "To reduce cost and time to production while properly evaluating and developing advanced technologies, OEMs are turning to model-based design," said manager Aymeric Rousseau, who led Autonomie's development. To facilitate this goal, a standard plug-and-play model architecture and

157

Future Automotive Aftertreatment Solutions: The 150°C Challenge Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

With future fuel economy standards enacted, the U.S. automotive manufacturers (OEMs) are committed to pursuing a variety of high risk/highly efficient stoichiometric and lean combustion strategies to achieve superior performance. In recognition of this need, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has partnered with domestic automotive manufacturers through U.S. DRIVE to develop these advanced technologies. However, before these advancements can be introduced into the U.S. market, they must also be able to meet increasingly stringent emissions requirements. A significant roadblock to this implementation is the inability of current catalyst and aftertreatment technologies to provide the required activity at the much lower exhaust temperatures that will accompany highly efficient combustion processes and powertrain strategies. Therefore, the goal of this workshop and report is to create a U.S. DRIVE emission control roadmap that will identify new materials and aftertreatment approaches that offer the potential for 90% conversion of emissions at low temperature (150°C) and are consistent with highly efficient combustion technologies currently under investigation within U.S. DRIVE Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) programs.

Zammit, Michael; DiMaggio, Craig L.; Kim, Chang H.; Lambert, Christine; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Parks, James E.; Howden, Ken

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Direct Injection Compressed Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The underlying goal of this project was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome technological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the US. market. Further, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive technologies. Eight objectives were defined to accomplish this goal: (1) Develop an interdisciplinary internal combustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. (2) Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. (3) Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary curriculum. (4) Promote strong interaction with industry, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. (5) Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. (6) Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. (7) Establish ''off-campus'' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various industrial sites. (8) Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

GATE Center of Excellence at UAB in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of the UAB GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications. The first Phase of the UAB DOE GATE center spanned the period 2005-2011. The UAB GATE goals coordinated with the overall goals of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicles Technologies initiative and DOE GATE program. The FCVT goals are: (1) Development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost; (2) To provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. The UAB GATE focused on both the FCVT and GATE goals in the following manner: (1) Train and produce graduates in lightweight automotive materials technologies; (2) Structure the engineering curricula to produce specialists in the automotive area; (3) Leverage automotive related industry in the State of Alabama; (4) Expose minority students to advanced technologies early in their career; (5) Develop innovative virtual classroom capabilities tied to real manufacturing operations; and (6) Integrate synergistic, multi-departmental activities to produce new product and manufacturing technologies for more damage tolerant, cost-effective, and lighter automotive structures.

None

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Energy and Environmental Impacts of Lithium Production for Automotive Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B. Dunn and Linda Gaines B. Dunn and Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Energy and Environmental Impacts of Lithium Production for Automotive Batteries American Chemical Society New Orleans, LA April 7-11, 2013 The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Can Automotive Battery recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaines, Jennifer B. Dunn, and Christine James Gaines, Jennifer B. Dunn, and Christine James Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? ACS Meeting New Orleans, LA April 7-11, 2013 The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly

162

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L. [Princeton Univ., Areospace Engineering. NJ (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Evans, David H [Sewanee, The University of the South; Hiestand, John [Indiana University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles March 20, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis DOE to invest $3.5 million in public outreach effort NEW YORK, NY - In an effort to engage students and the public on the significance of increasing the use of more clean, cutting-edge and energy-efficient vehicles to help transform our nation's transportation sector, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced plans to award nearly $3.5 million in a grant to the X PRIZE Foundation for the national education and outreach component of the Automotive X PRIZE (AXP) Education Program. The AXP, officially launched today, will award at least $10

165

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model (MA3T) Consumer Choice Model, MA3T Project U.S. consumer demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among various light-duty vehicle technologies for hundreds of market segments based and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/etsd/contactus.shtml References Retrieved from

166

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Re

167

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab)

168

A design strategy applied to sulfur resistant lean NOxĚł automotive catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst poisoning due to sulfur compounds derived from fuel sulfur presents a major challenge, intractable thus far, to development of many advanced technologies for automotive catalysts such as the lean NOx, trap. Under ...

Tang, Hairong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Managing novelty at the interfaces between concept and product : case studies for the automotive industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appearance of the product is a discerning factor for the consumers purchase decisions. Time from concept to product creation is a critical factor in the competitive automotive industry. The period to develop a product is ...

Zarewych, Lara Daniv, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Battery Aging, Diagnosis, and Prognosis of Lead-Acid Batteries for Automotive Application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New battery technologies have been emerging into today’s market and frequenting headlines; however, the lead-acid battery overwhelmingly remains the most common automotive battery. Because of… (more)

Picciano, Nicholas I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Adaptive control of time delay systems and applications to automotive control problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is about the adaptive control of time delay systems with applications to automotive control problems. The stabilization of systems involving time delays is a difficult problem since the existence of a delay may ...

Yildiz, Yildiray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Comparative analysis of automotive powertrain choices for the near to mid-term future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis attempts a technological assessment of automotive powertrain technologies for the near to mid term future. The powertrain types to be assessed include naturally aspirated gasoline engines, turbocharged gasoline ...

Kasseris, Emmanuel P

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The impact of manufacturing offshore on technology development paths in the automotive and optoelectronics industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents a two-case study of the impact of manufacturing offshore on the technology trajectory of the firm and the industry. It looks in particular at the automotive and optoelectronics industries. The ...

Fuchs, Erica R. H. (Erica Renee H.), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lean principle application in an automotive product development process with special emphasis on peer reviews  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Automotive, a large US based, global manufacturer of automobiles, has made significant gains in manufacturing competitiveness, in part through application of a lean manufacturing approach to high volume assembly. A ...

Boren, Michael S. (Michael Stuart)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A survey of front end modularity as an automotive architecture and its ability to deliver value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The partitioning of a system can and will dictate the creative space for a designer or engineer. This thesis will analyze how using a new automotive architecture known as a Front End Module (FEM) can affect a limited ...

Mahé, Vincent R. (Vincent Robert)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Predictive algorithm to determine the suitable time to change automotive engine oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, emerging technologies related to various sensors, product identification, and wireless communication give us new opportunities for improving the efficiency of automotive maintenance operations, in particular, implementing predictive maintenance. ... Keywords: Degradation, Engine oil, Mission profile data, Predictive maintenance, Statistical methods

Hong-Bae Jun; Dimitris Kiritsis; Mario Gambera; Paul Xirouchakis

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Multilevel Analysis of Institutional Fiscal Autonomy and its Effect on Affordability, Operating Efficiency, and Minority Access at Public Colleges and Universities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In recent years, an unstable funding environment for state higher education systems has led to a trend of increasing institutional fiscal autonomy in exchange… (more)

Glass, Christine J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Status of Automotive Fuel Cell Development: Applicability to Stationary Fuel Cell Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developers of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology -- targeting the automotive as well as the stationary markets -- are making significant strides in performance improvements and cost reductions. In concept, PEMFC systems could either replace internal combustion engine drivetrains or power auxiliary loads that would otherwise be powered by propulsion power plants. This report describes how automotive PEMFC development and stationary power PEMFC development will complement each other.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modular PM Motor Drives for Automotive Traction Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents modular permanent magnet (PM) motor drives for automotive traction applications. A partially modularized drive system consisting of a single PM motor and multiple inverters is described. The motor has multiple three-phase stator winding sets and each winding set is driven with a separate three-phase inverter module. A truly modularized inverter and motor configuration based on an axial-gap PM motor is then introduced, in which identical PM motor modules are mounted on a common shaft and each motor module is powered by a separate inverter module. The advantages of the modular approach for both inverter and motor include: (1) power rating scalability--one design meets different power requirements by simply stacking an adequate number of modules, thus avoiding redesigning and reducing the development cost, (2) increased fault tolerance, and (3) easy repairing. A prototype was constructed by using two inverters and an axial-gap PM motor with two sets of three-phase stat or windings, and it is used to assist the diesel engine in a hybrid electric vehicle converted from a Chevrolet Suburban. The effect of different pulse-width-modulation strategies for both motoring and regenerative modes on current control is analyzed. Torque and regenerative control algorithms are implemented with a digital signal processor. Analytical and initial testing results are included in the paper.

Su, G.J.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fatigue behavior and recommended design rules for an automotive composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fatigue curves (stress vs cycles to failure) were generated under a variety of conditions (temperatures, fluid environments, mean stresses, block loadings) for a candidate automotive structural composite. The results were used to (1) develop observations regarding basic fatigue behavioral characteristics and (2) establish fatigue design rules. The composite was a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Tensile fatigue tests on specimens from a single plaque at {minus}40 F, room temperature, and 250 F provided the basic behavioral characteristics. It was found that when stress was normalized by the at-temperature ultimate tensile strength, the fatigue curves at the three temperatures collapsed into a single master curve. An assessment of the individual stress-strain loops throughout each test showed a progressive loss in stiffness and an increase in permanent strain, both of which are indicative of increasing damage. Fatigue tests on specimens from several plaques were used to develop a design fatigue curve, which was established by using a reduction factor of 20 on average cycles to failure. This factor assures that the stiffness loss during the design life is no greater than 10 percent. Fatigue reduction factors were established to account for various fluids. Reversed stress fatigue tests allowed a mean stress rule to be validated, and block loading tests were used to demonstrate the adequacy of Miner`s rule for cumulative fatigue damage.

Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Ruggles, M.B.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

LOW-COST COMPOSITES IN VEHICLE MANUFACTURE - Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications.  

SciTech Connect

In the last decade, natural fiber composites have experienced rapid growth in the European automotive market, and this trend appears to be global in scale, provided the cost and performance is justified against competing technologies. However, mass reduction, recyclability, and performance requirements can be met today by competing systems such as injection-molded unreinforced thermoplastics; natural fiber composites will continue to expand their role in automotive applications only if such technical challenges as moisture stability, fiber-polymer interface compatibility, and consistent, repeatable fiber sources are available to supply automotive manufacturers. Efforts underway by Tier I and II automotive suppliers to explore hybrid glass-natural fiber systems, as well as applications that exploit such capabilities as natural fiber sound dampening characteristics, could very well have far-reaching effects. In addition, the current development underway of bio-based resins such as Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biodegradable polyesters and bio-based polyols could provide fully bio-based composite options to future automotive designers. In short, the development of the natural fiber composite market would make a positive impact on farmers and small business owners on a global scale, reduce US reliance on foreign oil, improve environmental quality through the development of a sustainable resource supply chain, and achieve a better CO2 balance over the vehicle?s lifetime with near-zero net greenhouse gas emissions.

Holbery, Jim; Houston, Dan

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Damage tolerance design procedures for an automotive composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the durability issues of concern in the use of composites in automobile structures is the damaging effects that low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) might have on strength and stiffness. This issue was experimentally investigated, and recommended design evaluation procedures were developed for a candidate automotive structural composite--a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Two test facilities were built to cover the range of impacts of interest--a pendulum device to characterize the effects of relative heavy objects at low velocities and an air gun to characterize the effects of relatively light objects at higher velocities. In all cases, the test specimen was a 9 x 9 x 1/8-in.-thick plate clamped on an 8-in.-diam circle. Sixty-five impact tests were performed. Included were tests using various impactor sizes and weights, tests at {minus}40 F, and tests on specimens that has been presoaked in water or exposed to battery acid. Damage areas were determined using ultrasonic C-scans, and the resulting areas were found to correlate with the quantity impactor mass to a power times velocity. A design curve was derived from the correlation and validated using dropped brick tests. To evaluate strength and stiffness reductions, the impacted plate specimens were cut into tensile, compressive, and fatigue test specimens that were used to determine reductions as a function of damage area. It was found that for design purposes, the strength reduction could be determined by representing the damage area by a circular hole of equivalent area.

Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

REQUEST BY UNITED STATES AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS PARTNERSHIP (USAMP) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATES AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS STATES AUTOMOTIVE MATERIALS PARTNERSHIP (USAMP) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC05-960R22363 AND FOR SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE UNDER ITS SUBCONTRACTS WITH LARGE, FOR- PROFIT BUSINESSES; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-95-001 [ORO- 593] USAMP has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the performance of cooperative agreement DE-FC05-950R22363 and Subject Inventions made under its subcontracts with large, for-profit businesses. Background The award of this cooperative agreement has been made in response to an unsolicited proposal from USAMP entitled "Automotive Lightweight Materials Program" whose objectives are closely

185

Durability of a continuous strand mat polymeric composite for automotive structural applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key unanswered question that must be addressed before polymeric composites will be widely used in automotive structural components is their durability. Major durability issues are the effects of cyclic loadings, creep, automotive environments, and low-energy impacts on dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness. The U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address these issues and to develop, in cooperation with the Automotive Composites Consortium, experimentally based, durability driven, design guidelines. The initial reference material is an isocyanurate reinforced with a continuous strand, swirl glass mat. This paper describes the basic deformation and failure behavior of the reference material, and it presents test results illustrating the property degradations caused by loading, time, and environmental effects. The importance of characterizing and understanding damage and how it leads to failure is also discussed. The results presented are from the initial phases of an ongoing project. The ongoing effort and plans are briefly described.

Corum, J.M.; McCoy, H.E. Jr.; Ruggles, M.B.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Analysis of the potential for new automotive uses of wrought magnesium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within the US Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought magnesium and its alloys to replace steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available for improving automotive fuel efficiency. Although high-strength steels, Al, and polymers are already being used to achieve significant weight reductions, substantial additional weight reductions could be achieved by increased use of Mg (whose density is less than one-fourth that of steel and only two-thirds that of Al). This study shows that Mg sheet could be used in automotive body nonstructural and semistructural applications, whereas extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. The primary barrier to such uses of wrought Mg is high cost.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-NT0003894; W(A)-09-061 ; CH1525 Delphi Automotive Systems LLC (Delphi), requests an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subcontract. Delphi is a subcontractor to United Technologies under the referenced cooperative agreement. The purpose of the cooperative agreement is the development of solid oxide fuel (SOFC) cell and stack technology suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive central generation power plant facilities fueled by coal synthesis gas, (syngas). According to its response to question 2 of the petition, Delphi states that development of this technology will significantly advance the nation's

188

Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber Automotive Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite, which was made by a rapid molding process suitable for high-volume automotive applications, consisted of continuous Thornel T300 fibers (6K tow) in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. The reinforcement was in the form of four {+-}45{sup o} stitch-bonded mats in the following layup: [0/90{sup o}/{+-}45{sup o}]{sub S}. This material is the second in a progression of three candidate thermoset composites to be characterized and modeled as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the industry Automotive Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for large automotive structural components. This document is in two parts. Part I provides the design criteria, and Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects on deformation, strength, and stiffness of cyclic and sustained loads, operating temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris). Guidance is provided for design analysis, time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage tolerance design guidance, including the effects of holes. Chapter 6 provides a brief summary of the design criteria.

Corum, J.M.

2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

Compatibility of alternative fuels with advanced automotive gas-turbine and Stirling engines. A literature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of alternative fuels in advanced automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines is discussed on the basis of a literature survey. These alternative engines are briefly described, and the aspects that will influence fuel selection are identified. Fuel properties and combustion properties are discussed, with consideration given to advanced materials and components. Alternative fuels from petroleum, coal, oil shale, alcohol, and hydrogen are discussed, and some background is given about the origin and production of these fuels. Fuel requirements for automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines are developed, and the need for certain research efforts is discussed. Future research efforts planned at Lewis are described. 52 references.

Cairelli, J.; Horvath, D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Aluminum R&D for Automotive Uses And the Department of Energy's Role  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

157 157 ENERGY DIVISION Aluminum R&D for Automotive Uses And the Department of Energy's Role S.W. Hadley S. Das J.W. Miller March 2000 Prepared for the Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6205 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORPORATION for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 ii iii TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables................................................................................................................................... v List of Figures .................................................................................................................................

191

Case Study- Steam System Improvements at Dupont Automotive Marshall Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dupont's Marshall Laboratory is an automotive paint research and development facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The campus is comprised of several buildings that are served by Trigen-Philadelphia Energy Corporation's district steam loop. In 1996 Dupont management announced that it was considering moving the facility out of Philadelphia primarily due to the high operating cost compared to where they were considering relocating. The city officials responded by bringing the local electric and gas utilities to the table to negotiate better rates for Dupont. Trigen also requested the opportunity to propose energy savings opportunities, and dedicated a team of engineers to review Dupont's steam system to determine if energy savings could be realized within the steam system infrastructure. As part of a proposal to help Dupont reduce energy costs while continuing to use Trigen's steam, Trigen recommended modifications to increase energy efficiency, reduce steam system maintenance costs and implement small scale cogeneration. These recommendations included reducing the medium pressure steam distribution to low pressure, eliminating the medium pressure to low pressure reducing stations, installing a back pressure steam turbine generator, and preheating the domestic hot water with the condensate. Dupont engineers evaluated these recommended modifications and chose to implement most of them. An analysis of Dupont's past steam consumption revealed that the steam distribution system sizing was acceptable if the steam pressure was reduced from medium to low. After a test of the system and a few modifications, Dupont reduced the steam distribution system to low pressure. Energy efficiency is improved since the heat transfer losses at the low pressure are less than at the medium pressure distribution. Additionally, steam system maintenance will be significantly reduced since 12 pressure reducing stations are eliminated. With the steam pressure reduction now occurring at one location, the opportunity existed to install a backpressure turbine generator adjacent to the primary pressure reducing station. The analysis of Dupont's steam and electric load profiles demonstrated that cost savings could be realized with the installation of 150 kW of self-generation. There were a few obstacles, including meeting the utility's parallel operation requirements, that made this installation challenging. Over two years have passed since the modifications were implemented, and although cost savings are difficult to quantify since process steam use has increased, the comparison of steam consumption to heating degree days shows a reducing trend. Dupont's willingness to tackle energy conservation projects without adversely affecting their process conditions can be an example to other industrial steam users.

Larkin, A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reinventing the Industrial Heartland: Supply Chain Sustainability and the New Automotive Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a new mobility infrastructure. In this strategy, the auto is a sustainably built, high tech component1 Report Reinventing the Industrial Heartland: Supply Chain Sustainability and the New Automotive in mobility and the auto of the future, through the German experience Background This conference for 50

Sheridan, Jennifer

193

A high-voltage low-power DC-DC buck regulator for automotive applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a High-Voltage Low-Power CMOS DC-DC buck regulator for automotive applications. The overall system, including the high and low voltage analog devices, the power MOS and the low voltage digital devices, was realized in the Austriamicrosystems ... Keywords: DC-DC regulator, buck converter, current control, low quiscent current, pulse frequency modulation

G. Pasetti; L. Fanucci; R. Serventi

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

An observer looks at the cell temperature in automotive battery packs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An observer looks at the cell temperature in automotive battery packs Maxime Deberta , Guillaume.bloch@univ-lorraine.fr Abstract The internal temperature of Li-ion batteries for electric or hybrid vehicles is an important measurement and a model. This paper presents the simplified modelling of heat transfers in a battery module

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

195

Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory 21st Century Automotive Challenge April 17-19, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric and hybrid cars in the American consumer marketplace." Competition participants included teams vehicle technology you need to match your lifestyle ­ electric, solar electric, hybrid, pluggable hybrid the electric utility grid. Sound impossible, or eons in the future? As part of the 21st Century Automotive

Lee, Dongwon

196

Acoustic Survey of a 3/8-Scale Automotive Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acoustic survey that consists of insertion loss and flow noise measurements was conducted at key locations around the circuit of a 3/8-scale automotive acoustic wind tunnel. Descriptions of the test, the instrumentation, and the wind tunnel facility ...

