Sample records for automatic watering systems

  1. Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Automatic Plant Watering System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Automatic Plant Watering System Overview The goal of this project was to design an automatic plant watering system for commercial in the soil of household plants and delivery water to those plants on a need-only basis. The overall design

  2. AUTOMATIC VARIABLE VENTILATION CONTROL SYSTEMS BASED ON AIR QUALITY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turiel, Isaac

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~saon Automatic Variable Ventilation Control Systems Based79-3 Automatic variable ventilation control systems based onof automatic variable ventilation control systems, result in

  3. Throttle And Brake Control Systems For Automatic Vehicle Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioannou, P.; Xu, Z.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Brake Control Systems for Automatic Vehicle Following P.and Brake Control Systems for Automatic Vehicle Following *Transit Systems, Proceedings of 1977 Joint Automatic Control

  4. Automatic bagout system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, R.M.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear material entrained wastes are generated at the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These wastes are removed from the glove box lines using the bagout method. This is a manual operation performed by technicians. An automated system is being developed to relieve the technicians from this task. The system will reduce the amount of accumulated radiation exposure to the worker. The primary components of the system consist of a six degree of freedom robot, a bag sealing device, and a small gantry robot. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  5. AUTOMATIC VARIABLE VENTILATION CONTROL SYSTEMS BASED ON AIR QUALITY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turiel, Isaac

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    saon Automatic Variable Ventilation Control Systems Based onL Kusuda, "Control Ventilation to Conserve Energy While t·79-3 Automatic variable ventilation control systems based on

  6. automatic transmission system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and toolset for automatic generation of hypertext system repositories. Our code generator, called and a supporting toolset to automatically generate hypertext system...

  7. Automatic reactor power control for a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungin Choi (Kyungwon Univ. (Korea, Republic of)); Yungjoon Hah (Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)); Unchul Lee (Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic reactor power control system is presented for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The associated reactor control strategy is called mode K.' The new system implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. Thus, the mode K enables precise regulation of both the reactivity and the power distribution, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load-follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1,000-MW (electric) PWR. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be a practical reactor power control strategy for the increased automation of nuclear plants.

  8. Data system for automatic flux mapping applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couch, R.D.; Kasinoff, A.M.; Neuner, J.A.; Oates, R.M.

    1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In an automatic flux mapping system utilizing a microprocessor for control and data information processing, signals from the incore detectors providing the flux mapping operation are converted to a frequency link and are made available to the microprocessor via a programmable timer thus minimizing the participation of the microprocessor so that the microprocessor can be made more available to satisfy other tasks.

  9. A Dynamic Visualization Environment For The Design And Evaluation Of Automatic Vehicle Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Z.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Automatic Vehicle Control Systems Application inand Evaluation of Automatic Vehicle Control Systems “, PATHand Evaluation of Automatic Vehicle Control Systems bY z. xu

  10. Automatic TLI recognition system, user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lassahn, G.D.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how to use an automatic target recognition system (version 14). In separate volumes are a general description of the ATR system, Automatic TLI Recognition System, General Description, and a programmer`s manual, Automatic TLI Recognition System, Programmer`s Guide.

  11. Optimization of Chilled Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidwani, B. N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPTIMIZATION OF CHILLED WATER SYSTEMS central 0 e m a In 8. N. Gidwani, P.E. Project Director Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester. Pennsylvania 19380 ABSTRACT Chilled water systems are one of the major energy consumers in industrial... manually, using a prescribed operating pro- cedure for each load level, or through automatic controls. The system configuration plays an important role in establishing the economics of sequencing. For example, sequencing of chillers in series...

  12. A continuous automatic hydroponic cultivation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reachi Gonzalez, Santiago

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . C. H. Samson, JW. Head of Department Dr. D. McDonald Member r. A. H. Laym n Member. August 1974 ABSTRACT A Continuous Automatic Hydroponic Cultivation Syst. m. (August 1974) Santiago Reachi Gonzalez, B. S. , Texas ARM University Co...-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. W Northam Dr. W. B. X, edbetter The main objective of this study is to develop a system that will provide a household with a high quality balanced vegetable mix at a cost less than existing retail pr' ces. Other objectives...

  13. Tri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    on an earlier draft. #12;Introduction The Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriTri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems James State University Portland, OR 97207 This report is benefited from interviews of Tri-Met staff involved

  14. automatic identification system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Universidad 3 Automatic feature-queried bird identification system based on entropy and fuzzy similarity Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  15. Crutcher introduces new automatic welding system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designed for pipe over 16 in. but suitable for smaller diameters if modified slightly, a new automatic welding system uses the metal inert gas process to weld the root bead from the outside with a specially designed backup ring that adapts to a standard internal pipe clamp, making internal welding unnecessary. Individual welding machines travel on flexible tracks that are positioned by a track-locating device; two machines are required at each welding station. Particularly applicable to lay-barge operations, the system consists of (1) a pipe-facing machine, (2) a diesel-driven hydraulic power unit, (3) a carriage track, (4) an air-driven, air-operated, simplified pipe clamp, and (5) a welding bug assembly consisting of a carriage with drive unit, welding head, oscillator, and wire spool mount with drag-brake assembly.

  16. Learning to Control Dynamic Systems with Automatic Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Charles X.

    Learning to Control Dynamic Systems with Automatic Quantization Charles X. Ling Department: Learning to Control with Automatic Quantization. 1 #12; 1 Introduction Controlling a dynamic system to control dynamic systems with unknown models is a challenging research problem. However, most previous work

  17. Automatic load follow control system for PWR plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakakura, H.; Ishiguro, A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Japan, load follow operation (daily load follow, automatic frequency control (AFC) operation, and governor free (GF) operation) of nuclear plants will be required in the near future to control grid frequency, as the ratio of nuclear plant electrical production to total grid production will increase. The AFC operation regulated power by demand from the central load dispatcher to control mainly the fringe component of the grid frequency fluctuation, and GF operation regulates power by turbine revolution or grid frequency to control mainly the cyclic component of grid frequency fluctuation. This paper deals with the automatic power distribution control system, which is important to load follow operation and possibly will be applied to pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. The reactor control systems noted below are conventional design with some improvements for AFC/GF operation, so that the reactor operates the turbine as before: (1) rod control system (reactor power control); (2) pressurizer pressure control system; (3) pressurizer level control system; and (4) steam generator level control system.

  18. automatic watering based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Kumar, Ratnesh 52 An Automatic Load Sharing Approach for a DFIG Based Wind Generator in a Microgrid Engineering Websites Summary: An Automatic Load Sharing Approach...

  19. CGMurphi: Automatic Synthesis of Numerical Controllers for Nonlinear Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    CGMurphi: Automatic Synthesis of Numerical Controllers for Nonlinear Hybrid Systems Giuseppe Della, thus much work is being done to create automatic controller synthesis tools. When dealing with critical systems, most of the times such controllers are required to be optimal and robust, i.e., they must achieve

  20. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  1. Security Requirements for Classified Automatic Data Processing Systems

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1985-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish and describe the computer security program for classified automatic data processing (ADP) systems at the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE N 251.9.

  2. An automatic control system for a laboratory precipitation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Mary Alice

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A LABORATORY PRECIPITATION PROCESS A Thesis by MARY ALICE BURNETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1986 Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR A LABORATORY PRECIPITATION PROCESS A Thesis MARY ALICE BURNETT Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chairman of Committee) Donald L. Reddell (Member) J...

  3. Automatic feed system for ultrasonic machining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, Noel C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for ultrasonic machining in which feeding of a tool assembly holding a machining tool toward a workpiece is accomplished automatically. In ultrasonic machining, a tool located just above a workpiece and vibrating in a vertical direction imparts vertical movement to particles of abrasive material which then remove material from the workpiece. The tool does not contact the workpiece. Apparatus for moving the tool assembly vertically is provided such that it operates with a relatively small amount of friction. Adjustable counterbalance means is provided which allows the tool to be immobilized in its vertical travel. A downward force, termed overbalance force, is applied to the tool assembly. The overbalance force causes the tool to move toward the workpiece as material is removed from the workpiece.

  4. Simulation of the TREAT-Upgrade Automatic Reactor Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Kirsch, L.W.; Valente, A.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design of the Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Upgrade. A simulation was used to facilitate the ARCS design and to completely test and verify its operation before installation at the TREAT facility.

  5. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  6. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  7. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  8. Automatic Synthesis of Control Software for an Industrial Automation Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    Automatic Synthesis of Control Software for an Industrial Automation Control System Enrico Tronci1 experimental results show that for industrial au- tomation control systems automatic synthesis is a viable@univaq.it, http: univaq.it tronci Abstract We present a case study on automatic synthesis of control software from

  9. Design of an Automatic Landing System for the Meridian UAV using Fuzzy Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, David Andrew

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    antennas attached below the wings. Fuzzy logic is determined the ideal application for an automatic landing controller based on its ability to control uncertain and nonlinear systems. Using fuzzy logic, a longitudinal automatic landing controller...

  10. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  11. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; /DESY

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  12. Cooling Water System Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aegerter, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

  13. Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically ``identical`` values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic. 16 figs.

  14. Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaubatz, Donald C. (Cupertino, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor protection system having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically "identical" values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: System for Automatically Maintaining Pressure in a Commercial Truck Tire

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Goodyear at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a system for automatically...

  16. ME 364L Automatic Control System Design ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    Material (references): R. Dorf and R. Bishop, Modern Control Systems, Addison-Wesley, 8th edition, 1998. KME 364L ­ Automatic Control System Design Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 364L ­ Automatic Control design; continuous and discrete time control. Prerequisite(s): ME 344 Dynamics Systems and Control

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AUTOMATIC DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL SILENCERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gaofeng Gary

    life-cycle costs, is not fully supported. This work documents the development of an automatic design1 DEVELOPMENT OF AN AUTOMATIC DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION SYSTEM FOR INDUSTRIAL SILENCERS Lee Ming Wong and optimization system for industrial silencers. The developed system greatly reduces the production costs

  18. On the Failure of Power System Automatic Generation Control due to Measurement Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    understood, the electric grid could become more vulnerable to failures in both cyber and physical components-level automatic closed-loop control system over the IT infrastructure of a power system [1], is sensitive1 On the Failure of Power System Automatic Generation Control due to Measurement Noise Jiangmeng

  19. MyhillNerode Relations on Automatic Systems and the Completeness of Kleene Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozen, Dexter

    Myhill­Nerode Relations on Automatic Systems and the Completeness of Kleene Algebra Dexter Kozen. It is well known that finite square matrices over a Kleene algebra again form a Kleene algebra. This is also infinite systems of inequalities over a Kleene algebra. Automatic systems are a special class of infinite

  20. System for treating produced water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

  1. Automatic Testing of Reactive Systems \\Lambda Pascal Raymond, Xavier Nicollin, Nicolas Halbwachs y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbwachs, Nicolas

    Automatic Testing of Reactive Systems \\Lambda Pascal Raymond, Xavier Nicollin, Nicolas Halbwachs y V'erimag z , Grenoble ­ France Daniel Weber x Schneider Electric, Grenoble ­ France Abstract This paper addresses the problem of automatizing the production of test sequences for reactive systems. We

  2. Simulation of the treat-upgrade automatic reactor control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Kirsch, L.W.; Valente, A.D.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design of the Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) for the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Upgrade. A simulation was used to facilitate the ARCS design, and to completely test and verify its operation before installation at the TREAT facility. The ARCS is a microprocessor network based closed loop control system that provides a position demand control signal to the transient rod hydraulic drive system. There are four identical servo-hydraulic rod drives and each operates as a position control system. The ARCS updates its position demand control signal every 1 msec and its function is to control the transient rods so that the reactor follows a prescribed power-time profile (planned transient). The Main Control Algorithm (MCA) for the ARCS is an optimal reactivity demand algorithm. At each time step, the MCA generates a set of reference reactor functions, e.g., power, period, energy, and delayed neutron power. These functions are compared to plant measurements and estimated values at each time step and are operated on by appropriate algorithms to generate the reactivity demand function. The data necessary to calculate the reference functions is supplied from a Transient Prescription Control Data Set (TPCDS). The TPCDS specifies the planned transient as a fixed number of simply connected independent power profile segments. The developed simulation code models the TREAT reactor kinetics, the hydraulic rod drive system, the plant measurement system, and the ARCS control processor MCA. All of the models operate as continuous systems with the exception of the MCA which operates as a discrete time system at fixed multiples of 1 msec. The study indicates that the ARCS will meet or exceed all of its design specifications.

  3. Green Systems Solar Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar panels not enough Generates heat energy Captures heat from generator and transfers it to water Stores Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1

  4. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

  5. Progress on Statistical Learning Systems as Data Mining Tools for the Creation of Automatic Databases in Fusion Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress on Statistical Learning Systems as Data Mining Tools for the Creation of Automatic Databases in Fusion Environments

  6. Applications of Automatic Vehicle Location systems towards improving service reliability and operations planning in London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Joseph Emanuel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technological advances in the transit industry, such as the introduction of Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) systems, have provided agencies with robust data collection and measurement systems and enabled the development ...

  7. Optimization of Chilled Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gidwani, B. N.

    OPTIMIZATION OF CHILLED WATER SYSTEMS B. N. GIDWANI, P.E., Vice President? Roy F. Weston, Inc.?West Chester, Pennsylvania 19380 ABSTRACT Chilled water systems are one of the major energy consumers in industrial, commercial, and institutional... complexes. The centralization of chilled water systems presents numerous advantages, including simplified controls, reduced installation capacity due to diversity, and consolidated maintenance and operation. Centrally chilled water systems present...

  8. An Integrated Automatic Test Data Generation System A. Je erson O utt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    An Integrated Automatic Test Data Generation System A. Je erson O utt Department of Computer Science Clemson University Clemson, SC 29634 January 21, 1996 Abstract The Godzilla automatic test data generator is an integrated collection of tools that implements a relatively new test data generation method

  9. An Integrated Automatic Test Data Generation System A. Jefferson Offutt \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    An Integrated Automatic Test Data Generation System A. Jefferson Offutt \\Lambda Department of Computer Science Clemson University Clemson, SC 29634 January 21, 1996 Abstract The Godzilla automatic test data generator is an integrated collection of tools that implements a relatively new test data

  10. Infuse: A Tool for Automatically Managing and Coordinating Source Changes in Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Dewayne E.

    Infuse: A Tool for Automatically Managing and Coordinating Source Changes in Large Systems Dewayne changes occur outside the tool. In contrast, Infuse concentrates on the actual change process and provides facilities for both managing and coordinating source changes. Infuse provides facilities for automatically

  11. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Neural Correlates of the Automatic Processing of Threat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Neural Correlates of the Automatic Processing of Threat Facial Signals threat. Attention was focused on either scenes or faces presented in a single overlapping display. Facial. These results suggest that automaticity is not funda- mental to the processing of all facial signals of threat

  12. Modified automatic time error control and inadvertent interchange reduction for the WSCC interconnected power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McReynolds, W.L. (Bonneville Power Administration, Vancouver, WA (US)); Badley, D.E. (N.W. Power Pool, Coordinating Office, Portland, OR (US))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an automatic generation control (AGC) system that simultaneously reduces time error and accumulated inadvertent interchange energy in interconnected power system. This method is automatic time error and accumulated inadvertent interchange reduction (AIIR). With this method control areas help correct the system time error when doing so also tends to correct accumulated inadvertent interchange. Thus in one step accumulated inadvertent interchange and system time error are corrected.

