National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for automotive octane requirements

  1. Automotive Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology Developments Automotive Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology Developments Significant improvements in ...

  2. Automotive Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology Developments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Significant improvements in turbocharger performance will be difficult to achieve requires a proper understanding of the trade-offs and engine effects and impacts must be part of turbocharger development

  3. Methyl aryl ethers from coal liquids as gasoline extenders and octane improvers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singerman, G.M.

    1980-11-01

    A mixture of methyl aryl ethers derived from the phenols present in direct liquefaction coal liquids shows considerable promise as a gasoline blending agent and octane improver. The mixture of methyl aryl ethers was blended at five volume percent with a commercial, unleaded gasoline. The properties and performance of the blend in a variety of laboratory and automotive tests is reported. The tests show that the mixture of methyl aryl ethers improves gasoline octane without degrading other gasoline properties.

  4. Sorbent Material Property Requirements for On-Board Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J-K; Hua, T. Q.

    2015-05-25

    Material properties required for on-board hydrogen storage in cryogenic sorbents for use with automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems are discussed. Models are formulated for physical, thermodynamic and transport properties, and for the dynamics of H-2 refueling and discharge from a sorbent bed. A conceptual storage configuration with in-bed heat exchanger tubes, a Type-3 containment vessel, vacuum insulation and requisite balance-of-plant components is developed to determine the peak excess sorption capacity and differential enthalpy of adsorption for 5.5 wt% system gravimetric capacity and 55% well-to-tank (WTT) efficiency. The analysis also determines the bulk density to which the material must be compacted for the storage system to reach 40 g.L-1 volumetric capacity. Thermal transport properties and heat transfer enhancement methods are analyzed to estimate the material thermal conductivity needed to achieve 1.5 kg.min(-1) H-2 refueling rate. Operating temperatures and pressures are determined for 55% WTT efficiency and 95% usable H-2. Needs for further improvements in material properties are analyzed that would allow reduction of storage pressure to 50 bar from 100 bar, elevation of storage temperature to 175-200 K from 150 K, and increase of WTT efficiency to 57.5% or higher.

  5. A Vehicle Manufacturer's Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Manufacturer's Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Ford Motor Company DOE "Biomass 2014" meeting Washington, D.C. July 29, 2014 2 Octane rating of fuel The octane ...

  6. Bio Octane Energias Renov veis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Octane Energias Renov veis Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bio-Octane Energias Renovveis Place: Minas Gerais, Brazil Product: Brazil-based biodiesel producer, located in the...

  7. High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Breakout Session 1C-Fostering Technology ...

  8. Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology Outlook for global fuel economy requirements and ...

  9. BiOctane | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Biofuel start-up planning to design and develop a biodiesel and ethanol refinery. References: BiOctane1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  10. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive ...

  11. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces

  12. AZ Automotive: Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The role of midsize automotive module suppliers in meeting the goals of the Energy Independence and Security act of 2007

  13. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. deer10_ciatti.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Use of Low Cetane Fuel to Enable Low Temperature Combustion High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Engine via Fuel Reactivity Control

  15. A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Technical Expert, Powertrain Evaluation and Analysis, Ford Motor Company

  16. Coda Automotive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coda Automotive Place: Santa Monica, California Zip: 90403 Product: California-based electric vehicle company which builds its cars in China. References: Coda Automotive1...

  17. Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides overview of DOE-supported projects in automotive thermoelectric generators and heaters/air conditioners

  18. High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blend Market Assessment

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    High-Octane Mid-Level Ethanol Blend Market Assessment Caley Johnson, Emily Newes, Aaron Brooker, and Robert McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Steve Peterson Lexidyne, LLC Paul Leiby, Rocio Uria Martinez, and Gbadebo Oladosu Oak Ridge National Laboratory Maxwell L. Brown Colorado School of Mines Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-63698 December 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance

  19. Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator ... More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat ...

  20. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Automotive ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Workforce Development Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology ...

  2. FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

    1989-05-29

    Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

  3. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  4. High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Brian West, Deputy Director, Engines and Emissions Research Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  5. Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Corporation n SNL researcher Cy Fujimoto demonstrates his new flexible hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte mem- brane, which could be a key factor in realizing a hydrogen car. The close partnership between Sandia and AFCC has resulted in a very unique and promising technology for future automotive applications. Dr. Rajeev Vohra Manager R&D AFCC Hydrocarbon Membrane Fuels the Suc- cess of Future Generation Vehicles While every car manufacturer, such as GM and Ford, has developed their

  6. Ionization of ethane, butane, and octane in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Mitchell, Rob; Ekanayake, N.; Watts, A. M.; White, S. L.; Sauer, Rob; Howard, L. E.; Videtto, M.; Mancuso, C.; Wells, S. J.; Stanev, T.; Wen, B. L.; Decamp, M. F.; Walker, B. C.

    2010-10-15

    Strong-field photoionization of ethane, butane, and octane are reported at intensities from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. The molecular fragment ions, C{sup +} and C{sup 2+}, are created in an intensity window from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and have intensity-dependent yields similar to the molecular fragments C{sub m}H{sub n}{sup +} and C{sub m}H{sub n}{sup 2+}. In the case of C{sup +}, the yield is independent of the molecular parent chain length. The ionization of more tightly bound valence electrons in carbon (C{sup 3+} and C{sup 4+}) has at least two contributing mechanisms, one influenced by the parent molecule size and one resulting from the tunneling ionization of the carbon ion.

  7. Integrity Automotive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Joint venture between Kentucky businessman Randal Waldman of Integrity Manufacturing and California-based electric car maker Zap. References: Integrity Automotive1...

  8. Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015, the ITB Group’s 16th annual technical conference, was held from March 4–5, 2015, in Novi, Michigan.

  9. Bluebird Automotive | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Vehicles Product: Producer of electric vehicles for the delivery market and other cars, specialising in making fast electric vehicles. References: Bluebird Automotive1...

  10. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Overview and status of project to develop ...

  11. Bright Automotive Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Automotive Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bright Automotive, Inc. Place: Anderson, Indiana Zip: 46013 Product: Designer and OEM for the IDEA PHEV. References: Bright...

  12. Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE) Innovative Drivetrains in Electric Automotive Technology Education (IDEATE) 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells ...

  13. Korean Automotive Research Instituiton | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korean Automotive Research Instituiton Jump to: navigation, search Name: Korean Automotive Research Instituiton Place: Korea Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership...

  14. Fisker Automotive Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fisker Automotive Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fisker Automotive Inc Place: Irvine, California Zip: 92606 Product: Irvine-based hybrid vehicle manufacturer. Coordinates:...

  15. Green Automotive Company Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Automotive Company Inc Place: Texas Zip: 75001 Product: Texas-based electric vehicle manufacturer. References: Green Automotive...

  16. Oscar Automotive Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oscar Automotive Ltd Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: OSCar Automotive is working towards the commercialisation of hydrogen fuel...

  17. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D ...

  18. Thermoelectrics: The New Green Automotive Technology | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (5.35 MB) More Documents & Publications Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC Vehicular Thermoelectrics: A New Green Technology Thermoelectrics: The New Green Automotive

  19. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimization | Department of Energy The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization deer12_szybist.pdf (3.46 MB) More Documents & Publications High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced

  20. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  1. CRC program for quantifying performance of knock-sensor-equipped vehicles with varying octane level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    A pilot study was conducted under the auspices of the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. (CRC) to assess the potential effects of gasoline octane quality on acceleration performance, fuel economy and driveability in vehicles equipped with electronic spark control systems (knock sensors). Fourteen vehicles were tested by five participating laboratories on CRC unleaded reference fuels of varying octane quality (78 to 104 RON). The test vehicles included nine naturally-aspirated and five turbocharged models. The results showed that acceleration performance was the parameter most sensitive to octane quality changes, particularly in the turbocharged models.

  2. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Anthony, Brian W.

    1997-01-01

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  3. High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Bastian, R.D.; DeTavernier, S. . Dept. of Chemistry Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Zettlemoyer Center for Surface Studies)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize high octane ethers directly from coal-derived synthesis gas via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and isobutanol. The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. Commercial acid and superacid resin catalysts were obtained and tested under one set of conditions to compare the activities and selectivities for forming the unsymmetric methylisobutylether (MIBE) by coupling methanol with isobutanol. It was found that both Nafion-H microsaddles and Amberlyst-15 resins are active for this synthesis reaction. While and the Nafion-H catalyst does form the MIBE product fairly selectively under the reaction conditions utilized, the Amberlyst-15 catalyst formed dimethylether (DME) as the major product. In addition, significantly larger quantities of the C{sub 4} hydrocarbon products were observed over the Amberlyst-15 catalyst at 123{degree}C and 13.6 atm. It has been demonstrated that methyltertiarybutylether (MTBE) MIBE, DME and diisobutylether (DIBE) are separated and quantitatively determined by using the proper analytical conditions. In order to gain insight into the role of superacidity in promoting the selective coupling of the alcohols to form the unsymmetric ether, the strengths of the acid sites on the catalysts are being probed by thermometric titrations in non-aqueous solutions. 18 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. An experimental investigation of low octane gasoline in diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciatti, S. A.; Subramanian, S.

    2011-09-01

    Conventional combustion techniques struggle to meet the current emissions norms. In particular, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) emissions have limited the utilization of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Advance combustion concepts have proved the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emission performance. Low-temperature combustion (LTC) offers reduced NO{sub x} and PM emissions with comparable modern diesel engine efficiencies. The ability of premixed, low-temperature compression ignition to deliver low PM and NO{sub x} emissions is dependent on achieving optimal combustion phasing. Diesel operated LTC is limited by early knocking combustion, whereas conventional gasoline operated LTC is limited by misfiring. So the concept of using an unconventional fuel with the properties in between those two boundary fuels has been experimented in this paper. Low-octane (84 RON) gasoline has shown comparable diesel efficiencies with the lowest NO{sub x} emissions at reasonable high power densities (NO{sub x} emission was 1 g/kW h at 12 bar BMEP and 2750 rpm).

  5. Advanced Automotive Technologies annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    This annual report serves to inform the United States Congress on the progress for fiscal year 1996 of programs under the Department of Energy`s Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies (OAAT). This document complies with the legislative requirement to report on the implementation of Title III of the Automotive Propulsion Research and Development Act of 1978. Also reported are related activities performed under subsequent relevant legislation without specific reporting requirements. Furthermore, this report serves as a vital means of communication from the Department to all public and private sector participants. Specific requirements that are addressed in this report are: Discussion of how each research and development contract, grant, or project funded under the authority of this Act satisfies the requirements of each subsection; Current comprehensive program definition for implementing Title III; Evaluation of the state of automotive propulsion system research and development in the United States; Number and amount of contracts and grants awarded under Title III; Analysis of the progress made in developing advanced automotive propulsion system technology; and Suggestions for improvements in automotive propulsion system research and development, including recommendations for legislation.