Jr Earl R. Booth; Romberg Gary; Hansen Larry; Lutz Ron

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Third annual report to Congress on the automotive technology development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Automotive Propulsion Research and Development Act of 1978 focused on advancing the technology of automotive propulsion systems. In formulating the Act, Congress found that: (1) existing automobiles do not meet the Nation's long-term environmental and energy goals; (2) insufficient resources are being devoted to research and development (R and D) on advanced automobile propulsion systems; (3) with sufficient R and D, alternatives to existing systems could meet long-term goals at reasonable cost; and (4) expanded R and D would complement and stimulate corresponding private sector efforts. Because of the Nation's energy problems, Congress felt that advanced automobile propulsion system technology should be developed quickly. Through the Act, Congress expressed its intent for the Department of Energy (DOE) to: (1) make R and D contracts and grants for development of advanced automobile propulsion systems within five years, or within the shortest practicable time consistent with appropriate R and D techniques; (2) evaluate and disseminate information about advanced automobile propulsion system technology; (3) preserve, enhance, and facilitate competition in R and D of existing and alternative automotive propulsion systems; and (4) supplement, but neither supplant nor duplicate, private industry R and D efforts. Summaries of the status of conventional powertrain technology, automotive technology development program, and the management plan and policy transition are given. Tables on contracts and grant procurement for advanced gas turbine engine systems, advanced Stirling engine systems, and the vehicle systems project are given. (WHK)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Durability of polymer matrix composites for automotive structural applications: A state-of-the-art review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A key unanswered question that must be addressed before polymeric composites will be widely used in automotive structural components is their known durability. Major durability issues are the effects that cyclic loadings, creep, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts have on dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness throughout the required life of a composite component. This report reviews the current state of understanding in each of these areas. It also discusses the limited information that exists on one of the prime candidate materials for automotive structural applications--an isocyanurate reinforced with a continuous strand, swirl mat. Because of the key role that nondestructive evaluations must play in understanding damage development and progression, a chapter is included on ultrasonic techniques. A final chapter then gives conclusions and recommendations for research needed to resolve the various durability issues. These recommendations will help provide a sound basis for program planning for the Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the Automotive Composites Consortium of Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors.

Corum, J.M.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.; Sun, C.T.; Talreja, R.; Weitsman, Y.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Social media in the product development process of the automotive industry: a new approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new methodology for implementing social media monitoring into an important stage of the innovation process within the automotive industry -- the prototype stage. The information gathered on social media channels was used for project ... Keywords: electric mobility, electric vehicles, product development, social media monitoring, social networking sites

Andreas Klein, Götz Spiegel

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fourth international symposium on automotive propulsion systems. Volume I. [Eighteen papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A pre-conference draft is given (in five volumes) of the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Automotive Propulsion Systems, held April 18-22, 1977, in Washington, D.C. Volume I contains eighteen papers; a separate abstract was prepared for each for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA).

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analysis, Simulation and Prediction of Cosmetic Defects on Automotive External Panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first feeling of quality for a vehicle is linked to its perfect appearance. This has a major impact on the reputation of a car manufacturer. Cosmetic defects are thus more and more taken into account in the process design. Qualifying a part as good or bad from the cosmetic point of view is mainly subjective: the part aspect is considered acceptable if no defect is visible on the vehicle by the final customer. Cosmetic defects that appear during sheet metal forming are checked by visual inspection in light inspection rooms

A. Le Port; S. Thuillier; C. Borot; J. Charbonneaux; Aethra Automotive Systems

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the participating students are now contributing to the advancement of automotive technology in this country.

David Holloway

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Automotive component product development enhancement through multi-attribute system design optimization in an integrated concurrent engineering framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive industry is facing a tough period. Production overcapacity and high fixed costs constrain companies' profits and challenge the very same existence of some corporations. Strangulated by the reduced cash availability ...

Usan, Massimo, 1967-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

205

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

206

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

207

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

208

What matters most : researching the critical factors for maximizing automotive innovation profitability, and their implications of systems-based innovations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is predicted by many in the industry that over the next decade automotive OEM's will look more and more like "vehicle-brand owners," focusing efforts on branding, marketing, and building a stronger retail channel. This ...

Clark, Nathan A. (Nathan Allen), 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO the full spectrum of research AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage systems, enabling longer range and broader use of hybrid and pure electric vehicles-generated models that simulate vehicle behaviour in dangerous driving scenarios and advanced stability systems to help drivers maintain traction and control, » Smart chargers that allow plug-in electric vehicles

Waterloo, University of

210

Application of High Performance Computing for Automotive Design and Manufacturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed new computer simulation tools which can be used in DOE internal combustion engine and weapons simulation programs currently being developed. Entirely new massively parallel computer modeling codes for chemically reactive and incompressible fluid mechanics with interactive physics sub-models were developed. Chemically reactive and aerodynamic flows are central parts in many DOE systems. Advanced computer modeling codes with new chemistry and physics capabilities can be used on massively parallel computers to handle more complex problems associated with chemically reactive propulsion systems, energy efficiency, enhanced performance and durability, multi-fuel capability and reduced pollutant emissions. The work for this project is also relevant to the design, development and application of advanced user-friendly computer codes for new high-performance computing platforms for manufacturing and which will also impact and interact with the U.S.'s advanced communications program. Finite element method (FEM) formulations were developed that are directly usable in simulating rapid deformation resulting from collision, impact, projectiles, etc. This simulation capability is applicable to both DOE (e.g., surety and penetration) and DoD (e.g., armor) applications. The models of plate and shell composite structures were developed for simulation of glass continuous strand mat and braided composite in thermoset polymer matrix. The developed numerical tools based upon the fundamental mechanisms responsible for damage evolution in continuous-fiber organic-matrix composites. This class of materials is especially relevant because of their high strength to mass ratio, anisotropic behavior, and general application in most transportation and weapon delivery systems. The high-performance computational tools developed are generally applicable to a broad spectrum of materials with similar fiber structures.

Zacharia, T.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ME EET Seminar: Real-time Predictive Control: From Automotive Systems to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Predictive Control: From Automotive Systems to Real-time Predictive Control: From Automotive Systems to Energy Efficient Buildings Speaker(s): Francesco Borrelli Date: February 10, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Hybrid systems are heterogeneous systems that exhibit both continuous and discrete dynamics. Over the last eight years we have focused on the development of systematic, real-time, predictive controller synthesis techniques for hybrid systems with constraints. In this talk I will first summarize our theoretical efforts starting from constrained optimal control design for hybrid systems with constraints. Then, I will show how these results can be used in order to develop a theory for distributed predictive control for large-scale systems. The second part of the talk presents a range of applications where the proposed techniques were used with great

212

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UGCP-HO P.04,-07 UGCP-HO P.04,-07 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS, LLC FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36- 04G014319 ENTITLED "SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT FOR AUXILLARY POWER IN HEAVY DUTY VEHICLE APPLICATIONS"; W(A)-04-082; CH-1261 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE patent counsel, Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above-identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L.

213

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications R. K. Ahluwalia, T. Q. Hua, and J-K Peng Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 M. Kromer, S. Lasher, K. McKenney, K. Law, and J. Sinha TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA 02421 June 21, 2011 Executive Summary In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program's Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and

214

Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 1. Executive summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary hydrogen-fueled automotive piston engine design data-base now exists as a result of a research project at the University of Miami. The effort, which is overviewed here, encompassed the testing of 19 different configurations of an appropriately-modified, 1.6-liter displacement, light-duty automotive piston engine. The design data base includes engine performance and exhaust emissions over the entire load range, generally at a fixed speed (1800 rpm) and best efficiency spark timing. This range was sometimes limited by intake manifold backfiring and lean-limit restrictions; however, effective measures were demonstrated for obviating these problems. High efficiency, competitive specific power, and low emissions were conclusively demonstrated.

Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for automotive vehicles. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work accomplished between July 1974 and October 1978 in a program directed toward the design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission (CVT) for an automotive vehicle is reported. The following major accomplishments were achieved: the laboratory and mathematical projections establishing the viability of the program and the predicted attainment of the primary goal of fuel economy were verified; the proposed Concept Demonstration prototype hydromechanical transmission (HMT) was completed from design to operation; the HMT was thoroughly tested in the laboratory and on the road and its in-vehicle performance was verified by independent testing laboratories; and design of a second generation Pre-Production HMT has proceeded to the point of confirming the practicality of the automotive HMT size and weight; most of the necessary information has been generated which could permit its production cost/competitiveness to be evaluated. (LCL)

None

1978-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09-33 09-33 Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne

217

Laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys to achieve defect-free, structurally sound and reliable welds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to seek improved process control and weldment reliability during laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys while retaining the high speed and accuracy of the laser beam welding process. The effects of various welding variables on the loss of alloying elements and the formation of porosity and other geometric weld defects such as underfill and overfill were studied both experimentally and theoretically.

DebRoy, T.

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of automotive battery separators. Environmental research brief  

SciTech Connect

The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures automotive battery separators. Two types of separators-polyethylene/silica sheet and vinyl rib-are produced. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that waste spill absorbents are generated in large quantities and at a significant waste management cost, and that waste reduction could result from using wringable, reusable aborbents.

Fleischman, M.; Schmidt, P.; Roberts, D.; Looby, G.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Digital Innovation and the Division of Innovative Labor: Digital Controls in the Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study of the U.S. automobile industry, we highlight the way the division of innovative labor across firms in the supply chain can be influenced by a particular form of digital innovation known as “digital control systems.” Digital ... Keywords: automotive industry, digital control hierarchy, digital controls, digital innovation, division of innovative labor, dual-product hierarchy, inclusionary hierarchy, mirroring hypothesis, systems integration

Jaegul Lee; Nicholas Berente

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of work in section F.

Pannala, S.; D'Azevedo, E.; Zacharia, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Modeling & Simulation - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out...

222

The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 09/16/10 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 09/16/10 The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 09/16/10 The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 09/16/10 Addthis ProgressiveXPrizeEvent_September_16_2010_Peraves_187mpg 1 of 39 ProgressiveXPrizeEvent_September_16_2010_Peraves_187mpg IMG_8811 2 of 39 IMG_8811 IMG_8894 3 of 39 IMG_8894 IMG_8918 4 of 39 IMG_8918 X Prize 003 5 of 39 X Prize 003 X Prize 004 6 of 39 X Prize 004 X Prize 005 7 of 39 X Prize 005 X Prize 014 8 of 39 X Prize 014 X Prize 015 9 of 39 X Prize 015 X Prize 016 10 of 39 X Prize 016 X Prize 018 11 of 39 X Prize 018 X Prize 021 12 of 39 X Prize 021 X Prize 022 13 of 39 X Prize 022 X Prize 023 14 of 39 X Prize 023 X Prize 026 15 of 39 X Prize 026 X Prize 027 16 of 39 X Prize 027 X Prize 029 17 of 39 X Prize 029 X Prize 035 18 of 39 X Prize 035 X Prize 039 19 of 39 X Prize 039

223

Improving Compressed Air Energy Efficiency in Automotive Plants - Practical Examples and Implementation  

SciTech Connect

The automotive industry is the largest industry in the United States in terms of the dollar value of production [1]. U.S. automakers face tremendous pressure from foreign competitors, which have an increasing manufacturing presence in this country. The Big Three North American Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler are reacting to declining sales figures and economic strain by working more efficiently and seeking out opportunities to reduce production costs without negatively affecting the production volume or the quality of the product. Successful, cost-effective investment and implementation of the energy efficiency technologies and practices meet the challenge of maintaining the output of high quality product with reduced production costs. Automotive stamping and assembly plants are typically large users of compressed air with annual compressed air utility bills in the range of $2M per year per plant. This paper focuses on practical methods that the authors have researched, analyzed and implemented to improve compressed air system efficiency in automobile manufacturing facilities. It describes typical compressed air systems in automotive stamping and assembly plants, and compares these systems to best practices. The paper then presents a series of examples, organized using the method of inside-out approach, which strategically identifies the energy savings in the compressed air system by first minimizing end-use demand, then minimizing distribution losses, and finally making improvements to primary energy conversion equipment, the air compressor plant.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Kissock, Professor Kelly [University of Dayton, Ohio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Tribopolymerization: An advanced lubrication concept for automotive engines and systems of the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced lubrication technologies based on the concept of tribopolymerization as a mechanism of boundary lubrication are described. Advantages of this approach as well as potential applications which could have an impact on the design, manufacture, and performance of existing and future automotive engines are presented and discussed. Tribopolymerization, a novel concept of molecular design developed by Furey and Kajdas, involves the continuous formation of thin polymeric films on rubbing surfaces; the protective films formed are self-replenishing. The antiwear compounds developed from this technology are effective with metals as well as ceramics and in the liquid as well as vapor phases. Furthermore, they are ashless and contain no harmful phosphorus or sulfur; and many are biodegradable. Thus, potential applications of this technology are diverse and include a variety of cost/performance/energy/environmental advantages. Examples include the following: (a) machining and cutting applications using thin films to reduce friction and ceramic tool wear; (b) the lubrication of ceramic engines (e.g., low heat rejection diesel engines) or ceramic components; (c) the development of ashless lubricants for existing and future automotive engines to reduce exhaust catalyst poisoning and environmental emissions; (d) ashless antiwear or ``lubricity`` additives for fuels, including gasoline, diesel and jet fuel; (e) vapor phase applications of this technology to high temperature gaseous systems or to fuel injector wear problems associated with the use of natural gas engines; and (f) the use of the concept of tribopolymerization as an enabling technology in the development of new engines and new automotive propulsion systems.

Furey, M.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Kajdas, C. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Plock (Poland); Kaltenbach, K.W. [Triad Investors Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

226

Autonomy-Oriented Computing (AOC): The nature and implications of a paradigm for self-organized computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facing the increasing needs for large-scale, robust, adaptive, and distributed/decentralized computing capabilities [1, 5] from such fields as Web intelligence, scientific and social computing, Internet commerce, and pervasive computing, an unconventional bottom-up paradigm, based on the notions of Autonomy-Oriented Computing (AOC) and self-organization in open complex systems, offers new opportunities for developing promising architectures, methods, and technologies. The goal of this paper is to describe the key concepts in this computing paradigm, and furthermore, discuss some of the fundamental principles and mechanisms for obtaining self-organized computing solutions. 1.

Jiming Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Modeling, Simulation Design and Control of Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Drives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ohio State University (OSU) is uniquely poised to establish such a center, with interdisciplinary emphasis on modeling, simulation, design and control of hybrid-electric drives for a number of reasons, some of which are: (1) The OSU Center for Automotive Research (CAR) already provides an infrastructure for interdisciplinary automotive research and graduate education; the facilities available at OSU-CAR in the area of vehicle and powertrain research are among the best in the country. CAR facilities include 31,000 sq. feet of space, multiple chassis and engine dynamometers, an anechoic chamber, and a high bay area. (2) OSU has in excess of 10 graduate level courses related to automotive systems. A graduate level sequence has already been initiated with GM. In addition, an Automotive Systems Engineering (ASE) program cosponsored by the mechanical and electrical engineering programs, had been formulated earlier at OSU, independent of the GATE program proposal. The main objective of the ASE is to provide multidisciplinary graduate education and training in the field of automotive systems to Masters level students. This graduate program can be easily adapted to fulfill the spirit of the GATE Center of Excellence. (3) A program in Mechatronic Systems Engineering has been in place at OSU since 1994; this program has a strong emphasis on automotive system integration issues, and has emphasized hybrid-electric vehicles as one of its application areas. (4) OSU researchers affiliated with CAR have been directly involved in the development and study of: HEV modeling and simulation; electric drives; transmission design and control; combustion engines; and energy storage systems. These activities have been conducted in collaboration with government and automotive industry sponsors; further, the same researchers have been actively involved in continuing education programs in these areas with the automotive industry. The proposed effort will include: (1) The development of a laboratory facility that will include: electric drive and IC engine test benches; a test vehicle designed for rapid installation of prototype drives; benches for the measurement and study of HEV energy storage components (batteries, ultra-capacitors, flywheels); hardware-in-the-loop control system development tools. (2) The creation of new courses and upgrades of existing courses on subjects related to: HEV modeling and simulation; supervisory control of HEV drivetrains; engine, transmission, and electric drive modeling and control. Specifically, two new courses (one entitled HEV Component Analysis: and the other entitled HEV System Integration and Control) will be developed. Two new labs, that will be taught with the courses (one entitled HEV Components Lab and one entitled HEV Systems and Control lab) will also be developed. (3) The consolidation of already existing ties among faculty in electrical and mechanical engineering departments. (4) The participation of industrial partners through: joint laboratory development; internship programs; continuing education programs; research project funding. The proposed effort will succeed because of the already exceptional level of involvement in HEV research and in graduate education in automotive engineering at OSU, and because the PIs have a proven record of interdisciplinary collaboration as evidenced by joint proposals, joint papers, and co-advising of graduate students. OSU has been expanding its emphasis in Automotive Systems for quite some time. This has led to numerous successes such as the establishment of the Center of Automotive Research, a graduate level course sequence with GM, and numerous grants and contracts on automotive research. The GATE Center of Excellence is a natural extension of what educators at OSU already do well.

Giorgio Rizzoni

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

A Plug-In Electric Vehicle Simulator for Electric Vehicles Supply Equipment Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing a portable plug-in electric vehicle simulator to support laboratory testing and evaluation of electric vehicle supply equipment. The device implements the signaling required in the Society of Automotive Engineers J1772 Recommended Practice, SAE Electric Vehicle Conductive Charge Coupler, and provides connection of power quality monitoring and simulated load equipment. The complete unit is self contained and battery powered for ease of field use, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL? resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTI’s analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a “Best Case Scenario” for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this “Best Case Scenario” including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of Power Line Carrier Technologies for Automotive Smart Charging Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Hybrid J2836J2847J2931 Committee, EPRI has undertaken evaluation of a set of power line carrier (PLC) technologies. This report documents Phase I activity, where vendor hardware evaluation kits were operated and tested in the EPRI lab. This initial activity lays the groundwork for in-depth PLC testing to occur in the near future. The primary focus of this report is to provide an overview of the vendor evaluation hardware and software and to report r...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

Creep and creep-rupture behavior of a continuous strand, swirl mat reinforced polymer composite in automotive environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Creep and creep-rupture behavior of an isocyanurate based polyurethane matrix with a continuous strand, swirl mat E-glass reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications. The material under stress was exposed to various automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on its creep and creep-rupture properties. Proposed design guide lines and stress reduction factors were developed for various automotive environments. These composites are considered candidate structural materials for light weight and fuel efficient automobiles of the future.