  13. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  14. ATCOM: Automatically Tuned Collective Communication System for SMP Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng-Shiou Wu

    2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional implementations of collective communications are based on point-to-point communications, and their optimizations have been focused on efficiency of those communication algorithms. However, point-to-point communications are not the optimal choice for modern computing clusters of SMPs due to their two-level communication structure. In recent years, a few research efforts have investigated efficient collective communications for SMP clusters. This dissertation is focused on platform-independent algorithms and implementations in this area. There are two main approaches to implementing efficient collective communications for clusters of SMPs: using shared memory operations for intra-node communications, and overlapping inter-node/intra-node communications. The former fully utilizes the hardware based shared memory of an SMP, and the latter takes advantage of the inherent hierarchy of the communications within a cluster of SMPs. Previous studies focused on clusters of SMP from certain vendors. However, the previously proposed methods are not portable to other systems. Because the performance optimization issue is very complicated and the developing process is very time consuming, it is highly desired to have self-tuning, platform-independent implementations. As proven in this dissertation, such an implementation can significantly out-perform the other point-to-point based portable implementations and some platform-specific implementations. The dissertation describes in detail the architecture of the platform-independent implementation. There are four system components: shared memory-based collective communications, overlapping mechanisms for inter-node and intra-node communications, a prediction-based tuning module and a micro-benchmark based tuning module. Each component is carefully designed with the goal of automatic tuning in mind.

  15. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  16. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  17. Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Building America Program is hosting a no-cost, webinar-based training on Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems. The webinar will focus the effective use of central heat pump water heaters...

  18. New methods for estimation, modeling and validation of dynamical systems using automatic differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this work is to demonstrate some new computational methods for estimation, optimization and modeling of dynamical systems that use automatic differentiation. Particular focus will be upon dynamical ...

  19. Automatic design of the gravity-reducing propulsion system of the TALARIS Hopper Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizales Díaz, Jorge (Jorge Luis)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a Systems Engineering tool for automatic design, presents the results of its application to the problem of designing Earth-based reduced-gravity simulators, and compares the performance of the found ...

  20. Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Tracy Lynn

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

  1. A proposed system to automatically control audio sound-to-noise levels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neinast, Gary Strickland

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PROPOSED SYSTEM TO AUTOMATICALLY CONTROL AUDIO SOUND TO NOISE LEVELS A Thesis ~ ]3y GARY 8% NEINAST Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agrioultural and Meohanioal College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  2. Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Tracy Lynn

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

  3. TREAT Upgrade Manual Reactor Control System and its interface with the Automatic Reactor Control System and the Plant Protection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, W.P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Argonne National Laboratory is being upgraded to simulate extreme conditions in a reactor. This facility will be used to subject test assemblies of fuel bundles to very rapid and intense power transients. This paper will describe in detail the manual reactor control system and its interfaces with the plant protection system the automatic reactor control system.

  4. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 4.5 Water-Energy SustainabilityWater Distribution System Water-energy Sustainability ToolWastewater-energy Sustainability Tool v   Acknowledgements

  5. Leica EM AFS2 Automatic Freeze Substitution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    " excludes humidity and oxygen · Fast UV polymerization with LED UV lamp Flexibility · Any choice is polymerized under UV light in the EM AFS2 and can be cut and immuno labelled. LED UV lamp FS chamber with new. An integrated LED UV lamp allows immediate polymerization of the samples. Automatic process · One step

  6. Automatic Tube Cleaning Systems for Condensers & Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Someah, K.

    .0001 h'ft .0F/Btu in the condenser-tube fouling thermal resistance causes a corresponding increase of 1.1% in the compressor power requirement (2). A significant factor affecting the heat transfer capability of water-cooled condensers and heat... available space - that is, the length of piping The operation of rubber balt cleaning for the strainer section. The strainer spool with systems is based on the circulation of a single screen will occupy twice the pipe length. elastomeric, slightly...

  7. Enhanced monitor system for water protection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, David E. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Rodriquez, Jr., Miguel [Oak Ridge, TN; Greenbaum, Elias (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic, self-contained device for detecting toxic agents in a water supply includes an analyzer for detecting at least one toxic agent in a water sample, introducing a means for introducing a water sample into the analyzer and discharging the water sample from the analyzer, holding means for holding a water sample for a pre-selected period of time before the water sample is introduced into the analyzer, and an electronics package that analyzes raw data from the analyzer and emits a signal indicating the presence of at least one toxic agent in the water sample.

  8. The automatic reconfiguration of electric shipboard power systems is an important step toward improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    ABSTRACT The automatic reconfiguration of electric shipboard power systems is an important step are envisioned by redes- igning the electric power system and its controls. This research focuses on a new scheme answer for a decentralized energy management system of the electric shipboard power system is addressed

  9. Protected Water Area System (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and establishment of a protected water area system and those adjacent lands needed to protect the integrity of that system. A...

  10. A computer test bench for checking and adjusting the automatic regulators of generator excitation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dovganyuk, I. Ya.; Labunets, I. A.; Plotnikova, T. V.; Sokur, P. V. [Affiliate of the 'NTTs Elektroenergetiki' Company - Scientific Research Institute of Electric Power (VNIIE) (Russian Federation)

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer test bench for testing and debugging natural samples of the automatic excitation regulation systems of generators, the protection units and the power part of the excitation system is described. The bench includes a personal computer with specialized input-output circuit boards for analog and digital signals, and enables the time and cost involved in developing and checking control systems to be reduced considerably. The program employed operates in real time and enables the automatic excitation regulators of synchronous generators and generators with longitudinal-transverse excitation in a specific power system to be adjusted.

  11. Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter 2008 Automatic Control Laboratory D-ITET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lygeros, John

    Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter 2008 Automatic Control Laboratory D-ITET ETH Zurich Winter happens to the state as t using the final value theorem. 1 #12;Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter T seconds. Do you believe her? Justify your answer. 2 #12;Signal and System Theory II, BSc, Winter 2008

  12. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient gas water heating appliance to market; a plan toefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and to planefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and 3) to

  13. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  14. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step in developing a realistic degradation term for tankless water heatersstep (water draw event) in the simulation. Instantaneous Gas Water Heater

  15. Automatic Control Software Synthesis for Quantized Discrete Time Hybrid Systems Vadim Alimguzhin, Federico Mari, Igor Melatti, Ivano Salvo, Enrico Tronci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    Automatic Control Software Synthesis for Quantized Discrete Time Hybrid Systems Vadim Alimguzhin for automatic synthesis of embedded systems con- trol software. This paper addresses control software synthesis Software Based Control Systems, that is control systems whose controller consists of control software

  16. Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird, Idaho: EnergyWhitmanLinkButton Jump to:Wien Automatic

  17. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation Polyethylene Polyvinyl chloride Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Water Distribution System

  18. Submitted to: Multimedia Systems, pending. Real Time Video Analysis for Automatic Archive Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Submitted to: Multimedia Systems, pending. Real Time Video Analysis for Automatic Archive Creation are indexed based on their captions and stored in a multimedia database. A client-server-based graphical user in video compression and transmission, the use of digital video in multimedia systems and over the Internet

  19. HADARA A Software System for Semi-Automatic Processing of Historical Handwritten Arabic Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sana, Jihad

    HADARA ­ A Software System for Semi-Automatic Processing of Historical Handwritten Arabic Documents-Gurion University of the Negev, Be'er-Sheva, Israel Raid Saabni; Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University available and to preserve historical documents. We present a modular software system which can be used

  20. Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW Department of Agronomy, Purdue University. Agric. Exp. Stn., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. SUMMARY The swelling of clay-water systems and the thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water in these systems are discussed. The swelling

  1. AUTOMATIC VARIABLE VENTILATION CONTROL SYSTEMS BASED ON AIR QUALITY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turiel, Isaac

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUt1t1ARY Mechanical ventilation systems usually provide aof any 02 based ventilation system is that a ventilationwith type of ventilation system~ weather conditions, and

  2. Recent advances in automatic alignment system for the National Iginition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Kalantar, D; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 50 minutes. The system automatically commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics based upon images acquired from high-resolution digital cameras viewing beams at various locations. Forty-five control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze these images of the beams and references, and automaticallys teer the beams toward the target. This paper discusses the upgrades to the NIF automatic alignment system to handle new alignment needs and evolving requirements as related to various types of experiments performed. As NIF becomes a continuously-operated system and more experiments are performed, performance monitoring is increasingly important for maintenance and commissioning work. Data, collected during operations, is analyzed for tuning of the laser and targeting maintenance work. handling evolving alignment and maintenance needs is expected for the planned 30-year operational life of NIF.

  3. Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    of water in a specific location. #12;Water Extraction & Conveyance Water Treatment End-Use AgriculturalIntegrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems Integrated Planning for Water and Energy Systems Wilkinson, Ph.D. Director, Water Policy Program Bren School of Environmental Science and Management

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 47, NO. 7, JULY 2002 1091 Distributed Control of Spatially Invariant Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bamieh, Bassam

    , robust control, spatially invariant systems. I. INTRODUCTION THE VAST majority of automatic controlIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 47, NO. 7, JULY 2002 1091 Distributed Control are spatially invariant, and where the controls and measurements are spatially distributed. These systems arise

  5. A better cooling water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gale, T.E.; Beecher, J.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To prepare their newly constructed reduced crude conversion (RCC) open recirculating cooling water system for the implementation of a corrosion and deposit control water treatment program, Ashland Petroleum, Catlettsburg, Ky., made plans for and carried out precleaning and passivation procedures. Here, the authors share the results, and some potential guidelines for one's own operations. Inspection of equipment after precleaning showed that the precleaning procedures was very effective in removing undesirable matter. After precleaning and passivation of the system, the recommended cooling water treatment program was started. Corrosion rates for mild steel specimens ranged from 0.5 to 1.5 mils per year (mpy), with an average of 1.0 mpy. The corrosion rates for admiralty specimens ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 mpy. Benefits of the precleaning and passivating programs greatly outweigh the costs, since the normal cooling water treatment program for corrosion and deposit control can then operate more effectively.

  6. automatic evaluation system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Websites Summary: to endorse or advertise a commercial product or company. 12;Gentle Logging System Evaluation (ParticipantsGentle Logging System...

  7. Information Sources for Small Water Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Managers of small waters systems must have information about a variety of topics. This publication lists essential printed and electronic resources on disaster preparedness, national drinking water standards, private water well management, water...

  8. The Coign Automatic Distributed Partitioning System Galen C. Hunt Michael L. Scott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    1 The Coign Automatic Distributed Partitioning System Galen C. Hunt Michael L. Scott Microsoft of middleware (such as RPC, CORBA, and DCOM) have made it eas- ier to connect distributed programs, the process of distributed application decomposition has changed little: programmers manually divide applications into sub

  9. An automatic control system for a laboratory precipitation process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Mary Alice

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Loop Tuning Procedure Flow Control pH Control RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 19 22 22 23 23 25 25 26 28 Calibrations Lime Dose ? pH Calibration Results Main Control Program Description Control Loop Tuning Results and Testing. Flow Cont... in type and concentration to compounds typically found in cooling water. Several tests were performed on 500 ml batches of feed- water using the pH meter, the lime pump, and a 10% lime slurry. Gaseous nitrogen was bubbled through the feedwater to strip...

  10. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculationsheat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations

  11. Information Sources for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    E - 4 3 8 0 2 - 0 7 ?The protection of water quality is vital for managers of small water systems.? Information S o urces for Small Water System s Monty Dozier, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist; Gene Theodori, Associate Professor... and Extension Program Leader; and Ric Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute, The Texas A&M University T The protection of water quality is vital for managers of small water systems. Ample resources related to water quality...

  12. System for computer controlled shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patil, Prabhakar B. (Detroit, MI)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an automotive vehicle having an automatic transmission that driveably connects a power source to the driving wheels, a method to control the application of hydraulic pressure to a clutch, whose engagement produces an upshift and whose disengagement produces a downshift, the speed of the power source, and the output torque of the transmission. The transmission output shaft torque and the power source speed are the controlled variables. The commanded power source torque and commanded hydraulic pressure supplied to the clutch are the control variables. A mathematical model is formulated that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the powertrain before, during and after a gear shift. The model represents the operating characteristics of each component and the structural arrangement of the components within the transmission being controlled. Next, a close loop feedback control is developed to determine the proper control law or compensation strategy to achieve an acceptably smooth gear ratio change, one in which the output torque disturbance is kept to a minimum and the duration of the shift is minimized. Then a computer algorithm simulating the shift dynamics employing the mathematical model is used to study the effects of changes in the values of the parameters established from a closed loop control of the clutch hydraulic and the power source torque on the shift quality. This computer simulation is used also to establish possible shift control strategies. The shift strategies determine from the prior step are reduced to an algorithm executed by a computer to control the operation of the power source and the transmission.

  13. automatic operation system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that could interfere with the operation of the brush & basket or the sponge rubber ball type systems. BRUSH AND BASKET SYSTEM A typical... of various types of screening and...

  14. automatic control system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA. Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration 2015-01-01 389...

  15. automatic control systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA. Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration 2015-01-01 389...

  16. Experimental results of water film formation on various fuel forms from a fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Davis, J.R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine the thickness and coverage of water film formations on various materials during fire sprinkler deluge. The primary criticality safety concern with automatic fire suppression systems is the increased amount of water that a film adds to the interstitial volume of an array per unit time. An exhaustive literature search revealed that no applicable research data exist that govern water film formations from fire protection systems. Therefore, a controlled, infield, mockup was created to predict the thickness and coverage of water film on fissile material forms. This paper discusses the background, experimental procedure, and the characterization of these water films.

  17. Automatic Tube Cleaning Systems for Condensers and Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Someah, K.

    and wiping action of the balls which prevents the de position of scale forming deposits inside the tube surface. The balls are collected by means of a special strainer installed in the outlet part of the condenser. The balls are then recirculated... and re injected back into the supply line. The major components of this type of cleaning systems are the ball strainer, the ball recirculation system and the control system. The ball collection is accomplished by two half sized electrical screens...

  18. 770 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 44, NO. 4, APRIL 1999 [2] J. E. Bertram, "The effect of quantization in sampled feedback systems,"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implementations of linear feedback control systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr., vol. 34, pp. 1319­1324, Dec, and H. Ye, "Some qualitative properties of sampled-data control system," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr parametrization of stability controllers for multirate sampled-data systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr., vol. 35

  19. automatic monitoring system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for monitoring the structural condition and the operational efficiency of the wind turbine. The monitoring system has been installed on a 500 kW wind turbine located in...

  20. automatic system planning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conducted... Starr, Luther James 2012-06-07 354 A SIMULATION-BASED PLANNING SYSTEM FOR WIND TURBINE CONSTRUCTION CiteSeer Summary: Wind turbine construction is a challenging...

  1. automatic surveillance system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    motion detection system is motivated by their potential for deployment in the areas where security is the main concern. The paper presents a platform for real time video motion...

  2. Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Taesoo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compromises of our computer systems are inevitable. New software vulnerabilities are discovered and exploited daily, but even if the software is bug-free, administrators may inadvertently make mistakes in configuring ...

  3. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 5 WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF SIMULATED ANNEALING Fred E. Goldman Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 5.1 INTRODUCTION The operation of water distribution systems affects the water quality in these systems. EPA regulations require that water quality be maintained

  4. Development of automatic operation system for coke oven machines at Yawata Works of Nippon Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsunaga, Masao; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yoji; Ishiharaguchi, Yuji

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coke plant is a working environment involving heavy dust emissions, high heat and demanding physical labor. The labor-saving operation of the coke plant is an essential issue from the standpoints of not only improvement in working environment, but also reduction in fixed cost by enhancement of labor productivity. Under these circumstances, Nippon Steel has implemented the automation of coke oven machines. The first automatic operation system for coke oven machinery entered service at Oita Works in 1992, followed by the second system at the No. 5 coke oven battery of the coke plant at Yawata Works. The Yawata automatic operation system is characterized by the installation of coke oven machinery to push as many as 140 ovens per day within a short cycle time, such as a preliminary ascension pipe cap opening car and cycle time simulator by the manned operation of the pusher, which is advantageous from the standpoint of investment efficiency, and by the monitoring of other oven machines by the pusher. These measures helped to reduce the manpower requirement to 2 persons per shift from 4 persons per shift. The system entered commercial operation in March, 1994 and has been smoothly working with an average total automatic rate of 97%. Results from the startup to recent operation of the system are reported below.

  5. Automatic Control System of Car-Bottom Reheating Furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xueqiao, M.; Weilian, X.; Hongchen, Z.

    that the furnaces are not modified in their construction. This paper, however, will give you a definite answer to this question. One of the most effective methods for increasing the calorific efficiency is to improve thermal control systems of reheating furnaces...