  6. Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of

  7. Automotive Thermoelectric Generator Design Issues

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mechanical, electrical, thermal engineering, and durability issues related to use of TEGs in the challenging automotive environment need to be resolved as they affect warranty cost and customer acceptance.

  8. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  9. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-08-01

    Software for predicting the octane number of motor gasoline by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry has been formulated. At the same time, a method has been studied to predict the composition of gasoline (in terms of the contents of paraffin, olefin, and aromatic compounds). The formulated program was evaluated by using it to predict the octane numbers of 31 samples of marketed summer gasoline (including 16 regular and 15 premium products), whose octane numbers and compositions were identified according to the ASTM standards. Also, the relationship between the PMR spectrum and gasoline composition was subjected to linear regression analysis by using the 31 samples whose octane numbers were calculated, and the appropriateness of the resultant regression equations was assessed. This report concerns the results of the study in which the octane numbers of the 31 samples were satisfactorily predicted by the formulated program and useful linear regression equation were obtained for the prediction of the composition of gasoline. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces

  11. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical ...

  12. NSF/DOE Thermoelectics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery NSFDOE Thermoelectics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery 2011 DOE ...

  13. Bannon Automotive LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Bannon Automotive LLC Place: New York Product: New York-based manufacturer of electric cars. References: Bannon Automotive LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  14. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards September 8, 2011 - 11:46am Addthis Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Initiative Awards DOE's Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) initiative will award $6.4 million over the course of five years to support seven Centers of Excellence at American colleges, universities, and university-affiliated research

  15. Combined Sustainability Assessment and Techno-Economic Analysis for the Production of Biomass-Derived High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit

    2015-11-13

    Conversion technologies for biomass to liquid hydrocarbon fuels are being actively developed. Converting biomass into advanced hydrocarbon fuels requires detailed assessments to help prioritize research; techno-economic analysis (TEA) is a long established tool used to assess feasibility and progress. TEA provides information needed to make informed judgments about the viability of any given conceptual conversion process; it is particularly useful to identify technical barriers and measure progress toward overcoming those barriers. Expansion of the cellulosic biofuels industry at the scale needed to meet the Renewable Fuel Standard goals is also expected to have environmental impacts. Hence, the success of the biofuels industry depends not only on economic viability, but also on environmental sustainability. A biorefinery process that is economically feasible but suffers from key sustainability drawbacks is not likely to represent a long-term solution to replace fossil-derived fuels. Overarching concerns like environmental sustainability need to be addressed for biofuels production. Combined TEA and environmental sustainability assessment of emerging pathways helps facilitate biorefinery designs that are both economically feasible and minimally impactful to the environment. This study focuses on environmental sustainability assessment and techno-economic analysis for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via gasification and methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates. Results from the conceptual process design with economic analysis, along with the quantification and assessment of the environmental sustainability, are presented and discussed. Sustainability metrics associated with the production of high-octane gasoline include carbon conversion efficiency, consumptive water use, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy consumption, energy return on investment and net energy value.

  16. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Indirect Liquefaction of Blended Biomass to Produce High Octane Gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Hao; Canter, Christina E.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Tan, Eric; Biddy, Mary; Talmadge, Michael; Hartley, Damon S.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) aims at developing and deploying technologies to transform renewable biomass resources into commercially viable, high-performance biofuels, bioproducts and biopower through public and private partnerships (DOE, 2015). BETO also performs a supply chain sustainability analysis (SCSA). This report describes the SCSA of the production of renewable high octane gasoline (HOG) via indirect liquefaction (IDL) of lignocellulosic biomass. This SCSA was developed for the 2017 design case for feedstock logistics (INL, 2014) and for the 2022 target case for HOG production via IDL (Tan et al., 2015). The design includes advancements that are likely and targeted to be achieved by 2017 for the feedstock logistics and 2022 for the IDL conversion process. The 2017 design case for feedstock logistics demonstrated a delivered feedstock cost of $80 per dry U.S. short ton by the year 2017 (INL, 2014). The 2022 design case for the conversion process, as modeled in Tan et al. (2015), uses the feedstock 2017 design case blend of biomass feedstocks consisting of pulpwood, wood residue, switchgrass, and construction and demolition waste (C&D) with performance properties consistent with a sole woody feedstock type (e.g., pine or poplar). The HOG SCSA case considers the 2017 feedstock design case (the blend) as well as individual feedstock cases separately as alternative scenarios when the feedstock blend ratio varies as a result of a change in feedstock availability. These scenarios could be viewed as bounding SCSA results because of distinctive requirements for energy and chemical inputs for the production and logistics of different components of the blend feedstocks.

  17. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

    2005-09-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

  18. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  19. Autonomie: Automotive System Design | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Autonomie: Automotive System Design Autonomie: Automotive System Design Argonne's Autonomie is a MATLAB©-based software environment and framework for automotive control system design, simulation and analysis. Autonomie is capable of Model-in-the-Loop (MIL), Software-in-the-Loop (SIL), Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) and Rapid-Control-Prototyping (RCP) Integrating math-based engineering activities through all stages of development Mixing and matching models of different levels of abstraction with

  20. Autonomie Automotive Simulation Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    industrial, aerospace, and automotive applications. It provides an efficient methodology that includes four key elements in the development process: modeling a plant (from...

  1. Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 16. Technology Integration and Education GATE Center of Excellence in ...

  2. Electrifying the Automotive Market | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrifying the Automotive Market Argonne is developing battery technology that extends the range for electric vehicles while increasing safety and decreasing price. PDF icon...

  3. Engine autoignition: The relationship between octane numbers and autoignition delay times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, Derek; Head, R.A.

    2006-11-15

    The research octane (RON) and motor octane (MON) numbers, carefully measured in standardized tests, are the principal parameters for characterizing autoignition of gasoline in engines. Increasingly, engines operate under different conditions of temperature, pressure, and mixture strength from those in these tests. As a result, RON and MON values become an incomplete guide to the onset of knock, and the octane index (OI), an octane number under operational conditions, is often measured. Values of the OI were measured with different fuels in a controlled autoignition single-cylinder engine, at different initial temperatures and pressures, at the instant of 10% heat release. Fundamental understanding of engine autoignition was sought by finding the OIs of different non-primary reference fuels (non-PRFs) by identifying the corresponding PRFs that give 10% heat release under identical conditions. The autoignition delay times of the PRFs were obtained from the shock tube data, for different temperatures and pressures, of the Aachen group. It was sufficiently accurate to equate the delay time of a non-PRF to that of the corresponding PRF under the same conditions for 10% heat release. The PRFs exhibited a higher value of the inverse pressure exponent for the delay time than the non-PRFs. Together with different temperature dependencies, these gave autoignition delay times of non-PRFs that could be higher than those of their associated RONs. This tendency increased with pressure and decreased with temperature and was most marked with olefenic and toluenic fuels. This could result in values of the OI that were higher than the RON of the fuel. This is important because, for a number of evolutionary reasons, engine pressures are tending to increase and temperatures to decrease. (author)

  4. PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and ...

  5. Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education (Gate) Program for In-Vehicle, High-Power Energy Storage Systems Penn State DOE Graduate Automotive Technology Education ...

  6. Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? Title Can Automotive Battery Recycling Help Meet Lithium Demand? Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2013...

  7. W.E.T. Automotive Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    E.T. Automotive Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: W.E.T. Automotive Systems Place: Odelzhausen, Germany Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes...

  8. Fact #868: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles - Dataset Fact 868: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved ...

  9. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4. Automotive Metals-Titanium FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive Metals-Titanium Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and ...

  10. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Automotive Metals-Wrought FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals-Wrought Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation ...

  11. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3. Automotive Metals - Cast FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals - Cast The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  12. High Efficiency Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Application...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications High Efficiency Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications Large increases in engine thermal efficiency result ...

  13. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. Automotive Metals-Steel FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive Metals-Steel Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of ...

  14. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Automotive Metals - Wrought FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals - Wrought The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate ...

  15. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. Automotive Metals - Steel FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive Metals - Steel The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  16. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6. Automotive Metals - Crosscutting FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals - Crosscutting The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to ...

  17. CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project Categorical ...

  18. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4. Automotive Metals - Titanium FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive Metals - Titanium The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to ...

  19. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and ...

  20. Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt ...

  2. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3. Automotive Metals-Cast FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals-Cast Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of ...

  3. Electrocatalysts for Automotive Fuel Cells: Status and Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrocatalysts for Automotive Fuel Cells: Status and Challenges Electrocatalysts for Automotive Fuel Cells: Status and Challenges Presentation by Nilesh Dale for the 2013 DOE ...

  4. Xiamien King Long United Automotive Industry Suzhou | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xiamien King Long United Automotive Industry Suzhou Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xiamien King Long United Automotive Industry (Suzhou) Place: Suzhou, Fujian Province, China...

  5. Zap Youngman Automotive Group JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Zap & Youngman Automotive Group JV Place: China Sector: Vehicles Product: Joint Venture between ZAP (OTCBB: ZAAP) and Youngman Automotive Group (China) to develop,...

  6. Reva Electric Bannon Automotive JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    & Bannon Automotive JV Place: New York Product: New York-based JV, manufacturer of electric cars. References: Reva Electric & Bannon Automotive JV1 This article is a stub....

  7. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) autoroadmap.pdf (481.39 KB) More ...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence to provide future generations of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive...