Ren, W.; Brinkman, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Program Evaluation - Automotive Lightweighting Materials Program Research and Development Projects Assessment of Benefits - Case Studies No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This report is the second of a series of studies to evaluate research and development (R&D) projects funded by the Automotive Lightweighting Materials (ALM) Program of the Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies (OAAT) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objectives of the program evaluation are to assess short-run outputs and long-run outcomes that may be attributable to the ALM R&D projects. The ALM program focuses on the development and validation of advanced technologies that significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. Funded projects range from fundamental materials science research to applied research in production environments. Collaborators on these projects include national laboratories, universities, and private sector firms, such as leading automobile manufacturers and their suppliers. Three ALM R&D projects were chosen for this evaluation: Design and Product Optimization for Cast Light Metals, Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures, and Rapid Tooling for Functional Prototyping of Metal Mold Processes. These projects were chosen because they have already been completed. The first project resulted in development of a comprehensive cast light metal property database, an automotive application design guide, computerized predictive models, process monitoring sensors, and quality assurance methods. The second project, the durability of lightweight composite structures, produced durability-based design criteria documents, predictive models for creep deformation, and minimum test requirements and suggested test methods for establishing durability properties and characteristics of random glass-fiber composites for automotive structural composites. The durability project supported Focal Project II, a validation activity that demonstrates ALM program goals and reduces the lead time for bringing new technology into the marketplace. Focal projects concentrate on specific classes of materials and nonproprietary components and are done jointly by DOE and the Automotive Composites Consortium of U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR). The third project developed a rapid tooling process that reduces tooling time, originally some 48-52 weeks, to less than 12 weeks by means of rapid generation of die-casting die inserts and development of generic holding blocks, suitable for use with large casting applications. This project was conducted by the United States Automotive Materials Partnership, another USCAR consortium.

Das, S.

2003-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

The role of rare-earth dopants in nanophase zirconia catalysts for automotive emission control.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rare earth (RE) modification of automotive catalysts (e.g., ZrO{sub 2}) for exhaust gas treatment results in outstanding improvement of the structural stability, catalytic functions and resistance to sintering at high temperatures. Owing to the low redox potential of nonstoichiometric CeO{sub 2}, oxygen release and intake associated with the conversion between the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states of the Ce ions in Ce-doped ZrO{sub 2} provide the oxygen storage capacity that is essentially to effective catalytic functions under dynamic air-to-fuel ratio cycling. Doping tripositive RE ions such as La and Nd in ZrO{sub 2}, on the other hand, introduces oxygen vacancies that affect the electronic and ionic conductivity. These effects, in conjunction with the nanostructure and surface reactivity of the fine powders, present a challenging problem in the development of better ZrO{sub 2}-containing three-way catalysts. We have carried out in-situ small-to-wide angle neutron diffraction at high temperatures and under controlled atmospheres to study the structural phase transitions, sintering behavior, and Ce{sup 3+} {leftrightarrow} Ce{sup 4+} redox process. We found substantial effects due to RE doping on the nature of aggregation of nanoparticles, defect formation, crystal phase transformation, and metal-support interaction in ZrO{sub 2} catalysts for automotive emission control.

Loong, C.-K.; Ozawa, M.

1999-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

235

Electrical signature analysis applications for non-intrusive automotive alternator diagnostics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automotive alternators are designed to supply power for automobile engine ignition systems as well as charge the storage battery. This product is used in a large market where consumers are concerned with acoustic noise and vibration that comes from the unit. as well as overall quality and dependability. Alternators and generators in general are used in industries other than automotive, such as transportation and airline industries and in military applications. Their manufacturers are interested in pursuing state-of-the-art methods to achieve higher quality and reduced costs. Preliminary investigations of non-intrusive diagnostic techniques utilizing the inherent voltage signals of alternators have been performed with promising results. These techniques are based on time and frequency domain analyses of specially conditioned signals taken from several alternators under various test conditions. This paper discusses investigations that show correlations of the alternator output voltage to airborne noise production. In addition these signals provide insight into internal magnetic characteristics that relate to design and/or assembly problems.

Ayers, C.W.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development of a carburizing and quenching simulation tool: Numerical simulations of rings and gears  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a calculational procedure using the ABAQUS finite element code that simulates a carburizing and quench heat treat cycle for automotive gears. The procedure features a numerically efficient 2-phase constitutive model to represent transformational plasticity effects for the austenite/martensite transformation together with refined finite element meshes to capture the steep gradients in stress and composition near the gear surfaces. The procedure is illustrated on carburizing and quenching of a thick ring, and comparison of model predictions for distortion, phase distribution, and residual stress with experiment is discussed. Sensitivity of predictions to mesh refinement is studied.

Anderson, C.; Goldman, P.; Rangaswamy, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Managing the Proliferation of Digital Technology in the Automotive Industry A Systems Engineering Approach to Embedded Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Managing the Proliferation of Digital Technology in the Automotive Industry A Systems Engineering (1993) Submitted to the System Design and Management Program in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements. Signature of Author Dawn R. Paluszny System Design and Management Program Certified by Nancy G. Leveson

de Weck, Olivier L.

238

Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL-10/24 ANL-10/24 Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

239

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1NT41022; W(A)-03-022; CH-1146 1NT41022; W(A)-03-022; CH-1146 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Delphi Automotive Systems, L.L.C (Delphi) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subject cooperative agreement. The waiver will apply to inventions made by Delphi employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. Referring to item 2 of Delphi's petition, the purpose of this agreement is the development of interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell systems. Delphi will investigate materials for the metal

240

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS (DELPHII) FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DELPHII) FOR AN DELPHII) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC04-02AL67633, DOE WAIVER NO. W(A) 01-040. The Petitioner, Delphi, a subcontractor to Electricore, Inc (Electricore), has requested a waiver of all domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions that it may conceive or first reduce to practice in the course of work under Cooperative Agreement Number DE- FC04-02L67633 entitled "Lower Cost Wide Range Oxygen Sensor" with the U S. Department of Energy (DOE). The work to be done will be the development of a robust oxygen sensor for use in direct injection light duty diesel engines. The program goal is to create a low cost, wide range oxygen sensor compatible with high volume automotive use. Such sensors would be a

242

Evaluation of the Benefits Attributable to Automotive Lightweight Materials Program Research and Development Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-237 -237 Evaluation of the Benefits Attributable to Automotive Lightweight Materials Program Research and Development Projects November 2001 Prepared by Sujit Das Oak Ridge National Laboratory Jean H. Peretz The University of Tennessee Bruce Tonn Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

243

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2NT41246; W(A) 03-021 ; CH-1147 2NT41246; W(A) 03-021 ; CH-1147 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Delphi Automotive Systems, L.L.C (Delphi) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above subject cooperative agreement. The waiver will apply to inventions made by Delphi employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended, and National Laboratories. Referring to item 2 of Delphi's petition, the purpose of this agreement is to develop 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power systems for a range of fuels and applications. These

244

Separation and recovery process R&D to enhance automotive materials recycling  

SciTech Connect

Since 1976, the sales-weighted curb-weight of cars and light trucks sold in the United States has decreased by almost 800 pounds. Vehicle weight reduction has, of course, provided for a significant increase in US fleet fuel economy, from 17 to 27 miles per gallon. However, achievement of the weight reduction and concomitant increase in fuel economy was brought about, in part, by the substitution of lighter-weight materials, such as thinner-gauge coated sheet-steels replacing heavy-gauge noncoated sheet-steels and new aluminum alloys replacing steel as well as the increased use of plastics replacing metals. Each of these new materials has created the need for new technology for materials recycling. This paper highlights some of the R&D being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to develop technology that will enhance and minimize the cost of automotive materials recycling.

Daniels, E.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Integration Of The Security Sub-Modules Elements In The Automotive Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is addressed to obtain a design methodology for integrated security sub-modules (constituting the suspension and steering modules) in the car manufacturing industry. The sub-modules are made up of a steel structure and anchorage elements (rubber-metal or plastic-metal), which undergo separate surface treatments to prevent corrosion. Afterwards, the elements are traditionally joined by means of adhesives and screws. This process involves a great number of stages, low quality union methods and generation of corrosion areas that shorten its useful life.This methodology provides automotive suppliers an additional added value and cost reduction, allowing them to increase its competitiveness in a sector that faces the transition from the traditional supply chain to a strategic value chain.

Gallego, C.; Fernandez, M.; Caires, A. S. [CIDAUT, Research and Development in Transport and Energy (Spain); Canibano, E. [CIDAUT, Research and Development in Transport and Energy (Spain); Escuela Universitaria Politecnica de Valladolid, Dpto. de Construcciones Arquitectonicas, Ingenieria del Terreno y Mecanica de los Medios Continuos y Teoria de Estructuras (Spain)

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Overview of DOE'S programs on aluminum and magnesium for automotive application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy will present an update and review of its programs in aluminum and magnesium for automotive and heavy-duty vehicle applications. While the main programs focused on vehicle materials are in the Office of Transportation Technologies, contributing efforts will be described in the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and the DOE Office of Energy Research. The presentation will discuss materials for body/chassis and power train, and will highlight the considerable synergy among the efforts. The bulk of the effort is on castings, sheet, and alloys with a smaller focus on metal matrix composites. Cost reduction and energy savings are the overriding themes of the programs.

Carpenter, J.; Diamond, S.; Dillich, S.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Milliken, J.; Sklad, P.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Use of infra-red thermography for automotive climate control analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, several automotive climate control applications for IR thermography are described. Some of these applications can be performed using conventional IR techniques. Others, such as visualizing the air temperature distribution within the cabin, at duct exits, and at heater and evaporator faces, require new experimental methods. In order to capture the temperature distribution within an airstream, a 0.25-mm-thick (0.01 inch) fiberglass screen is used. This screen can be positioned perpendicular or parallel to the flow to obtain three-dimensional spatial measurements. In many cases, the air flow pattern can be inferred from the resulting temperature distribution, allowing improved air distribution designs. In all cases, significant improvement in the speed, ease, and quantity of temperature distribution information can be realized with thermography as compared to conventional thermocouple array techniques. Comparisons are presented between IR thermography images and both thermocouple measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions.

Burch, S.D.; Hassani, V.; Penney, T.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first 3 months effort of the Ford/DOE Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program, specifically Task I which is Fuel Economy Assessment. At the beginning of this contract effort the projected fuel economy of the 4-215 Stirling engine was 21.16 MPG with a confidence level of 29 percent. Since that date, the fuel economy improvement projection of the 4-215 Stirling engine has been increased to 22.11 MPG, with a confidence level of 29 percent. Collection of fuel economy improvement data is directly related to engine durability. Engine durability has been limited. Since September 19, 1977 a total of 47.7 hours of engine running time has been accumulated using two engine builds. Progress is reported in sub-task studies of burners, preheaters, engine drive, blower system, power control, air-fuel ratio control, cooling system, and cycle control. (LCL)

Kitzner, E.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Engineering-economic analyses of automotive fuel economy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 25 years more than 20 major studies have examined the technological potential to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks in the US. The majority has used technology/cost analysis, a combination of analytical methods from the disciplines of economics and automotive engineering. In this paper the authors describe the key elements of this methodology, discuss critical issues responsible for the often widely divergent estimates produced by different studies, review the history of its use, and present results from six recent assessments. Whereas early studies tended to confine their scope to the potential of proven technology over a 10-year time period, more recent studies have focused on advanced technologies, raising questions about how best to include the likelihood of technological change. The paper concludes with recommendations for further research.

Greene, D.L.; DeCicco, J.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Numerical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of Friction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Strength Aluminum Brazing Sheets for Condenser Fins of Automotive Heat Exchangers · High Temperature Creep Characterization of A380 Cast ...

251

Design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle. Phase IV. Quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the design and development of a continuously variable ratio transmission for an automotive vehicle is reported. The Major automotive hydromechanical transmission development problem continues to be the reduction of hydrostatic noise and the project plan, therefore, concentrated on the new hydrostatic module. The potential for achieving acceptably low noise levels in the second generation hydromechanical transmission is to be assessed by comparing the noise levels of the hydrostatic modules for the first and second generation transmissions. A set of twelve test points was selected comprising of road load steady state and wide-open-throttle acceleration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 mph. The module operating conditions for the two transmissions at each of these twelve points were calculated. Baseline noise data was measured on the first generation module. The results are given testing of co-axial hydrostatic module for second generation hydromechanical transmission will be emphasized. (LCL)

None

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Integrating agent-based simulation and system dynamics to support product strategy decisions in the automotive industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Especially in the European Union both, regulatory requirements regarding the CO2 emissions of new vehicles and the shortage of crude oil force car manufacturers to introduce alternative fuel and powertrain concepts. Due to high investments and long development ...

Karsten Kieckhäfer; Grit Walther; Joachim Axmann; Thomas Spengler

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new fiber optic sensing technology for measuring in-cylinder pressure in automotive engines was investigated. The optic sensing element consists of two mirrors in an in-line single mode fiber that are separated by some distance. To withstand the harsh conditions inside an engine, the Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FFPI) element was coated with gold and copper. The metal-protected fiber sensor was embedded into a small cut in the metal casing of the spark plug. At first, the sensing element was dipped in liquid gold and cured. Then the gold-coated fiber sensor was electroplated with copper. Finally, the metal-coated fiber sensor was embedded in the spark plug. The spark-plug-embedded FFPI sensor was monitored using a signal conditioning unit. Field tests were carried out in a 3-cylinder automotive engine with a piezoelectric pressure sensor as a reference transducer up to about 3500 rpm. The fiber optic sensor data generally matched those measured by the piezoelectric reference sensor. The use of a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) diode as a light source in an FFPI optic sensor system was investigated. Reflected light from the FFPI sensing element was used to measure the optical path difference. With a 1550nm VCSEL as the light source in a 12mm cavity length Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer, spectral characteristics were examined to determine the proper combination of dc bias current, modulation current amplitude and modulation frequency. Single VCSEL operation and regular fringe patterns were achieved. The laser tuning was -41.2 GHz/mA and was determined from measurements of the shift in the spectral peak of the VCSEL diode output as a function of dc bias current. By testing the fringe movement as the FFPI sensor was heated, the temperature tuning coefficient for the optical length was determined to be 11 x 10-6 Ă?ÂşC. The results of these experiments indicate that the use of VCSEL diode as a light source for the FFPI sensor offers a viable alternative to the use of Distributed Feedback (DFB) laser diodes for monitoring at a lower bias current and modulating current amplitude.

Bae, Taehan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

All auto shredding: evaluation of automotive shredder residue generated by shredding only vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

A well developed infrastructure exists for the reuse and recycling of automotive parts and materials. At the end of a vehicle's useful life many parts are removed and sold for reuse and fluids are recovered for recycling or proper disposal. What remains is shredded, along with other metal bearing scrap such as home appliances, demolition debris and process equipment, and the metals are separated out and recycled. The remainder of the vehicle materials is call shredder residue which ends up in the landfill. As energy and natural resources becomes more treasured, increased effort has been afforded to find ways to reduce energy consumption and minimize the use of our limited resources. Many of the materials found in shredder residue could be recovered and help offset the use of energy and material consumption. For example, the energy content of the plastics and rubbers currently landfilled with the shredder residue is equivalent to 16 million barrels of oil per year. However, in the United States, the recovered materials, primarily polymers, cannot be recycled due to current regulatory barriers which preclude the re-introduction into commerce of certain materials because of residual contamination with substances of concern (SOCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The source of the PCBs is not well understood. Old transformers, capacitors, white goods and ballasts from lighting fixtures are likely contributing factors. The project was designed to evaluate whether vehicles of varying age and manufacturing origin contribute to the PCB content in shredder residue. Additionally, the project was designed to determine if there are any trends in material composition of the shredder residue from varied age and manufacturing groups. This information would aid in future material recovery facility strategy and design. The test utilized a newly installed shredder plant to shred four categories of automobiles. The categories were defined by vehicle age and the manufacturing company and location. Each category of vehicles was processed individually through the shredder plant and the resulting shredder residue was analyzed for its materials composition and presence of PCBs and leachable metals. The results show that shredder residue from all vehicle categories tested are not significant contributors of PCBs and leachable metals. It was evident that leachable cadmium levels have decreased in newer vehicles. The composition of the shredder residue from each of the four categories is similar to the others. In addition, these compositions are approximately equal to the composition of typical shredder residues, not limited to automotive materials.

Duranceau, C. M.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems); (Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC); (American Chemistry Counsel, Plastics Division)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Automotive storage of hydrogen as a mixture of methanol and water. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The concept of steam-reforming methanol on-board an automobile was evaluated as a candidate method of storing fuel for the hydrogen engine. This method uses low-temperature, engine waste heat to evaporate a 1:1 molar water-methanol mixture at 373/sup 0/K (212/sup 0/F) and to provide endothermic reaction heat at 505/sup 0/K (450/sup 0/F) to convert this mixture to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. By using engine waste heat, a fuel combustion enrichment of 8% (LHV) or 18% (HHV) is obtained when the reactor effluents are compared with those from the tanked fuel. Defining system efficiency as the product of the generator chemical efficiency (108%) and the engine thermal efficiency (assumed to be 30%) yields a value of 32.4%. Conservative estimates indicate that an additional volume of 44 to 49 liters and an additional weight of 110 to 140 kg would be required, compared with a conventional 20 gal gasoline tank. A 500 hour endurance test of this system with a Girdler G-66B catalyst was conducted at 505/sup 0/K (450/sup 0/F), atmospheric pressure, and low space velocity--compared with automotive requirements--at wide-open-throttle conditions with laboratory-grade methanol; there was no loss of activity. However, when fuel-grade methanol containing small amounts of higher alcohols was substituted for the laboratory-grade methanol, significant catalyst deactivation occurred. (auth)

Kester, F.L.; Konopka, A.J.; Camara, E.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report determines cost and performance requirements for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles carrying pure H{sub 2} fuel, to achieve parity with internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. A conceptual design of a near term FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) is presented. Complete power system weight and cost breakdowns are presented for baseline design. Near term FCEV power system weight is 6% higher than ICE system, mid-term FCEV projected weights are 29% lower than ICE`s. There are no inherently high-cost components in FCE, and at automotive production volumes, near term FCEV cost viability is closer at hand than at first thought. PEM current vs voltage performance is presented for leading PEM manufacturers and researchers. 5 current and proposed onboard hydrogen storage techniques are critically compared: pressurized gas, cryogenic liquid, combined pressurized/cryogenic, rechargeable hydride, adsorption. Battery, capacitor, and motor/controller performance is summarized. Fuel cell power system component weight and cost densities (threshold and goal) are tabulated.

James, B.D.; Baum, G.N.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX, LLC)

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Static properties and multiaxial strength criterion for design of composite automotive structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the US Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on one representative reference material -- an isocyanurate (polyurethane) reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass. The present paper describes tensile, compressive, flexure, and shear testing and results for the reference composite. Behavioral trends and proportional limit are established for both tension and compression. Damage development due to tensile loading, strain rate effects, and effects of temperature are discussed. Furthermore, effects on static properties of various fluids, including water at room and elevated temperatures, salt water, antifreeze, windshield washer fluid, used motor oil, battery acid, gasoline, and brake fluid, were investigated. Effects of prior loading were evaluated as well. Finally, the effect of multiaxial loading on strength was determined, and the maximum shear strength criterion was identified for design.

Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.; Battiste, R.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

DOE PLANT-WIDE ENERGY ASSESSMENT RESULTS RELATED TO THE U. S. AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

Forty-nine plant-wide energy efficiency assessments have been undertaken under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Industrial Technologies Program. Plant-wide assessments are comprehensive, systematic investigations of plant energy efficiency, including plant utility systems and process operations. Assessments in industrial facilities have highlighted opportunities for implementing best practices in industrial energy management, including the adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies and process and equipment improvements. Total annual savings opportunities of $201 million have been identified from the 40 completed assessments. Many of the participating industrial plants have implemented efficiency-improvement projects and already have realized total cost savings of more than $81 million annually. This paper provides an overview of the assessment efforts undertaken and presents a summary of the major energy and cost savings identified to date. The paper also discusses specific results from assessments conducted at four plants in the automotive manufacturing operations and supporting industries. These particular assessments were conducted at facilities that produce engine castings, plastic films used for glass laminates, forged components, and at a body spray painting plant.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi, Len Bishop

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermally-induced microstructural changes in a three-way automotive catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of advanced electron microscopy techniques to characterize both the bulk and near-atomic level microstructural evolution of catalyst materials during different dynamometer/vehicle aging cycles is an integral part of understanding catalyst deactivation. The study described here was undertaken to evaluate thermally-induced microstructural changes which caused the progressive loss of catalyst performance in a three-way automotive catalyst. Several different catalyst processing variables, for example changing the washcoat ceria content, were also evaluated as a function of aging cycle and thermal history. A number of thermally-induced microstructural changes were identified using high resolution electron microscopy techniques that contributed to the deactivation of the catalyst, including sintering of all washcoat constituents, {gamma}-alumina transforming to {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {delta}-alumina, precious metal redistribution, and constituent encapsulation. The data accumulated in this study have been used to correlate microstructural evolution with thermal history and catalyst performance during various aging cycles and to subsequently evaluate different washcoat formulations for increased thermal stability.

More, K.L.; Kenik, E.A.; Coffey, D.W.; Geer, T.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Theis, J.; LaBarge, W.; Beckmeyer, R. [Delphi Automotive Systems, Flint, MI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Control of Two Permanent Magnet Machines Using a Five-Leg Inverter for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents digital control schemes for control of two permanent magnet (PM) machines in an integrated traction and air-conditioning compressor drive system for automotive applications. The integrated drive system employs a five-leg inverter to power a three-phase traction PM motor and a two-phase compressor PM motor by tying the common terminal of the two-phase motor to the neutral point of the three-phase motor. Compared to a three-phase or a standalone two-phase inverter, it eliminates one phase leg and shares the control electronics between the two drives, thus significantly reducing the component count of the compressor drive. To demonstrate that the speed and torque of the two PM motors can be controlled independently, a control strategy was implemented in a digital signal processor, which includes a rotor flux field orientation based control (RFOC) for the three-phase motor, a similar RFOC and a position sensorless control in the brushless dc (BLDC) mode for the two-phase motor. Control implementation issues unique to a two-phase PM motor are also discussed. Test results with the three-phase motor running in the ac synchronous (ACS) mode while the two-phase motor either in the ACS or the BLDC mode are included to verify the independent speed and torque control capability of the integrated drive.

Su, Gui-Jia [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Huang, Xianghui [GE Global Research

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Electrostatic coalescence of used automotive crankcase oil as an alternative to other separation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an initial investigation of using electrostatic coalescence as an alternative to conventional separation processes to purify used automotive crankcase oil. Specific emphasis of this study was the feasibility of this approach, verified by separating and analyzing a used oil emulsion. The metal removal efficiency was compared to that of a five day gravity settling. Separation experiments were performed in a 2.26 L coalescer with a flat parallel insulated electrode configuration. The used oil emulsion, composed of used oil, Isopar M, and water (no noticeable phase separation for 12 hours) followed the electrostatic coalescence characteristic of higher applied voltages or frequencies allowing higher feed rates. Metal removal efficiencies for iron, calcium and zinc were 3.57, 47.1, and 46.7 %, respectively, using Nalco 7715 at a peak a.c. voltage of 7 kV/cm and a frequency of 1000 Hz at the maximum rate of coalescence. For gravity settlement, metal removal efficiencies for iron, calcium and zinc were 11.2, 15.6, and 57.1 %, respectively. Considering the residence time of a moderate emulsion feed rate is a fraction of an hour, electrostatic coalescence offers an advantage over gravity settling. Oil phase water content varied between 0.05 and 7.2 wt %.

Dixon, John Leslie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Feasibility test on compounding the internal combustion engine for automotive vehicles, Task II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The organic Rankine bottoming cycle can be considered for various automobile and truck applications. The most attractive use, however, is in large, heavy-duty diesel trucks for long distance hauling. Here, the engine load and speed requirements are nearly constant over a large portion of the operating hours, and high mileages are accumulated. Thus, the potential fuel savings are sufficient to justify the added cost of a bottoming cycle system. A conceptual design study of compounding the diesel truck engine with an ORCS was made and the results of the study are presented. Based on the results of the conceptual design study which showed a 15 percent fuel economy improvement potential over the duty cycle, an early feasibility demonstration test of the system was initiated. The demonstration system uses a Mack ENDT 676 diesel engine with existing but nonoptimum ORCS hardware made available from an earlier automotive Rankine-cycle program. The results of these feasibility demonstration tests, both steady-state and transient, over the operating range of the diesel engine, are presented.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Automotive stirling engine development program. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1978--June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report covers the third quarter (April--June, 1978) effort of the Ford/DOE Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program, specifically Task I of that effort which is Fuel Economy Assessment. At the end of the previous quarter (March 31, 1978) the total fourth generation fuel economy projection was 23.7 mpg with a confidence level of 40%. At the end of this quarter (June 30, 1978) the total fourth generation fuel economy projection was 26.12 mpg with a confidence level of 44%. This represents an improvement of 66.4% over the baseline M-H fuel economy of 15.7 mpg. The confidence level for the original 20.6 mpg goal has been increased from 53 to 57%. Engine 3X17 has now accumulated a total of 213 h of variable speed running. A summary of the individual sub-tasks of Task I is presented. The sub-tasks are grouped into two categories: Category 1 consists of those sub-tasks which are directly related to fuel economy and Category 2 consists of those sub-tasks which are not directly related to fuel economy but are an integral part of the Task I effort.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%.

Hua, T.; Ahluwalia, R.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX LLC)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage are assessed and compared to the targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm. The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) or by central electrolysis. The main conclusions are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity, mid-term target for system volumetric capacity, and the target for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. However, the high-volume manufacturing cost and the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production scenario are, respectively, 2-4 and 1.6-2.4 times the current targets, and the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

Ahluwalia, R.; Hua, T.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Gardiner, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC; U.S. DOE

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of a carburizing and quenching simulation tool: numerical simulations of rings and gears  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to accurately calculate temperatures, stresses and metallurgical transformations in a single calculation or in a sequence of calculations is the key to prediction of distortion, residual stress and phase distribution in quench hardened automotive parts. Successful predictions in turn rely on the adequacy of the input data to the calculational procedure. These data include mechanical and thermal properties of the alloy phases over the range of temperature and strain rates experienced during the heat treat process, the mathematical description of the transformation kinetics, and the accuracy of the heat transfer boundary conditions. In this presentation we describe a calculational procedure using the ABAQUS{sup (1)} finite element code that simulates a carburizing and quench heat treat cycle for automotive gears. The calculational procedure features a numerically efficient 2-phase constitutive model, developed as part of the NCMS-Heat Treatment Distortion Prediction program, to represent transformational plasticity effects for the austenite/martensite Deformation together with refined finite element meshes to capture the steep gradients in stress and composition near the gear surfaces. The calculational procedure is illustrated on carburizing and quenching of a thick ring and comparison of model predictions for distortion, phase distribution, and residual stress with experimental measurements are discussed. Included in this model study is an investigation of the sensitivity of the predictions to mesh refinement.

Anderson, C.; Godlman, P.; Rangaswamy, P. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The California greenhouse gas initiative and its implications to the automotive industry  

SciTech Connect

CAR undertook this investigation to better understand the costs and challenges of a local (state) regulation necessitating the implementation of alternative or advanced powertrain technology. CAR will attempt to add insight into the challenges that local regulations present to the automotive industry, and to contribute further to the discussion of how advanced powertrain technology may be used to meet such regulation. Any local law that (directly or indirectly) affects light duty motor vehicle fuel economy creates what in effect is a specialty market for powertrain technology. As such these small markets present significant challenges for automotive manufacturers. First, a small market with unique standards presents significant challenges to an industry that has sustained growth by relying on large volumes to achieve scale economies and deliver products at a cost acceptable to the consumer. Further, the challenges of the additional technology make it likely that any powertrain capable of meeting the stringent emissions standards will include costly additional components, and thus will be more costly to manufacture. It is likely that manufacturers would consider the following actions as steps to deliver products to meet the pending California regulatory requirements anticipated as a result of prior California legislation: (1) Substituting more fuel efficient vehicles: Bring in more efficient vehicles from global operations, while likely dropping existing domestic products. (2) Substituting powertrains: Add existing downsized engines (i.e. turbocharged versions, etc.) into California market-bound vehicles. (3) Powertrain enhancements: Add technology to current engine and transmission offerings to improve efficiency and reduce emissions. (4) Incorporating alternative powertrains into existing vehicle platforms: Develop a hybrid or other type of powertrain for an existing vehicle. (5) New powertrains and new platforms: Develop vehicles specifically intended to incorporate new powertrain technologies, materials and/or design (e.g. the General Motors EV1 or the Toyota Prius). These five actions represent the gamut from the least complicated solution to the most complex. They also generally represent the least expensive response to the most expensive. It is possible that the least expensive responses may be least likely to meet market demands while achieving required GHG emission limits. At the same time, the most expensive option may produce a vehicle that satisfies the GHG reduction requirements and meets some consumer requirements, but is far too costly to manufacture and sell profitably. The response of a manufacturer would certainly have to take market size, consumer acceptance, technology implication and cost, as well as internal capacities and constraints, into consideration. It is important to understand that individual companies may respond differently in the short term. However, it is probable that there would be a more consistent industry-wide response in the longer term. Options 1 and 2 present the simplest responses. A company may reach into its global portfolio to deliver vehicles that are more fuel-efficient. These vehicles are usually much smaller and significantly less powerful than current U.S. offerings. Industry respondents indicated that such a strategy may be possible but would likely be met with less than positive reaction from the buying public. A general estimate for the cost to homologize a vehicle--that is, to prepare an existing vehicle for entry into the United States provided all business conditions were met (reasonable product, capacity availability, etc.), would be approximately $50 million. Assuming an estimated cost for homologation to meet U.S. standards of $50 million and a 20,000 vehicle per year sales volume in California, the company would then incur a $2,500 per-vehicle cost to bring them into the market. A manufacturer may also choose to incorporate a more efficient powertrain into a vehicle already sold in the market. The costs associated with such a strategy would include reengineering

Smith, B. C.; Miller, R. T.; Center for Automotive Research

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Automotive storage of hydrogen using modified magnesium hydrides. Final report, March 1976-March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal hydrides can store more hydrogen per unit volume than normal high pressure or cryogenic techniques. Little energy is required to store the hydrogen in the hydride, and high stability at room temperature ensures low losses over long storage periods. Safety features of metal hydride storage are favorable. Because of its low weight and high hydrogen storage densities, modified magnesium hydride offers the greatest potential for automotive storage of hydrogen. Experimental and analytical work in this program has been directed toward the optimization of this storage system. Due to the relative stability of MgH/sub 2/, modifications of the MgMH/sub x/ (M = metal ion) have been made to decrease the dissociation temperature while retaining high hydrogen capacity. This parameter is crucial since vehicle exhaust will supply the thermal energy to dissociate the hydride in an automobile. System studies indicate that hydride dissociation temperature (T/sub D/) should be 200/sup 0/C to ensure uninterrupted fuel flow at all driving and idle conditions. From experimental data developed in this four task study, we conclude that alloys comprised of Mg, Cu and Ni have come closest to meeting the dissociation temperature goal. Small additions of rare-earth elements to the basic alloy also contribute to a reduction of T/sub D/. The best alloy developed in this program exhibits a T/sub D/ = 223/sup 0/C and a hydrogen capacity near four weight percent compared to a theoretical 7.65 percent for MgH/sub 2/. That alloy has been characterized for dissociation temperature, hydrogen capacity, kinetics, and P-C-T relationships. Dissociation temperature, hydrogen capacity and material cost are reported for each alloy tested in this program.

Rohy, D. A.; Nachman, J. F.; Hammer, A. N.; Duffy, T. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Materials review for improved automotive gas-turbine engine. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced materials are the key to achieving the performance and fuel economy goals of improved automotive gas turbine engines. The potential role of superalloys, refractory alloys, and ceramics in the hottest sections of future engines that may be required to operate with turbine inlet temperatures as high as 1370/sup 0/C (2500/sup 0/F) is examined. These high temperature materials are reviewed. The characteristics of the best modern conventional superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, and tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys are reviewed; and the most promising alloys in each system are compared on the basis of maximum turbine blade temperature capability. The requirements for improved high temperature protective coatings and special fabrication techniques for these advanced alloys are discussed. Chromium, columbium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed. On the basis of properties, cost, availability, and strategic importance, molybdenum alloys are found to be the most suitable refractory material for turbine wheels for mass produced engines. Ceramic material candidates are reviewed and ranked according to their probability of success in particular applications. Various forms of, and fabrication processes for both silicon nitride and silicon carbide, along with SiAlON's are investigated for use in high-stress and medium-stress high temperature environments. Low-stress glass-ceramic regenerator materials are also investigated. Treatment is given to processing requirements, such as coatings for oxidation/corrosion protection, joining methods, and machining technology. Economics of ceramic raw materials, and of various processing methods are discussed. Conclusions are drawn, and recommendations for areas of further research are proposed for consideration and/or adoption.

Belleau, C.; Ehlers, W.L.; Hagen, F.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modeling & Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling & Simulation Modeling & Simulation Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this...

276

Use of microPCM fluids as enhanced liquid coolants in automotive EV and HEV vehicles. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-concept experiments using a specific microPCM fluid that potentially can have an impact on the thermal management of automotive EV and HEV systems have been conducted. Samples of nominally 20-micron diameter microencapsulated octacosane and glycol/water coolant were prepared for testing. The melting/freezing characteristics of the fluid, as well as the viscosity, were determined. A bench scale pumped-loop thermal system was used to determine heat transfer coefficients and wall temperatures in the source heat exchanged. Comparisons were made which illustrate the enhancements of thermal performance, reductions of pumping power, and increases of heat transfer which occur with the microPCM fluid.

Mulligan, James C.; Gould, Richard D.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Deep Food Autonomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and transportation, and hidden social costs. However, fortransportation and chemistry that add their own variables, demands and side-effects (social costs)

Gould, Kerin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Theoretical analysis of the steam pressure exchange ejector for an automotive air conditioning application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The project conducted at The George Washington University is a computer simulation and theoretical analysis of the steam pressure exchange ejector air conditioning system… (more)

Gould, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

Brown, L.F.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Corum, James [ORNL; Klett, Lynn B [ORNL; Davenport, Mike [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL; Simpson, Jr., William A [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Simulation and optimization of a slurry-based fiberglass preform manufacturing process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program directed by the U.S. Department of Commerce, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting various research and development projects identified by representatives of the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) as high priority areas deserving special attention. A water-based slurry process for producing chopped fiberglass preforms that can be used in manufacturing structural automotive composites is being developed by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and members of the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), as part of the U.S. Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (USAMP). The main objective of the project is to achieve a uniform (by mass) distribution of fibers in the preform. To this end, computer modeling and experimental efforts are currently underway at the INEL. The present article reports strategy, progress and current results for the modeling effort. The modeling effort includes computational fluid dynamic simulations of the current process to help visualize process dynamics and computer-based design optimization that automatically adjusts process parameters to find the best design to meet the objective.

Johnson, R.W.; Landon, M.D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Electrothermal Battery Pack Modeling and Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Much attention as been given to the study of Li-Ion batteries for their use in automotive applications such as Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV), Plug In… (more)

Yurkovich, Benjamin J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Full length article: Comparative analysis of single-channel direction finding algorithms for automotive applications at 2400 MHz in a complex reflecting environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an amplitude-based single-channel direction finding system for automotive applications and compares its performance against two different phase-based single-channel direction finding algorithms in a complex reflecting environment ... Keywords: Angle of arrival, Antenna array, Direction finding, Pseudo-Doppler, Signal propagation

Daniel N. Aloi; Mohammad S. Sharawi

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Network Simulation  

SciTech Connect

A detailed introduction to the design, implementation and use of network simulation tools is presented. The requirements and issues faced in the design of simulators for wired and wireless networks are discussed. Abstractions such as packet- and fluid-level network models are covered. Several existing simulations are given as examples, with details and rationales regarding design decisions presented. Issues regarding performance and scalability are discussed in detail, describing how one can utilize distributed simulation methods to increase the scale and performance of a simulation environment. Finally, a case study of two simulation tools is presented that have been developed using distributed simulation techniques. This text is essential to any student, researcher or network architect desiring a detailed understanding of how network simulation tools are designed, implemented, and used.

Fujimoto, Richard [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Riley, George F. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

Gregory Meisner

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Simulation Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building simulation tool screen capture Building simulation tool screen capture Simulation Tools Researchers develop whole-building energy simulation software programs that allow architects and building engineers to design or retrofit buildings for maximum energy efficiency and occupant comfort. Programs developed by researchers include: the EnergyPlus whole building simulation program, the Modelica Buildings library for rapid prototyping and controls design, the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed for co-simulation and for model-based operation, and the GenOpt generic optimization program. Contacts Philip Haves PHaves@lbl.gov (510) 486-6512 Michael Wetter MWetter@lbl.gov (510) 486-6990 Links Simulation Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings

287

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski & Kevin N. Baum One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared under: Subcontract No. AGB-0-40628-01 to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to the U.S. Department of Energy Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gasses and pollutants than

288

Retrofitting an automotive air conditioner with HFC-134a, additive, and mineral oil. Final report, October 1992-May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper gives results of an evaluation of a lubricant additive developed for use in retrofitting motor vehicle air conditioners. The additive was designed to enable HFC-134a to be used as a retrofit refrigerant with the existing mineral oil in CFC-12 systems. The goal of the project was to provide preliminary feasibility testing of the additive. The cooling effect of the test system retrofitted with HFC-134a and the oil additive was nearly the same as that of the original system with CFC 12 refrigerant. If lubricant additives prove to be successful, miscible lubricants may not be needed for retrofitting some automotive systems. The retrofitting procedure might be simplified and the cost to consumers might be reduced. It has not been determined if retrofitting systems with HFC-134a and oil additives is feasible for a wider range of operating conditions and types of equipment, including the applicability of orifice tube/suction accumulator systems.

Jetter, J.J.; Delafield, F.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Alternative powertrains for automotive applications aim at improving emissions and fuel economy. Lack of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies. In our efforts to build a design envi- ronment for hybrid electric vehicles, we have developed algorithms. Vehicle handling simulations and advanced light-weight body structure designs are also available, rigor, since it is based on mathematical methods of decision making. A simple application to a hybrid

Papalambros, Panos

290

Avestar® - Simulators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

291

Simulation tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last two decades, simulation tools made a significant contribution to the great progress in development of power electronics. Time to market was shortened and development costs were reduced drastically. Falling costs, as well as improved speed and precision, opened new fields of application. Today, continuous and switched circuits can be mixed. A comfortable number of powerful simulation tools is available. The users have to choose the best suitable for their application. Here a simple rule applies: The best available simulation tool is the tool the user is already used to (provided, it can solve the task). Abilities, speed, user friendliness and other features are continuously being improved—even though they are already powerful and comfortable. This paper aims at giving the reader an insight into the simulation of power electronics. Starting with a short description of the fundamentals of a simulation tool as well as properties of tools, several tools are presented. Starting with simplified models ...