  6. VI International SAUM Conference on Systems, Automatic Control and Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    and filtering tasks into pure­slow and pure­fast time scales. The presented methodol­ ogy eliminates numerical into the design procedures, allows independent parallel processing of informa­ tion in slow and fast time scales, aircrafts, robots, electrical cir­ cuits, power systems, nuclear reactors, chemical reactors, dc

  7. Progress report on a fully automatic Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daumeyer, G.J. III

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan to develop a fully automatic gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) system that will utilize a vision-sensing computer (which will provide in-process feedback control) is presently in work. Evaluations of different technological aspects and system design requirements continue. This report summaries major activities in the plan`s successful progress. The technological feasibility of producing the fully automated GTAW system has been proven. The goal of this process development project is to provide a production-ready system within the shortest reasonable time frame.

  8. Automatic alpha-track counting with image analysis systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shymanski, Michael Joseph

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . Digital Image Processing Particle Track Counting III. MATERIALS AND METHODS LR-115 Type II Film Detector Package and Assembly . Radon Exposure System Uranium Exposure Method LR-115 Thermochemical Etch Process Quality Control of LR-115 Material... (calibration factor). EPA has developed protocols for humidity correction methodologies which are published in EERF Standard 10 Operating Procedures for zziRn Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters (USEPA 1987). Two types of continuous assay techniques...

  9. Automatic alpha-track counting with image analysis systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shymanski, Michael Joseph

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to establish an explanation of why an increased calibration factor, for a track counting system, is observed with increasing photometer readings. Second, TSD measurements were made for films irradiated with a depleted uranium source in order to determine... the usefulness of uranium as a fast exposure facility for quality control (QC) films for the etch process. The results of this work concluded that uranium was not a good QC source for the current etching process for the exposure methods used. Finally, total...

  10. Application of multi-variable control for automatic frequency controller of HVDC transmission system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanpei, Masatoshi (Electric Power Development Co., Tokyo (Japan)); Kakehi, Atsuyuki; Takeda, Hideo (Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an HVDC transmission system that links two ac power systems, the automatic frequency controller (AFC) calculates power to be interchanged between the two ac systems according to their frequencies thereby improving the frequency characteristics of the two power systems. This paper introduces a newly developed dc AFC system, which applies a multi-variable control to the dc system-based frequency control. It is capable of controlling the frequencies of the two ac systems optimally while maintaining their stability. This system was developed for one of Japan's HVDC transmission facilities and produced good results in a combined test using a power system simulator. The field installation will be completed in March 1993, when the AFC system will enter service.

  11. Automatic flush valve performance (gallons per flush) measured from fixtures in a mixed-use classroom/office building at Texas A&M University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lertbannaphong, Salilla

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    flush valve performance (gpf) of fixtures in a mixed use classroom building at Texas A&M University. Water consumption (gpf) among three types of fixtures; low-consumption manual, old optic automatic and improved optic automatic systems are measured...

  12. Water Resource System Optimization by Geometric Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, W. L.; Shih, C. S.; Wray, D. J.

    Water resources planners and systems analysts are continually confronted with many complex optimization problems. Two major factors contribute to this problem. Firstly, mathematical modeling and system description capabilities in water resources...

  13. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2008 Annual Water-Quality Report and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated equipment

  14. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2004 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  15. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2005 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  16. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or (MRDLG): The level of drinking water1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2007 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  17. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112 Clemson, SC 2003 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  18. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or (MRDLG): The level of drinking water1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2006 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  19. Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Clemson University Water System System No, SC3910006 Clemson, SC 2003 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  20. Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level1 Fant's Grove Water System System No, SC390112 Clemson, SC 2004 Annual Water-Quality Report with a safe and reliable supply of high-quality drinking water. We test our water using sophisticated

  1. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  2. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  3. Stealthy Deception Attacks on Water SCADA Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    Stealthy Deception Attacks on Water SCADA Systems Saurabh Amin1 Xavier Litrico2 Alexandre M. Bayen1 The Gignac Water SCADA System Modeling of Cascade Canal Pools Attacks on PI Control Limits on Stability and Detectability #12;Recapitulation from last year The Gignac Water SCADA System Modeling of Cascade Canal Pools

  4. Distrbuted Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assesment and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assessment and ManagementSensing Systems for Water Quality Assessment and ManagementSensing Systems for Water Quality Assessment and Management

  5. The TREAT upgrade manual reactor control system and its interface with the automatic reactor control system and the plant protection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, W.P.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at Argonne National Laboratory is being upgraded to simulate extreme conditions in a reactor. This facility will be used to subject test assemblies of fuel bundles to very rapid and intense power transients. This paper describes in detail the manual reactor control system and its interfaces with the plant protection system the automatic reactor control system.

  6. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN (United States); [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  7. Rate Setting for Small Water Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute; The Texas A&M University System K Knowing how to set the proper rate for water service is a daunting challenge for small water systems. The rates must be high enough to re- cover...

  8. Incremental Evolutionary Methods for Automatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langseth, Helge

    Incremental Evolutionary Methods for Automatic Programming of Robot Controllers Thesis Theory studies the fundamental control principles of robotic systems. However, the technological progress such system often requires manual work of engineers. Automatic methods might lead to systems that perform task

  9. Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and Extension Specialist; Monty Dozier, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist; and Ric Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute; The Texas A&M University System There are many resources to help managers of small water...

  10. Rate Setting for Small Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing how to set the proper rate for water service is a challenge for small water systems. They must generate enough revenue to remain solvent, but offer affordable service. This publication describes the various types of rates and explains...

  11. Automatic Analysis and Synthesis of Controllers for Dynamical Systems Based On P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Feng

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a novel design methodology for the synthesis of automatic controllers, together with a computational environment---the Control Engineer's Workbench---integrating a suite of programs that automatically analyze ...

  12. Contaminant Transport in Municipal Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    Chapter 1 Contaminant Transport in Municipal Water Systems Presented at the 3rd PIMS Industrial the inverse problem. We begin in the following sections with an overview of the physics of ow in water forcing to raise the hydraulic head of the water in the network. The nodes are either junctions, tanks

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 48, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 1817 Adaptive and Robust Controls of Uncertain Systems With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Zhihua

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 48, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 1817 Adaptive and Robust Controls of Uncertain Systems With Nonlinear Parameterization Zhihua Qu Abstract--Two classes of partially--Adaptive control, nonlinear parameterization, observer, robust control, uncertain systems. I. INTRODUCTION In many

  14. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  15. Water turbine system and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P. (Montpelier, VT)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  16. Water turbine system and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  17. Water turbine system and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P. (Montpelier, VT)

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing electrical power from a current turbine is provided. The system includes a floatation device and a mooring. A water turbine structure is provided having an upper and lower portion wherein the lower portion includes a water fillable chamber. A plurality of cables are used to couple the system where a first cable couples the water turbine to the mooring and a second cable couples the floatation device to the first cable. The system is arranged to allow the turbine structure to be deployed and retrieved for service, repair, maintenance and redeployment.

  18. Robot design for leak detection in water-pipe systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Changrak

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leaks are major problem that occur in the water pipelines all around the world. Several reports indicate loss of around 20 to 30 percent of water in the distribution of water through water pipe systems. Such loss of water ...

  19. Automatic system for regulating the frequency and power of the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units at the Reftinskaya GRES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilenko, V. A.; Gal'perina, A. I.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'skii, D. Yu. [JSC 'Interavtomatka' (Russian Federation); Zhugrin, A. G.; Bebenin, P. A.; Syrchin, M. V. [JSC 'Reftinskaya GRES' (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring and control systems at the 500 MW coal-dust power generating units No. 7, 8, and 9 at the Reftinskaya GRES have been modernized using information-regulator systems. Layouts for instrumental construction of these systems and expanded algorithmic schemes for the automatic frequency and power control system and for the boiler supply and fuelling are discussed. Results from tests and normal operation of the automatic frequency and power control system are presented.

  20. High temperature hot water systems: A primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govan, F.A. [NMD and Associates, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental principles of high temperature water (HTW) system technology and its advantages for thermal energy distribution are presented. Misconceptions of this technology are also addressed. The paper describes design principles, applications, HTW properties, HTW system advantages, selecting the engineer, load diversification, design temperatures, system pressurization, pump considerations, constant vs. VS pumps, HTW generator types, and burners and controls.

  1. Resources for Small Water Systems in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication is a guide to finding the many resources available to help managers of small water systems in Texas. Details are provided about sources of financial assistance, tools for capacity building, training programs and educational...

  2. Renewable Energy Powered Water Treatment Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Bryce S.; Schäfer, Andrea

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many motivations for choosing renewable energy technologies to provide the necessary energy to power water treatment systems for reuse and desalination. These range from the lack of an existing electricity grid, ...

  3. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (?2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ?2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the original plan fluence map as the starting stage reduced OAR dose at the mid-dose region, but increased the monitor units by 17%. Differences of only 2cc or less in OAR V50%/V70Gy/V76Gy were observed between 100 and 50 iterations.Conclusions: It is feasible to perform automatic online reoptimization in ?2 min using a clinical treatment planning system. Selecting optimal sets of input parameters is the key to achieving high quality reoptimized plans, and should be based on the individual patient's daily anatomy, delivery efficiency, and time allowed for plan adaptation.

  4. Design and analysis of a laser oriented, automatic dimensional inspection system for high-speed process control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Steven Morris

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Filter. Photodetector . Electronic Subsystem ~ Signal Generation Signal Amplii'ication. 10 15 16 19 19 22 22 25 25 viii Cl~~er IV. Signal Comparison . ~ Reference Voltage Control Logical Generation of Ejection Pulse, . ~ EXPERIMENTAL... Repeatability. . ~ 66 LIST OF FIGURES 2, 1 3 ~ 3 3. 4 ~Pe Automatic Process Control System . . 6 General Design of Outer Dimension Inspection System, Analog Inspection Signal and Reference Voltages . . ~. . . ~ ~ . 14. Simulated, High-Speed Production...

  5. Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes This presentation is from the Building America...

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Certified Water Heater §111, §113 (a) Water Heater Efficiency §113 (b) Service Water Heating Installation/A" in the column next to the measure. 2: For each water heater, pool heat and domestic water loop (or groupsSTATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS CEC-MECH-2C

  7. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

  8. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  9. High temperature hot water distribution system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System has been plagued with design and construction deficiencies since startup of the HTHW system, in October 1988. In October 1989, after one year of service, these deficiencies were outlined in a technical evaluation. The deficiencies included flooded manholes, sump pumps not hooked up, leaking valves, contaminated HTHW water, and no cathodic protection system. This feasibility study of the High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System was performed under Contract No. DACA0l-94-D-0033, Delivery Order 0013, Modification 1, issued to EMC Engineers, Inc. (EMC), by the Norfolk District Corps of Engineers, on 25 April 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine the existing conditions of the High Temperature Hot Water Distribution System, manholes, and areas of containment system degradation. The study focused on two areas of concern, as follows: * Determine existing conditions and areas of containment system degradation (leaks) in the underground carrier pipes and protective conduit. * Document the condition of underground steel and concrete manholes. To document the leaks, a site survey was performed, using state-of-the-art infrared leak detection equipment and tracer gas leak detection equipment. To document the condition of the manholes, color photographs were taken of the insides of 125 manholes, and notes were made on the condition of these manholes.

  10. Water injected fuel cell system compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siepierski, James S. (Williamsville, NY); Moore, Barbara S. (Victor, NY); Hoch, Martin Monroe (Webster, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

  11. Energy optimization of water distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to analyze pump operating scenarios for the system with the computer model, information on existing pumping equipment and the distribution system was collected. The information includes the following: component description and design criteria for line booster stations, booster stations with reservoirs, and high lift pumps at the water treatment plants; daily operations data for 1988; annual reports from fiscal year 1987/1988 to fiscal year 1991/1992; and a 1985 calibrated KYPIPE computer model of DWSD`s water distribution system which included input data for the maximum hour and average day demands on the system for that year. This information has been used to produce the inventory database of the system and will be used to develop the computer program to analyze the system.

  12. Hot Water Heating System Operation and Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Z.; Chen, H.; Wei, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an example of the reconstruction of a hot water heating system, this paper provides an analysis and comparison of the operations of hot water heating systems, including supply water temperature adjustment, flow adjustment during each...

  13. Introduction of Heat Recovery Chiller Control and Water System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The styles, feature and main concerns of heat recovery water system are discussed, and the entering condenser water temperature control is recommended for higher chiller efficiency and reliable operation. Three optimized water system designs...

  14. Introduction of Heat Recovery Chiller Control and Water System Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The styles, feature and main concerns of heat recovery water system are discussed, and the entering condenser water temperature control is recommended for higher chiller efficiency and reliable operation. Three optimized water system designs...

  15. ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSING POWER PLANT COOLING WATER INTAKE SYSTEM ENTRAINMENT IMPACTS Prepared For: California be obvious that large studies like these require the coordinated work of many people. We would first like from the Duke Energy South Bay and Morro Bay power plants and the PG&E Diablo Canyon Power Plant

  16. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  17. Optimization of California's Water Supply System: Results and Insights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    headings: Optimization; California; Water supply; Water shortage. Introduction Water is scarceOptimization of California's Water Supply System: Results and Insights Marion W. Jenkins1 ; Jay R-engineering optimization model of California's water supply system. The results of this 4-year effort illustrate the value

  18. Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Difference Across the Heater and Water Flow Rate MeasuredDifference Across the Heater and Water Flow Rate Measurednew_specs/downloads/water _heaters/Water_Heater_Market_

  19. Water delivery in the Early Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Süli, Áron; Sándor, Zsolt; Galiazzo, Mattia; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the national scientific network 'Pathways to Habitable Worlds' the delivery of water onto terrestrial planets is a key question since water is essential for the development of life as we know it. After summarizing the state of the art we show some first results of the transport of water in the early Solar System for scattered main belt objects. Hereby we investigate the questions whether planetesimals and planetesimal fragments which have gained considerable inclination due to the strong dynamical interactions in the main belt region around 2 AU can be efficient water transporting vessels. The Hungaria asteroid group is the best example that such scenarios are realistic. Assuming that the gas giants and the terrestrial planets are already formed, we monitor the collisions of scattered small bodies containing water (in the order of a few percent) with the terrestrial planets. Thus we are able to give a first estimate concerning the respective contribution of such bodies to the actual water content i...

  20. Dealing with big circulation flow, small temperature difference based on verified dynamic model simulations of a hot water district heating system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEALING WITH “BIG CIRCULATION FLOW RATE, SMALL TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCE” BASED ON VERIFIED DYNAMIC MODEL SIMULATIONS OF A HOT WATER DISTRICT HEATING SYSTEM Li Lian Zhong, Senior Sales Consultant, Danfoss Automatic Controls Management (Shanghai...) Co.,Ltd, Anshan, China ABSTRACT Dynamic models of an indirect hot water district heating system were developed based on the first principle of thermodynamics. The ideal model was verified by using measured operational data. The ideal...

  1. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary. 2 figures.

  2. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (3134 Natalie Cir., Augusta, GA 30909-2748)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

  3. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackman, Terry E. (Finleyville, PA); Place, John M. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  4. Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, K.

    Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

  5. Critical review of water based radiant cooling system design methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Bauman, Fred; Schiavon, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Embedded Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, InternationalWATER BASED RADIANT COOLING SYSTEM DESIGN METHODS Jingjuan (Keywords: Radiant Cooling System, Design Approach,

  6. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating with other existing data sources, thus minimizing manually entered data.

  7. A stock water solar heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nydahl, J.; Carlson, B.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the progress in the development of an inexpensive but rugged solar system to heat stock water. Insulation encased in fiber reinforced concrete is the main structural component for the collector and the partition between the unheated stock tank and the heated section. A fully wetted, drain-back collector was designed to produce a high optical efficiency and to permit its water passage to be opened for cleaning. A unique double-glazed design is used in which the inner glazing is a film with a large thermal expansion coefficient. This causes a significant drop in the stagnation temperatures since a single glazed configuration is approached at high temperatures. The collector and the partially covered insulated tank prevented freezing, and held the average water temperature at 6.4 C (44 F) during the day while the mean daily ambient temperature was {minus}5.4 C (22 F) over a nine day test.