  9. The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on Ethanol Engine Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P; West, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called E85, underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane E85 fuel. While this fuel is suitable for current ethanol tolerant flex fuel vehicles, this study experimentally examines whether engines can still be aggressively optimized for the resultant fuel from the revised ASTM D5798 specification. The performance of six ethanol fuel blends, ranging from 51-85% ethanol, is compared to a premium-grade certification gasoline (UTG-96) in a single-cylinder direct-injection (DI) engine with a compression ratio of 12.9:1 at knock-prone engine conditions. UTG-96 (RON = 96.1), light straight run gasoline (RON = 63.6), and n-heptane (RON = 0) are used as the hydrocarbon blending streams for the ethanol-containing fuels in an effort to establish a broad range of knock resistance for high ethanol fuels. Results show that nearly all ethanol-containing fuels are more resistant to engine knock than UTG-96 (the only exception being the ethanol blend with 49% n-heptane). This knock resistance allows ethanol blends made with 33 and 49% light straight run gasoline, and 33% n-heptane to be operated at significantly more advanced combustion phasing for higher efficiency, as well as at higher engine loads. While experimental results show that the octane number of the hydrocarbon

  10. Effects of High Octane Ethanol Blends on Four Legacy Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and a Turbocharged GDI Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F; West, Brian H; Huff, Shean P

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting engine and vehicle research to investigate the potential of high-octane fuels to improve fuel economy. Ethanol has very high research octane number (RON) and heat of vaporization (HoV), properties that make it an excellent spark ignition engine fuel. The prospects of increasing both the ethanol content and the octane number of the gasoline pool has the potential to enable improved fuel economy in future vehicles with downsized, downsped engines. This report describes a small study to explore the potential performance benefits of high octane ethanol blends in the legacy fleet. There are over 17 million flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) on the road today in the United States, vehicles capable of using any fuel from E0 to E85. If a future high-octane blend for dedicated vehicles is on the horizon, the nation is faced with the classic chicken-and-egg dilemma. If today’s FFVs can see a performance advantage with a high octane ethanol blend such as E25 or E30, then perhaps consumer demand for this fuel can serve as a bridge to future dedicated vehicles. Experiments were performed with four FFVs using a 10% ethanol fuel (E10) with 88 pump octane, and a market gasoline blended with ethanol to make a 30% by volume ethanol fuel (E30) with 94 pump octane. The research octane numbers were 92.4 for the E10 fuel and 100.7 for the E30 fuel. Two vehicles had gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines, and two featured port fuel injection (PFI). Significant wide open throttle (WOT) performance improvements were measured for three of the four FFVs, with one vehicle showing no change. Additionally, a conventional (non-FFV) vehicle with a small turbocharged direct-injected engine was tested with a regular grade of gasoline with no ethanol (E0) and a splash blend of this same fuel with 15% ethanol by volume (E15). RON was increased from 90.7 for the E0 to 97.8 for the E15 blend. Significant wide open throttle and thermal efficiency performance

  11. United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC (USAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States Automotive Materials Partnership

    2011-01-31

    materials and technologies, and have resulted in significant technical successes to date, as discussed in the individual project summary final reports. Over 70 materials-focused projects have been established by USAMP, in collaboration with participating suppliers, academic/non-profit organizations and national laboratories, and executed through its original three divisions: the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), the Automotive Metals Division (AMD), and Auto/Steel Partnership (A/SP). Two new divisions were formed by USAMP in 2006 to drive research emphasis on integration of structures incorporating dissimilar lightweighting materials, and on enabling technology for nondestructive evaluation of structures and joints. These new USAMP divisions are: Multi-Material Vehicle Research and Development Initiative (MMV), and the Non-Destructive Evaluation Steering Committee (NDE). In cooperation with USAMP and the FreedomCAR Materials Technical Team, a consensus process has been established to facilitate the development of projects to help move leveraged research to targeted development projects that eventually migrate to the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) as application engineering projects. Research projects are assigned to one of three phases: concept feasibility, technical feasibility, and demonstration feasibility. Projects are guided through ongoing monitoring and USAMP offsite reviews, so as to meet the requirements of each phase before they are allowed to move on to the next phase. As progress is made on these projects, the benefits of lightweight construction and enabling technologies will be transferred to the supply base and implemented in production vehicles. The single greatest barrier to automotive use of lightweight materials is their high cost; therefore, priority is given to activities aimed at reducing costs through development of new materials, forming technologies, and manufacturing processes. The emphasis of the research projects reported in this

  12. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near Net Shape Automotive Panels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Development of Advancing Automotive Panel Manufacturing for Increased Energy and Material Savings

  13. Automotive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  14. Chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semelsberger, Troy; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage is the sought after hydrogen storage media for automotive applications because of the expected low pressure operation (<20 atm), moderate temperature operation (<200 C), system gravimetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/kg system), and system volumetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/L system). Currently, the primary shortcomings of chemical hydrogen storage are regeneration efficiency, fuel cost and fuel phase (i.e., solid or slurry phase). Understanding the required material properties to meet the DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems is a critical knowledge gap in the hydrogen storage research community. This study presents a set of fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications meeting the 2017 DOE technical targets. Viable material properties were determined using a boiler-plate automotive system design. The fluid phase chemical hydrogen storage media considered in this study were neat liquids, solutions, and non-settling homogeneous slurries. Material properties examined include kinetics, heats of reaction, fuel-cell impurities, gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities, and regeneration efficiency. The material properties, although not exhaustive, are an essential first step in identifying viable chemical hydrogen storage material propertiesdand most important, their implications on system mass, system volume and system performance.

  15. Solubilities of toluene and n-octane in aqueous protosurfactant and surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The solubilities of toluene and n-octane in aqueous protosurfactant and surfactant solutins were determined at 25/sup 0/C. The protosurfactants studied are sodium salts of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, 2,5-diisopropylbenzenesulfonic acid, and 3,5-diisopropyisalicylic acid. Each of them has six alkyl carbons (S /SUB AC/ =6) and does not form micelles in water. The two micelle-forming surfactants used are sodium n-hexanoate with six alkyl carbons (S /SUB AC/ =6) and sodium n-octanoate with eight alkyl carbons (S /SUB AC/ =8). In three-component systems of toluene or n-octane with water and organic salt (either protosurfactant or surfactant), the solubility of the hydrocarbon in the aqueous phase increases as the number of alkyl carbons of the organic salt and as the aqueous concentration of the organic salt increases. However, in this study we found that sodium 3,5-diisopropyisalicylate causes much more pronounced increases in hydrocarbon solubility than these two surfactants. Sodium 2,5-diisopropylbenzenesulfonate, although not as effective in solubilization as the salicylate, has much stronger hydrotropic properties for hydrocarbons than either of these two surfactants. Sodium cyclohexanoate, with a compact arrangement of the six alkyl carbons, shows a higher hydrotropic effect than sodium n-hexanoate.

  16. Process for producing gasoline of high octane number and particularly lead free gasoline, from olefininc c3-c4 cuts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellin, M.; Juguin, B.; Torck, B.; Vu, Q. D.

    1981-05-19

    Lead free gasoline of high octane number is obtained from C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ olefinic cuts as follows: propylene contained in the C/sub 3/ cut is oligomerized, at least 80% of the isobutene and less than 40% of the n-butenes of the C/sub 4/ cut are oligomerized to form an oligomerizate distilling in the gasoline range, which is separated from the unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons, the latter are subsequently alkylated to form a gasoline fraction which can be admixed with the oligomerizates of the Cnumber and the C/sub 4/ cuts to produce the desired high octane gasoline.

  17. Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USCAR / FreedomCAR Fuel Cell Tech Team Industry Members Craig Gittleman, David Masten and Scott Jorgensen General Motors James Waldecker, Shinichi Hirano and Mark Mehall Ford Motor Company Tarek Abdel-Baset Chrysler LLC Automotive Fuel Cell R&D Needs DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop March 16, 2010 Golden, CO General Motors - Ford - Chrysler Overview * Purpose: To provide automotive OEM perspective on topics recommended for study in the DOE Fuel Cell Subprogram * Categories described

  18. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ace067_goodson_2012_o.pdf (5.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces

  19. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace067_goodson_2011_o.pdf (1.89 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application

  20. Localized corrosion resistance of automotive exhaust alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabata, A.; Brossia, C.S.; Behling, M.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion in automotive exhaust systems can be broadly classified as (a) cold end corrosion and (b) hot end corrosion. For the cold end, the requirements include inside-out perforation corrosion resistance and cosmetic corrosion resistance. Perforation corrosion causes noticeable degradation in noise quality and may even affect the back pressure. For the hot end, the key concern has been perforation corrosion resistance. With the use of oxygen sensors in catalytic converters, the failure criteria will become more stringent. Numerous accelerated corrosion tests have been used to rank materials for the Hot End and the Cold End. These include (a) Continuous Test, (b) Cyclic Tests -- Hot End, (c) Cyclic Tests -- Cold End, (d) Electrochemical Ranking. In this paper the authors evaluate some of the commonly used exhaust materials in these accelerated tests. These accelerated tests are easy to use, inexpensive to run as compared to proving ground testing or trailer testing and can provide information in a relatively short time. Here they report lab work to date on some of the accelerated corrosion testing for perforation corrosion resistance. Note that these tests are useful for ranking materials only. Life expectancy of the material can be given only after a correlation is established between the accelerated tests and field performance. The electrochemical tests were designed to gain insight into pit growth kinetics in the accelerated tests.

  1. Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and 2020 Cost Targets Interim Update: Global Automotive Power Electronics R&D Relevant To DOE 2015 and ...

  2. Fact #921: April 18, 2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion Batteries by Capacity in 2014 - Dataset Fact 921: April 18, 2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion Batteries by ...

  3. Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 Automotive Accessibility and Efficiency Meet in the Innovative MV-1 March 11, 2011 - 4:03pm Addthis The MV-1, a ...

  4. Electrocatalysts for Automotive Fuel Cells: Status and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Nilesh Dale for the 2013 DOE Catalyst Working Group Meeting on electrocatalysts for automotive fuel cells.

  5. Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell membranes in automotive applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_membr_auto.pdf (99.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive R&D Plan for the High Temperature Membrane

  6. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Overview and status of project to develop thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery and achieve at least 10% fuel economy improvement. deer08_gundlach.pdf (1 MB) More Documents & Publications Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry Develop Thermoelectric

  7. Fact #570: May 11, 2009 Automotive Manufacturing Employment Declining |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: May 11, 2009 Automotive Manufacturing Employment Declining Fact #570: May 11, 2009 Automotive Manufacturing Employment Declining The number of people employed by automotive manufacturing has been decreasing since 2000. Although nearly three times as many people are employed by motor vehicle parts manufacturing as motor vehicle manufacturing, parts manufacturing has experienced a sharper decline in employment since 2000. Automotive Manufacturing Employment, 1990-2008

  8. Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ape015_anderson_2010_o.pdf (2.46 MB) More Documents & Publications Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Permanent Magnet Development for

  9. Automotive Perspective on PEM Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PEM Evaluation Automotive Perspective on PEM Evaluation Presented at the 2009 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held May 18, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia htmwg_may09_automotive_perspective.pdf (2.8 MB) More Documents & Publications Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications New Membranes for PEM Fuel Cells Membrane and MEA Accelerated Stress Test Protocols

  10. NSF/DOE Thermoelectics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Recovery | Department of Energy 4_xu_2011_p.pdf (2.97 MB) More Documents & Publications NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Purdue … GM Partnership on Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

  11. Past experiences with automotive external combustion engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amann, C.A.