Jenni, F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 4: Low Temperature Fuel Cell System BOP & FUEL Processors For Stationary and Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BREAKOUT GROUP 4: LOW TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL SYSTEM BOP & FUEL PROCESSORS FOR STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE BREAKOUT GROUP 4: LOW TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL SYSTEM BOP & FUEL PROCESSORS FOR STATIONARY AND AUTOMOTIVE PARTICIPANTS O NAME RGANIZATION Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Chris Ainscough NUVERA Rod Borup Los Alamos National Laboratory Vince Contini Battelle Rick Cutright PlugPower LLC David Frank Hydrogenics Jamie Holladay Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Terry Johnson Sandia National Laboratory Sridhas Kanuri UTC Power Ted Krause Argonne National Laboratory Michael McCarthy Protonex Technology Corporation Pinakin Patel FuelCell Energy Inc. Dennis Rapodios Argonne National Laboratory Eric Simpkins IdaTech LLC Anna Stefanopoulou University of Michigan Ken Stroh Los Alamos National Laboratory Olivier Verdu HELION Doug Wheeler National Renewable Energy Laboratory

293

Process demonstration and cost analysis of a mass production forging technique for automotive turbine wheels: Phase II. Final report, January 1975--March 1977  

SciTech Connect

Low cost fabrication of integrally-bladed automotive turbine wheels utilizing the GATORIZING forging process was demonstrated. The capability of the forging process was characterized as to blade shape, and the effect of the blade shape on Chrysler baseline engine turbine efficiency was analytically defined. Actual baseline engine turbine wheels were fabricated from IN100 and AF2-1DA for evaluation. A mass production cost estimate was generated for manufacturing large production quantities.

Allen, M.M.; Larson, K.J.; Walker, B.H.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells (FCs) are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several countries, including the United States, Japan, Germany, and South Korea have established publicly funded R&D and market transformation programs to develop viable domestic FC industries for both automotive and non-automotive applications. Important non-automotive applications include large scale and small scale distributed combined heat and electrical power, backup and uninterruptible power, material handling and auxiliary power units. The U.S. FC industry is in the early stages of development, and is working to establish sustainable markets in all these areas. To be successful, manufacturers must reduce costs, improve performance, and overcome market barriers to new technologies. U.S. policies are assisting via research and development, tax credits and government-only and government-assisted procurements. Over the past three years, the industry has made remarkable progress, bringing both stack and system costs down by more than a factor of two while improving durability and efficiency, thanks in part to government support. Today, FCs are still not yet able to compete in these markets without continued policy support. However, continuation or enhancement of current policies, such as the investment tax credit and government procurements, together with continued progress by the industry, appears likely to establish a viable domestic industry within the next decade.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, K. G. [ICF International; Upreti, Girish [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Simulation: Thermodynamic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(by selectively reflecting), so system energy stays constant. -- Heat is generated by viscous action corresponds to vortex generation in similar fluid mechanical situations. But the high flow speed#12; ' & $ % Coupling Continuum to Molecular Dynamics Simulation: Reflecting Particle Method

Li, Ju

296

Model based design of an automotive-scale, metal hydride hydrogen storage system.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia and General Motors have successfully designed, fabricated, and experimentally operated a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. Over the 6 year project, the team tackled the primary barriers associated with storage and delivery of hydrogen including mass, volume, efficiency and cost. The result was the hydrogen storage demonstration system design. The key technologies developed for this hydrogen storage system include optimal heat exchange designs, thermal properties enhancement, a unique catalytic hydrogen burner and energy efficient control schemes. The prototype system designed, built, and operated to demonstrate these technologies consists of four identical hydrogen storage modules with a total hydrogen capacity of 3 kg. Each module consists of twelve stainless steel tubes that contain the enhanced sodium alanate. The tubes are arranged in a staggered, 4 x 3 array and enclosed by a steel shell to form a shell and tube heat exchanger. Temperature control during hydrogen absorption and desorption is accomplished by circulating a heat transfer fluid through each module shell. For desorption, heat is provided by the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen within a high efficiency, compact heat exchanger. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to the circulating heat transfer fluid. The demonstration system module design and the system control strategies were enabled by experiment-based, computational simulations that included heat and mass transfer coupled with chemical kinetics. Module heat exchange systems were optimized using multi-dimensional models of coupled fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Chemical kinetics models were coupled with both heat and mass transfer calculations to design the sodium alanate vessels. Fluid flow distribution was a key aspect of the design for the hydrogen storage modules and computational simulations were used to balance heat transfer with fluid pressure requirements. An overview of the hydrogen storage system will be given, and examples of these models and simulation results will be described and related to component design. In addition, comparisons of demonstration system experimental results to model predictions will be reported.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.; Jorgensen, Scott W. (General Motors R& D); Dedrick, Daniel E.; Evans, Gregory Herbert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Simulation Approach Paradigm: An Optimization and Inventory Challenge Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents a simulation on automotive inventory and stock issue, followed by evaluated performance of automotif Sector Company, focused on getting optimum profit from supply and demand balancing. Starting by evaluating and verification of customer's document until car delivered to customer. Simulation method of performance is used to evaluate company activity. excess demand of car by customer, not eligible customer to rented a car, number of customer who served and number of customer who served including the driver, the last result is number of optimum demand that match with the stock or supply of car by the company. Finally, board of management should be making decision; the first decision is buy the new car for meet with the demand or second decision is recruit new staff for increasing customer service or customer care.

Susanto, Heru; Aksoy, Mehmet Sabih; Tuan, Yong Chee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Digestion Simulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Digestion Simulations Digestion Simulations Name: Lisa Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My 5th grade students are beginning an experiment next week and their hypothesis involves edibility(edibleness?). Is there a way to replicate the stomach in, say, a bottle?? Are there ways to test for edibleness(?) without actually ingesting the experiment yourself? Replies: I would not recommend the idea of a bottle stomach. The stomach digests only proteins anyway with HCl [pH 1.0] which is very, very strong acid that will burn seriously if in contact with skin. The intestine is just as much responsible for digestion of lipids [bile], carbohydrates and remaining proteins using enzymes, many of these you do not want to be handling, let alone purchase. As a high school teacher, I have lab exercises dealing with digestion, but I can not recommend any of these unless you are set up with a functional science laboratory and all the safety equipment necessary.

299

Low Emission AMTEC Automotive Power System. Final report for Department of Energy Contract DE-FG02-94ER81696  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program investigated the potential for Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) technology to be useful in automotive power system applications. AMTEC, a thermally regenerative electrochemical energy conversion system, converts heat into electricity from a heat source at 750 C to 850 C and a radiator at 200 C to 350 C. AMTEC uses external combustion with correspondingly low emission of NO{sub x} and hydrocarbons, and can tolerate essentially any hydrocarbon fuel. Efficiencies of 20% to 30% are projected to be feasible for systems of 25 kWe to 40 kWe peak output. The research program has shown that there are significant advantages to be achieved if AMTEC systems can be made cost effective for vehicle applications. Among these are (1) higher efficiency at part load than IC engines can yield, (2) omnifuel capability, and (3) low noise and low emission of pollutants. Demonstrated lifetimes already above 12,000 hours should be adequate for most vehicle applications. In major production, AMTEC costs are projected to reach $1/Watt, a value still too high for widespread automotive main power application. AMTEC's unique capabilities for low emissions, all-fuel operation, and insensitivity to ambient temperature, however, do make it a potential option for specialized vehicle applications needing these properties.

Hunt, Thomas K.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cooperative autonomy for contact investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous surface and underwater vehicles present a safe and low-cost solution for various contact investigation tasks, such as harbor surveillance for potentially threatening small craft or submarines. Since such a task ...

Schmidt, Henrik

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Recycling Automotive Scrap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Today's automobiles contain more plastic and less metal than ever. The metal from junked vehicles is easily recovered for Today's automobiles contain more plastic and less metal than ever. The metal from junked vehicles is easily recovered for reuse, but the remaining materials, called shredder residue, is creating new challenges for the vehicle recycling industry. Argonne National Laboratory is meeting these challenges head-on with innovative, award-winning solutions. With its on-site recycling pilot plant, Argonne is able to test actual materials, benchmark technologies, and demonstrate working

302

Automotive turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

Gas flow through a turbine is divided, with part of the flow directed to the compressor for the combusion chamber and part directed to the primary power turbine. Division of the gas flow is accomplished by a mixing wheel of novel design. Before passing to the primary power turbine the gas flow passes through a secondary power turbine that drives the compressor for the combustion chamber. Both the secondary power turbine and the compressor rotate independently of the main turbine rotor shaft. The power input to the secondary power turbine is varied in accordance with the pressure differential between the gas pressure at the outlet of the compressor for the combustion chamber and the outlet from the mixing wheel. If the speed of the main turbine shaft slows down more power is put into the secondary power turbine and the combustion chamber compressor is speeded up so as to produce a higher gas pressure than would otherwise be the case.

Wirth, R.E.; Wirth, M.N.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Automotive Alloys 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ice, provided that the base fee of $7.00 per copy is paid directly to Copyright Clearance. Center, 27 Congress Street, Salem, Massachu- setts 01970. For those ...

304

Numerical simulation of linear fiction welding (LFW) processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid state welding processes are becoming increasingly important due to a large number of advantages related to joining ''unweldable'' materials and in particular light weight alloys. Linear friction welding (LFW) has been used successfully to bond non-axisymmetric components of a range of materials including titanium alloys, steels, aluminum alloys, nickel, copper, and also dissimilar material combinations. The technique is useful in the research of quality of the joints and in reducing costs of components and parts of the aeronautic and automotive industries.LFW involves parts to be welded through the relative reciprocating motion of two components under an axial force. In such process the heat source is given by the frictional forces work decaying into heat determining a local softening of the material and proper bonding conditions due to both the temperature increase and the local pressure of the two edges to be welded. This paper is a comparative test between the numerical model in two dimensions, i.e. in plane strain conditions, and in three dimensions of a LFW process of AISI1045 steel specimens. It must be observed that the 3D model assures a faithful simulation of the actual threedimensional material flow, even if the two-dimensional simulation computational times are very short, a few hours instead of several ones as the 3D model. The obtained results were compared with experimental values found out in the scientific literature.

Fratini, L.; La Spisa, D. [University of Palermo-Dept. of Industrial engineering (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

305

Property:OpenEI/Tool/Keyword | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Keyword Keyword Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OpenEI/Tool/Keyword Property Type String Pages using the property "OpenEI/Tool/Keyword" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A ActiveGreenScore + Cleanweb Hackathon +, Boston +, Community Generated + Alternative Fueling Station Locator + Featured + Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool + Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools + B BEST v2 + Challenge Generated +, Green Button Apps + BEopt + EERE tool +, BEopt + BITES + Featured + BIY - Budget It Yourself + Challenge Generated +, Green Button Apps + Badema + Cleanweb Hackathon +, Boston +, Community Generated + Bioenergy KDF + Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools + Biofuels Techno-Economic Models + EERE tool +, Biofuels Techno-Economic Models +

306

Integrated, Feed-Forward Hybrid Electric Vehicle Simulation in SIMULINK and its Use for Power Management Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A hybdd electric vehicle simulation tool (HE-VESIM) has been developed at the Automotive Research Center of the University of Michigan to study the fuel economy potential of hybrid military/civilian trucks. In this paper, the fundamental architecture of the feed-forward parallel hybrid-electric vehicle system is described, together with dynamic equations and basic features of sub-system modules. Two vehicle-level power management control algorithms are assessed, a rule-based algorithm, which mainly explores engine efficiency in an intuitive manner, and a dynamic-programming optimization algorithm. Simulation results over the urban driving cycle demonstrate the potential of the selected hybrid system to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy, the improvement being greater when the dynamicprogramming power management algorithm is applied.

Chan-Chiao Lin; Zoran Fillipi; Yongsheng Wang; Loucas Louca; Huel Peng; Dennis Assanis; Jeffrey Stein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Second-Use Li-Ion Batteries to Aid Automotive and Utility Industries (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repurposing lithium-ion batteries at the end of useful life Repurposing lithium-ion batteries at the end of useful life in electric drive vehicles could eliminate owners' disposal concerns and offer low-cost energy storage for certain applications. Increasing the number of plug-in electric drive vehicles (PEVs) is one major strategy for reduc- ing the nation's oil imports and greenhouse gas emissions. However, the high up-front cost and end-of-service disposal concerns of their lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries could impede the proliferation of such vehicles. Re-using Li-ion batteries after their useful automotive life has been proposed as a way to remedy both matters. In response, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners are conducting research to identify, assess, and verify profitable

308

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

309

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/CeO{sub 2} Washcoats for three-way automotive emission catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pt-Rh based three-way catalysts are the primary catalytic system for control of hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} automotive emissions. Mixed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/CeO{sub 2} oxides are often dispersed on a cordierite honeycomb monolith as a washcoat and act as a high-surface-area carrier for the heavy metal catalyst clusters. Conversion efficiency and lifetime of a converter is determined by the microstructure of the washcoat/monolith and its evolution during high-temperature exposure to the exhaust gas. SEM, electron microprobe analysis, and analytical electron microscopy were used to study these catalysts before and after engine dynamometer tests, with max monolith temperatures of 1000 and 1150 C.

Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); LaBarge, W.; Beckmeyer, R. [General Motors, Flint, MI (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Simulation of Storm Occurrences Using Simulated Annealing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling storm occurrences has become a vital part of hurricane prediction. In this paper, a method for simulating event occurrences using a simulated annealing algorithm is described. The method is illustrated using annual counts of hurricanes ...

Ravindra S. Lokupitiya; Leon E. Borgman; Richard Anderson-Sprecher

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Case study: Visual analysis of complex, time-dependent simulation results of a diesel exhaust system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In previous work we have presented visualization techniques that provide engineers with a high degree of interactivity and flexibility for analyzing large, time-dependent, and high-dimensional data sets resulting from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. In this case study we apply our techniques in the fields of the automotive engineering industry and demonstrate how users benefit from using them during their routine analysis, as well as for exploring new phenomena. For coping with some of the special requirements in this application, we adapted and extended parts of the system. A comparison of two related cases of a diesel exhaust system is presented, and some important questions about these cases are addressed. 1.

Helmut Doleisch; Michael Mayer; Martin Gasser; Helwig Hauser

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Winter Simulation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 2009 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), recognized as the premiere international conference for simulation professionals in discrete and combined discrete-continuous simulation. WSC is always located in exciting and dynamic locations ...

Ann Dunkin; Ricki G. Ingalls

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fire, Smoke, and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Technologies Help Improve Homeland Security. AVI file (Smokeview simulation animation). Initial Model for Fires in ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

314

The ATLAS Simulation Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simulation software for the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is being used for large-scale production of events on the LHC Computing Grid. This simulation requires many components, from the generators that simulate particle collisions, through packages simulating the response of the various detectors and triggers. All of these components come together under the ATLAS simulation infrastructure. In this paper, that infrastructure is discussed, including that supporting the detector description, interfacing the event generation, and combining the GEANT4 simulation of the response of the individual detectors. Also described are the tools allowing the software validation, performance testing, and the validation of the simulated output against known physics processes.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Symbolic Modelling and Simulation of Wheeled Vehicle Systems on Three-Dimensional Roads.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, there has been a push by automotive manufacturers to improve the efficiency of the vehicle development process. This can be accomplished by… (more)

Bombardier, William

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Modeling and Simulation of A Hybrid Electric Vehicle Using MATLAB/Simulink and ADAMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the global economy strives towards clean energy in the face of climate change, the automotive industry is researching into improving the efficiency of automobiles.… (more)

Fan, Brian Su-Ming

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Increased understanding of hybrid vehicle design through modeling, simulation, and optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vehicle design is constantly changing and improving due to the technologically driven nature of the automotive industry, particularly in the hybridization and electrification of vehicle… (more)

Geller, Benjamin M. (Benjamin Michael)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Modeling & Simulation - GCTool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out of the fuel cell reformer she's been working on. Never mind 5% more from the next component on her list. Computer software, such as Argonne's GCTool, lets designers "try out" different system configurations, without the expense and delays of actually building numerous prototypes. Our engineer could learn that she's been worrying about the wrong thing. Argonne systems analysts have shown that in fuel cell systems for vehicles, more is not always better. For example, increasing the efficiency of the fuel processor (the component that converts hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen for the fuel cell) may actually lower the overall system efficiency. "They go in opposite directions. You can make the fuel processor more efficient, but that's because you're stealing energy from somewhere else in the system," says Argonne's Romesh Kumar, who leads Argonne's fuel cell modeling efforts.

319

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Design and development of an automotive organic Rankine-cycle powerplant with a reciprocating expander. Final report. Volume II. Detailed discussion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed for the design and development of an organic Rankine-cycle engine for automobile propulsion is reported. An automotive power plant using an organic Rankine-cycle system with a reciprocating expander has been designed, built, and tested on an engine dynamometer in a preprototype configuration. The system is designed to provide performance approximately equivalent to that of a 351-CID internal combustion engine in the reference car, a 1972 Ford Galaxie 500. A description of the preprototype system, major components, and results from component and system testing are presented. The fuel economy based on steady-state measurements is estimated to be 10.2 mpg over the federal driving cycle with a maximum of 16 mpg at 30 mph. Projections of steady-state emission measurements show compliance with the 1970 Clean Air Act standards for 1978 vehicle emissions. The levels for unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen were 41 percent, 6 percent, and 69 percent of the standards, respectively. At the conclusion of the preprototype phase of the program, a prototype design effort was initiated to upgrade and improve the performance of the preprototype system. The reference vehicle for this prototype design is a compact car in the weight class of a 1974 Ford Pinto. The results of this design study, including performance projections, are also presented.

Not Available

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hydrogen storage via metal hydrides for utility and automotive energy storage applications. [HCl electrolysis for H/sub 2/--Cl/sub 2/ fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently supported by ERDA to develop the technology and techniques for storing hydrogen via metal hydrides. Hydrogen is able to react with a wide variety of metal and metal alloy materials to form hydride compounds of hydrogen and metals. These compounds differ in stability--some are relatively unstable and can be readily formed and decomposed at low temperatures. The use of these systems for hydrogen storage involves the design of heat exchanger and mass transfer systems, i.e., removal of heat during the charging reaction and addition of heat during the discharge reaction. The most notable example of a metal hydride material is iron titanium which shows promise of being economical for a number of near term hydrogen storage applications. Recent work and progress on the development of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage connected with utility energy storage applications and natural gas supplementation are discussed and electric-to-electric storage system is described in some detail. A system of energy storage involving the electrolysis of hydrochloric acid is described which would utilize metal hydrides to store the hydrogen. In addition, the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in automotive systems is described.

Salzano, F J; Braun, C; Beaufrere, A; Srinivasan, S; Strickland, G; Reilly, J J; Waide, C

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radio Channel Simulator  

Radio Channel Simulator (RCSim) is a simulation package for making site-specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power atdiscrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. ...