  8. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  9. Automatic history matching of dual porosity system with wellbore storage and skin constant rate case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olarewaju, Joseph Shola

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION MATHEMATICAL MODEL HISTORY MATCHING MODEL MODEL VALIDATION Comparison with the Warren and Root Solution RESULTS Type Curves Automatic History Matching Behavior at Early... Page I Comparison of the Numerical Inversion Results with the Warren and Root Analytical Solution. 2 Comparison of the Numerical Inversion Results with the Agarwal et al. Analytical Solution. 3 Basic Type Curve Data 4 Simulated Drawdown Example...

  10. Continuous Commissioning of a Central Chilled Water & Hot Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Batten, T.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the campus loops and the building loops. Some optimization of the plant chiller 1 boiler operation is also necessary and beneficial. In general, through Continuous Commissioning, chilled water and hot water loop temperature differences will be improved...

  11. Automatic Control Flow Generation from Software Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Kung-Kiu

    -time automatically. To achieve this we take a different approach to system construction. We take control out.-K. Lau and V. Ukis generic connectors, and generate control flow of the system automatically at run in different systems with different control flows. Our automatic runtime control flow generation not only

  12. Conference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    of compartmentalized data, lack of central storage, and limited access to data for decision-making in water managementConference Topic: Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Areas Management National Water Information Systems: A Tool to Support Integrated Water Resources Management in the Caribbean Marie-Claire St

  13. K West integrated water treatment system subproject safety analysis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEMMENS, L.S.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Accident Analysis evaluates unmitigated accident scenarios, and identifies Safety Significant and Safety Class structures, systems, and components for the K West Integrated Water Treatment System.

  14. Sustaining Sherman Island: A Water Management and Agricultural Diversification System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Richard

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank Production Systems: Aquaponics-Integrating Fish andand environmental resources. The Aquaponics Water Managementstorage zone. The aquaponics system is a bio- integrated

  15. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buckley, C. A. ; Carbon footprint analysis for increasingeffectively reduce their carbon footprint. To accomplish7 February 2013. (8) The Carbon Footprint of Water; River

  16. 2003: Energy performance of daylight-linked automatic lighting control systems in large atrium spaces: report on two field-monitored case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Galasiu; Morad R. Atif; Anca D. Galasiu

    This paper presents the field-measured energy performance of two common types of daylight-linked lighting control systems, continuous dimming and automatic on/off installed in two existing large atrium spaces located in Canada. The daylighting performance was evaluated based on the daylight contribution to the indoor illuminance and the amount of electrical lighting displaced by daylighting via the daylight-linked lighting control systems. Measured daylighting contribution to the space indicates that significant lighting energy savings can be achieved in atrium spaces if the daylight-linked lighting control system is appropriately selected, installed and commissioned throughout its existence. Results extrapolated from measurements collected during summer and winter indicate that as installed, the continuous dimming lighting control system provides 46% annual savings in electrical lighting consumption, while the automatic on/off saves between 11-17% in lighting energy. These savings account for 68% of the lighting energy consumed during main occupancy for the continuous dimming system, and 31.5% for the automatic on/off. Operation irregularities such as a reduced dimming linearity and an incorrect adjustment of the phases of the dimming control system, as well as the inadequate location of the photocell controlling the automatic on/off lighting system, the improper maintenance of the skylight during winter and the oversizing of the lighting system reduced the energy efficiency of the lighting control systems by 30-65%.

  17. Water-loop heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eley, C.; Hydeman, M. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-loop heat pump (WLHP) systems are reliable, versatile, energy-efficient alternatives to conventional systems such as packaged rooftop or central chiller systems. These systems offer low installed costs, unparalleled design flexibility, and an inherent ability to recover heat in a variety of commercial and multifamily residential buildings for both new construction and retrofit markets. Southern California Edison Co. (SCE) teamed with EPRI to develop a comprehensive design guide for WLHP systems that incorporated recent research by EPRI, SCE, and others. The project team reviewed current literature, equipment data, and design guidelines from equipment manufacturers. They next discussed design and application practices with consulting engineers as well as design and building contractors. The team also ran extensive computer simulations on commercial and multifamily residential building models for Southern California, both to determine the sensitivity of energy use to WLHP system design parameters and to establish optimal design parameters. This information culminated in a comprehensive engineering guide. Volume 1 of this report, provides step-by-step technical design data for selection, application, and specification of WLHP systems. This guide emphasizes energy-efficient design principles and incorporates the findings of the computer simulations and research. For example, it recommends lowering the loop temperature in buildings dominated by internal loads. Reducing the loop temperature from 90 to 80[degrees]F provides a 7--10% savings in the total system energy in Southern California climate areas. Other recommendations include (1) installing a cooling tower with a propeller fan, which uses one fourth to one third of the energy of a cooling tower with a centrifugal fan; and (2) incorporating variable-speed pumps in conjunction with two-position valves in the heat pumps to reduce the system pump energy use by up to 50%.

  18. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. King

    2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

  19. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  20. Simulation Models for Improved Water Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Simulation of a Smart Water Heater. ” In Workshop inFreezers, Furnaces, Water Heaters, Room and Central AirNovember. ADL. 1982b. Water Heater Computer Model User’s

  1. CC Retrofits and Optimal Controls for Hot Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, L.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Commissioning (CC) technologies, three old boilers (13.39 MMBH each) were replaced by three new boilers (1.675 MMBH each) and hot water pumps. Optimal controls for the hot water systems included optimal hot water temperature reset, hot water pump...

  2. Charles J. Vrsmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    .1 billion people lack clean drinking water 2.6 billion people lack basic sanitationCharles J. Vörösmarty & the UNH Water Systems Analysis Group Fall Water Institute Seminar Series Corridor #12;Goals for This Discussion · Describe chief forces shaping the contemporary and future water

  3. A Step Towards Automatic Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Claude

    This paper describes a system which automatically generates program documentation. Starting with a plan generated by analyzing the program, the system computes several kinds of summary information about the program. The ...

  4. Energy-efficient water heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how to reduce the amount of hot water used in faucets and showers, automatic dishwashers, and washing machines; how to increase water-heating system efficiency by lowering the water heater thermostat, installing a timer and heat traps, and insulating hot water pipes and the storage tank; and how to use off-peak power to heat water. A resource list for further information is included.

  5. Installation package for a Sunspot Cascade Solar Water Heating System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elcam, Incorporated of Santa Barbara, California, has developed two solar water heating systems. The systems have been installed at Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California. The systems consist of the following: collector, collector-tank water loop, solar tank, conventional tank and controls. General guidelines are provided which may be utilized in development of detailed instalation plans and specifications. In addition, it provides instruction on operation, maintenance and installation of solar hot water systems.

  6. Building America Webinar: Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by DOE's Building America program, this webinar will focus on the effective use of central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) and control systems to reduce the energy use in hot water distribution.

  7. Building America Webinar: Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 4:30PM EST This free webinar will focus on the effective use of central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) and control systems to reduce the energy use in hot water...

  8. Feasibility and design of blast mitigation systems for naval applications using water mist fire suppression systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitchenka, Julie A

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent trend of using fine water mist systems to replace the legacy HALON- 1301 fire suppression systems warrants further study into other applications of the water mist systems. Preliminary research and investigation ...

  9. Homeland Security Challenges Facing Small Water Systems in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    and Extension Specialist; and Ric Jensen, Assistant Research Scientist, Texas Water Resources Institute; The Texas A&M University System Water systems of all sizes, including small systems, may be vulner- able to man-made and natural threats that can...

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS (SDHW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attached CEC F-Chart) # of Collectors in System Collector Size Solar Tank Volume (gallons) §150(j)1B piping shall be insulated. §150(j)4: Solar water-heating system and/or/collectors are certifiedSTATE OF CALIFORNIA SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS (SDHW) CEC- CF-6R-MECH-02 (Revised 08

  11. El Dorado County Water Systems Energy Generation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water systems within the El Dorado Irrigation District and the Georgetown Divide Public UtilityEl Dorado County Water Systems Energy Generation Project RENEWABLE ENERGY RESEARCH www systems, there is significant room for improvement in energy management, efficiency, and reducing demand

  12. Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application Forms Webpage Abstract Provides a list of permit...

  13. Sensor Networks for Monitoring and Control of Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittle, Andrew

    Water distribution systems present a significant challenge for structural monitoring. They comprise a complex network of pipelines buried underground that are relatively inaccessible. Maintaining the integrity of these ...

  14. Building America Webinar: Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems, will take place on January 21, 2015.

  15. VAPOR + LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM OF WATER, CARBON DIOXIDE, AND THE BINARY SYSTEM WATER + CARBON DIOXIDE FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and their binary mixtures (between 348 and 393 K). The properties of supercritical carbon dioxide were determinedVAPOR + LIQUID EQUILIBRIUM OF WATER, CARBON DIOXIDE, AND THE BINARY SYSTEM WATER + CARBON DIOXIDE the vapor-liquid equilibrium of water (between 323 and 573 K), carbon dioxide (between 230 and 290 K

  16. Reducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not decrease the residual TOC by 0.3 mg/L. #12;Guidelines: Coagulant dosages for water supplies where NOMReducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems by M. Robin Collins, James P. Malley, Jr, & Ethan Brooke Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center Department of Civil Engineering

  17. Challenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    cleaned and retained as a Best Management Practice (BMP). Receives only non-industrial storm water on storm water are leading municipalities to change permitting practices. As a result, facilitiesChallenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems A South Carolina Case

  18. Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum- and Bio-based Semi for petroleum and bio-based MWFs that improve fluid lifetime by providing emulsion stability under hard water. The newly developed petroleum and bio-based formulations with improved hard water stability are competitive

  19. Seismic Fragility of the LANL Fire Water Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mertz

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a site-wide system fragility assessment. This assessment focuses solely on the performance of the water distribution systems that supply Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR), Weapons Engineering and Tritium Facility (WETF), Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), Waste Characterization, Reduction, Repackaging Facility (WCRRF), and Transuranic Waste Inspectable Storage Project (TWISP). The analysis methodology is based on the American Lifelines Alliance seismic fragility formulations for water systems. System fragilities are convolved with the 1995 LANL seismic hazards to develop failure frequencies. Acceptance is determined by comparing the failure frequencies to the DOE-1020 Performance Goals. This study concludes that: (1) If a significant number of existing isolation valves in the water distribution system are closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in specific nuclear facilities; (2) Then, the water distribution systems for WETF, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP meet the PC-2 performance goal and the water distribution system for CMR is capable of surviving a 0.06g earthquake. A parametric study of the WETF water distribution system demonstrates that: (1) If a significant number of valves in the water distribution system are NOT closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in WETF; (2) Then, the water distribution system for WETF has an annual probability of failure on the order of 4 x 10{sup -3} that does not meet the PC-2 performance goal. Similar conclusions are expected for CMR, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP. It is important to note that some of the assumptions made in deriving the results should be verified by personnel in the safety-basis office and may need to be incorporated in technical surveillance requirements in the existing authorization basis documentation if credit for availability of fire protection water is taken at the PC-2 level earthquake levels. Assumptions are presented in Section 2.2 of this report.

  20. On The Impact of Communication Delays on Power System Automatic Generation Control Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    to become more prevalent in electric power systems. With increased integration of information technology (IT the IT infrastructure of a power system [1], is sensitive to such emerging behaviors, which, in turn, could have signals to generators through the IT infrastructure. The goal of the AGC system is to regulate electrical

  1. Fault tolerant control of automatically controlled vehicles in response to brake system failures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsien, Li-Wei

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the brake system is vital. In this thesis, nonlinear failure detection filters are used for fault detection of sensors and actuators in a class of nonlinear systems. In this thesis, the effects of brake system failures in an AHS where the vehicle steering...

  2. Fault tolerant control of automatically controlled vehicles in response to brake system failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsien, Li-Wei

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the brake system is vital. In this thesis, nonlinear failure detection filters are used for fault detection of sensors and actuators in a class of nonlinear systems. In this thesis, the effects of brake system failures in an AHS where the vehicle steering...

  3. Rig-site system allows water reuse, cuts cleanup costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neidhardt, D.

    1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A new well-site treatment system is described which extends the use of solids control equipment to help solve the common drilling problems of water supply and/or wastewater disposal. The new closed-loop system combines water treatment with more conventional solids handling to continuously create clean water. The results include: re-use of water for rig cleaning, mud, and even cement makeup with no need to eject liquid to the environment; greatly reduced water-input requirements; and division of the conventional wastewater pit into an active treatment operations pit and an overflow reserve pit for emergency storage.

  4. Autonomous monitoring of control hardware to predict off-normal conditions using NIF automatic Alignment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Leach, R; Kamm, V M; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Cohen, S

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high power laser system capable of supporting high-energy-density experimentation as a user facility for the next 30 years. In order to maximize the facility availability, preventive maintenance enhancements are being introduced into the system. An example of such an enhancement is a camera-based health monitoring system, integrated into the automated alignment system, which provides an opportunity to monitor trends in measurements such as average beam intensity, size of the beam, and pixel saturation. The monitoring system will generate alerts based on observed trends in measurements to allow scheduled pro-active maintenance before routine off-normal detection stops system operations requiring unscheduled intervention.

  5. Vulnerability assessment of water supply systems for insufficient fire flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    supply systems are vulnerable to many forms of terrorist acts, most of the vulnerability analysis studies on these systems have been for chemical and biological threats. Because of the interdependency of water supply infrastructure and emergency fire...

  6. Improving Heating System Operations Using Water Re-Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, F.; Han, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to solve the imbalance problem of a heating system, brought about by consumer demand and regulation, and save the electricity energy consumed by a circulation pump, a water mixing and pressure difference control heating system is proposed...

  7. Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, John

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

  8. Fourteenth Service Water System Reliability Improvement Seminar Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information presented at the Fourteenth Service Water System Reliability Improvement (SWSRI) Seminar held June 24-25, 2002, in San Diego, California. The bi-annual seminar--sponsored by EPRI--provided an opportunity for participants to exchange technical information and experiences regarding the monitoring, repair, and replacement of service water system components.

  9. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  10. Evaporative system for water and beverage refrigeration in hot countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaporative system for water and beverage refrigeration in hot countries A Saleh1 and MA Al-Nimr2 1 Abstract: The present study proposes an evaporative refrigerating system used to keep water or other are found to be consistent with the available literature data. Keywords: evaporative refrigeration, heat

  11. Design refinements and support systems for Texas A&M Automatic Marine Corer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Herman Olen

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conductors for operating 15 horsepower on 3-phase 440 volt, electric current. 3. Contain six twisted pairs of signal conductors for monitoring and control. 4. Be blocked to prevent water seepage around the conductors. 5. Have a length of at least 1, 500... having an outside diameter of 0. 818 in. and a minimum breaking strength of 50, 000 lb. The recommended maximum line pull is 17, 000 lb. However, the cable will be able to withstand loads up to 33, 000 lb without damage to the inner conductors...

  12. A system for automatic positioning and alignment of fiber-tip interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalan, Mahesh

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -Acousto-Photonic NDE technique for characterizing a wide range of engineering materials including polymers, semiconductors and composites. The need to adapt the fiber-optic interferometric system to an industrial environment and to achieve precision control...

  13. Performance Monitoring of Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Anna; Lanzisera, Steven; Lutz, Jim; Fitting, Christian; Kloss, Margarita; Stiles, Christopher

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current water distribution systems are designed such that users need to run the water for some time to achieve the desired temperature, wasting energy and water in the process. We developed a wireless sensor network for large-scale, long time-series monitoring of residential water end use. Our system consists of flow meters connected to wireless motes transmitting data to a central manager mote, which in turn posts data to our server via the internet. This project also demonstrates a reliable and flexible data collection system that could be configured for various other forms of end use metering in buildings. The purpose of this study was to determine water and energy use and waste in hot water distribution systems in California residences. We installed meters at every end use point and the water heater in 20 homes and collected 1s flow and temperature data over an 8 month period. For a typical shower and dishwasher events, approximately half the energy is wasted. This relatively low efficiency highlights the importance of further examining the energy and water waste in hot water distribution systems.