    1999-07-01

    GMR (General Motors Research Laboratories, now GM R and D Center) has a history of improving the internal combustion engine, especially as it relates to automotive use. During the quarter century from 1950--75, considerable effort was devoted to evaluating alternative powerplants based on thermodynamic cycles different from those on which the established spark-ignition and diesel engines are founded. Two of these, the steam engine and the Stirling engine, incorporated external combustion. Research on those two alternatives is reviewed. Both were judged to fall short of current needs for commercial success as prime movers for conventional automotive vehicles.

  12. Mod I automotive Stirling engine mechanical development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simetkosky, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Mod I Stirling engine was the first automotive Stirling engine designed specifically for automotive application. Testing of these engines has revealed several deficiencies in engine mechanical integrity which have been corrected by redesign or upgrade. The main deficiencies uncovered during the Mod I program lie in the combustion, auxiliary, main seal, and heater head areas. This paper will address each of the major area deficiencies in detail, and describe the corrective actions taken as they apply to the Mod I and the next Stirling-engine design, the Upgraded Mod I (a redesign to incorporate new materials for cost/weight reduction and improved performance).

  13. Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automotive Deployment Option Projection Tool (ADOPT) Model (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Objectives Estimate the petroleum use impacts of alternative technologies and policies. Estimate future vehicle market share based on infrastructure constraints, consumer preferences, and vehicle attributes. Analyze policy options by considering factors such as vehicle incentives and energy prices. Key Attributes & Strengths The model validates in many relevant dimensions with historical vehicle

  14. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  15. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  16. Passive Two-Phase Cooling for Automotive Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated and tested using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245 fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator concept that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce its size was designed. Simulation results indicate the concept's thermal resistance can be 58% to 65% lower than automotive dual-side-cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers-plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  17. DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETIC MODELING OF ISO-OCTANE SI-HCCI TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havstad, M A; Aceves, S M; McNenly, M J; Piggott, W T; Edwards, K D; Wagner, R M; Daw, C S; Finney, C A

    2009-10-12

    The authors describe a CHEMKIN-based multi-zone model that simulates the expected combustion variations in a single-cylinder engine fueled with iso-octane as the engine transitions from spark-ignited (ST) combustion to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. The model includes a 63-species reaction mechanism and mass and energy balances for the cylinder and the exhaust flow. For this study they assumed that the SI-to-HCCI transition is implemented by means of increasing the internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) at constant engine speed. This transition scneario is consistent with that implemented in previously reported experimental measurements on an experimental engine equipped with variable valve actuation. They find that the model captures many of the important experimental trends, including stable SI combustion at low EGR ({approx} 0.10), a transition to highly unstable combustion at intermediate EGR, and finally stable HCCI combustion at very high EGR ({approx} 0.75). Remaining differences between the predicted and experimental instability patterns indicate that there is further room for model improvement.

  18. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Iso-octane SI-HCCI Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havstad, Mark A; Aceves, Salvador M; McNenly, Matthew J; Piggott, William T; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Daw, C Stuart; FINNEY, Charles E A

    2010-01-01

    We describe a CHEMKIN-based multi-zone model that simulates the expected combustion variations in a single-cylinder engine fueled with iso-octane as the engine transitions from spark-ignited (SI) combustion to homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. The model includes a 63-species reaction mechanism and mass and energy balances for the cylinder and the exhaust flow. For this study we assumed that the SI-to-HCCI transition is implemented by means of increasing the internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) at constant engine speed. This transition scenario is consistent with that implemented in previously reported experimental measurements on an experimental engine equipped with variable valve actuation. We find that the model captures many of the important experimental trends, including stable SI combustion at low EGR (-0.10), a transition to highly unstable combustion at intermediate EGR, and finally stable HCCI combustion at very high EGR (-0.75). Remaining differences between the predicted and experimental instability patterns indicate that there is further room for model improvement.

  19. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-15

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  20. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  1. Demand forecasting for automotive sector in Malaysia by system dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zulkepli, Jafri Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Fong, Chan Hwa

    2015-12-11

    In general, Proton as an automotive company needs to forecast future demand of the car to assist in decision making related to capacity expansion planning. One of the forecasting approaches that based on judgemental or subjective factors is normally used to forecast the demand. As a result, demand could be overstock that eventually will increase the operation cost; or the company will face understock, which resulted losing their customers. Due to automotive industry is very challenging process because of high level of complexity and uncertainty involved in the system, an accurate tool to forecast the future of automotive demand from the modelling perspective is required. Hence, the main objective of this paper is to forecast the demand of automotive Proton car industry in Malaysia using system dynamics approach. Two types of intervention namely optimistic and pessimistic experiments scenarios have been tested to determine the capacity expansion that can prevent the company from overstocking. Finding from this study highlighted that the management needs to expand their production for optimistic scenario, whilst pessimistic give results that would otherwise. Finally, this study could help Proton Edar Sdn. Bhd (PESB) to manage the long-term capacity planning in order to meet the future demand of the Proton cars.

  2. Friction of Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2013-01-01

    This brief overview of friction-related issues in materials for automobiles is invited for a special issue on automotive materials in the ASM journal AM&P. It describes a range of areas in a ground vehicle in which friction must be controlled or minimized. Applications range from piston rings to tires, and from brakes to fuel injector components. A perspective on new materials and lubricants, and the need for validation testing is presented.

  3. Automotive Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presents thermal management of lithium-ion battery packs for electric vehicles cunningham.pdf (691.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity Overview of Battery R&D Activities

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology | Department of Energy 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Presentation given by Cree at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about 88 kilowatt automotive inverter with new

  5. CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX: Categorical Determination-Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project Categorical Determination Alcoa Tennessee Automotive Sheet Expansion Project CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 05/06/2014 Location(s): Alcoa, Tennessee Offices(s): Loan Programs Office More Documents & Publications CX-012188: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012189: Categorical Exclusion

  6. The Challenges for PEMFC Catalysts in Automotive Applications | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy The Challenges for PEMFC Catalysts in Automotive Applications The Challenges for PEMFC Catalysts in Automotive Applications Presentation by Stephen Campbell for the 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting on PEMFC catalysts in automotive applications. cwg_may2013_campbell.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications FCTO Consortia Overview (HyMARC and FC-PAD) Webinar FCTO Consortia Overview (HyMARC and FC-PAD) Webinar Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism

  7. Automotive Perspective on Membrane Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Membrane Evaluation Automotive Perspective on Membrane Evaluation Presentation at the 2008 High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held June 9, 2008, in Washington, DC waldecker_htmwg_2008.pdf (86.19 KB) More Documents & Publications Transportation Fuel Cell R&D Needs (Presentation) Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs Analysis of the Durability of PEM FC Membrane Electrode Assemblies in Automotive Applications

  8. TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer | Department of Energy Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer TODAY: Secretary Chu and Senator Stabenow to Announce Advanced Automotive Technology Loan for Michigan Manufacturer July 13, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will join U.S. Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow on a conference call to make an announcement regarding an advanced automotive

  9. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive Technical targets for fuel cell CCMs in automotive applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). technical_targets_ccms_auto.pdf (117.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary R&D Plan for the High Temperature

  10. Racing Ahead in Automotive Education | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Racing Ahead in Automotive Education Racing Ahead in Automotive Education February 18, 2011 - 4:52pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Helps develop the next generation of innovative auto engineers Where will the next generation of automotive innovation come from? That's a question that's driving discussion throughout the auto industry at the moment, and many hope that the answer lies in the next generation of

  11. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy ... Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and ...

  12. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry On Thermoelectric Properties of p-Type Skutterudites Development of Thermoelectric ...

  13. Automotive Thermoelectric Moduleswith Scalable Thermo- andElectro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moduleswith Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Automotive Thermoelectric Moduleswith Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Interface materials based on ...

  14. ECIS-Automotive Fuel Cell Corporation: Hydrocarbon Membrane Fuels...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sandia researcher Cy Fujimoto demonstrates his new flexible hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte membrane, which could be a key factor in realizing a hydrogen car. Current automotive ...

  15. Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and Energy Applications Citation ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  16. Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Shear Rolling of Magnesium Sheet for Automotive, Defense, and Energy Applications Authors: Muralidharan, Govindarajan 1 ; Muth, Thomas R 1 ; Peter, William H 1 ; ...

  17. Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications Presented by Tom Greszler of General Motors at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group ...

  18. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents nanostructured thermal/electrical interface tapeŽ concept involving carbon nanotube and metal nanowire films to improve thermomechanical cycling behavior of automotive TEGs

  19. Automotive Energy Supply Corporation AESC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Automotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC) Place: Zama, Kanagawa, Japan Product: JV formed for development and marketing of advanced lithium-ion batteries for...

  20. Final report: U.S. competitive position in automotive technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, Michael B.; Cheney, Margaret; Thomas, Patrick; Kroll, Peter

    2002-09-30

    Patent data are presented and analyzed to assess the U.S. competitive position in eleven advanced automotive technology categories, including automotive fuel cells, hydrogen storage, advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles and others. Inventive activity in most of the technologies is found to be growing at a rapid pace, particularly in advanced batteries, automotive fuel cells and ultracapacitors. The U.S. is the clear leader in automotive fuel cells, on-board hydrogen storage and light weight materials. Japan leads in advanced batteries, hybrid electric vehicles, ultracapacitors, and appears to be close to overtaking the U.S. in other areas of power electronics.

  1. Automotive Fuels - The Challenge for Sustainable Mobility | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels - The Challenge for Sustainable Mobility Automotive Fuels - The Challenge for Sustainable Mobility Overview of challenges and future fuel options deer12warnecke.pdf (1.72 ...

  2. Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Economic and Environmental Tradeoffs in New Automotive Painting Technologies Painting is the most expensive unit operation in automobile manufacturing and the source of over ...

  3. Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, held April 16, 2013.

  4. US Council for Automotive Research USCAR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Automotive Research (USCAR) Place: Southfield, Michigan Zip: 48075 - Product: Umbrella organization of DaimlerChrysler, Ford and General Motors, formed to conduct research....

  5. Development of Computer-Aided Design Tools for Automotive Batteries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Progress of Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries (CAEBAT) Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Computer-Aided Design Tools for Automotive Batteries ...

  6. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Development of Cost-Competitive ...

  7. Automotive frames of stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmons, J.B.; Douthett, J.

    1996-08-01

    A lightweight, stainless steel vehicle modular frame that meets the requirements of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is being jointly developed by Armco and Autokinetics. Reaching the long-term goal of the program known as the Supercar will require technology that is capable of significantly reducing mass, while holding the cost of the finished vehicle to current levels. The structure should reduce mass by at least 50%, and must be high in performance, practical to manufacture, and conceptually simple compared to current practice. Another key PNGV goal is the development of a manufacturing infrastructure to attain cost and production levels consistent with auto industry norms. A third goal is to spin off as much of the resulting advanced technology as possible to conventional vehicles, enabling them to benefit from advances in mass reduction, aerodynamics, and materials technologies. All of these benefits can be realized with the stainless steel modular frame.