323

Ad Hoc Distributed Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ad hoc distributed simulation is a collection of autonomous on-line simulations brought together to model an operational system. They offer the potential of increased accuracy, responsiveness, and robustness compared to centralized approaches. They ...

Richard Fujimoto; Michael Hunter; Jason Sirichoke; Mahesh Palekar; Hoe Kim; Wonho Suh

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Simulated Chromatographic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated Chromatographic Data. Description/Summary: ... Data are provided in individual files that are packaged together in grouped zip files. ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Atomistic Simulation and ICME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual NIST workshops on "Atomistic Simulations for Industrial Needs" .... First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials.

327

Weld arc simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

Burr, M.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Air Shower Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro [Centro de Tecnologias de Informacion y Comunicaciones, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima (Peru); Araya, Ignacio J. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Knapp, Johannes [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

An ontology for trajectory simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the concept exploration for a weapon system to training simulators, from hardware-in-the-loop simulators to mission planning tools, trajectory simulations are used throughout the life cycle of a weapon system. A trajectory simulation can be defined ...

Umut Durak; Halit Oguztuzun; S. Kemal Ider

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume IV. Energy/economic comparison of coal-based automotive energy supply systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Considerable debate has occurred in recent years about the relative merits of energy analysis versus traditional economic analysis. Some economists assert that energy analysis adds no new information to that in economic analysis; energy analysts claim that the explicit consideration of energy flows is necessary for a complete understanding of the implications of energy supply and use. In comparing the cost and energy consumption figures for the various automotive energy options, certain parallels are evident. Those system components that have the highest costs also require high levels of energy consumption. This is generally due to the severity of the processing conditions required to convert one energy form (e.g., coal) to another (e.g., methanol). These conditions require the use of capital-intensive equipment as well as the consumption of large amounts of energy. For some components that have relatively high costs but low energy requirements (e.g., fuel distribution), the costs are due to the many handling and transfer requirements. Overall, the capital- and energy-intensive energy conversion processes dominate the systems we have examined. Therefore, a comparison of cost with energy consumption for all the fuels considered shows a definite trend - increasing costs imply increasing energy consumption. Thus, decision makers concerned with promoting energy conservative supply options need not worry that their choices will be unduly costly. Rather, they will tend to be the least costly for the types of systems considered here. We caution against extrapolating these results to other systems, however, because systems that do not have the same kinds of capital- and energy-intensive components as those considered here may exhibit different trends.

Steele, R.V.; Sharma, K.J.; Dickson, E.M.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Power Market Simulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's first seminar on electricity market simulation provided a forum for discussion of potential modifications and applications for this new technology, specifically in the areas of market design and operations. The resounding messages heard from both speakers and participants were as follows: o The use of simulation for electricity markets has the potential to help society avoid devastating costs due to market flaws. o Market simulation can be broadly applied with a diverse set of potential users. o C...

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

House Simulation Protocols Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Building America's House Simulation Protocols report is designed to assist researchers in tracking the progress of multiyear, whole-building energy reduction against research goals for new and...

333

Ferrocyanide waste simulant characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide waste simulants were prepared and characterized to help assess safety concerns associated with the ferrocyanide sludges stored in underground single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Simulants were prepared to represent the variety of ferrocyanide sludges stored in the storage tanks. Physical properties, chemical compositions, and thermodynamic properties of the simulants were determined. The simulants, as produced, were shown to not sustain propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. Additional testing and evaluations are recommended to assess safety concerns associated with postulated ferrocyanide sludge dry-out and exposure to external ignition sources.

Jeppson, D.W.; Wong, J.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

AVESTAR® - Gasification Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meet Our Partners Simulators IGCC Gasification Combined Cycle NGCC SCOT Oxy-coal Shale Gas 3D Virtual IGCC Training How to Register for Training IGCC Gasification Combined...

335

Dynamic Infrared Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The increased usage of infrared sensors by pilots has created a growing demand for simulated environments based on infrared radiation. This has led to… (more)

Dehlin, Jonas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Molecular Simulation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced CO2 Adsorption in Ti-exchanged Zirconium Organic Frameworks – A Molecular Simulation Study. Author(s), Ravichandar Babarao ...

337

Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Dynamic Modeling and Simulation Based Analysis of an Ammonia Borane (AB) Reactor System for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has shown it to be a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell applications. AB was selected by DOE’s Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of three molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. A model of a bead reactor system which includes feed and product tanks, hot and cold augers, a ballast tank/reactor, a H2 burner and a radiator was developed to study AB system performance in an automotive application and estimate the energy, mass, and volume requirements for this off-board regenerable hydrogen storage material. Preliminary system simulation results for a start-up case and for a transient drive cycle indicate appropriate trends in the reactor system dynamics. A new controller was developed and validated in simulation for a couple of H2 demand cases.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; Herling, Darrell R.

2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

339

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

SciTech Connect

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Escorted free energy simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a strategy to improve the efficiency of free energy estimates by reducing dissipation in nonequilibrium Monte Carlo simulations. This strategy generalizes the targeted free energyperturbation approach [C. Jarzynski

Suriyanarayanan Vaikuntanathan; Christopher Jarzynski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

343

Image simulation using LOCUS  

SciTech Connect

The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Simulations and symbolic explanations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following paper defines the problem of writing symbolic explanation facilities for computer simulations. Our approach towards this problem draws from an existing body of research on a related problem, that of writing an explanation facility for an ...

D H Helman; J L Bennett; A W Foster

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Sky Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

framework. The sun is simulated with a 1,000-watt halogen lamp inside a parabolic mirror dish mounted on a track. It can assume any altitude angle from the horizon to the zenith....

346

Modeling & Simulation publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling & Simulation » Modeling & Simulation » Modeling & Simulation Publications Modeling & Simulation publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Harradine Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy Email Josh Smith Chemistry Email The inherent knowledge of transformation has beguiled sorcerers and scientists alike. D.A. Horner, F. Lambert, J.D. Kress, and L.A. Collins, "Transport properties of lithium hydride from quantum molecular dynamics and orbital-free molecular dynamics," Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics 80(2) (2009). J.D. Kress, D.A. Horner, and L.A. Collins, "Mixing rules for optical and transport properties of warm, dense matter," AIP Conference Proceedings 1195, 931-934 (2009).

347

Applications of HRSG Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Recovery Steam Generators are widely used in cogeneration and combined cycle plants generating steam utilizing energy from gas turbine exhaust. Before planning cogen projects, consultants should study various options available in terms of steam parameters and select the optimum. Simulation helps plan such studies. In addition, useful "what if" studies can be performed without even designing the HRSG, thus saving valuable time. This article outlines the applications of HRSG simulation and how plant engineers, consultants can benefit from such studies.

Ganapathy, V. V.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Theory Modeling and Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Xyce parallel electronic simulator.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

Keiter, Eric Richard; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Santarelli, Keith R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Computer simulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Computer simulation Citation wikipedia. Computer simulation Internet....

351

High Performance Computing: Modeling & Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Computing: Modeling & Simulation High Performance Computing: Modeling & Simulation Express Licensing Adaptive Real-Time Methodology for Optimizing Energy-Efficient...

352

Computers in teaching science: To simulate or not to simulate?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Do computer simulations help students learn science? How can we tell? Are there negative implications of using simulations to teach students about real world phenomena? In this paper I describe my experience using a computer simulation on air resistance. In order to parse out the effects of using the computer simulation and of having an interactive learning environment

Richard N. Steinberg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Computers in teaching science: To simulate or not to simulate?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computers in teaching science: To simulate or not to simulate? Richard N. Steinberg City College of New York Phys. Ed. Res. Suppl. to Am. J. Phys. 68, S37-S41 (2000) Do computer simulations help students about real world phenomena? In this paper I describe my experience using a computer simulation

Steinberg, Richard N.

354

Autonomy Levels For Unmanned Systems (ALFUS) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gaithersburg, MD. Sixteenth Workshop, April 24-25, 2007, Idaho National Labs, Idaho Falls City, Idaho. Seventeenth Workshop, ...

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

AUTONOMY LEVELS FOR UNMANNED SYSTEMS (ALFUS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Human must do it all. Page 24. EXISTENT WORK Essential Foundations • OODA -- Observe, Orient, Decide, Act. • 4D/RCS Reference Architecture ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

Autonomy Levels for Unmanned Systems (ALFUS) Framework ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory ... There is both individual and group or team ... for locating, providing medical treatment to, and ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Author Autonomy and Atomism in Copyright Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rights”). Brian Stelter, Facebook’s Users Ask Who Ownslicensed to others. Facebook users are demanding ownershiplicensed to others. Facebook users are demanding ownership

Van Houweling, Molly S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

359

Flight code validation simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An End-To-End Simulation capability for software development and validation of missile flight software on the actual embedded computer has been developed utilizing a 486 PC, i860 DSP coprocessor, embedded flight computer and custom dual port memory interface hardware. This system allows real-time interrupt driven embedded flight software development and checkout. The flight software runs in a Sandia Digital Airborne Computer (SANDAC) and reads and writes actual hardware sensor locations in which IMU (Inertial Measurements Unit) data resides. The simulator provides six degree of freedom real-time dynamic simulation, accurate real-time discrete sensor data and acts on commands and discretes from the flight computer. This system was utilized in the development and validation of the successful premier flight of the Digital Miniature Attitude Reference System (DMARS) in January 1995 at the White Sands Missile Range on a two stage attitude controlled sounding rocket.

Sims, B.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Simulating neural systems with Xyce.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia's parallel circuit simulator, Xyce, can address large scale neuron simulations in a new way extending the range within which one can perform high-fidelity, multi-compartment neuron simulations. This report documents the implementation of neuron devices in Xyce, their use in simulation and analysis of neuron systems.

Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Warrender, Christina E.; Aimone, James Bradley; Teeter, Corinne; Duda, Alex M. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Toroidal simulation magnet tests  

SciTech Connect

A number of different schemes for testing superconducting coils in a simulated tokamak environment are analyzed for their merits relative to a set of test criteria. Two of the concepts are examined in more detail: the so-called cluster test scheme, which employs two large background field coils, one on either side of the test coil, and the compact torus, a low-aspect ratio toroidal array of a small number of coils in which all of the coils are essentially test coils. Simulation of the pulsed fields of the tokamak is discussed briefly. (auth)

Walstrom, P.L.; Domm, T.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Advanced Simulation and Computing  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 NA-ASC-117R-09-Vol.1-Rev.0 Advanced Simulation and Computing PROGRAM PLAN FY09 October 2008 ASC Focal Point Robert Meisner, Director DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-0908 Program Plan Focal Point for NA-121.2 Njema Frazier DOE/NNSA NA-121.2 202-586-5789 A Publication of the Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NNSA Defense Programs i Contents Executive Summary ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 I. Introduction -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 Realizing the Vision ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2 The Future of the Nuclear Weapons Complex ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2

363

Simulation of geothermal subsidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an assessment of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction are summarized. The following subjects are discussed: the prediction process, physical processes of geothermal subsidence, computational models for reservoir flow, computational models for deformation, proficiency assessment, and real and idealized case studies. (MHR)

Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Ion trap simulation tools.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Simulation Data as Data Streams  

SciTech Connect

Computational or scientific simulations are increasingly being applied to solve a variety of scientific problems. Domains such as astrophysics, engineering, chemistry, biology, and environmental studies are benefiting from this important capability. Simulations, however, produce enormous amounts of data that need to be analyzed and understood. In this overview paper, we describe scientific simulation data, its characteristics, and the way scientists generate and use the data. We then compare and contrast simulation data to data streams. Finally, we describe our approach to analyzing simulation data, present the AQSim (Ad-hoc Queries for Simulation data) system, and discuss some of the challenges that result from handling this kind of data.

Abdulla, G; Arrighi, W; Critchlow, T

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

Simulation of biochemical networks using COPASI: a complex pathway simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and modeling is becoming one of the standard approaches to understand complex biochemical processes. Therefore, there is a big need for software tools that allow access to diverse simulation and modeling methods as well as support for the ...

Sven Sahle; Ralph Gauges; Jürgen Pahle; Natalia Simus; Ursula Kummer; Stefan Hoops; Christine Lee; Mudita Singhal; Liang Xu; Pedro Mendes

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Simulation-based optimization: practical introduction to simulation optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The merging of optimization and simulation technologies has seen a rapid growth in recent years. A Google search on "Simulation Optimization" returns more than six thousand pages where this phrase appears. The content of these pages ranges from articles, ...

Jay April; Fred Glover; James P. Kelly; Manuel Laguna

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Simulation standards: a framework for standard modular simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary reason for building manufacturing simulations is to provide support tools that aid the manufacturing decision-making process. Simulations are typically a part of a case study commissioned by manufacturing management to address a particular ...

Charles McLean; Swee Leong

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Risk Analysis and Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis and Simulation Analysis and Simulation for Geologic Storage of CO 2 BEST PRACTICES for: 2013 Revised Edition Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

370

Implicit Large Eddy Simulation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Implicit Implicit Large Eddy Simulation (ILES) for High Reynolds Number Flows Len Margolin Applied Physics Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaborators: 1. Bill Rider (LANL) 2. Piotr Smolarkiewicz (NCAR) 3. Andrzej Wysogrodski (NCAR) 4. Fernando Grinstein (NRL) len@lanl.gov 1 Implicit Large Eddy Simulation Outline: * What is ILES? * What are its advantages? * Historical perspective * Why does it work? * Some examples len@lanl.gov 2 What is ILES ILES is the direct application of a fluid solver to a high Reynolds number fluid flow with no explicit turbulence model. · The truncation terms of the algorithm serve as an effective model of the effects of the unresolved scales. · Fluid solvers based on Nonoscillatory Finite Volume (NFV) approximations work effectively for ILES. · Fluid solvers based on pseudospectral methods, leapfrog methods, advective form methods, etc. do not work

371

The Simulation Intranet Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simdarion Infranet (S1) is a term which is being used to dcscribc one element of a multidisciplinary distributed and distance computing initiative known as DisCom2 at Sandia National Laboratory (http ct al. 1998). The Simulation Intranet is an architecture for satisfying Sandia's long term goal of providing an end- to-end set of scrviccs for high fidelity full physics simu- lations in a high performance, distributed, and distance computing environment. The Intranet Architecture group was formed to apply current distributed object technologies to this problcm. For the hardware architec- tures and software models involved with the current simulation process, a CORBA-based architecture is best suited to meet Sandia's needs. This paper presents the initial desi-a and implementation of this Intranct based on a three-tier Network Computing Architecture(NCA). The major parts of the architecture include: the Web Cli- ent, the Business Objects, and Data Persistence.

Holmes, V.P.; Linebarger, J.M.; Miller, D.J.; Vandewart, R.L.

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fast Simulation and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Fast Simulation and Modeling" (FSM) project of the IntelliGrid Consortium is developing a high-performance "look-ahead" capability for a self-healing grid8212one capable of automatically anticipating and responding to power system disturbances while continually optimizing its own performance. This project's roadmap assesses individual software solutions and equipment components that vendors will provide during the next 5 to 15 years and that electric power companies will adopt to realize FSM's self-...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

Performance simulation and prediction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational procedures useful during the passive solar design process are discussed. Analysis tools are described suitable for each of the three phases of design: rules of thumb for the concept development phase, quick-and-dirty techniques for the design development phase, and the monthly solar load ratio method for the final design phase. Issues are discussed regarding the role of simulation analysis during the design process.

Balcomb, J.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

COLLABORATIVE: FUSION SIMULATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, participated in the ���¢��������Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) Planning Activities���¢������� [http://www.pppl.gov/fsp], with C.S. Chang as the institutional PI. FSP���¢��������s mission was to enable scientific discovery of important new plasma phenomena with associated understanding that emerges only upon integration. This requires developing a predictive integrated simulation capability for magnetically-confined fusion plasmas that are properly validated against experiments in regimes relevant for producing practical fusion energy. Specific institutional goal of the New York University was to participate in the planning of the edge integrated simulation, with emphasis on the usage of large scale HPCs, in connection with the SciDAC CPES project which the PI was leading. New York University successfully completed its mission by participating in the various planning activities, including the edge physics integration, the edge science drivers, and the mathematical verification. The activity resulted in the combined report that can be found in http://www.pppl.gov/fsp/Overview.html. Participation and presentations as part of this project are listed in a separation file.

Chang, Choong Seock

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Virtual urban traffic network simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this project, I designed and implemented a virtual urban traffic network simulator. The simulator serves as a testbed for human-subject experiments to determine driver behavior in road networks and also as a platform ...

Uh, Jason (Jason J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Simulation of Alberta Cumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional cloud model was used to simulate an Alberta, Canada, seeding experiment that was conducted on 24 July 1979, by the Alberta Research Council. The simulation reproduced some of the characteristics of the silver iodide seeded cloud ...

Fred J. Kopp

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Computer simulations of cardiac electrophysiology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CardioWave is a modular system for simulating wavefront conduction in the heart. These simulations may be used to investigate the factors that generate and sustain life-threatening arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation. The user selects a set ...

John B. Pormann; Craig S. Henriquez; John A. Board, Jr.; Donald J. Rose; David M. Harrild; Alexandra P. Henriquez

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Simulations of nanoscale spatial disorder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we detail the design, implementation, and testing of two simulations of nanometer scale disorder phenomena important for electronic device fabrication. We created a kinetic simulator for the surface assembly ...

Howe, Ethan (Ethan Gabriel Grief)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Translation Effects on Simulated Tornadoes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation of tornadoes translating over the ground was carried out in a modified Ward simulator. The purpose was to investigate the effects of translation on tornado dynamics. The results are as follows:

Chris J. Diamond; Eugene M. Wilkins

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Design of mechanical arterial simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A force controlled ultrasound probe is being explored as a new method of measuring blood pressure. An arterial simulator was designed and built for experiments. For this simulator, the vessels and bulk material were designed ...

Chai, Lauren (Lauren Amy)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Simulation of Sextet Diquark Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method for simulating the production and decay of particles in the sextet representation of $SU(3)_C$ including the simulation of QCD radiation. First results from the Monte Carlo simulation of sextet diquark production at the LHC including both resonant and pair production are presented. We include limits on resonant diquark production from recent ATLAS results and perform the first simulation studies of the less model dependent pair production mechanism.

Peter Richardson; David Winn

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair: Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation Sponsored by: Metallurgical ...

384

Circuit simulation: some humbling thoughts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A short, very personal note on circuit simulation is presented. It does neither include theoretical background on circuit simulation, nor offers an overview of available software, but just gives some general remarks for a discussion on circuit simulator needs in context to the design and development of accelerator beam instrumentation circuits and systems.

Wendt, Manfred; /Fermilab

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Bio-threat microparticle simulants  

SciTech Connect

A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

Simulation in education and training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the use of simulation has been an important aspect of training in some fields (such as aviation). As the cost of computing power decreases simulation is now finding its way into training for other fields. As simulation moves into these ...

J. Peter Kincaid; Ken K. Westerlund

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Utility Analysis of Parallel Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel computers are used to execute discrete-event simulations in contexts where a serial computer is unable to provide answers fast enough, and/or is unable to hold the simulation state in memory. Traditional research in parallel simulation has focused ...

David M. Nicol

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Plasma Simulation Program  

SciTech Connect

Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a critical impediment to successful operation of machines like ITER. If disruptions prove unable to be avoided, their associated dynamics and effects will be addressed in the next phase of the FSP.