  14. Multiscale modeling of clay-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebrahimi, Davoud

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering properties of soils are highly affected by clay content and clay-water interactions. However, existing macro-scale continuum models have no length scale to describe the evolution of the clay microstructure ...

  15. Automatic Generation of ApplicationSpecific Systems Based on a Micro-programmed Java Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoeberl, Martin

    . Single-chip systems can be more tightly coupled, since the interconnects are no longer limited by the pad-17, 2005, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA Copyright 2005 ACM 1-58113-964-0/05/0003 ...$5.00. cores. Furthermore steps in the design flow. Specifi- cally we look at interconnection structures, communication

  16. Information in coordinated system control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Keunmo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nonlinear systems’, IEEE Transaction of Automatic Controllinear systems’, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control 23,nonlinear systems’, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control

  17. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  18. Department of Computer Science AUTOMATIC VERIFICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Department of Computer Science AUTOMATIC VERIFICATION OF COMPETITIVE STOCHASTIC SYSTEMS Taolue Chen Automatic verification techniques for probabilistic systems have been success- fully applied in a variety systems also exhibit non- deterministic behaviour, e.g. due to concurrency, underspecification or control

  19. Prevention of ice formation in light-aircraft-engine induction systems by using an automatic control to operate the carburetor-air heater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenhunt, Garland Bishop

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRARY A A III COLLEGE OF TEXAS PREVENTION OF ICE FORMATION IN LIGHT-AIRCRAFT-EIEIINE INDUCTION SYSTEMS BY USING AN AUTOMATIC CONTROL TO OPERATE THE CARBURETOB AIR HEATER A Thesis GARLAND BISHOP MHISENHUNT & JR SuIm&itted to the Graduate... School of the Agricultural and Mechanioal College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1955 MAJOR SUBJECT ' MECHANICAL ENGINEERING& PREVENTION OF ICE FORMATION IN LIGHT...

  20. A proposed system to automatically control audio sound-to-noise levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neinast, Gary Strickland

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the human ear is stimulated by vibrating particles of a1r, sound is sensed. If this sound is undesired, it isp by definition, noise. Any sound that is irx'egular, impulsive, non-repetitive, or simply irri, tating to the listenez' may be classified..., applause, or laughter in theaters; motor or wind noise in moving vehicles] or the noise of people dancing. The level or the souroe ef noise was unimportant sinoe the oontrol system would hold the sound-to-noise level approximately constant. Fox' design...

  1. Milli-Q Reference Water Purification System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    , they must do so at a faster pace, while meeting increasing standards and often operating in laboratories water quality Large digital & graphic screen with detailed procedures for full on line support Inside graphics help you perform specific tasks such as maintenance. From the same screen, you can even print

  2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    1 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Water Monitoring System Plans and Specifications Created By: David Carothers Date: 2/17/05 #12;2 Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Project Date: 2/14/05 Created By: David and the flumes shall be water tight. (Figures 1&2) · The connection between the flume and the green roof membrane

  3. New computerized system saves water and money By Kate Weidaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Daniel

    New computerized system saves water and money By Kate Weidaw Updated: Thursday, October 10, 2013 on the University of Texas campus in Austin and the savings is counted in more than just gallons of water on the savings are just coming in and the changes have resulted in a savings of nearly one million dollars a year

  4. Analyzing risk and uncertainty for improving water distribution system security from malevolent water supply contamination events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jacob Manuel

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous efforts to apply risk analysis for water distribution systems (WDS) have not typically included explicit hydraulic simulations in their methodologies. A risk classification scheme is here employed for identifying vulnerable WDS components...

  5. Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

  6. Stealthy Deception Attacks on Water SCADA Systems Saurabh Amin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    day irrigation canal systems. This type of monitoring and control infrastructure is also commonStealthy Deception Attacks on Water SCADA Systems Saurabh Amin Department of CEE UC Berkeley, CA the vulnerabilities of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems which mon- itor and control the modern

  7. Boiler Upgrades and Decentralizing Steam Systems Save Water and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steam Systems Save Water and Energy at Naval Air Station Oceana Case study details Naval Air Station Oceana findings that its heating needs could be met more efficiently by...

  8. Strategic indicators for characterization of water system infrastructure and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garvin, Michael J. (Michael Joseph)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shifts in the US water industry are characteristic of the flux found across all infrastructure sectors. Economic, environmental, market, regulatory and systemic forces are pushing the industry toward a different future ...

  9. Homeland Security Challenges Facing Small Water Systems in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Theodori, Gene L.; Jensen, Ricard

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    across Texas A&M are now developing graduate classes on such areas as government programs related to homeland security, haz- ard mitigation, cybersecurity, public health and critical infrastructure protection related to water and wastewater systems...

  10. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    . Basin-wide impacts of water resources development projects and management strategies may be evaluated. The software package is generalized for application to any river/reservoir/use system, with input files being developed for the particular river basin...

  11. EA-1093: Surface Water Drainage System, Golden, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats...

  12. auxiliary water systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Discussions on Disposal Forms of Auxiliary Heat Source in Surface Water Heat Pump System Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: This paper presents two common...

  13. Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All public water supply and wastewater disposal systems are subject to classification and regulation by the State of North Dakota, and must obtain certification from the State Department of Health.

  14. PGPG: An Automatic Generator of Pipeline Design for Programmable GRAPE Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuyoshi Hamada; Toshiyuki Fukushige; Junichiro Makino

    2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed PGPG (Pipeline Generator for Programmable GRAPE), a software which generates the low-level design of the pipeline processor and communication software for FPGA-based computing engines (FBCEs). An FBCE typically consists of one or multiple FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) chips and local memory. Here, the term "Field-Programmable" means that one can rewrite the logic implemented to the chip after the hardware is completed, and therefore a single FBCE can be used for calculation of various functions, for example pipeline processors for gravity, SPH interaction, or image processing. The main problem with FBCEs is that the user need to develop the detailed hardware design for the processor to be implemented to FPGA chips. In addition, she or he has to write the control logic for the processor, communication and data conversion library on the host processor, and application program which uses the developed processor. These require detailed knowledge of hardware design, a hardware description language such as VHDL, the operating system and the application, and amount of human work is huge. A relatively simple design would require 1 person-year or more. The PGPG software generates all necessary design descriptions, except for the application software itself, from a high-level design description of the pipeline processor in the PGPG language. The PGPG language is a simple language, specialized to the description of pipeline processors. Thus, the design of pipeline processor in PGPG language is much easier than the traditional design. For real applications such as the pipeline for gravitational interaction, the pipeline processor generated by PGPG achieved the performance similar to that of hand-written code. In this paper we present a detailed description of PGPG version 1.0.

  15. Water oxidation reaction in natural and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure and mechanism of water oxidation catalysts is an essential component for developing artificial photosynthetic devices. In the natural water oxidation catalyst, the geometric and electronic structure of its inorganic core, the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5} cluster, has been studied by spectroscopic and diffraction measurements. In inorganic systems, metal oxides seem to be good candidates for water oxidation catalysts. Understanding the reaction mechanism in both natural and oxide-based catalysts will helpin further developing efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

  16. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauritzen, Ted (Lafayette, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  17. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  18. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  19. WATER DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS INTEGRATIONS WITH MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Acquisition (SCADA) system that can control operations in treatment plants, as well as continuously check and SCADA interfaces for even more integrated analyses, which is important since many suppliers are implementing SCADA systems. However, only about thirty-five (35) percent of the suppliers have a functioning

  20. The water megamaser in the merger system Arp299

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tarchi; P. Castangia; C. Henkel; K. M. Menten

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results of an interferometric study of the water megamaser in the merger system Arp299. This system is composed of two main sources: IC694 and NGC3690. There is clear evidence that most of the water maser emission is associated with the nucleus of the latter, confirming the presence of an optically obscured AGN as previously suggested by X-ray observations. Furthermore, emission arises from the inner regions of IC694, where an OH megamaser is also present. The velocity of the water maser line is blueshifted w.r.t. the optically determined systemic velocity and is consistent with that of the OH megamaser line. This finding might then indicate that both masers are associated with the same (expanding) structure and that, for the first time, strong 22 GHz water and 1.67 GHz OH maser emission has been found to coexist.

  1. New mud system produces solids-free, reusable water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corpus Christi, Texas, based Cameron Equipment Co., Inc., has developed a closed-loop mud treating system that removes solids from water-based systems and leaves the separated fluid clean and chemical free enough to be re-used directly on the rig. The system has been successfully applied by a Gulf of Mexico operator in areas where zero discharge is required. The alternative mud conditions program offered by the developers is called the Cameron Fluid Recycling System. Designed for closed-loop water-based fluids, the system is a new method of removing solids from normally discharged fluids such as drilling mud, waste and wash water, or any other water-based fluid that contains undesirable solids. The patented method efficiently produces end products that are (1) dry solids; and (2) essentially 100% solids-free fluid that can be re-used in the same mud system. All excess drilling mud, and all wash water that would normally go to the reserve pit or a cuttings barge are collected in a tank. Recycled fluid is compatible with the mud system fluid, no harmful chemicals are used, and pH is not altered.

  2. LANSCE Drift Tube Linac Water Control System Refurbishment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marroquin, Pilar S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several refurbishment projects underway at the Los Alamos National Laboratory LANSCE linear accelerator. Systems involved are: RF, water cooling, networks, diagnostics, timing, controls, etc. The Drift Tube Linac (DTL) portion of the accelerator consists of four DTL tanks, each with three independent water control systems. The systems are about 40 years old, use outdated and non-replaceable equipment and NIM bin control modules, are beyond their design life and provide unstable temperature control. Insufficient instrumentation and documentation further complicate efforts at maintaining system performance. Detailed design of the replacement cooling systems is currently in progress. Previous design experience on the SNS accelerator water cooling systems will be leveraged, see the SNS DTL FDR. Plans call for replacement of water piping, manifolds, pumps, valves, mix tanks, instrumentation (flow, pressure and temperature) and control system hardware and software. This presentation will focus on the control system design with specific attention on planned use of the National Instruments Compact RIO platform with the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control system (EPICS) software toolkit.

  3. Energy Conservation in Process Chilled Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambs, L. L.; DiBella, R. A.

    The energy consumption of the chiller and cooling tower in a process cooling application was analyzed using the TRNSYS computer code. The basic system included a constant speed centrifugal chiller and an induced-draft, counterflow cooling tower...

  4. Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Reduction of Vinyl Chloride in Metallic Iron-Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G * Department to groundwater and soil contamination. In particular, VC can be produced as an intermediate in the reductive- lenging. Traditional "pump-and-treat" treatment systems have proven to be costly and ineffective in many

  5. A multilayer shallow water system for polydisperse sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    functions. The resulting multilayer sedimentation-flow model can be written as a hyperbolic systemA multilayer shallow water system for polydisperse sedimentation E.D. Fern´andez-Nieto , E.H. Kon of a fluid containing one disperse substance consisting of small particles that belong to different species

  6. Verification and Validation of Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermostat is an automatic control system to regulate indoorthe speed, the automatic transmission control system decideshybrid systems. Automatic Control, IEEE Transactions on, 43(

  7. Nonlinear Control of Delay and PDE Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekiaris-Liberis, Nikolaos

    delay systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 56 (lag systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 31 (nonlinear systems, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control,

  8. Detection of the Water Reservoir in a Forming Planetary System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Brinch, Christian; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Blake, Geoffrey A; Dominik, Carsten; Lis, Dariusz C; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Panic, Olja; Pearson, John C; Kristensen, Lars; Yildiz, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Icy bodies may have delivered the oceans to the early Earth, yet little is known about water in the ice-dominated regions of extra-solar planet-forming disks. The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on-board the Herschel Space Observatory has detected emission from both spin isomers of cold water vapor from the disk around the young star TW Hydrae. This water vapor likely originates from ice-coated solids near the disk surface hinting at a water ice reservoir equivalent to several thousand Earth Oceans in mass. The water's ortho-to-para ratio falls well below that of Solar System comets, suggesting that comets contain heterogeneous ice mixtures collected across the entire solar nebula during the early stages of planetary birth.

  9. Solar space and water heating system installed at Charlottesville, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greer, Charles R.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar energy system located at David C. Wilson Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia, consists of 88 single glazed, Sunworks Solector copper base plate collector modules; hot water coils in the hot air ducts; a domestic hot water (DHW) preheat tank; a 3,000 gallon concrete urethane-insulated storage tank and other miscellaneous components. This report includes extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  10. Automatic vehicle following for emergency lane change maneuvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Seok Min

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lane change maneuver is one of the many appropriate responses to an emergency situation. This thesis proposes to design a combined controller for automatic vehicles for an emergency lane change (ELC) maneuver on an Automatic Highway System (AHS...

  11. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  12. Automatic vehicle following for emergency lane change maneuvers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Seok Min

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lane change maneuver is one of the many appropriate responses to an emergency situation. This thesis proposes to design a combined controller for automatic vehicles for an emergency lane change (ELC) maneuver on an Automatic Highway System (AHS...

  13. Design of a high temperature hot water central heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaumont, E.L.; Johnson, R.C.; Weaver, J.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the conceptual design of a central heating system at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The resource considered for this heating system design was hot dry rock geothermal energy. Design criteria were developed to ensure reliability of energy supply, to provide flexibility for adaptation to multiple energy resources, to make optimum use of existing equipment and to minimize reinvestment cost. A variable temperature peaking high temperature water system was selected for this purpose.

  14. Design manual for high temperature hot water and steam systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cofield, R.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents aspects of high temperature hot water and steam generating systems. It covers all the calculations that must be made for sizing and then selecting the equipment that will make up an energy system. The author provides essential information on loan analysis, types of fuel, storage requirements, handling facilities, waste disposal, HVAC needs, and back-up systems. Also included are the calculations needed for determining the size of compressors, air pollution devices, fans, filters, and other supplementary equipment.

  15. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  16. Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

  17. Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery techniques is waste heat and condensation water recovery system. Waste heat and condensation water recovery system is one of the most important facilities in power plants. High efficiency waste heat

  18. Control of cyber-physical systems using incremental properties of physical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamani, Majid

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid Systems, IEEE Transaction on Automatic Control, 43(systems. IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, [AS99] D.quan- tized control systems. IEEE Transactions on Automatic

  19. Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images Chenyu Wu, Ce Liu, Heung-Yueng Shum, Member, IEEE an intelligent image editing and face synthesis system that automatically removes eyeglasses from an input frontal face image. Although conventional image editing tools can be used to remove eyeglasses by pixel

  20. Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Integrated system dynamics toolbox for water resources planning.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Marissa Devan; Passell, Howard David; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Peplinski, William J.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Coursey, Don (University of Chicago, Chicago, IL); Hanson, Jason (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Grimsrud, Kristine (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Thacher, Jennifer (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Broadbent, Craig (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brookshire, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chemak, Janie (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Cockerill, Kristan (Cockeril Consulting, Boone, NC); Aragon, Carlos (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Hallett, Heather (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Vivoni, Enrique (New Mexico Univeristy of Technology and Mining (NM-TECH), Socorro, NM); Roach, Jesse

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public mediated resource planning is quickly becoming the norm rather than the exception. Unfortunately, supporting tools are lacking that interactively engage the public in the decision-making process and integrate over the myriad values that influence water policy. In the pages of this report we document the first steps toward developing a specialized decision framework to meet this need; specifically, a modular and generic resource-planning ''toolbox''. The technical challenge lies in the integration of the disparate systems of hydrology, ecology, climate, demographics, economics, policy and law, each of which influence the supply and demand for water. Specifically, these systems, their associated processes, and most importantly the constitutive relations that link them must be identified, abstracted, and quantified. For this reason, the toolbox forms a collection of process modules and constitutive relations that the analyst can ''swap'' in and out to model the physical and social systems unique to their problem. This toolbox with all of its modules is developed within the common computational platform of system dynamics linked to a Geographical Information System (GIS). Development of this resource-planning toolbox represents an important foundational element of the proposed interagency center for Computer Aided Dispute Resolution (CADRe). The Center's mission is to manage water conflict through the application of computer-aided collaborative decision-making methods. The Center will promote the use of decision-support technologies within collaborative stakeholder processes to help stakeholders find common ground and create mutually beneficial water management solutions. The Center will also serve to develop new methods and technologies to help federal, state and local water managers find innovative and balanced solutions to the nation's most vexing water problems. The toolbox is an important step toward achieving the technology development goals of this center.