  8. Automotive Lithium-ion Battery Supply Chain and U.S. Competitiveness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Automotive Lithium-ion Battery Supply Chain and U.S. Competitiveness Considerations Automotive Lithium-ion Battery Supply Chain and U.S. Competitiveness Considerations This Clean ...

  9. The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 09/16/10 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 091610 The Automotive X Prize rolls into Washington, DC 091610 Addthis ProgressiveXPrizeEventSeptember162010Peraves187mpg...

  10. Sources of UHC and CO in Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UHC and CO in Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Systems Sources of UHC and CO in Low Temperature Automotive Diesel Combustion Systems Presentation given at the 16th ...

  11. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near Net Shape Automotive Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures.

  12. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ace_45_yang.pdf (1.15 MB) More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Solid-State Energy Conversion Overview

  13. Waste audit study: Automotive paint shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the results of a waste-audit study of automotive paint shops. The study focuses on the types and quantities of wastes generated, treatment and disposal alternatives, and the potential for reducing the amount and/or toxicity of waste generated. The analysis of solvent waste minimization focused primarily on in-plant modifications (e.g., source reduction) to reduce the generation of solvent waste. Strict inventory control is the most-readily implementable approach. While in-house recycling is viable, it is usually only cost-effective for larger firms. Specific recommendations for waste reduction were made.

  14. Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of

  15. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  16. Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation reports on direct hydrogen PEMFC manufacturing cost estimation for automotive applications.

  17. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to High Octane Gasoline: Thermochemical Research Pathway with Indirect Gasification and Methanol Intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Eric; Talmadge, M.; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Schaidle, Josh; Biddy, Mary J.; Humbird, David; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ross, Jeff; Sexton, Danielle; Yap, Raymond; Lukas, John

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes research for enabling cost-competitive liquid fuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research is geared to advance the state of technology (SOT) of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of their involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction (IDL). The steps involve the conversion of biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas cleanup and catalytic syngas conversion to a methanol intermediate; methanol is then further catalytically converted to high octane hydrocarbons. The conversion process model leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via tar and hydrocarbons reforming was one of the key technology advancements as part of that research. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area with downstream utilization of clean biomass-syngas for the production of high octane hydrocarbon products through a methanol intermediate, i.e., dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME) which subsequently undergoes homologation to high octane hydrocarbon products.

  18. Electromagnetic interference filter for automotive electrical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Carlson, Douglas S; Tang, David; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-02

    A filter for an automotive electrical system includes a substrate having first and second conductive members. First and second input terminals are mounted to the substrate. The first input terminal is electrically connected to the first conductive member, and the second input terminal is electrically connected to the second conductive member. A plurality of capacitors are mounted to the substrate. Each of the capacitors is electrically connected to at least one of the first and second conductive members. First and second power connectors are mounted to the substrate. The first power connector is electrically connected to the first conductive member, and the second power connector is electrically connected to the second conductive member. A common mode choke is coupled to the substrate and arranged such that the common mode choke extends around at least a portion of the substrate and the first and second conductive members.

  19. A historical analysis of the co-evolution of gasoline octane number and spark-ignition engines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Splitter, Derek A.; Pawlowski, Alex E.; Wagner, Robert M.

    2016-01-06

    In our work, the authors reviewed engine, vehicle, and fuel data since 1925 to examine the historical and recent coupling of compression ratio and fuel antiknock properties (i.e., octane number) in the U.S. light-duty vehicle market. The analysis identified historical timeframes, trends, and illustrated how three factors: consumer preferences, technical capabilities, and regulatory legislation, affect personal mobility. Data showed that throughout history these three factors have a complex and time sensitive interplay. Long term trends in the data were identified where interaction and evolution between all three factors was observed. Transportation efficiency per unit power (gal/ton-mi/hp) was found to bemore » a good metric to integrate technical, societal, and regulatory effects into the evolutional pathway of personal mobility. From this framework, discussions of future evolutionary changes to personal mobility are also presented.« less

  20. Automotive Thermoelectric Moduleswith Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Interface materials based on carbon nanotubes and metallic alloys, scalable p- and n-type thermoelectrics, materials compatibility for improved reliability, and performance targets for automotive applications are discussed

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: 88 Kilowatt Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology | Department of Energy 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: 88 Kilowatt Automotive Inverter with New 900 Volt Silicon Carbide MOSFET Technology Presentation given by Cree at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Electric Drive Systems

  2. High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es131_choi_2012_p.pdf (1.19 MB) More Documents & Publications High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications

  3. Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape015_anderson_2011_o.pdf (1.01 MB) More Documents & Publications Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of Radically Enhanced alnico Magnets (DREaM) for Traction Drive

  4. Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs Presentation by USCAR FreedomCARFuel Cell Tech Team Industry for DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - March 16, 2010 Golden, CO fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_gittleman.pdf (235.45 KB) More Documents & Publications Automotive Perspective on Membrane Evaluation Transportation Fuel Cell R&D Needs (Presentation) DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 2: MEAs,

  5. Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells Part of a $100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. 4_graftech.pdf (23.01 KB) More Documents & Publications WA_07_040_GRAFTECH_INTERNATIONAL_LTD_Waiver_of_Patent_Rights.pdf Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-004 Metallic Bipolar Plates with Composite Coatings

  6. Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications | Department of Energy Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications Membrane Performance and Durability Overview for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications Presented by Tom Greszler of General Motors at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006. htmwg_greszler.pdf (502.69 KB) More Documents & Publications High Temperature Membrane Working Group, Minutes of Meeting on September 14, 2006 Some durability

  7. PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ti_01_anstrom.pdf (1.33 MB) More Documents & Publications IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Penn State DOE Graduate

  8. Intergranular corrosion of Type 409 stainless steel used in automotive exhaust applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brossia, C.S.; Martin, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Automotive exhaust systems must meet increasingly stringent lifetime requirements, and thus the incorporation of stainless steels (primarily ferritic) has increased. One of the failure mechanisms that is rarely encountered, but does occur, is intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion of ferritic stainless steels is believed to occur via a similar mechanism as is observed in austenitic stainless, namely precipitation of chromium-carbon nitride (Cr-C/N) particles at the grain boundaries leading to Cr-depleted regions. In the present study, the effect of thermal history (including heat treatment, welding and post-weld heat treatment) and alloy chemistry on the level of sensitization of Type 409SS were examined.

  9. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-02-08

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

  10. Conceptual process design and economics for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass through methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Humbird, David; Schaidle, Joshua; Biddy, Mary

    2015-10-28

    This paper describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas via indirect gasification, gas clean-up via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and the homologation of DME over a zeolite catalyst to high-octane gasoline-range hydrocarbon products. The current process configuration has similarities to conventional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies, but there are key distinctions, specifically regarding the product slate, catalysts, and reactor conditions. A techno-economicmore » analysis is performed to investigate the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock. The design features a processing daily capacity of 2000 tonnes (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The process yields 271 liters of liquid fuel per dry tonne of biomass (65 gal/dry ton), for an annual fuel production rate of 178 million liters (47 MM gal) at 90% on-stream time. The estimated total capital investment for an nth-plant is $438 million. The resulting minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) is $0.86 per liter or $3.25 per gallon in 2011 US dollars. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance. Sustainability metrics for the conversion process are quantified and assessed. The potential premium value of the high-octane gasoline blendstock is examined and found to be at least as competitive as fossil-derived blendstocks. A simple blending strategy is proposed to demonstrate the potential for blending the biomass-derived blendstock with petroleum-derived intermediates. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining published by Society of Industrial Chemistry and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.« less

  11. Conceptual process design and economics for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass through methanol/dimethyl ether intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Humbird, David; Schaidle, Joshua; Biddy, Mary

    2015-10-28

    This paper describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas via indirect gasification, gas clean-up via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and the homologation of DME over a zeolite catalyst to high-octane gasoline-range hydrocarbon products. The current process configuration has similarities to conventional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies, but there are key distinctions, specifically regarding the product slate, catalysts, and reactor conditions. A techno-economic analysis is performed to investigate the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock. The design features a processing daily capacity of 2000 tonnes (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The process yields 271 liters of liquid fuel per dry tonne of biomass (65 gal/dry ton), for an annual fuel production rate of 178 million liters (47 MM gal) at 90% on-stream time. The estimated total capital investment for an nth-plant is $438 million. The resulting minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) is $0.86 per liter or $3.25 per gallon in 2011 US dollars. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance. Sustainability metrics for the conversion process are quantified and assessed. The potential premium value of the high-octane gasoline blendstock is examined and found to be at least as competitive as fossil-derived blendstocks. A simple blending strategy is proposed to demonstrate the potential for blending the biomass-derived blendstock with petroleum-derived intermediates. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining published by Society of Industrial Chemistry and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. EA-1690: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery Production Facilities near Detroit, MI EA-1690: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery Production ...

  13. Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Asola Advanced and Automotive Solar Systems GmbH Place: Erfurt, Germany Zip: D-99428 Sector:...

  14. U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient ...

  15. NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Purdue … GM Partnership on Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews results in developing commercially viable thermoelectric generators for efficient conversion of automotive exhaust waste heat to electricity

  16. DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education | Department of Energy $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive Technology Education August 29, 2005 - 2:47pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of eight universities that will receive $4.7 million to be Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence. The goal of GATE is to train a future workforce of automotive

  17. Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress Society of Automotive Engineers World Congress April 6, 2006 - 10:12am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman Thank you, Greg. It's always a pleasure to be in a room full of engineers. As an engineer myself, I know there is nothing our profession likes better than plain talk and solving problems. So, I'm going to serve you up some plain talk and then some assignments. Our nation faces big challenges in the energy and

  18. High Efficiency Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications High Efficiency Full Expansion (FEx) Engine for Automotive Applications Large increases in engine thermal efficiency result from a new method of large reductions in both heat energy normally lost to the cooling medium and in heat energy in the exhaust system. p-18_taylor.pdf (46.48 KB) More Documents & Publications Two-Stroke Engines: New Frontier in Engine Efficiency Two-Stroke Uniflow Turbo-Compound IC Engine

  19. Future Automotive Aftertreatment Solutions: The 150°C Challenge Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zammit, Michael; DiMaggio, Craig L.; Kim, Chang H.; Lambert, Christine; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Parks, James E.; Howden, Ken

    2013-10-15

    With future fuel economy standards enacted, the U.S. automotive manufacturers (OEMs) are committed to pursuing a variety of high risk/highly efficient stoichiometric and lean combustion strategies to achieve superior performance. In recognition of this need, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has partnered with domestic automotive manufacturers through U.S. DRIVE to develop these advanced technologies. However, before these advancements can be introduced into the U.S. market, they must also be able to meet increasingly stringent emissions requirements. A significant roadblock to this implementation is the inability of current catalyst and aftertreatment technologies to provide the required activity at the much lower exhaust temperatures that will accompany highly efficient combustion processes and powertrain strategies. Therefore, the goal of this workshop and report is to create a U.S. DRIVE emission control roadmap that will identify new materials and aftertreatment approaches that offer the potential for 90% conversion of emissions at low temperature (150°C) and are consistent with highly efficient combustion technologies currently under investigation within U.S. DRIVE Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) programs.