Greenwald, Martin

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

389

Maintenance simulation: Software issues  

SciTech Connect

The maintenance of a distributed software system in a production environment involves: (1) maintaining software integrity, (2) maintaining and database integrity, (3) adding new features, and (4) adding new systems. These issues will be discussed in general: what they are and how they are handled. This paper will present our experience with a distributed resource management system that accounts for resources consumed, in real-time, on a network of heterogenous computers. The simulated environments to maintain this system will be presented relate to the four maintenance areas.

Luk, C.H.; Jette, M.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

Michael A. Romano

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fusion Simulation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under this project, General Atomics (GA) was tasked to develop the experimental validation plans for two high priority ISAs, Boundary and Pedestal and Whole Device Modeling in collaboration with the theory, simulation and experimental communities. The following sections have been incorporated into the final FSP Program Plan (www.pppl.gov/fsp), which was delivered to the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional deliverables by GA include guidance for validation, development of metrics to evaluate success and procedures for collaboration with experiments. These are also part of the final report.

Project Staff (V.S. Chan)

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

NETL: Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, a fractured reservoir modeling software developed by the...

393

Manet simulation studies: The incredibles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation is the research tool of choice for a majority of the mobile ad hoc network (MANET) community. However, while the use of simulation has increased, the credibility of the simulation results has decreased. To determine the state of MANET simulation studies, we surveyed the 2000-2005 proceedings of the ACM International Symposium on Mobile Ad Hoc Networking and Computing (MobiHoc). From our survey, we found significant shortfalls. We present the results of our survey in this paper. We then summarize common simulation study pitfalls found in our survey. Finally, we discuss the tools available that aid the development of rigorous simulation studies. We offer these results to the community with the hope of improving the credibility of MANET simulation-based studies. I.

Stuart Kurkowski; Tracy Camp; Michael Colagrosso

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fading channel simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Disens: scalable distributed sensor network simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation is widely used for developing, evaluating and analyzing sensor network applications, especially when deploying a large scale sensor network remains expensive and labor intensive. However, due to its computation intensive nature, existent simulation ... Keywords: distributed simulation, sensor network, simulation

Ye Wen; Rich Wolski; Gregory Moore

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

THERM NFRC Simulation Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/ WINDOW 6.3 / WINDOW 6.3 NFRC Simulation Manual Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 2013 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

397

Cellular array processing simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cellular array processing simulation (CAPS) system is a high-level image language that runs on a multiprocessor configuration. CAPS is interpretively decoded on a conventional minicomputer with all image operation instructions executed on an array processor. CAPS was designed to be both modular and table driven so that it can be easily maintained and modified. CAPS uses the image convolution operator as one of its primitives and performs this cellular operation by decomposing it into parallel image steps. Among its features is the ability to observe the imagery in real time as a user's algorithm is executed. CAPS also contains a language processor that permits users to develop re-entrant image processing subroutines or algorithms. 4 references.

Lee, H.C.; Preston, E.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boltzmann Boltzmann Simulation Optimization on Leading Multicore Platforms Selected as Best Paper in Application Track, IPDPS 2008, April 14-28, Miami, Florida, USA Samuel Williams † , Jonathan Carter , Leonid Oliker John Shalf , Katherine Yelick † CRD/NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 † CS Division, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 {SWWilliams, JTCarter, LOliker, JShalf, KAYelick}@lbl.gov Abstract We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize ap- plication performance on emerging multicore architec- tures. The methodology extends the idea of search- based performance optimizations, popular in linear al- gebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific com- putational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD) that histor- ically has made poor use of scalar microprocessors

399

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management  

Multi-Process High Performance Computing Simulator Modular simulation capability for barrier and waste form degradation, multiphase flow and reactive ...

400

Quantum to Atomistic Simulations - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational Modeling and Simulation of Advanced Materials for Energy Applications: Quantum to Atomistic Simulations Sponsored by: TMS/ASM: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Non-detonable explosive simulators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Pruneda, Cesar O. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Visualization of the Invisible, Explanation of the Unknown, Ruggedization of the Unstable: Sensitivity Analysis, Virtual Tryout and Robust Design through Systematic Stochastic Simulation  

SciTech Connect

In the past decade, sheet metal forming simulation became a well established tool to predict the formability of parts. In the automotive industry, this has enabled significant reduction in the cost and time for vehicle design and development, and has helped to improve the quality and performance of vehicle parts. However, production stoppages for troubleshooting and unplanned die maintenance, as well as production quality fluctuations continue to plague manufacturing cost and time. The focus therefore has shifted in recent times beyond mere feasibility to robustness of the product and process being engineered. Ensuring robustness is the next big challenge for the virtual tryout / simulation technology.We introduce new methods, based on systematic stochastic simulations, to visualize the behavior of the part during the whole forming process -- in simulation as well as in production. Sensitivity analysis explains the response of the part to changes in influencing parameters. Virtual tryout allows quick exploration of changed designs and conditions. Robust design and manufacturing guarantees quality and process capability for the production process. While conventional simulations helped to reduce development time and cost by ensuring feasible processes, robustness engineering tools have the potential for far greater cost and time savings.Through examples we illustrate how expected and unexpected behavior of deep drawing parts may be tracked down, identified and assigned to the influential parameters. With this knowledge, defects can be eliminated or springback can be compensated e.g.; the response of the part to uncontrollable noise can be predicted and minimized. The newly introduced methods enable more reliable and predictable stamping processes in general.

Zwickl, Titus; Carleer, Bart; Kubli, Waldemar [AutoForm Engineering GmbH, Technoparkstrasse 1, CH-8005 Zurich (Switzerland)

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

NIST Standard Reference Simulation Website  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... simulations, that can be treated similar to "standard reference data ... techniques and compiled by NIST under the Standards Reference Data Program. ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Computer interactive resistance simulator (CIRS)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for simulating the insertion of electric resistance values of either positive or negative quantity into an electric circuit and for cancelling drift errors therefrom.

Mayn, Bobby G. (Pleasanton, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Computational simulation of aerosol behaviour.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, computational methods have been developed for the simulation of aerosol dynamics and transport. Two different coupled aerosol-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are… (more)

Pyykönen, Jouni

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Simulation I - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 15, 2010 ... Molecular dynamics Simulation of Nucleation Process: Ramanarayan Hariharaputran1; David Wu1; 1Institute of High Performance Computing, ...

408

Logic Simulation Using Graphics Processors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Logic Simulation is widely used to verify the logical correctness of hardware designs. In this work, we present the implementation of a generic graphics processor… (more)

Perinkulam, Atchuthan S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

LAMMPS Molecular Dynamics Simulator - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 8, 2007 ... LAMMPS stands for Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator. LAMMPS has potentials for soft materials (biomolecules, ...

410

Real time wind turbine simulator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel dynamic real-time wind turbine simulator (WTS) is developed in this thesis, which is capable of reproducing dynamic behavior of real wind turbine. The… (more)

Gong, Bing

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the electrical panel for run times commensurate with identified use profiles. The profiles enabled sought Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly insulating windows demonstration. The bases for occupancy simulation were data and analysis developed

412

High-Performance Control of Two Three-Phase Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machines in an Integrated Drive for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

The closed-loop control of an integrated dual AC drive system is presented to control two three-phase permanent-magnet motors. A five-leg inverter is employed in the drive system; three of the inverter legs are for a main traction motor, but only two are needed for a three-phase auxiliary motor by utilizing the neutral point of the traction motor. An integrated drive with reduced component count is therefore achieved by eliminating one inverter leg and its gate drivers. A modified current control scheme based on the rotor flux orientation principle is presented. Simulation and experimental results are included to verify the independent control capability of the integrated drive.

Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Su, Gui-Jia [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Foam drilling simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the use of compressible drilling fluids is experiencing growth, the flow behavior and stability properties of drilling foams are more complicated than those of conventional fluids. In contrast with conventional mud, the physical properties of foam change along the wellbore. Foam physical and thermal properties are strongly affected by pressure and temperature. Many problems associated with field applications still exist, and a precise characterization of the rheological properties of these complex systems needs to be performed. The accurate determination of the foam properties in circulating wells helps to achieve better estimation of foam rheology and pressure. A computer code is developed to process the data and closely simulate the pressure during drilling a well. The model also offers a detailed discussion of many aspects of foam drilling operations and enables the user to generate many comparative graphs and tables. The effects of some important parameters such as: back-pressure, rate of penetration, cuttings concentration, cuttings size, and formation water influx on pressure, injection rate, and velocity are presented in tabular and graphical form. A discretized heat transfer model is formulated with an energy balance on a control volume in the flowing fluid. The finite difference model (FDM) is used to write the governing heat transfer equations in discretized form. A detailed discussion on the determination of heat transfer coefficients and the solution approach is presented. Additional research is required to analyze the foam heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity.

Paknejad, Amir Saman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Simulating nanoscale semiconductor devices.  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of electronic devices will be developed at the nanoscale and molecular level, where quantum mechanical effects are observed. These effects must be accounted for in the design process for such small devices. One prototypical nanoscale semiconductor device under investigation is a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). Scientists are hopeful the quantum tunneling effects present in an RTD can be exploited to induce and sustain THz frequency current oscillations. To simulate the electron transport within the RTD, the Wigner-Poisson equations are used. These equations describe the time evolution of the electrons distribution within the device. In this paper, this model and a parameter study using this model will be presented. The parameter study involves calculating the steady-state current output from the RTD as a function of an applied voltage drop across the RTD and also calculating the stability of that solution. To implement the parameter study, the computational model was connected to LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms), a part of Sandia National Laboratories parallel solver project, Trilinos. Numerical results will be presented.

Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Zhao, P. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Woolard, D. L. (U. S. Army Research Laboratory, NC); Kelley, C. Tim (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Lasater, Matthew S. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Battery Life Estimator Manual Linear Modeling and Simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Battery Calendar Life Estimator Manual Modeling and Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

TERAPIXEL IMAGING OF COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The increasing size of cosmological simulations has led to the need for new visualization techniques. We focus on smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations run with the GADGET code and describe methods for visually accessing the entire simulation at full resolution. The simulation snapshots are rastered and processed on supercomputers into images that are ready to be accessed through a Web interface (GigaPan). This allows any scientist with a Web browser to interactively explore simulation data sets in both spatial and temporal dimensions and data sets which in their native format can be hundreds of terabytes in size or more. We present two examples, the first a static terapixel image of the MassiveBlack simulation, a P-GADGET SPH simulation with 65 billion particles, and the second an interactively zoomable animation of a different simulation with more than 1000 frames, each a gigapixel in size. Both are available for public access through the GigaPan Web interface. We also make our imaging software publicly available.

Feng Yu; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Khandai, Nishikanta [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Sargent, Randy; Nourbakhsh, Illah; Dille, Paul; Bartley, Chris [Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Springel, Volker [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Jana, Anirban [Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Gardner, Jeffrey, E-mail: yfeng1@andrew.cmu.edu [Physics Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

BEST: Biochemical Engineering Simulation Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The idea of developing a process simulator that can describe biochemical engineering (a relatively new technology area) was formulated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the late 1980s. The initial plan was to build a consortium of industrial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners to enhance a commercial simulator with biochemical unit operations. DOE supported this effort; however, before the consortium was established, the process simulator industry changed considerably. Work on the first phase of implementing various fermentation reactors into the chemical process simulator, ASPEN/SP-BEST, is complete. This report will focus on those developments. Simulation Sciences, Inc. (SimSci) no longer supports ASPEN/SP, and Aspen Technology, Inc. (AspenTech) has developed an add-on to its ASPEN PLUS (also called BioProcess Simulator [BPS]). This report will also explain the similarities and differences between BEST and BPS. ASPEN, developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for DOE in the late 1970s, is still the state-of-the-art chemical process simulator. It was selected as the only simulator with the potential to be easily expanded into the biochemical area. ASPEN/SP, commercially sold by SimSci, was selected for the BEST work. SimSci completed work on batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation reactors in 1993, just as it announced it would no longer commercially support the complete ASPEN/SP product. BEST was left without a basic support program. Luckily, during this same time frame, AspenTech was developing a biochemical simulator with its version of ASPEN (ASPEN PLUS), which incorporates most BEST concepts. The future of BEST will involve developing physical property data and models appropriate to biochemical systems that are necessary for good biochemical process design.

Not Available

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Hybrid simulation models - When, Why, How?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS) and System Dynamics (SD) are two popular simulation paradigms. Despite their common goal, these simulation methods are rarely combined and there has been a very low amount of joint research in these fields. ... Keywords: Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation, Artificial intelligence, Expert Systems, Hybrid simulation models, System Dynamics

Lauri Lättilä; Per Hilletofth; Bishan Lin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mixed-Technology System-Level Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient method to simulate mixed-domain systems under the requirements of a system-level framework. The approach is the combined use of Modified Nodal Analysis (MNA) for the representation of a mixed-technology ... Keywords: MEM simulation, microsystem modeling and simulation, modified nodal analysis (MNA), optical MEM CAD tool, optoelectronic simulation, piecewise linear simulation (PWL)

J. A. Martinez; T. P. Kurzweg; S. P. Levitan; P. J. Marchand; D. M. Chiarulli

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Validation of a Geothermal Simulator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A geothermal simulator, TETRAD, is validated against the Stanford Geothermal Problem Set. The governing equations, formulation, and solution technique employed by TETRAD are first outlined. Each problem in the Stanford Problem Set is then discussed in detail, and results from the simulations are presented. The results obtained using TETRAD are compared against several other geothermal simulators. Favorable comparison between results indicates that TETRAD is capable of solving the highly non-linear equations describing the flow of mass and energy in porous media. This validation exercise allows for the use of TETRAD in studying geothermal problems with a high degree of confidence.

Shook, G.M.; Faulder, D.D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Numerical wind speed simulation model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Applications of agent based simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a survey and analysis of applications of Agent Based Simulation (ABS). A framework for describing and assessing the applications is presented and systematically applied. A general conclusion from the study is that even if ABS seems ...

Paul Davidsson; Johan Holmgren; Hans Kyhlbäck; Dawit Mengistu; Marie Persson

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Numerical Simulations of Maritime Frontogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrostatic primitive equation model initialized in a highly baroclinically unstable state was used to simulate maritime cyclogenesis and frontogenesis. In order to identify boundary layer physical processes important in maritime frontogenesis, ...

William T. Thompson; R. T. Williams

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Physics and detector simulation requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

‘‘This document describes the computing environment needed to meet the requirements for high energy physics Monte Carlo Calculations for the simulation of Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory physics and detectors.’’ (AIP)

Computer Acquisition Working Group

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Monte Carlo Simulation of Solidification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

m>= (2+ cod).( l- cose)2. 4. (3). In the simulation, it is assumed that the nucleation in a cell (iJ) would not take place until the accumulation of nucleation (Ni) ...

427

Computer Simulation Center in Internet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general description of infrastructure and content of SciShop.ru computer simulation center is given. This resource is a new form of knowledge generation and remote education using modern Cloud Computing technologies.

Tarnavsky, G A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Simulation aids cogeneration system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cogeneration systems using gas turbines and heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are widely used in chemical process industries (CPI) plants. Because these plants are quite expensive and the HRSG is an important part of the system, it is prudent to analyze the heat-recovery system or simulate its performance well in advance of finalizing plant specifications. Simulation is a method of predicting the performance of the HRSG under different operating modes and gas and steam conditions without physically designing the equipment. Such a study will provide the engineer with valuable information about the HRSG and its performance capabilities. The simulation results could influence the choice of steam system parameters and the selection of the steam or gas turbine. In addition, one may also obtain information about the performance of the HRSG and the cogeneration system. This article explains what HRSG simulation is and the basic methodology. Its applications are then illustrated through several examples.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Simulation data as data streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational or scientific simulations are increasingly being applied to solve a variety of scientific problems. Domains such as astrophysics, engineering, chemistry, biology, and environmental studies are benefiting from this important capability. ...

Ghaleb Abdulla; Terence Critchlow; William Arrighi

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Factor Separation in Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method is developed for computing the interactions among various factors influencing the atmospheric circulations. It is shown how numerical simulations can be utilized to obtain the pure contribution of any factor to any predicted field,...

U. Stein; P. Alpert

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Robust simulation of lamprey tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biologically realistic computer simulation of vertebrates is a challenging problem with exciting applications in computer graphics and robotics. Once the mechanics of locomotion are available it is interesting to mediate this locomotion with higher level ...

Matthew Beauregard; Paul J. Kennedy

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Catching Carbon with Computer Simulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRD and Material Sciences Researchers Receive 2 Million to Develop Efficient Carbon Capture Simulation Tools Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov , 510-495-2402 Share September 30,...

433

Confidence in ASCI scientific simulations  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program calls for the development of high end computing and advanced application simulations as one component of a program to eliminate reliance upon nuclear testing in the US nuclear weapons program. This paper presents results from the ASCI program`s examination of needs for focused validation and verification (V and V). These V and V activities will ensure that 100 TeraOP-scale ASCI simulation code development projects apply the appropriate means to achieve high confidence in the use of simulations for stockpile assessment and certification. The authors begin with an examination of the roles for model development and validation in the traditional scientific method. The traditional view is that the scientific method has two foundations, experimental and theoretical. While the traditional scientific method does not acknowledge the role for computing and simulation, this examination establishes a foundation for the extension of the traditional processes to include verification and scientific software development that results in the notional framework known as Sargent`s Framework. This framework elucidates the relationships between the processes of scientific model development, computational model verification and simulation validation. This paper presents a discussion of the methodologies and practices that the ASCI program will use to establish confidence in large-scale scientific simulations. While the effort for a focused program in V and V is just getting started, the ASCI program has been underway for a couple of years. The authors discuss some V and V activities and preliminary results from the ALEGRA simulation code that is under development for ASCI. The breadth of physical phenomena and the advanced computational algorithms that are employed by ALEGRA make it a subject for V and V that should typify what is required for many ASCI simulations.

Ang, J.A.; Trucano, T.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luginbuhl, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 2012 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), recognized as the premiere international conference for simulation professionals in discrete and combined discrete-continuous simulation. Our venue of Berlin this year continues the trend of new ...

Oliver Rose; Adelinde M. Uhrmacher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

System dynamics simulation of the telecom industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this research effort was to integrate several pieces of relatively simple dynamics simulations into a full blown system dynamics simulation of the telecom industry. The economic simulation model was ...

Shapira, Gil, 1971-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Efficient simulation-based discrete optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many practical applications of simulation it is desirable to optimize the levels of integer or binary variables that are inputs for the simulation model. In these cases, the objective function must often be estimated through an expensive simulation ...

Seth D. Guikema; Rachel A. Davidson; Zehra Ça?nan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water, they have a very low environmental impact. The fuel cell system consists of several subsystems requiring a lot of e?ort from engineers in diverse areas. Fuel cell simulators can provide a convenient and economic alternative for testing the electrical subsystems such as converters and inverters. This thesis proposes a low-cost and an easy-to-use fuel cell simulator using a programmable DC supply along with a control module written in LabVIEW. This simulator reproduces the electrical characteristics of a 5kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack under various operating conditions. The experimental results indicate that the proposed simulator closely matches the voltage-current characteristic of the SOFC system under varying load conditions. E?ects of non-electrical parameters like hydrogen ?ow rate are also modeled and these parameters are taken as dynamic inputs from the user. The simulator is customizable through a graphical user interface and allows the user to model other types of fuel cells with the respective voltage-current data. The simulator provides an inexpensive and accurate representation of a solid oxide fuel cell under steady state and transient conditions and can replace an actual fuel cell during testing of power conditioning equipment.