  2. automatic fuzzy rule: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the main pros of fuzzy systems is their ability to design comprehensible models of real1 Automatic tuning of a fuzzy visual system using evolutionary algorithms:...

  3. automatic conformation prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    describes a system which automatically generates program documentation. Starting with a plan generated by analyzing the program, the system computes several kinds of summary...

  4. Monitoring microbial corrosion in large oilfield water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.Y.; Chen, R.B.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring of microbial corrosion is always difficult because of the sessile nature of bacteria and the lack of meaningful correlation between routine bacteria counts and bacterial activity. This problem is further aggravated in a large oilfield water system because of its size and sampling difficulties. This paper discusses some monitoring techniques currently used in the oil industry, their limitations and the possible areas for improvement. These suggested improvements either are presently being implemented or will be implemented in the Aramco systems.

  5. Monitoring microbial corrosion in large oilfield water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, E.Y.; Chen, R.B.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring of microbial corrosion is always difficult because of the sessile nature of bacteria and the lack of meaningful correlation between routine bacteria counts and bacterial activity. This problem is further aggravated in a large oilfield water system because of size and sampling difficulties. This paper discusses some monitoring techniques currently used in the oil industry, their limitations, and possible areas for improvement. These improved techniques are in use or will be implemented in the Aramco systems.

  6. Hydrocarbon Formation in Metallic Iron/Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Hydrocarbon Formation in Metallic Iron/Water Systems B A O L I N D E N G , , § T I M O T H Y J . C-labeled hydrocarbons are produced. In the absence of chlorinated ethenes, however, lower con- centrations of many of the same hydrocarbons (methane and C2-C6 alkanes and alkenes) are also produced. Hardy and Gillham (1996

  7. EA-1905: Double Eagle Water System, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA, prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management Carlsbad Field Office and adopted by DOE, evaluates the expansion and upgrade of the City of Carlsbad’s Double Eagle Water System.

  8. System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DERUSSEAU, R.R.

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

  9. Marzia Cescon Department of Automatic Control Lund University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Como, Giacomo

    Transactions on Automatic Control; IEEE Transactions on Control System Technology; IEEE TransactionsMarzia Cescon Department of Automatic Control ­ Lund University Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden-Present Education Ph.D. in Automatic Control, Lund University, advisor prof. Rolf Johansson. November 2013

  10. Automatic Model Complexity Control Using Marginalized Discriminative Growth Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hain, Thomas

    Automatic model complexity control . Most LVCSR systems are trained on large amounts of data. . ManyAutomatic Model Complexity Control Using Marginalized Discriminative Growth Functions X. Liu & M. J. J. F. Gales: Automatic Model Complexity Control Using Marginalized Discriminative Growth Functions

  11. INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

  12. The Development of an Energy Evaluation Tool for Chilled Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocki, M.; Kosanovic, D.; Ambs, L.

    An energy evaluation tool for chilled water systems was developed. This tool quantifies the energy usage of various chilled water systems and typical energy conservation measures that are applied to these systems. It can be used as a screening tool...

  13. Economic and Distributed Model Predictive Control of Nonlinear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidarinejad, Mohsen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrid systems. IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, [6]nonlinear systems. IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control,of switched systems. IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control,

  14. Application of a water rights analysis program to reservoir system yield calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walls, William Brian

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    corrected to approximate naturalized flows. As water management becomes more critical, it is necessary to gage the effect of governmental institutions on reservoir yields. In Texas and elsewhere, water users are governed by a system of water rights.... The effect of this system on firm yields must be quantified in order to provide effective water management. This thesis documents research into the effect of the Texas water rights system on the Brazos River Authority reservoir system. A new generalized...

  15. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  16. Portable water filtration system for oil well fractionation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seibert, D. L.

    1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises a portable, multi-stage filtration system utilized in filtering water for an oil and gas stimulation process commonly known as fracking. Three stages are used, the first being a straining operation reducing the size of particulate matter in the water to about three-eighths of an inch. The second stage is a centrifugal separator, reducing the particle size to about 50 microns. The final stage utilizes a cartridge-type filter giving a final particle size in the water of about 5 microns. In this manner, water which is injected into the well head during the fracking process and which is obtained from readily available sources such as ponds, streams and the like is relatively free of particulate matter which can foul the fracking process. The invention, by virtue of being mounted on a trailer, is portable and thus can be easily moved from site to site. Water flow rates obtained using the invention are between 250 and 300 gallons per minute, sufficient for processing a small to medium sized well.

  17. Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling Conference. In: Models and Applications to Urban Water Systems, Vol. 12 (edited by W. James). CHI. Guelph, Ontario, pp. 257 294. 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    Stormwater and Urban Water Systems Modeling Conference. In: Models and Applications to Urban Water AND EXAMINATION OF A MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM DATABASE Robert Pitt, Alex Maestre, Renee Morquecho of Water 104(b)3 grant in 2001 to collect and evaluate stormwater data from a representative number

  18. Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

  19. Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

  20. Phosphate and ammonium removal from waste water, using constructed wetland systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drizo, Aleksandra

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphorus and nitrogen in waste water from sewerage systems contribute to excessive nutrient enrichment of surface waters, presenting a threat to nature conservation, domestic and industrial water supplies, and recreation. ...

  1. Water: Challenges at the Intersection of Human and Natural Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Futrell, J.H.; Gephart, R. E.; Kabat-Lensch, E.; McKnight, D. M.; Pyrtle, A.; Schimel, J. P.; Smyth, R. L.; Skole, D. L. Wilson, J. L.; Gephart, J. M.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing recognition about the critical role water plays in sustaining people and society. This workshop established dialog between disciplinary scientists and program managers from diverse backgrounds in order to share perspectives and broaden community understanding of ongoing fundamental and applied research on water as a complex environmental problem. Three major scientific themes emerged: (1) coupling of cycles and process, with emphasis on the role of interfaces; (2) coupling of human and natural systems across spatial and temporal scales; and (3) prediction in the face of uncertainty. In addition, the need for observation systems, sensors, and infrastructure; and the need for data management and synthesis were addressed. Current barriers to progress were noted as educational and institutional barriers and the integration of science and policy.

  2. PURPOSE: This product provides simulation capabilities to allow water resource managers to meet operational and water quality objectives in a basin wide approach under the System-Wide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Manage- ment System (CWMS). ERDC TN-SWWRP-11-2 February 2011 Meeting Water Quality and Water Control operational and water quality objectives in a basin wide approach under the System-Wide Water Resources the impact of water quality in reservoir operations system decision-making. As a result, integration

  3. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Programming Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WRAP interface program was developed as a Fortran QuickWin application. SIM simulates the river/reservoir water allocation/management/use system for input sequences of monthly naturalized flows and net evaporation rates. (Chapter 2) SIMD (D for daily... management, and other utility functions. Many different Fortran compiler/IDE packages are sold by various companies. The WRAP programs are in standard Fortran that can be compiled with the various compilers. The compiler, linker, and development...

  4. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Steven J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mal, Thomas (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  5. Modeling Integrated Decisions for a Municipal Water System with Recourse and Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    for a municipal water system to cost-effectively accommodate a distribution of water shortages. Alternative robust in action costs, life spans, water volumes gained or saved, shortage levels, and shortage probabilities make water shortages pressing or impending realities for Amman, Jordan and many other urban water

  6. Automatic Generation of Implementations For Object-Oriented Abstractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    -purpose code transformation system, the POET system, for the purpose of automatic code genera- tion from high then use the POET system to au- tomatically translate the behavior specifications to type-safe OO implementations in Java or C++. Finally, we use the POET system to automatically translate the behavior speci

  7. The ASME handbook on water technology for thermal power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, P. (ed.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea that a handbook on water technology be developed was initially put forth in 1978 by the ASME Research Committee on Water in Thermal Power Systems. A prospectus was issued in 1979 to solicit funding from industry and government. The preparation of the handbook began in 1980 under the direct control of a Handbook Steering Subcommittee established by the Research Committee and an editor reporting to that subcommittee. Handbook content was carefully monitored by an editorial committee of industry experts and by a special honorary editorial committee from the Chemistry Committee of the Edison Electric Institute. This handbook summarizes the current state of the art of water technology for steam power plant cycles. It is intended to serve both as a training text and a reference volume for power station chemists, engineers, manufacturers, and research and development institutions. While the primary emphasis is on Electric Utility Power Generation cycles (fossil and nuclear), the book will also serve as a valuable reference on high pressure industrial steam system technology.

  8. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  9. automatic coding method: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    content words, key words, pragmatic H. P. Edmundson 1969-01-01 14 Automatic recognition codes for Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

  10. automatic modeling functions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system communication; com- puting the group of symmetries Miller, Alice 31 Automatic Abduction of Qualitative Models Bradley L. R ichards Computer Technologies and Information...

  11. automatic software processing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems Engineering Environments (PCSEEs) 2 support such projects with both tooling and processes, yet these must Ulm, Universitt 5 Automatically tuned linear...

  12. automatic equipment operation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    free text against audio signals we in- vent an "automatic record review" system that labels new music audio with maximal semantic value for future re- trieval tasks. In...

  13. A three-phase K-value study for pure hydrocarbons/water and crude oil/water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanclos, Ritchie Paul

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A THREE-PHASE K-VALUE STUDY FOR PURE HYDROCARBONS/WATER AND CRUDE OIL/WATER SYSTEMS A Thesis by RITCHIE PAUL LANCLOS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of Committee) P. T. Eubank (Member) R. A. Wattenbar (Member) W. D. Von Gonten (Member) December 1990 ABSTRACT A Three-Phase K-Value Study for Pure Hydrocarbons/Water and Crude Oil/Water Systems Ritchie Paul Lanclos, B. S. , University...

  14. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  15. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  16. Solar Water Splitting: Photocatalyst Materials Discovery and Systems Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNulty, Thomas F.

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen promises to be an attractive transportation fuel in the post-fossil fuel era. Relatively abundant and clean burning (water being the principal byproduct), hydrogen offers the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, there are significant technical barriers that require solutions before hydrogen can be implemented in large scale. These are: · Sources (e.g. hydrocarbon, water) · Transportation · Storage Each of the aforementioned barriers carries with it important considerations. First, would a hydrocarbon-based hydrogen source be of any benefit compared to conventional fossil fuels? Second, will a system based on centralized generation and distribution be viable? Finally, methods of on-board storage, whether they are liquefaction, adsorption, or intercalation, are far from optimized. The scope of this program is limited to hydrogen generation, specifically generation using solarinitiated water electrolysis. Though concept of making hydrogen using water and sunlight may sound somewhat far-fetched, in reality the concept is very real. Since the discovery of solar-generated hydrogen, termed photoelectrochemical hydrogen, nearly 30 years ago by Fujishima and Honda, significant advances in both fundamental understanding and technological capability have been made. Using solar radiation to generate hydrogen in a fashion akin to using solar to generate electricity offers many advantages. First, hydrogen can be generated at the point of use, reducing the importance of transportation. Second, using water as the hydrogen source eliminates greenhouse gas evolution and the consequences that come with it. Finally, because the process uses very little electricity (pumps and compressors predominantly), the quantity of chemical fuel produced far exceeds the amount of electricity consumed. Consequently, there is some level of truth to the notion that photoelectrochemically-derived hydrogen offers the potential to nearly eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation landscape. This report focuses primarily on the technical issues inherent to developing an economically viable photoelectrochemical hydrogen system. This involves research intended to address technology gaps as well as research to address commercial feasibility. Though a firm cost target is not identified explicitly, much of the economics are presented in terms of “dollars per gallon of gasoline equivalent” ($/gge). Obviously this is a moving target, but it is important to understand cost in terms of current gasoline pricing, since the intended target is gasoline replacement. However, this does put the cost contribution into a perspective that at least allows for a reasonable assessment of technological viability. It also allows for the identification of need areas beyond the obvious technology gaps.

  17. Automation of Pivot Sprinkler Irrigation Systems to More Efficiently Utilize Rainfall and Irrigation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendt, C. W.; Runkles, J. R.; Gerst, M. D.; Harbert, H. P. III; Hutmacher, R. B.

    A study was conducted to develop automated pivot sprinkler irrigation systems and determine if such systems use less water and energy than manually operated systems. The study was conducted near Earth, Texas, using irrigation systems located...

  18. 1486 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 51, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2006 Accessibility of Switched Linear Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuan

    the controllability of switched linear sys- tems. The structure of accessibility Lie algebra is revealed. Some accessi or normal) controllability of a large class of switched linear systems are obtained. Index Terms--Accessibility, controllability, Lie algebra, switched linear system. I. INTRODUCTION Consider a switched linear system _x(t) = A

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 42, NO. 6, JUNE 1997 771 Optimal State Estimation for Stochastic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    when the system is Gaussian. Index Terms-- Dual control, entropy, Kalman filtering, state estimation. I systems. Fol- lowing the classical work of Gauss on least squares estimation and the modern day approach studies on least squares estimation. When applied to stochastic control systems, Kalman filtering theory

  20. Water sensors with cellular system eliminate tail water drainage in alfalfa irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Rajat; Raghuwanshi, Narendra S; Upadhyaya, Shrinivasa K; Wallender, Wesley W.; Slaughter, David C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003. Improving irrigation water management of alfalfa. In:number, sensor number and water arrival time. Wire meshplate Terminals Fig. 1. The water-arrival, or wetting-front,

  1. Dolomitization by ground-water flow systems in carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dolomite occurs throughout the subsurface of modern carbonate platforms such as the Bahamas. Groundwater flow systems must be responsible for delivery of reactants needed for dolomitization. Reflux, freshwater lens flows, and thermal convection are large-scale flow systems that may be widespread in active platforms. The author has evaluated some aspects of the dynamics and characteristics of these processes with ground-water flow theory and by scaled sandbox experiments. Reflux is not restricted to hypersaline brines, but can occur with bankwaters of only slightly elevated salinity such as those found on the Bahama Banks today (42%). The lack of evaporites in a stratigraphic section, therefore, does not rule out the possibility that reflux may have operated. Flows associated with freshwater lenses include flow in the lens, in the mixing zone, and in the seawater beneath and offshore of the lens. Upward transfer of seawater through the platform margins occurs when surrounding cold ocean water migrates into the platform and is heated. This type of thermal convection (Kohout convection) has been studied by Francis Kohout in south Florida. The ranges of mass flux of magnesium in these processes are all comparable and are all sufficient to account for young dolomites beneath modern platforms. Each process yields dolomitized zones of characteristic shape and location and perhaps may be distinguishable in ancient rocks. The concepts presented here may have application to exploration for dolomite reservoirs in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere.

  2. Acceptance test procedure for High Pressure Water Jet System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the acceptance test is to demonstrate a combined system. This includes associated tools and equipment necessary to perform cleaning in the 105 K East Basin (KE) for achieving optimum reduction in the level of contamination/dose rate on canisters prior to removal from the KE Basin and subsequent packaging for disposal. Acceptance tests shall include necessary hardware to achieve acceptance of the cleaning phase of canisters. This acceptance test procedure will define the acceptance testing criteria of the high pressure water jet cleaning fixture. The focus of this procedure will be to provide guidelines and instructions to control, evaluate and document the acceptance testing for cleaning effectiveness and method(s) of removing the contaminated surface layer from the canister presently identified in KE Basin. Additionally, the desired result of the acceptance test will be to deliver to K Basins a thoroughly tested and proven system for underwater decontamination and dose reduction. This report discusses the acceptance test procedure for the High Pressure Water Jet.