  20. Automotive Stirling engine Mod I design-review report. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Volume No. 2 of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I Design Review Report contains descriptions of the operating principles, performance requirements and design details of the auxiliaries and control systems for the MOD I Stirling engine system. These components and sub-systems have the following main functions: provide the required fuel and air flows for a well controlled combustion process, generating heat to the Stirling cycle; provide a driver acceptable method for controlling the power output of the engine; provide adequate lubrication and cooling water circulation; generate the electric energy required for engine and vehicle operation; provide a driver acceptable method for starting, stopping and monitoring the engine; and provide a guard system, that protects the engine at component or system malfunction.

  1. 10 Questions for an Automotive Engineer: Thomas Wallner

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meet Thomas Wallner – automotive engineer extraordinaire, who hails from Argonne National Laboratory’s Center for Transportation Research. He took some time to answer our 10 Questions and share his insight on advanced engine technologies from dual-fuel to biofuels.

  2. Development of Computer-Aided Design Tools for Automotive Batteries |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 9_han_2012_o.pdf (3.61 MB) More Documents & Publications Progress of Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries (CAEBAT) Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Computer-Aided Design Tools for Automotive Batteries

  3. Role of Friction in Materials Selection for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2013-01-01

    This is an invited article for a special issue of the ASM International monthly magazine that concerns "Automotive Materials and Applications." The article itself overviews frictional considerations in material selection for automobiles. It discusses implications for energy efficiency (engine friction) and safety (brakes) among other topics.

  4. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robyn Ready

    2011-12-31

    The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

  5. Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm049_berger_2012_o.pdf (4.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials

  6. Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy lm_08_kia.pdf (2.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications

  7. GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems at Virginia Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Douglas

    2011-09-30

    The Virginia Tech GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems (CAFCS) achieved the following objectives in support of the domestic automotive industry: Expanded and updated fuel cell and vehicle technologies education programs; Conducted industry directed research in three thrust areas development and characterization of materials for PEM fuel cells; performance and durability modeling for PEM fuel cells; and fuel cell systems design and optimization, including hybrid and plug-in hybrid fuel cell vehicles; Developed MS and Ph.D. engineers and scientists who are pursuing careers related to fuel cells and automotive applications; Published research results that provide industry with new knowledge which contributes to the advancement of fuel cell and vehicle systems commercialization. With support from the Dept. of Energy, the CAFCS upgraded existing graduate course offerings; introduced a hands-on laboratory component that make use of Virginia Tech's comprehensive laboratory facilities, funded 15 GATE Fellowships over a five year period; and expanded our program of industry interaction to improve student awareness of challenges and opportunities in the automotive industry. GATE Center graduate students have a state-of-the-art research experience preparing them for a career to contribute to the advancement fuel cell and vehicle technologies.

  8. Automotive Stirling Engine Mod I design review report. Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This volume, No. 3, of the Automotive Stirling Engine Mod 1 Design Review Report contains a preliminary parts list and detailed drawings of equipment for the basic Stirling engine and for the following systems: vehicular Stirling Engine System; external heat system; hot and cold engine systems; engine drive; controls and auxiliaries; and vehicle integration. (LCL)

  9. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  10. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

    2007-09-25

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

  11. Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Objectives Forecasts sales of competing vehicle technologies among consumer segments. Analyzes how technology, infrastructure, consumer behavior, and policy affect sales of new technologies and determines the resulting societal, environmental and economic impacts. Key Attributes & Strengths MA3T can be used to investigate the societal benefits, costs, and employment impacts of market transitions

  12. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Waste Heat at GM | Department of Energy Overview of design, fabrication, integration, and test of working prototype TEG for engine waste heat recovery on Suburban test vehicle, and continuing investigation of skutterudite materials systems meisner.pdf (1.94 MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Electrical and Thermal

  13. Technology Roadmap for Energy Reduction in Automotive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), in collaboration with the United States Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR), hosted a technology roadmap workshop in Troy, Michigan in May 2008. The purpose of the workshop was to explore opportunities for energy reduction, discuss the challenges and barriers that might need to be overcome, and identify priorities for future R&D. The results of the workshop are presented in this report.

  14. Vertically Integrated Mass Production of Automotive Class Lithium Ion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. deer10_fairbanks.pdf (3.36 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectrics: The New Green Automotive Technology Vehicular Thermoelectrics: A New Green Technology Vehicular Thermoelectrics: A Fleets | Department of Energy

    With their presence in almost every neighborhood and community, refuse trucks, like the one shown above, can benefit from

  15. Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program. RESD Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    This is the final report compiling a summary of the information presented and discussed at the May 1983 Automotive Stirling Engine (AES) Reference Engine System Design (RESD) review held at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The design of the engine and its auxiliaries and controls is described. Manufacturing costs in production quantity are also presented. Engine system performance predictions are discussed and vehicle integration is developed, along with projected fuel economy levels.

  16. Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

  17. Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure | Department of Energy and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry and Plans for Deployment of Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure This report by Oak Ridge National Laboratory assesses the current status of automotive fuel cell

  18. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities | Department of Energy Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities This report prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory examines the progress that has been made in U.S. non-automotive fuel cell

  19. Fourth annual report to Congress on the Automotive Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    Program implementation and management are described. The status of conventional power-train technology is described with respect to uniform charge reciprocating Otto engine, stratified charge reciprocating Otto engine, rotary Otto engine, diesel engine, and transmissions. The three tasks of the Automotive Technology Development Program are discussed as follows; automotive gas turbine project, automotive Stirling engine development project, and the heavy duty transport technology project.

  20. The status of ceramic turbine component fabrication and quality assurance relevant to automotive turbine needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richerson, D.W.

    2000-02-01

    This report documents a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) with guidance from the Ceramics Division of the United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP). DOE and the automotive companies have funded extensive development of ceramic materials for automotive gas turbine components, the most recent effort being under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program.

  1. Development of a Rapid-Start On-Board Automotive Steam Reformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Davis, James M.

    2004-04-29

    The paper reports on the status of efforts to engineer a microchannel steam reforming system to enable a rapid cold start capability. The steam reformer is intended to be coupled with a WGS and PROX reactor to provide reformate to a PEM fuel cell for an automotive propulsion application. A compact and efficient microchannel steam reformer was previously developed that required ~15 minutes to accomplish a cold start. The objective of the current work was to reduce this start time to <30 seconds without sacrificing steady-state efficiency. The paper describes the changes made in the reforming system to enable cold start capability and presents data on reformate flow and temperature transients during cold start testing. The results demonstrate that the system is capable of producing reformate within 22 seconds after a cold start. A strategy for integrating the system with a WGS and PROX reactor to provide a rapid start fuel processing system is described.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Automotive Low Temperature Gasoline Combustion Engine Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about automotive low...

  3. Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge ... Light Source facility, is leading the Hydrogen Materials - Advanced Research Consortium ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Automotive Low Temperature Gasoline Combustion Engine Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about automotive low...

  5. Development of a High-Efficiency Zonal Thermoelectric HVAC System for Automotive Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Identify a technical and business approach to accelerate the deployment of light-duty automotive TE HVAC technology, maintain occupant comfort, and improve energy efficiency.

  6. DOE Provides $4.7 Million to Support Excellence in Automotive...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    vehicles for the U.S. market. "GATE Centers of ... to create more efficient gas powered, hybrid and even ... Control, and System Integration of Advanced Automotive ...

  7. Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) Vehicle Technologies Office ...

  8. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigle N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

  9. Ethanol Production for Automotive Fuel Usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, T.E.; Stenzel, R.A.; Yim, Y.J.; Yu, J.

    1980-01-31

    The conceptual design of the 20 million gallon per year anhydrous ethanol facility a t Raft River has been completed. The corresponding geothermal gathering, extraction and reinjection systems to supply the process heating requirement were also completed. The ethanol facility operating on sugar beets, potatoes and wheat will share common fermentation and product recovery equipment. The geothermal fluid requirement will be approximately 6,000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by 9 supply wells spaced at no closer than 1/4 mile in order to prevent mutual interferences. The geothermal fluid will be flashed in three stages to supply process steam at 250 F, 225 F and 205 F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will all be reinjected through 9 reinjection wells. The capital cost estimated for this ethanol plant employing all three feedstocks is $64 million. If only a single feedstock were used (for the same 20 mm gal/yr plant) the capital costs are estimated at $51.6 million, $43.1 million and $40. 5 million for sugar beets, potatoes and wheat respectively. The estimated capital cost for the geothermal system is $18 million.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 2. Fuel and EGR Effects on Knock-Limited Load and Speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A; Szybist, James P

    2013-01-01

    The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external-cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to that of 87AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicating mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. The results demonstrate that for all fuels, EGR is a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency but is less useful for knock mitigation with E30 than for 87AKI gasoline or IB24. Under knocking conditions, 15% EGR is found to offer 1 CA of CA50 timing advance with E30, whereas up to 5 CA of CA50 advance is possible with knock-limited 87AKI gasoline. Compared to 87AKI, both E30 and IB24 are found to have reduced adiabatic flame temperature and shorter combustion durations, which reduce knocking propensity beyond that indicated by the octane number. However, E30+0% EGR is found to exhibit the better antiknock properties than either 87AKI+15% EGR or IB24+15% EGR, expanding the knock limited operating range and engine stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. Furthermore, the fuel sensitivity (S) of E30 was attributed to reduced speed sensitivity of E30, expanding the low-speed stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. The results illustrate that intermediate alcohol gasoline blends exhibit exceptional antiknock properties and performance beyond that indicated by the octane

  11. A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.F.

    1996-03-01

    Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

  12. Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements, March 2008

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and

  13. Fact #921: April 18, 2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion Batteries by Capacity in 2014- Dataset

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Excel file and dataset for Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion Batteries by Capacity in 2014

  14. Fact #868: April 13, 2015 Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Automotive Technology Has Improved Performance and Fuel Economy of New Light Vehicles

  15. Electrohydraulic Forming of Near-Net Shape Automotive Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovaschenko, Sergey F.