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

House Simulation House Simulation Protocols Report to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: House Simulation Protocols Report on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center

439

MAPPING HVAC SYSTEMS FOR SIMULATION IN ENERGYPLUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-XXXXX MAPPING HVAC SYSTEMS FOR SIMULATION IN ENERGYPLUSof California. MAPPING HVAC SYSTEMS FOR SIMULATION INpresent a conventional view of HVAC systems to the user, and

Basarkar, Mangesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Theory, Modeling & Simulation | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory, Modeling and Simulation SHARE Theory, Modeling and Simulation ORNL conducts a broad range of theoretical research in the physical sciences with over 60 staff members and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Theory, Modeling & Simulation | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Theory and Simulation SHARE Materials Theory and Simulation ORNL conducts a broad range of theoretical research in the physical sciences with over 60 staff members and...

442

Zero Power Reactor simulation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zero Power Reactor simulation Share Description Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by...

443

Computer-Simulation-Assisted Lean Manufacturing Training.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis assesses the potential of using computer simulation to aid existing lean manufacturing training methods such as lecture and live simulation. An investigation of… (more)

Wang, Luoding 1970-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data MariaJune 2009 Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Datathe performance of conventional window systems. Complex

Konstantoglou, Maria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

A Simulator for Timed CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time is an integral aspect of computer systems. It is essential for modelling a system’s performance, but may also affect its safety or security. Timed CSP [Sch00] conservatively extends the process algebra CSP with timed primitives, where real numbers ? 0 model how time passes with reference to a single, conceptually global, clock. While there have been approaches for model checking Timed CSP ([Sch00, DHSZ06]), to the best of our knowledge we are the first to present a simulator for Timed CSP. Here, we restrict time to rational values only. Theoretically, this limits the expressibility of the language. Practically, this limitation turns out to be negligible (for instance all examples of Schneider’s book [Sch00] can be dealt with in our simulator). The simulator is the outcome of an undergraduate project at Swansea University [Dra11]. Our Timed CSP simulator extends the open source tool ProB [Leu]. ProB’s CSP simulator works as follows: The CSP specification is analyzed by a parser (written in Haskell) and translated to a representation in Prolog. A CSP Interpreter (in Prolog) stores the “firing rules” of CSP’s operational semantics. The Simulator (also in Prolog) determines the actions available and the resultant states. A GUI (written in Tcl/Tk) allows the user to interact with the Simulator. Timed CSP is closed under rational time [DNR11]. Consider, for example, the following firing rule ( t ? stands for a timed transition of duration t): P d? ? P ? (P ?d Q) d?

Marc Dragon; Andy Gimblett; Markus Roggenbach; Jens Bendisposto; Cliff Jones; Michael Leuschel; Er Romanovsky; Tiziana Margaria; Julia Padberg; Gabriele Taentzer; Marc Dragon; Andy Gimblett; Markus Roggenbach

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Stochastic models: theory and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

Many problems in applied science and engineering involve physical phenomena that behave randomly in time and/or space. Examples are diverse and include turbulent flow over an aircraft wing, Earth climatology, material microstructure, and the financial markets. Mathematical models for these random phenomena are referred to as stochastic processes and/or random fields, and Monte Carlo simulation is the only general-purpose tool for solving problems of this type. The use of Monte Carlo simulation requires methods and algorithms to generate samples of the appropriate stochastic model; these samples then become inputs and/or boundary conditions to established deterministic simulation codes. While numerous algorithms and tools currently exist to generate samples of simple random variables and vectors, no cohesive simulation tool yet exists for generating samples of stochastic processes and/or random fields. There are two objectives of this report. First, we provide some theoretical background on stochastic processes and random fields that can be used to model phenomena that are random in space and/or time. Second, we provide simple algorithms that can be used to generate independent samples of general stochastic models. The theory and simulation of random variables and vectors is also reviewed for completeness.

Field, Richard V., Jr.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

448

Simulator for Microlens Planet Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the status of a computer simulator for microlens planet surveys. The simulator generates synthetic light curves of microlensing events observed with specified networks of telescopes over specified periods of time. Particular attention is paid to models for sky brightness and seeing, calibrated by fitting to data from the OGLE survey and RoboNet observations in 2011. Time intervals during which events are observable are identified by accounting for positions of the Sun and the Moon, and other restrictions on telescope pointing. Simulated observations are then generated for an algorithm that adjusts target priorities in real time with the aim of maximizing planet detection zone area summed over all the available events. The exoplanet detection capability of observations was compared for several telescopes.

Ipatov, Sergei I; Alsubai, Khalid A; Bramich, Daniel M; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus P G; Liebig, Christine; Snodgrass, Colin D B; Street, Rachel A; Tsapras, Yiannis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Simulating chemistry using quantum computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well-known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors.

Ivan Kassal; James D. Whitfield; Alejandro Perdomo-Ortiz; Man-Hong Yung; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs of the process plant, cogeneration or combined cycle plant. There is no need to design the HRSG per se and hence simulation is a valuable tool for anyone interested in evaluating the HRSG performance even before it is designed. It can also save a lot of time for specification writers as they need not guess how the steam side performance will vary with different gas/steam parameters. A few examples are given to show how simulation methods can be applied to real life problems.

Ganapathy, V.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Efficient Mushroom Cloud Simulation on GPU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a method to simulate the Mushroom Cloud efficient on GPU using advanced particle system, and our particle system is a state-preserving simulation system. We provide the visual-only model of Mushroom Cloud and we divide the Mushroom ... Keywords: Floating Point Textures, GPU (Graphics Processing Unit), Mushroom Cloud simulation, particle system, state-preserving simulation

Xingquan Cai; Jinhong Li; Zhitong Su

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

JILA Researchers Discover Atomic Clock Can Simulate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Artist's conception of interactions among atoms in JILA's strontium atomic clock during a quantum simulation experiment. ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Measurement of simulation speed: its relation to simulation accuracy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mainly by the time step. For non-spiking neurons, this means not larger than 100 usec for a reasonable physiological simulations we don't need better accuracy than 2-5%, time steps on the order of 100 usec

Pennsylvania, University of

454

Water simulation of sodium reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system.

Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

1981-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Simulation-assisted inductive learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learning by induction can require a large number of training examples. We show the power of using a simulator to generate training data and test data in learning rules for an expert system. The induction program is RL, a simplified version of Meta-DENDRAL. The expert system is ABLE, a rule-based system that identifies and located errors in particle beam lines used in high energy physics. A simulator of beam lines allowed forming and testing rules on sufficient numbers of cases that ABLE's performance is demonstrably accurate and precise. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Buchanan, B.G.; Sullivan, J.; Cheng, Tze-Pin; Clearwater, S.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Universal digital quantum simulation with trapped ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A digital quantum simulator is an envisioned quantum device that can be pro- grammed to efficiently simulate any other local system. We demonstrate and investigate the digital approach to quantum simulation in a system of trapped ions. Using sequences of up to 100 gates and 6 qubits, the full time dynamics of a range of spin systems are digitally simulated. Interactions beyond those naturally present in our simulator are accurately reproduced and quantitative bounds are provided for the overall simulation quality. Our results demon- strate the key principles of digital quantum simulation and provide evidence that the level of control required for a full-scale device is within reach.

B. P. Lanyon; C. Hempel; D. Nigg; M. Müller; R. Gerritsma; F. Zähringer; P. Schindler; J. T. Barreiro; M. Rambach; G. Kirchmair; M. Hennrich; P. Zoller; R. Blatt; C. F. Roos

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

An Interactive Simulation Framework for Burning Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simulation framework to integrate several aspects of the combustion and burning process in a unified and modular manner. A simple three gas flame model is used to simulate a combustion process, while air motion is simulated as a single moving fluid. Solid objects inside the simulation domain can catch fire and start burning. Heat information is transferred from the fluid simulator to a solid simulator, while the solid simulator injects fuel into the fluid simulation. We also present a simple yet effective method for modeling of object decomposition under combustion using level set methods. The interaction between modules is presented as well as a discussion of fluid-solid coupling. All simulation modules run together at interactive rates, enabling the user to tweak the simulation parameters and setup for desired behavior 1. 1

Zeki Melek; John Keyser

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Numerical Simulations of Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Simulations of Black Holes 26 Aug 2009 Frank Herrmann (fherrman@umd.edu) Department · merger of compact objects Much more than just black hole evolutions · Formulations · Hyperboloidal)/2.0; . . . high arithmetic intensity Operator Number of times used 12,961 + 5,398 - 3,438 / 69 14 #12;Black Hole

Maryland at College Park, University of

459

Particle simulations of space weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review the application of particle simulation techniques to the full kinetic study of space weather events. We focus especially on the methods designed to overcome the difficulties created by the tremendous range of time and space scales present in ... Keywords: Adaptive, Implicit, Particle-in-cell, Space weather

Giovanni Lapenta

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Simulation of Shot Peen Forming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...balls, 4.0 mm diam, v B =6.1 m/s; stochastically distributed shot impacts; control of kinetic energy of single impacts with calculation of the contact, three-dimensional mesh; fine discretization in the middle of the sample; elastic-plastic material behaviour. (a) Before the simulation. (b) After the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Tutorial: Parallel Simulation on Supercomputers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tutorial introduces typical hardware and software characteristics of extant and emerging supercomputing platforms, and presents issues and solutions in executing large-scale parallel discrete event simulation scenarios on such high performance computing systems. Covered topics include synchronization, model organization, example applications, and observed performance from illustrative large-scale runs.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

2, 14671508, 2002 simulations of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the activity parameterization of the nucleation rate by Koop et al. (2000). The simulations are constrained on the time history of relative humidity with respect to ice, aerosol size distribution, partitioning of water10 between gas and particle phase, onset times of freezing, freezing threshold relative humidities

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

464

Fluctuations in molecular dynamics simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical fluctuations of a system about its equilibrium state, monitored in a molecular dynamics simulation, are an effective means of computing the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of interfaces in metals and alloys. In this work, three applications ... Keywords: Fluctuations, Grain boundaries, Interfaces, Interfacial free energy, Mobility, Molecular dynamics

J. J. Hoyt; Z. T. Trautt; M. Upmanyu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Cloning Parallel Simulations MARIA HYBINETTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Our performance results with a commercial air traffic control sim- ulation demonstrate that cloning parallel simulations can or do play a role include air traffic control, gaming strategy and battle is by permission of the ACM, Inc. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers, or to redistribute to lists

Hybinette, Maria

466

Fusion Simulation Project Workshop Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for tokamak operation, disruptions, energetic particle stability and confinement, turbulent transport to performance projections and operational limits. The Fusion Simulation Project, which will focus on tokamak and transient heat loads on the divertor . . . . . 17 2.1.3 Tritium migration and impurity transport

Gropp, Bill

467

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geostatistical techniques can generate fine-scale description of reservoir properties that honor a variety of available data. The differences among multiple geostatistical realizations indicate the presence of uncertainty due to the lack of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions. However, this approach is not feasible in practice because of the computational costs associated with multiple detailed flow simulations. Other major reservoir management challenges include the determination of the swept and unswept areas at a particular time of interest in the life of a reservoir. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations have generally been limited to homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir is difficult due to the inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. Identifying the swept and unswept areas is primarily important for making a decision on the infill locations. Most of the mature reservoirs all over the world are under waterflood. Managing a waterflood requires an understanding of how injection wells displace oil to producing wells. By quantifying the fluid movements, the displacement process can be actively managed. Areas that are not being swept can be developed, and inefficiencies, such as water cycling, can be removed. Conventional simulation provides general answers to almost all of these problems, however time constraint prohibits using a detailed model to capture complexities for each well. Three dimensional streamline simulation can meet most of these reservoir management challenges. Moreover use of fast streamline-based simulation technique offers significant potential in terms of computational efficiency. Its high performance simulation speed makes it well suited for describing flow characteristics for high resolution reservoir models and can be used on a routine basis to make effective and efficient reservoir management decisions. In this research, we extend the capability of streamline simulation as an efficient tool for reservoir management purposes. We show its application in terms of swept volume calculations, ranking of stochastic reservoir models, pattern rate allocation and reservoir performance forecasting under uncertainty.

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Teaching the classics of simulation to beginners, panel: teaching the classics of simulation to beginners (panel)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to get more people to use and understand simulation, improved teaching of simulation to beginners is important. The panel members share their experience in teaching the classic systems of simulation, used for several decades, to novice students.

Ingolf Stĺhl; Raymond R. Hill; Joan M. Donohue; Henry Herper; Catherine M. Harmonosky; W. David Kelton

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Argonne TTRDC - Publications - Transforum 10.2 - Propylene Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Autonomie Batteries Downloadable Dynamometer Database Engines Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In...

470

Predictive Simulation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predictive Predictive Simulation Predictive Simulation Empirical To First Principle Models Computing tools currently used in nuclear industry and regulatory practice are based primarily on empirical math models to approximate, or fit, existing experimental data. Many have a pedigree reaching back to the 1970s and 1980s and were designed to support decision making and evaluate everything from behavior of individual fuel pellets to severe accident scenarios for an entire power plant. Programs like SAPHIRE, FRAPCON, RELAP5, and MELCOR are just a few examples of current computing tools used in the regulation and operation of nuclear power plants. While these conventional tools have been updated for today's technology, they still suffer from limitations of their original

471

Computer simulation and scientific visualization  

SciTech Connect

The simulation of processes in engineering and the physical sciences has progressed rapidly over the last several years. With rapid developments in supercomputers, parallel processing, numerical algorithms and software, scientists and engineers are now positioned to quantitatively simulate systems requiring many billions of arithmetic operations. The need to understand and assimilate such massive amounts of data has been a driving force in the development of both hardware and software to create visual representations of the underling physical systems. In this paper, and the accompanying videotape, the evolution and development of the visualization process in scientific computing will be reviewed. Specific applications and associated imaging hardware and software technology illustrate both the computational needs and the evolving trends. 6 refs.

Weber, D.P.; Moszur, F.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.

James Glimm; Xiaolin Li

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Visually simulating realistic fluid motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we investigate various methods for visually simulating fluid flow. The focus is on implementing effective fluid simulation within an interactive animation system. Two implementations have been developed based on derivations and simplifications of the Navier-Stokes' equations. The first implementation is the most accurate and follows the physics of fluid dynamics more closely. However, the high computation times incurred by this implementation make it inappropriate as an interactive method. The second approach is not as accurate as the first one, however it incurs lower computation times. This second method is only able to model a subset of the total fluid behavior. The second method has been integrated into an interactive modeling and animation environment. Several examples are included.

Naithani, Priyanka

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Simulation Research Group, LBNL, USA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* T. Hong () Simulation Research Group, LBNL, USA e-mail: thong@lbl.gov Building Energy Benchmarking between the United States and China: Methods and Challenges Tianzhen Hong 1,* , Le Yang 2 , Jianjun Xia 2 , Wei Feng 1 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China Abstract. Currently, buildings in the U.S. account for more than 40% of total primary energy. In China the

475

Reversible Simulations of Elastic Collisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consider a system of N identical hard spherical particles moving in a d-dimensional box and undergoing elastic, possibly multi-particle, collisions. We develop a new algorithm that recovers the pre-collision state from the post-collision state of the system, across a series of consecutive collisions, \\textit{with essentially no memory overhead}. The challenge in achieving reversibility for an n-particle collision (where, in general, nN) arises from the presence of nd-d-1 degrees of freedom (arbitrary angles) during each collision, as well as from the complex geometrical constraints placed on the colliding particles. To reverse the collisions in a traditional simulation setting, all of the particular realizations of these degrees of freedom (angles) during the forward simulation must be tracked. This requires memory proportional to the number of collisions, which grows very fast with N and d, thereby severely limiting the \\textit{de facto} applicability of the scheme. This limitation is addressed here by first performing a pseudo-randomization of angles, which ensures determinism in the reverse path for any values of n and d. To address the more difficult problem of geometrical and dynamic constraints, a new approach is developed which correctly samples the constrained phase space. Upon combining the pseudo-randomization with correct phase space sampling, perfect reversibility of collisions is achieved, as illustrated for nn=2, d=3. This result enables, for the first time, reversible simulations of elastic collisions with essentially zero memory accumulation. In principle, the approach presented here could be generalized to larger values of n, which would be of definite interest for molecular dynamics simulations at high densities.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Protopopescu, Vladimir A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Modeling and Simulation for Safeguards  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this talk is to give an overview of the role of modeling and simulation in Safeguards R&D and introduce you to (some of) the tools used. Some definitions are: (1) Modeling - the representation, often mathematical, of a process, concept, or operation of a system, often implemented by a computer program; (2) Simulation - the representation of the behavior or characteristics of one system through the use of another system, especially a computer program designed for the purpose; and (3) Safeguards - the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. The role of modeling and simulation are: (1) Calculate amounts of material (plant modeling); (2) Calculate signatures of nuclear material etc. (source terms); and (3) Detector performance (radiation transport and detection). Plant modeling software (e.g. FACSIM) gives the flows and amount of material stored at all parts of the process. In safeguards this allow us to calculate the expected uncertainty of the mass and evaluate the expected MUF. We can determine the measurement accuracy required to achieve a certain performance.

Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

477

FreedomCAR Automotive Lightweighting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 1, 2007... probable peaking of conventional petroleum production capacity in the ... SOURCE: Carpenter, Joseph A., Edward Daniels, Philip Sklad, ...

478

Ethanol Production for Automotive Fuel Usage  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of the 20 million gallon per year anhydrous ethanol facility a t Raft River has been completed. The corresponding geothermal gathering, extraction and reinjection systems to supply the process heating requirement were also completed. The ethanol facility operating on sugar beets, potatoes and wheat will share common fermentation and product recovery equipment. The geothermal fluid requirement will be approximately 6,000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by 9 supply wells spaced at no closer than 1/4 mile in order to prevent mutual interferences. The geothermal fluid will be flashed in three stages to supply process steam at 250 F, 225 F and 205 F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will all be reinjected through 9 reinjection wells. The capital cost estimated for this ethanol plant employing all three feedstocks is $64 million. If only a single feedstock were used (for the same 20 mm gal/yr plant) the capital costs are estimated at $51.6 million, $43.1 million and $40. 5 million for sugar beets, potatoes and wheat respectively. The estimated capital cost for the geothermal system is $18 million.

Lindemuth, T.E.; Stenzel, R.A.; Yim, Y.J.; Yu, J.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decay. - GDL properties can have an impact on membrane and electrode life (membrane cracking & shorting, electrode cracking). * Interface optimization is important - PlateGDL:...

480

Computing Tools for the Automotive Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easy way to estimate the impact of future transportation technologies and scenarios on oil use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. For example, VISION can calculate what the oil...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "autonomie automotive simulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Lighweight Materials for the Automotive: Environmental Impact ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive life cycle analysis for a reference car design was conducted to study ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

482

Double layer capacitors : automotive applications and modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents the work on the modeling of double layer capacitors (DLCs) and the validation of the modeling procedure. Several experiments were conducted to subject the device under test to a variety of ...

New, David Allen, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483