  3. Operating experience of a chilled water storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierpoint, T.J.; Marsilii, J.A.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) is actively studying methods, such as Thermal Energy Storage (TES), to reduce the summer peak growth rate. TES is a technology that can provide significant reductions in the summer on-peak demand level thereby aiding building owners in reducing their operating costs while helping utilities reduce summer peak load growth. From analysis of PEPCO's chilled water storage system in its Forestville, MD office building it is evident that for demand reduction to be achieved significant consideration must be placed in the operational strategies chosen for the TES system. The chiller priority strategy was chosen because it is straightforward to implement and provides security that stored chilled water will always be available. The building, operating under the chiller priority scenario, accomplished a maximum load reduction 20 kW in 1985 and an average summer season load reduction of 13.5 kW. Demand reductions of up to 50 kW were expected but not achieved largely due to the operational strategies chosen. An alternative approach is storage priority. If storage priority had been implemented for the 1985 cooling season, analysis indicate that the expected demand reductions of 50 kW could have been achieved. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Hot Water Efficiency Plumbing System Using Thermal Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cha, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Seo, H. Y.

    hot water piping system, Thermo controlled valve, Circulation, Mixing water pipe, Recirculation water pipe INTRODUCTION Finding ways to conserve energy while heating a building?s water supply can be approached from a number of angles. Still...?s disadvantage is that so much water is wasted until the optimal tap temperature is reached.(6) We tried to solve this problem by developing a water-saving hot water plumbing system that utilizes a thermo-controlled valve. The goal was to not allow...

  5. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), and many other agencies and organizations, have worked with Ralph Wurbs over the years to develop WRAP (the Water Rights Analysis Package). The WRAP model simulates management of the water resources of a...

  6. DESIGN OF A RURAL WATER PROVISION SYSTEM TO DECREASE ARSENIC EXPOSURE IN BANGLADESH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed

  7. New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is crucial to ensuring their status as global competitors. Currently, most industries treat water to meet standards for direct discharge to surface water. The process includes a...

  8. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  9. 2372 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 58, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 Observability of a Linear System Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yüksel, Serdar

    notion of controllability, these form the essence of modern linear control theory. In this technical note states intact. Furthermore, with the increasing emphasis on networked control systems, it has been realized that the controllability and observability concepts for linear systems with controllers having

  10. Automatic Synthesis of Filters to Discard Buffer Overflow Attacks: A Step Towards Realizing Self-Healing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekar, R.

    such as those due to worms, these protection mechanisms lead to re- peated restarts of the victim application- ploit the same vulnerability. An important benefit of self-healing is that it avoids system resources]. Although these techniques can de- tect attacks before vital system resources (such as files

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 44, NO. 3, MARCH 1999 583 V. CONCLUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anantharam, Venkat

    , "H1 control for nonlinear systems via output feedback," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr., vol. 38, pp. 546 systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr., vol. 37, pp. 1283­1293, 1992. [4] A. Isidori, "H1 control via´c, and W. R. Perkins, "Design of reliable control systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr., vol. 37, pp. 290

  12. Summary of resources available to small water systems for meeting the 10 ppb arsenic drinking water limit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Thomson, Bruce M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ziegler, Matt (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Susan (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Himmelberger, Heather (New Mexico Tech, Albuquerque, NM); Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the lowering of the EPA maximum contaminant level of arsenic from 50 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb, many public water systems in the country and in New Mexico in particular, are faced with making decisions about how to bring their system into compliance. This document provides detail on the options available to the water systems and the steps they need to take to achieve compliance with this regulation. Additionally, this document provides extensive resources and reference information for additional outreach support, financing options, vendors for treatment systems, and media pilot project results.

  13. Modeling the Global Water Resource System in an Integrated Assessment Modeling Framework: IGSM-WRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    The availability of water resources affects energy, agricultural and environmental systems, which are linked together as well as to climate via the water cycle. As such, watersheds and river basins are directly impacted ...

  14. Complex Adaptive Systems Simulation-Optimization Framework for Adaptive Urban Water Resources Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacomoni, Marcio

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Population growth, urbanization and climate change threaten urban water systems. The rise of demands caused by growing urban areas and the potential decrease of water availability caused by the increase of frequency and severity of droughts...

  15. Seasonal Performance Variations for Storm-Water Management Systems in Cold Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    headings: Stormwater management; Best management practice; Performance characteristics; Water qualitySeasonal Performance Variations for Storm-Water Management Systems in Cold Climate Conditions. An examination of six varied LID designs, in contrast with conventional best-management practices BMPs

  16. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  17. Testing of a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovell, A.; Dahlby, J.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the tests done with a portable ultrahigh pressure water decontamination system (UHPWDS) on highly radioactively contaminated surfaces. A small unit was purchased, modified, and used for in-situ decontamination to change the waste level of the contaminated box from transuranic (TRU) waste to low- level waste (LLW). Low-level waste is less costly by as much as a factor of five or more if compared with TRU waste when handling, storage, and disposal are considered. The portable unit we tested is commercially available and requires minimal utilities for operation. We describe the UHPWDS unit itself, a procedure for its use, the results of the testing we did, and conclusions including positive and negative aspects of the UHPWDS.

  18. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  19. The Full Water Disposal Ways and Study on Central Air-conditioning Circulation Cooling Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has been made the further study about the water quality issue of the central air-conditioning circulation cooling water. Based on the comparison of the existing common adopted disposal ways, put forward the new ways of combination...

  20. Reservoir/River System Reliability Considering Water Rights and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Sanchez-Torres, Gerardo; Dunn, David D.

    Effective management of the highly variable water resources of a river basin requires an understanding of the amount of suitable quality water that can be provided under various conditions within institutional constraints. Although much research has...

  1. The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly...

  2. The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly...

  3. Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the propane-water complex: A prototypical water-hydrophobe system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the propane-water complex: A prototypical water) The Fourier transform microwave spectrum of the propane-water complex (C3H,-H,O) has been observed and analyzed. This spectrum includes transitions assigned to propane complexed with both the ortho and para

  4. Robust Energy Cost Optimization of Water Distribution System with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy cost optimization of a water-supply network is a very important practical .... nonlinear equations for energy conservation. .... [water balance equations] ...... Israel Institute of Technology, Technion, Technion City, Haifa 32000, Israel.

  5. Boiler System Efficiency Improves with Effective Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, D.

    Water treatment is an important aspect of boiler operation which can affect efficiency or result in damage if neglected. Without effective water treatment, scale can form on boiler tubes, reducing heat transfer, and causing a loss of boiler...

  6. Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

  7. Modeling the water consumption of Singapore using system dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welling, Karen Noiva

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources are essential to life, and in urban areas, the high demand density and finite local resources often engender conditions of relative water scarcity. To overcome this scarcity, governments intensify infrastructure ...

  8. Systematization of water allocation systems: an engineering approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos Roman, Deborah Matilde

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis Package (WRAP) model in supporting water allocation efforts. The Lower Rio Grande WAS was used as a case study to demonstrate how the principles presented in the conceptual framework can be used to assess water allocation issues and identify...

  9. Automatic Dependent SurveillanceBroadcast in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    significant restructuring of the cur- rent Air Traffic Control (ATC) system. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) plans include the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), a Joint Planning Aviation Administration is adopting Automatic Dependent Surveillance­Broadcast (ADS­B) to provide

  10. Aerosol behavior experiments on light water reactor primary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, F.J.; Collen, J.; Wright, A.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of three experimental programs relevant to the behavior of aerosols in the primary systems of light water reactors (LWRs) are presented. These are the Large-Scale Aerosol Transport Test programs performed at the Marviken test facility in Sweden, parts of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the TRAP-MELT validation project performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Marviken experiments focused on the behavior of aerosols released from fuel and structural materials in a damaged core. Data on the transport of these aerosols and their physical characteristics were obtained in five experiments that simulated LWR primary systems. The LACE program data include results from the containment bypass accident tests, which focused on aerosol transport in pipes. The TRAP-MELT validation project data include results from two types of experiments: (a) aerosol transport tests to investigate aerosol wall plateout in a vertical pipe geometry and (b) aerosol resuspension tests to provide a data base from which analytical models can be developed. Typical results from these programs are presented and discussed.

  11. A Free Cooling Based Chilled Water System at Kingston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, P. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the concept of cooling chilled water with condenser water via plate heat exchangers. The other free cooling scheme considered was a process called 'strainer cycle'. In strainer cycle, the cooling tower water is pumped directly into the chilled water... and process equipment and the CDD's (coolant distribution units) of computers installed and on test. Additionally, switchover to strainer cycle would be more time consuming and difficult. For a high technology site the switch over must be smooth...

  12. Modeling the large-scale water balance impact of different irrigation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Modeling the large-scale water balance impact of different irrigation systems J. P. Evans1 and B. F precipitation causes the Turkish government to invest in modernizing its own irrigation systems balance impact of different irrigation systems, Water Resour. Res., 44, W08448, doi:10.1029/2007WR006671

  13. Water Supply Planning Using an Expert Geographic Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Daene C.; Burgin, John F.; Maidment, David R.

    supply and demand data; and a network flow solver, to balance the flows in networks developed by the expert GIS with input from a water resource analyst. Commonly available water demand forecasts and water supply data are used in this new planning tool...

  14. Arizona law now requires that community water systems record and submit an Annual Water Use Report and Sys-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    of this project was to develop an online drought trigger analysis tool and supporting guidance materials to help community water systems more effectively assess their drought risk and make informed decisions to prevent systems need indicators and triggers for each stage. No such tool was previously available. PROJECT TEAM

  15. A Simple and Quick Chilled Water Loop Balancing for Variable Flow System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Y.; Batten, T.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system is reduced by about 40%. Key words: chilled water, loop, riser, balancing, commissioning, cold deck, pump, energy consumption, EMCS. INTRODUCTION Variable flow pumping systems are becoming more prevalent in the chilled water loops or risers... the building owner, facility engineers or HVAC operators more opportunities to run the chilled water system more efficiently. Generally, the pump speeds are controlled by the EMCS or a stand-alone controller to maintain the differential pressure setpoints...

  16. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  17. Automatic Channel Fault Detection and Diagnosis System for a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Charest; Jean-François Beaudoin; Jules Cadorette; Roger Lecomte; Charles-Antoine Brunet; Réjean Fontaine

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fault detection and diagnosis is critical to many applications in order to ensure proper operation and performance over time. Positron emission tomography (PET) systems that require regular calibrations by qualified scanner operators are good candidates for such continuous improvements. Furthermore, for scanners employing one-to-one coupling of crystals to photodetectors to achieve enhanced spatial resolution and contrast, the calibration task is even more daunting because of the large number of independent channels involved. To cope with the additional complexity of the calibration and quality control procedures of these scanners, an intelligent system (IS) was designed to perform fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of malfunctioning channels. The IS can be broken down into four hierarchical modules: parameter extraction, channel fault detection, fault prioritization and diagnosis. Of these modules, the first two have previously been reported and this paper focuses on fault prioritization and diagnosis. The purpose of the fault prioritization module is to help the operator to zero in on the faults that need immediate attention. The fault diagnosis module will then identify the causes of the malfunction and propose an explanation of the reasons that lead to the diagnosis. The FDD system was implemented on a LabPET avalanche photodiode (APD)-based digital PET scanner. Experiments demonstrated a FDD Sensitivity of 99.3 % (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of: [98.7, 99.9]) for major faults. Globally, the Balanced Accuracy of the diagnosis for varying fault severities is 92 %. This suggests the IS can greatly benefit the operators in their maintenance task.

  18. 1630 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 43, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1998 ACKNOWLEDGMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwatny, Harry G.

    control of failure prone manufacturing systems," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr., vol. 39, pp. 1875­1880, 1994, "Optimal control of production rate in a failure prone manufacturing system," IEEE Trans. Automat. Contr1630 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 43, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1998 ACKNOWLEDGMENT

  19. Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district heating system ­ and makes a proposal for a technical and economic improvement. Monitoring of water quality in district heating systems is necessary

  20. A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Clément

    A satellite ocean color observation operator system for eutrophication assessment in coastal waters: Satellite ocean color Observation operator Eutrophication Remote sensing Radiative transfer modeling

  1. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will improve the capability of engineers to design heat pump systems that utilize surface water or standing column wells (SCW) as their heat sources and sinks.

  2. Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations for K West Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REED, A.V.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop the rational for the material balances that are documented in the KW Basin water system Level 1 process flow diagrams.

  3. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Photobiological processes are attractive routes to renewable H2 production. With the input of solar energy, photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria and green algae carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, using sunlight energy to extract protons and high energy electrons from water. These protons and high energy electrons can be fed to a hydrogenase system yielding H2. However, most hydrogen-evolving hydrogenases are inhibited by O2, which is an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The rate of H2 production is thus limited. Certain photosynthetic bacteria are reported to have an O2-tolerant evolving hydrogenase, yet these microbes do not split water, and require other more expensive feedstocks. To overcome these difficulties, the goal of this work has been to construct novel microbial hybrids by genetically transferring O2-tolerant hydrogenases from other bacteria into a class of photosynthetic bacteria called cyanobacteria. These hybrid organisms will use the photosynthetic machinery of the cyanobacterial hosts to perform the water-oxidation reaction with the input of solar energy, and couple the resulting protons and high energy electrons to the O2-tolerant bacterial hydrogenase, all within the same microbe (Fig. 1). The ultimate goal of this work has been to overcome the sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme to O2 and address one of the key technological hurdles to cost-effective photobiological H2 production which currently limits the production of hydrogen in algal systems. In pursuit of this goal, work on this project has successfully completed many subtasks leading to a greatly increased understanding of the complicated [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. At the beginning of this project, [NiFe] hydrogenases had never been successfully moved across wide species barriers and had never been heterologously expressed in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, the idea that whole, functional genes could be extracted from complicated, mixed-sequence meta-genomes was not established. In the course of this work, we identified a new hydrogenase from environmental DNA sequence and successfully expressed it in a variety of hosts including cyanobacteria. This was one of the first examples of these complicated enzymes being moved across vastly different bacterial species and is the first example of a hydrogenase being “brought to life” from no other information than a DNA sequence from metagenomic data. The hydrogenase we identified had the molecular signature of other O2-tolerant hydrogenases, and we discovered that the resulting enzyme had exceptionally high oxygen- and thermo-tolerance. The new enzyme retained 80% of its activity after incubation at 80° C for 2 hours and retained 20% activity in 1% O2. We performed detailed analysis on the maturation genes required for construction of a functional enzyme of this class of hydrogenase, and found that seven additional maturation genes were required for minimal activity and a total of nine genes besides the hydrogenase were required for optimal maturation efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the maturation genes are functional on closely-related hydrogenase enzymes such as those from Alteromonas macleodii and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. Finally, we have extensively modified the hydrogenase to engineer new traits including higher H2 production and better interaction with electron donors. For example, combining two strategies increased hydrogenase activity in cyanobacteria by at least 20-fold over our initial expression level. The activity of this combined strain is almost twice that of the native hydrogenase activity in S. elongatus. This work validates the idea that these enzymes are broadly tolerant to modifications that may help integrate them into a successful photobiological H2 production system. While we did not achieve our ultimate goal of integrating the functional hydrogenase with the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus, the work on this project has led to significant advances in the understanding of these complicated enzymes. This work will greatly benefit future

  4. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  5. Optimization of hybrid-water/air-cooled condenser in an enhanced turbine geothermal ORC system

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Program Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: To improve the efficiency and output variability of geothermal-based ORC power production systems with minimal water consumption by deploying: 1) a hybrid-water/air cooled condenser with low water consumption and 2) an enhanced turbine with high efficiency.