    2013-09-26

    The objective of this project was to develop the electrohydraulic forming (EHF) process as a near-net shape automotive panel manufacturing technology that simultaneously reduces the energy embedded in vehicles and the energy consumed while producing automotive structures. Pulsed pressure is created via a shockwave generated by the discharge of high voltage capacitors through a pair of electrodes in a liquid-filled chamber. The shockwave in the liquid initiated by the expansion of the plasma channel formed between two electrodes propagates towards the blank and causes the blank to be deformed into a one-sided die cavity. The numerical model of the EHF process was validated experimentally and was successfully applied to the design of the electrode system and to a multi-electrode EHF chamber for full scale validation of the process. The numerical model was able to predict stresses in the dies during pulsed forming and was validated by the experimental study of the die insert failure mode for corner filling operations. The electrohydraulic forming process and its major subsystems, including durable electrodes, an EHF chamber, a water/air management system, a pulse generator and integrated process controls, were validated to be capable to operate in a fully automated, computer controlled mode for forming of a portion of a full-scale sheet metal component in laboratory conditions. Additionally, the novel processes of electrohydraulic trimming and electrohydraulic calibration were demonstrated at a reduced-scale component level. Furthermore, a hybrid process combining conventional stamping with EHF was demonstrated as a laboratory process for a full-scale automotive panel formed out of AHSS material. The economic feasibility of the developed EHF processes was defined by developing a cost model of the EHF process in comparison to the conventional stamping process.

  16. An Interoperability Testing Study: Automotive Inventory Visibility and Interoperability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivezic, Nenad; Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Frechette, Simon; Jones, Albert

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative effort between the NIST and Korean Business-to-Business Interoperability Test Beds to support a global, automotive-industry interoperability project. The purpose of the collaboration is to develop a methodology for validation of interoperable data-content standards implemented across inventory visibility tools within an internationally adopted testing framework. In this paper we describe methods (1) to help the vendors consistently implement prescribed message standards and (2) to assess compliance of those implementations with respect to the prescribed data content standards. We also illustrate these methods in support of an initial proof of concept for an international IV&I scenario.

  17. Extra mile: Rethinking energy policy for automotive transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nivola, P.S.; Crandall, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    In the United States, proposals for gasoline tax hikes have consistently met with broad-based congressional opposition. Although such taxes are a common and effective method of conserving energy in other industrialized nations, U.S. policy has traditionally relied on regulatory programs rather than fuel taxes to promote energy efficiency in automotive transportation. This book examines both the political causes and the economic effects of this idiosyncratic policy preference. Moderating the consumption and importation of oil has been an explicit goal of the United States over the past twenty years.

  18. Table I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2002 status a 2005 2010 Membrane Areal Resistance in cell, operating temperature Ω-cm 2 0.1 0.1 0.1 RT Ω-cm 2 0.07 0.07 0.07 -20 o C Ω-cm 2 0.01 0.01 0.01 Cost b $/kW 200 100 10 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c temperature - lower upper o C -20 ? -30 175 -40 200 Total catalyst

  19. A comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for combustion of n-alkane hydrocarbons from n-octane to n-hexadecane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.; Herbinet, Olivier; Silke, Emma J.; Curran, Henry J.

    2009-01-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction classes first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, is available for download from our web page. (author)

  20. Direct Injection Compression Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Carl L

    2006-09-25

    The underlying goal of this prqject was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome teclmological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. Fu1iher, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive teclmologies. Eight objectives were defmed to accomplish this goal: 1. Develop an interdisciplinary internal co1nbustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. 2. Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. 3. Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary cuniculum. 4. Promote strong interaction with indusuy, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. 5. Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. 6. Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. 7. Establish 'off-campus' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various indusuial sites. 8. Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

  1. GATE Center of Excellence at UAB in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the UAB GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications. The first Phase of the UAB DOE GATE center spanned the period 2005-2011. The UAB GATE goals coordinated with the overall goals of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicles Technologies initiative and DOE GATE program. The FCVT goals are: (1) Development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost; (2) To provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. The UAB GATE focused on both the FCVT and GATE goals in the following manner: (1) Train and produce graduates in lightweight automotive materials technologies; (2) Structure the engineering curricula to produce specialists in the automotive area; (3) Leverage automotive related industry in the State of Alabama; (4) Expose minority students to advanced technologies early in their career; (5) Develop innovative virtual classroom capabilities tied to real manufacturing operations; and (6) Integrate synergistic, multi-departmental activities to produce new product and manufacturing technologies for more damage tolerant, cost-effective, and lighter automotive structures.

  2. Fact #921: April 18, 2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Batteries by Capacity in 2014 | Department of Energy 1: April 18, 2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion Batteries by Capacity in 2014 Fact #921: April 18, 2016 Japan Produced the Most Automotive Lithium-ion Batteries by Capacity in 2014 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Japan produced about 2 gigawatt-hours (GWh) of automotive lithium-ion battery cells in 2014, which is more than any other country/region. In 2014, China had the greatest potential for increased production with

  3. EA-1690: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Facilities near Detroit, MI | Department of Energy 0: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery Production Facilities near Detroit, MI EA-1690: A123 Systems, Inc., Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Battery Production Facilities near Detroit, MI April 1, 2010 EA-1690: Final Environmental Assessment For a Loan and Grant to A123 Systems, Inc., for Vertically Integrated Mass Production of Automotive-Class Lithium-Ion Batteries April 20, 2010 EA-1690: Finding of No

  4. An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan Portfolio

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan Portfolio An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department's Loan Portfolio September 17, 2013 - 5:20pm Addthis An Update on Fisker Automotive and the Energy Department’s Loan Portfolio Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Former Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office (LPO) What are the key facts? Thanks to investments made by the Obama Administration, the U.S. auto industry has had three straight

  5. Review and evaluation of automotive fuel conservation technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, H.M.; Schwarz, R.; Andon, J.; Kolars, G.; Gerstenberger, T.

    1981-12-01

    To support the Office of Research and Development of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration with focused studies in areas affecting automotive fuel economy and related safety issues, a series of in-depth studies were carried out: Fuel Consumption Estimates of Stratified Charge Rotary Engines Installed in Five Vehicles; Oldsmobile Omega X Body Baseline Weight Data; GM X Body Material Substitution Weight Reduction/Cost Effectiveness Study; Calspan RSV Restraint System Cost Study; FMVSS No. 208 Extension to Light Trucks, Vans, and MPV's - Cost Lead Time Study; Multipiece Rims for Trucks, Buses, and Trailers; Identifying Design Changes, Cost Impacts and Manufacturing Lead Times to Upgrade FMVSS 114 for Passenger Cars, Trucks, and MPV's; Ford Escort GL Baseline Weight Data.

  6. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab)

  7. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Re

  8. Automotive Lithium-ion Battery Supply Chain and U.S. Competitiveness Considerations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This study highlights the U.S. foothold in automotive lithium-ion battery (LIB) production, globally. U.S.-based manufacturers comprise 17% of global production capacity. With increasing demand for...

  9. NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development for commercialization of automotive thermoelectric generators from high-ZT TE materials with using low-cost, widely available materials, system design and modeling to maximize temperature differential across TE modules and maximize power output

  10. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Eric C. D.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Hensley, Jesse; Schaidle, Josh; Biddy, Mary; Humbird, David; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ross, Jeff; Sexton, Danielle; Yap, Raymond; Lukas, John

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to

  11. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Chopped-Glass-Fiber Automotive Structural Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battiste, R.L.; Corum, J.M.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1999-11-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design criteria for a chopped-glass-fiber reinforced polymeric composite for automotive structural applications. The criteria closely follow the framework of an earlier criteria document for a continuous-strand-mat (CSM) glass-fiber reference composite. Together these design criteria demonstrate a framework that can be adapted for future random-glass-fiber composites for automotive structural applications.

  12. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications R. K. Ahluwalia, T. Q. Hua, and J-K Peng Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 M. Kromer, S. Lasher, K. McKenney, K. Law, and J. Sinha TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA 02421 June 21, 2011 Executive Summary In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program's

  13. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets | Department of Energy Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ape032_whaling_2013_o.pdf (1.3 MB) More Documents & Publications

  14. Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B.D.; Baum, G.N.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    This report determines cost and performance requirements for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell vehicles carrying pure H{sub 2} fuel, to achieve parity with internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. A conceptual design of a near term FCEV (fuel cell electric vehicle) is presented. Complete power system weight and cost breakdowns are presented for baseline design. Near term FCEV power system weight is 6% higher than ICE system, mid-term FCEV projected weights are 29% lower than ICE`s. There are no inherently high-cost components in FCE, and at automotive production volumes, near term FCEV cost viability is closer at hand than at first thought. PEM current vs voltage performance is presented for leading PEM manufacturers and researchers. 5 current and proposed onboard hydrogen storage techniques are critically compared: pressurized gas, cryogenic liquid, combined pressurized/cryogenic, rechargeable hydride, adsorption. Battery, capacitor, and motor/controller performance is summarized. Fuel cell power system component weight and cost densities (threshold and goal) are tabulated.

  15. Predicting the Occurrence of Cosmetic Defects in Automotive Skin Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, S.; Williams, D.; Roy, R.; Aylmore, R.; Allen, M.; Hollingdale, D.

    2011-05-04

    The appearance of defects such as 'hollows' and 'shock lines' can affect the perceived quality and attractiveness of automotive skin panels. These defects are the result of the stamping process and appear as small, localized deviations from the intended styling of the panels. Despite their size, they become visually apparent after the application of paint and the perceived quality of a panel may become unacceptable. Considerable time is then dedicated to minimizing their occurrence through tool modifications. This paper will investigate the use of the wavelet transform as a tool to analyze physically measured panels. The transform has two key aspects. The first is its ability to distinguish small scale local defects from large scale styling curvature. The second is its ability to characterize the shape of a defect in terms of its wavelength and a 'correlation value'. The two features of the transform enable it to be used as a tool for locating and predicting the severity of defects. The paper will describe the transform and illustrate its application on test cases.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 1. Engine Load Range and Downsize Downspeed Opportunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A; Szybist, James P

    2013-01-01

    The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine was used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicated mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. EGR provided thermodynamic advantages and was a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency for all fuel types. However, with E30, EGR was less useful for knock mitigation than gasoline or IB24. Torque densities with E30 with 15% EGR at = 1 operation were similar or better than a modern EURO IV calibration turbo-diesel engine. The results of the present study suggest that it could be possible to implement a 40% downsize + downspeed configuration (1.2 L engine) into a representative midsize sedan. For example, for a midsize sedan at a 65 miles/h cruise, an estimated fuel consumption of 43.9 miles per gallon (MPG) (engine out 102 g-CO2/km) could be achieved with similar reserve power to a 2.0 L engine with 87AKI (38.6 MPG, engine out 135 g-CO2/km). Data suggest that, with midlevel alcohol gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol gasoline blends and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

  17. PEM fuel cell stack development for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Presently, the major challenges to the introduction of fuel cell power systems for automotive applications are to maximize the effective system power density and minimize cost. The material cost, especially for Platinum, had been a significant factor until recent advances by Los Alamos National Laboratory and others in low Platinum loading electrode design has brought these costs within control. Since the initiation of its PEM stack development efforts, MTI has focused on applying its system and mechanical engineering heritage on both increasing power density and reducing cost. In May of 1995, MTI was selected (along with four other companies) as a subcontractor by the Ford Motor Company to participate in Phase I of the DOE Office of Transportation Technology sponsored PNGV Program entitled: {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}. This Program was instituted to: (1) Advance the performance and economic viability of a direct-hydrogen-fueled PEM fuel cell system, (2) Identify the critical problems that must be resolved before system scale-up and vehicle integration, and (3) Integrate the fuel cell power system into a sub-scale vehicle propulsion system. The Phase I objective was to develop and demonstrate a nominal 10 kW stack meeting specific criteria. Figure I is a photograph of the stack used for these demonstrations. After completion of Phase I, MTI was one of only two companies selected to continue into Phase II of the Program. This paper summarizes Phase I stack development and results.

  18. Analysis of the potential for new automotive uses of wrought magnesium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S.; Stodolsky, F.

    1996-02-01

    The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within the US Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought magnesium and its alloys to replace steel or aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available for improving automotive fuel efficiency. Although high-strength steels, Al, and polymers are already being used to achieve significant weight reductions, substantial additional weight reductions could be achieved by increased use of Mg (whose density is less than one-fourth that of steel and only two-thirds that of Al). This study shows that Mg sheet could be used in automotive body nonstructural and semistructural applications, whereas extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. The primary barrier to such uses of wrought Mg is high cost.

  19. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber Automotive Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corum, J.M.

    2002-04-17

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quasi-isotropic carbon-fiber composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite, which was made by a rapid molding process suitable for high-volume automotive applications, consisted of continuous Thornel T300 fibers (6K tow) in a Baydur 420 IMR urethane matrix. The reinforcement was in the form of four {+-}45{sup o} stitch-bonded mats in the following layup: [0/90{sup o}/{+-}45{sup o}]{sub S}. This material is the second in a progression of three candidate thermoset composites to be characterized and modeled as part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory project entitled Durability of Carbon-Fiber Composites. The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies and is closely coordinated with the industry Automotive Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for large automotive structural components. This document is in two parts. Part I provides the design criteria, and Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects on deformation, strength, and stiffness of cyclic and sustained loads, operating temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris). Guidance is provided for design analysis, time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage tolerance design guidance, including the effects of holes. Chapter 6 provides a brief summary of the design criteria.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles | Department of Energy the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles U.S. Department of Energy and the Automotive X PRIZE Foundation to Promote Clean, Energy-Efficient Vehicles March 20, 2008 - 10:52am Addthis DOE to invest $3.5 million in public outreach effort NEW YORK, NY - In an effort to engage students and the public on the significance of increasing the use of more clean, cutting-edge and energy-efficient vehicles to

  1. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the centers focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  2. Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing - a GATE Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan-Dearborn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallick, P. K.

    2012-08-30

    The Center for Lightweighting Materials and Processing (CLAMP) was established in September 1998 with a grant from the Department of Energy’s Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) program. The center received the second round of GATE grant in 2005 under the title “Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing”. Using the two grants, the Center has successfully created 10 graduate level courses on lightweight automotive materials, integrated them into master’s and PhD programs in Automotive Systems Engineering, and offered them regularly to the graduate students in the program. In addition, the Center has created a web-based lightweight automotive materials database, conducted research on lightweight automotive materials and organized seminars/symposia on lightweight automotive materials for both academia and industry. The faculty involved with the Center has conducted research on a variety of topics related to design, testing, characterization and processing of lightweight materials for automotive applications and have received numerous research grants from automotive companies and government agencies to support their research. The materials considered included advanced steels, light alloys (aluminum, magnesium and titanium) and fiber reinforced polymer composites. In some of these research projects, CLAMP faculty have collaborated with industry partners and students have used the research facilities at industry locations. The specific objectives of the project during the current funding period (2005 – 2012) were as follows: (1) develop new graduate courses and incorporate them in the automotive systems engineering curriculum (2) improve and update two existing courses on automotive materials and processing (3) upgrade the laboratory facilities used by graduate students to conduct research (4) expand the Lightweight Automotive Materials Database to include additional materials, design case studies and make it more

  3. Effect of Premixed Fuel Preparation for Partially Premixed Combustion with a Low Octane Gasoline on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Compression Ignition Engine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M.; Cannella, William C.

    2015-05-12

    has relatively high fuel reactivity with a research octane number of 68. The results of this experimental campaign indicate that the highest brake thermal efficiency and lowest emissions are achieved simultaneously with the earliest pilot injection timings (i.e., during the intake stroke).« less

  4. Effect of Premixed Fuel Preparation for Partially Premixed Combustion with a Low Octane Gasoline on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Compression Ignition Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott; Wagner, Robert M.; Cannella, William C.

    2015-05-12

    relatively high fuel reactivity with a research octane number of 68. The results of this experimental campaign indicate that the highest brake thermal efficiency and lowest emissions are achieved simultaneously with the earliest pilot injection timings (i.e., during the intake stroke).

  5. Canola-Based Automotive Oil Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Ira N.; Kammerman, Steven B.

    2009-12-07

    This research project establishes data on the ability of the bioindustry to provide sufficient production of Canola/rapeseed, functioning as a biolubricant, to replace petroleum-based automotive lubricants at competitive prices. In 2005 total sales for lubricants amounted to 2.5 billion gallons. Research was also conducted to determine the attitudes toward adoption of bioproducts, specifically among industries that are large-scale users of automotive lubricants, including government and private industry users. The green technology industry, or bioindustry, uses a variety of plant- and crop-based resources, known as biomass, to produce energy, fuel and many different bioproducts. Rapeseed is categorized as a lignocellulosic biomass. High erucic acid rapeseed is not intended for human consumption thereby negating the food vs. fuel issue that arose with the increased production of corn as a feedstock for use in ethanol. Key findings show that the oil from Canola/rapeseed provides about twice the yield than soybean oil. These seeds also have significantly higher natural lubricity than petroleum, enabling Canola/rapeseed to function in many different capacities where oxidation issues are critical. It also has the most positive energy balance of all common vegetable oils, making it an excellent potential replacement for petroleum-based fuels as well. As a rotating crop, it enhances farm lands, thereby increasing subsequent yields of barley and wheat, thus increasing profit margins. Petroleum-based bioproducts negatively impact the environment by releasing greenhouse gases, sulfur, heavy metals and other pollutants into the air, ground and water. Replacing these products with bio-alternatives is a significant step toward preserving the country’s natural resources and the environment. Further to this, promoting the growth of the green biotechnology industry will strengthen the nation’s economy, creating jobs in the agriculture, science and engineering sectors, while

  6. Materials selection for automotive engines. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning material selection and substitution for automobile engines. Mechanical properties, including dimensional stability, are reviewed. Machined parts, castings, forgings, and extrusions are examined. Citations concerning automotive bodies, frames, and structures are presented in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  7. Materials selection for automotive engines. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning material selection and substitution for automobile engines. Mechanical properties, including dimensional stability, are reviewed. Machined parts, castings, forgings, and extrusions are examined. Citations concerning automotive bodies, frames, and structures are presented in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Materials selection for automotive engines. (Latest citations from Metadex). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning material selection and substitution for automobile engines. Mechanical properties, including dimensional stability, are reviewed. Machined parts, castings, forgings, and extrusions are examined. Citations concerning automotive bodies, frames, and structures are presented in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 165 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Third annual report to Congress on the automotive technology development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The Automotive Propulsion Research and Development Act of 1978 focused on advancing the technology of automotive propulsion systems. In formulating the Act, Congress found that: (1) existing automobiles do not meet the Nation's long-term environmental and energy goals; (2) insufficient resources are being devoted to research and development (R and D) on advanced automobile propulsion systems; (3) with sufficient R and D, alternatives to existing systems could meet long-term goals at reasonable cost; and (4) expanded R and D would complement and stimulate corresponding private sector efforts. Because of the Nation's energy problems, Congress felt that advanced automobile propulsion system technology should be developed quickly. Through the Act, Congress expressed its intent for the Department of Energy (DOE) to: (1) make R and D contracts and grants for development of advanced automobile propulsion systems within five years, or within the shortest practicable time consistent with appropriate R and D techniques; (2) evaluate and disseminate information about advanced automobile propulsion system technology; (3) preserve, enhance, and facilitate competition in R and D of existing and alternative automotive propulsion systems; and (4) supplement, but neither supplant nor duplicate, private industry R and D efforts. Summaries of the status of conventional powertrain technology, automotive technology development program, and the management plan and policy transition are given. Tables on contracts and grant procurement for advanced gas turbine engine systems, advanced Stirling engine systems, and the vehicle systems project are given. (WHK)

  10. Durability-Based Design Guide for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 2. Background Data and Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Weitsman, Y.J.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-02-01

    This background report is a companion to the document entitled ''Durability-Based Design Criteria for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 1. Design Rules'' (ORNL-6930). The rules and the supporting material characterization and modeling efforts described here are the result of a U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Automotive Materials project entitled ''Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures.'' The overall goal of the project is to develop experimentally based, durability-driven design guidelines for automotive structural composites. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC). The initial reference material addressed by the rules and this background report was chosen and supplied by ACC. The material is a structural reaction injection-molded isocyanurate (urethane), reinforced with continuous-strand, swirl-mat, E-glass fibers. This report consists of 16 position papers, each summarizing the observations and results of a key area of investigation carried out to provide the basis for the durability-based design guide. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluids, vibrations, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. The position papers cover these durability issues. Topics include (1) tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural properties; (2) creep and creep rupture; (3) cyclic fatigue; (4) the effects of temperature, environment, and prior loadings; (5) a multiaxial strength criterion; (6) impact damage and damage tolerance design; (7) stress concentrations; (8) a damage-based predictive model for time-dependent deformations; (9) confirmatory subscale component tests; and (10) damage development and growth observations.