  6. Analyzing water supply in future energy systems using the TIMES Integrated Assessment Model (TIAM-FR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mathematics, MINES ParisTech Sophia Antipolis, France ABSTRACT Even though policies related to water energy system model. Water footprints for the processes in terms of withdrawals and consumptions were environmental impacts. Some experts refer to water as the new oil, reflecting a growing concern about

  7. Simulation of energy use in residential water heating systems Carolyn Dianarose Schneyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    around BC: Kamloops, Victoria and Williams Lake. Electric and gas-fired tank water heaters of various The resulting data is presented from a variety of angles, including the relative impacts of water heater ratingSimulation of energy use in residential water heating systems by Carolyn Dianarose Schneyer B

  8. AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF OPTIMAL CONTROLLERS THROUGH MODEL CHECKING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF OPTIMAL CONTROLLERS THROUGH MODEL CHECKING TECHNIQUES Giuseppe Della Penna Keywords: Controller Synthesis, Controller Optimization, Model Checking, Nonlinear Systems Abstract: We INTRODUCTION Control systems (or, shortly, controllers) are small hardware/software components that control

  9. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.M. Whitworth; Liangxiong Li

    2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during the first year of the project ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Waters.'' This research project has two objectives. The first objective is to test the use of clay membranes in the treatment of produced waters by reverse osmosis. The second objective is to test the ability of a system patented by the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation to remove salts from reverse osmosis waste streams as a solid. We performed 12 experiments using clay membranes in cross-flow experimental cells. We found that, due to dispersion in the porous frit used adjacent to the membrane, the concentration polarization layer seems to be completely (or nearly completely) destroyed at low flow rates. This observation suggests that clay membranes used with porous frit material many reach optimum rejection rates at lower pumping rates than required for use with synthetic membranes. The solute rejection efficiency decreases with increasing solution concentration. For the membranes and experiments reported here, the rejection efficiency ranged from 71% with 0.01 M NaCl solution down to 12% with 2.3 M NaCl solution. More compacted clay membranes will have higher rejection capabilities. The clay membranes used in our experiments were relatively thick (approximately 0.5 mm). The active layer of most synthetic membranes is only 0.04 {micro}m (0.00004 mm), approximately 1250 times thinner than the clay membranes used in these experiments. Yet clay membranes as thin as 12 {micro}m have been constructed (Fritz and Eady, 1985). Since Darcy's law states that the flow through a material of constant permeability is inversely proportional to it's the material's thickness, then, based on these experimental observations, a very thin clay membrane would be expected to have much higher flow rates than the ones used in these experiments. Future experiments will focus on testing very thin clay membranes. The membranes generally exhibited reasonable stable rejection rates over time for chloride for a range of concentrations between 0.01 and 2.5 M. One membrane ran in excess of three months with no apparent loss of usability. This suggests that clay membranes may have a long useable life. Twenty different hyperfiltration-induced solute precipitation experiments were either attempted or completed and are reported here. The results of these experiments suggest that hyperfiltration-induced solute precipitation is possible, even for very soluble substances such as NaCl. However, the precipitation rates obtained in the laboratory do not appear to be adequate for commercial application at this time. Future experiments will focus on making the clay membranes more compact and thinner in order to obtain higher flux rates. Two alternative methods of removing solutes from solution, for which the New Mexico Tech Research Foundation is preparing patent applications, are also being investigated. These methods will be described in the next annual report after the patent applications are filed. Technology transfer efforts included two meetings (one in Farmington NM, and one in Hobbs, NM) where the results of this research were presented to independent oil producers and other interested parties. In addition, members of the research team gave seven presentations concerning this research and because of this research project T. M. (Mike) Whitworth was asked to sit on the advisory board for development of a new water treatment facility for the City of El Paso, Texas. Several papers are in preparation for submission to peer-reviewed journals based on the data presented in this report.

  10. Watts nickel and rinse water recovery via an advanced reverse osmosis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, C.; White, I.E.; Ludwig, R.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the results of an eight month test program conducted at the Hewlett Packard Printed Circuit Board Production Plant, Sunnyvale, CA (H.P.) to assess the effectiveness of an advanced reverse osmosis system (AROS). The AROS unit, manufactured by Water Technologies, Inc. (WTI) of Minneapolis, MN, incorporates membrane materials and system components designed to treat metal plating rinse water and produce two product streams; (1) a concentrated metal solution suitable for the plating bath, and (2) rinse water suitable for reuse as final rinse. Waste water discharge can be virtually eliminated and significant reductions realized in the need for new plating bath solution and rinse water.

  11. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  12. AUTOMATIC GUIDING OF THE PRIMARY IMAGE OF SOLAR GREGORY TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and declination angles of the Sun. Gregory-type telescopes have an elliptical secondary mirror behind the primeAUTOMATIC GUIDING OF THE PRIMARY IMAGE OF SOLAR GREGORY TELESCOPES G. KÃ?VELER1, E. WIEHR2, D of solar Gregory telescopes is used for automatic guiding. This new system avoids temporal varying

  13. RIS-M-2311 AUTOMATIC FAULT TREE CONSTRUCTION WITH RIKKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2311 AUTOMATIC FAULT TREE CONSTRUCTION WITH RIKKE A COMPENDIUM OF EXAMPLES, VOLUME I BASIC MODELS J.R. Taylor Abstract. Examples of automatically constructed fault trees are given. In this first are intended to illustrate the prin- ciples of fault tree construction using the RIKKE failure analysis system

  14. New Methods in Automatic Extracting H. P. EDMUNDSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hearst, Marti

    system is parameterized to control and vary the influence of the above four components. The researchNew Methods in Automatic Extracting H. P. EDMUNDSON University of Maryland,* College Park, Maryland ABSTRACT. This paper describes new methods of automatically extracting documents for screening purposes, i

  15. AUTOMATIC TV LOGO DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION IN BROADCAST VIDEOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTOMATIC TV LOGO DETECTION AND CLASSIFICATION IN BROADCAST VIDEOS Nedret ¨OZAY, B¨ulent SANKUR In this study1 , we present a fully automatic TV logo iden- tification system. TV logos are detected in static of a logo candidate is established, TV logos are recognized via their subspace fea- tures. Comparative

  16. Experimental results of water film formation on various fuel forms from a fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Davis, J.R.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine the thickness and coverage of water film formations on various materials during fire sprinkler deluge. An exhaustive literature search revealed that no applicable research data exists that governs water film formations from fire protection systems. Therefore, a controlled, infield, mockup was created to predict the thickness and coverage of water film on fissile material forms. This paper discusses the background, experimental procedure and the characterization of these water films.

  17. Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Nanxi 1986-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling Coil Efficiency Water viscosity at the water bulk temperature Water fluid viscosity at the pipe wall temperature Fin Pitch ix TABLE OF CONTENTS... of the analysis will be compared with the weather data and chilled water system data of the DFW Airport during 2010. Other possible causes of the reduced delta-T at low loads exist and will be investigated. 8 2 LITERATURE REVIEW 2.1 Heat transfer...

  18. ELECTRICAL LOAD MANAGEMENT FOR THE CALIFORNIA WATER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieg, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Projects Generating Plants and Shiftable Generationfrom "base load" generating plants. ing" and saves energy.Cily flow PUfflj);ng - GeneratIng Plant San LUIS Reservo,,'

  19. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  20. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Lee; Junghan Dong

    2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report of ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Water,'' DOE project No. DE-FC26-00BC15326 describes work performed in the third year of the project. Several good results were obtained, which are documented in this report. The compacted bentonite membranes were replaced by supported bentonite membranes, which exhibited the same salt rejection capability. Unfortunately, it also inherited the clay expansion problem due to water invasion into the interlayer spaces of the compacted bentonite membranes. We noted that the supported bentonite membrane developed in the project was the first of its kind reported in the literature. An {alpha}-alumina-supported MFI-type zeolite membrane synthesized by in-situ crystallization was fabricated and tested. Unlike the bentonite clay membranes, the zeolite membranes maintained stability and high salt rejection rate even for a highly saline solution. Actual produced brines from gas and oil fields were then tested. For gas fields producing brine, the 18,300 ppm TDS (total dissolved solids) in the produced brine was reduced to 3060 ppm, an 83.3% rejection rate of 15,240 ppm salt rejection. For oilfield brine, while the TDS was reduced from 181,600 ppm to 148,900 ppm, an 18% rejection rate of 32,700 ppm reduction, the zeolite membrane was stable. Preliminary results show the dissolved organics, mainly hydrocarbons, did not affect the salt rejection. However, the rejection of organics was inconclusive at this point. Finally, the by-product of this project, the {alpha}-alumina-supported Pt-Co/Na Y catalytic zeolite membrane was developed and demonstrated for overcoming the two-step limitation of nonoxidation methane (CH{sub 4}) conversion to higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Detailed experiments to obtain quantitative results of H{sub 2} generation for various conditions are now being conducted. Technology transfer efforts included five manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals and five conference presentations.

  1. The impact of passive safety systems on desirability of advanced light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eul, Ryan C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates whether the advanced light water reactor designs with passive safety systems are more desirable than advanced reactor designs with active safety systems from the point of view of uncertainty in the ...

  2. Conservation of Energy Through The Use of a Predictive Performance Simulator of Operating Cooling Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schell, C. J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical treatment program for the prevention of corrosion, scale and deposit accumulations. Calgon has made available a computerized performance simulator of operating cooling water systems which reliably predicts system corrosion rates, percent scale...

  3. Water Distribution System Monitoring and Decision Support Using a Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael

    Water distribution systems comprise labyrinthine networks of pipes, often in poor states of repair, that are buried beneath our city streets and relatively inaccessible. Engineers who manage these systems need reliable ...

  4. Observations of englacial water passages: a fracture-dominated system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobel, Robert W.

    hydraulics of glaciers have focused on the subglacial regime. In temperate alpine glaciers and ice caps controls the spatial distribution of water at the bed, which may affect local ice movement. These passages and the outward melting of the ice walls due to the frictional heat produced by the flowing water. The processes

  5. VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN TO ENVIRONMENTAL Resources VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN TO ENVIRONMENTAL Resources Institute of African Research and Studies, Cairo University For the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE

  6. Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2009-2010 Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The performance of seven differing types of residential water heating systems was compared in a side-by-side test configuration over a full year period. The Hot Water System Laboratory (HWS Lab) test facility at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) in Cocoa, FL was used for the tests.

  7. Analysis of Heating Systems and Scale of Natural Gas-Condensing Water Boilers in Northern Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Wang, S.; Pan, S.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, various heating systems and scale of the natural gas-condensing water boiler in northern zones are discussed, based on a technical-economic analysis of the heating systems of natural gas condensing water boilers in northern zones...

  8. Analysis of Heating Systems and Scale of Natural Gas-Condensing Water Boilers in Northern Zones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Wang, S.; Pan, S.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, various heating systems and scale of the natural gas-condensing water boiler in northern zones are discussed, based on a technical-economic analysis of the heating systems of natural gas condensing water boilers in northern zones...

  9. Ternary Oil-Water-Amphiphile Systems: Self-Assembly and Phase Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ternary Oil-Water-Amphiphile Systems: Self-Assembly and Phase Equilibria Seung-Yeon Kim surfactant - oil - water systems were studied by grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations assisted H represents hydrophilic and T hydrophobic groups. In contrast to earlier studies, we studied oil

  10. Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Helmut A.

    Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data Reinhold cartographic feature extraction by the airborne AeS--1 instrument is presented. We extract regions corresponding to cartographic features for the classes built--up area, forest, water and open area. Water

  11. Considerations for understanding one`s cooling system prior to reuse water implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmelovski, M.J. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water reuse situations are growing due to the need or desire to minimize water discharge from an industrial facility. Most of these applications are retrofits or system redesigns. Many times information is required to make decisions about the reuse application. Real-time or diagnostic studies provide improved information about the water systems. Addition of very low concentrations of a chemical tracer can provide improved information about the system. Useful and unique functions of chemical tracers are that they can provide one with the following information: system volume, quantifying previously unaccounted blowdown, holding time index, water distribution, leakage, and flowrate. These are important parameters when considering water reuse and system redesign. The chemical tracers discussed in this paper represent a significant improvement over compounds previously used in reuse applications.

  12. Vapor-liquid equilibria of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mun, S.Y.; Lee, H.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data of the water + 1,3-propanediol and water + 1,3-propanediol + lithium bromide systems were measured at 60, 160, 300, and 760 mmHg at temperatures ranging from 315 to 488 K. The apparatus used in this work is a modified still especially designed for the measurement of low-pressure VLE, in which both liquid and vapor are continuously recirculated. For the analysis of salt-containing solutions, a method incorporating refractometry and gravimetry was used. From the experimental measurements, the effect of lithium bromide on the VLE behavior of water + 1,3-propanediol was investigated. The experimental data of the salt-free system were successfully correlated using the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models. In addition, the extended UNIQUAC model of Sander et al. was applied to the VLE calculation of salt-containing mixtures.

  13. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  14. Implementation of automatic inspection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chawla, Yugank

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspection is the formal examination of a product manufactured by any manufacturing process. Inspection process is critical to all the industries as it ensures that a good quality product reach at the end customers. In ...

  15. Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and monitoring at the water heater and hot water end uses.water at the trunk (water heater) and twigs (individual end-and outlet of the water heater and several hot water end-

  16. A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atilhan, Selma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and distribution of water resources. This dissertation introduces a systems approach...

  17. A Systems-Integration Approach to the Optimal Design and Operation of Macroscopic Water Desalination and Supply Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atilhan, Selma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the escalating levels of water demand, there is a need for expansion in the capacity of water desalination infrastructure and for better management and distribution of water resources. This dissertation introduces a systems approach...

  18. Automatic Synthesis of Robust Embedded Control Software Tichakorn Wongpiromsarn, Ufuk Topcu and Richard M. Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    science and control to allow automatic synthesis of embedded control software for such systems (KaramanAutomatic Synthesis of Robust Embedded Control Software Tichakorn Wongpiromsarn, Ufuk Topcu a methodology for automatic synthesis of embedded control software that accounts for exogenous disturbances

  19. On-line hydraulic state prediction for water distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittle, Andrew

    This paper describes and demonstrates a method for on?line hydraulic state prediction in urban water networks. The proposed method uses a Predictor?Corrector (PC) approach in which a statistical data?driven algorithm is ...

  20. A computerized storage and retrieval system for water quality data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparr, Ted M

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and retrieval capability is needed in the field of water quality research, With many varied environmen- tal quality studies being conducted, an easy-to-use, flexible, and responsive means of storing and selectively retrieving date using a wide variety... this need, will have the follpw- Ing data management capabilities: (I) Create and maintain a water quality data base including sampled data values, reliability indicators, and remarks (2) retrieve selected data from this data bank (3} support a...

  1. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Graywater Use and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    : To reuse graywater, a homeowner first must decide which graywater sources to collect. Us- ing graywater from all sources will increase the risk of pollutants in the graywater. Before using graywater, evaluate what it is to be used for and what... using it to water plants that thrive in acidic soils. To prevent salt accumulation, ? distribute graywater over a large surface area and rotate distribu- tion from one area to another. Select reuse applications appro- ? priate for the amount of water...

  2. Robust feasibility for control of water flow in a reservoir-canal system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . INTRODUCTION Open-channel hydraulic systems are central to a variety of human needs such as irrigation, power of irrigation systems has be- come a crucial issue. Historically, irrigation systems around the world wereRobust feasibility for control of water flow in a reservoir-canal system Saurabh Amin, Alexandre M

  3. Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Use Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel?based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

  4. Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Use Policies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel?based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

  5. Automatic Mechetronic Wheel Light Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammed John Fitzgerald (Silver Spring, MD)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A wheel lighting device for illuminating a wheel of a vehicle to increase safety and enhance aesthetics. The device produces the appearance of a "ring of light" on a vehicle's wheels as the vehicle moves. The "ring of light" can automatically change in color and/or brightness according to a vehicle's speed, acceleration, jerk, selection of transmission gears, and/or engine speed. The device provides auxiliary indicator lights by producing light in conjunction with a vehicle's turn signals, hazard lights, alarm systems, and etc. The device comprises a combination of mechanical and electronic components and can be placed on the outer or inner surface of a wheel or made integral to a wheel or wheel cover. The device can be configured for all vehicle types, and is electrically powered by a vehicle's electrical system and/or battery.

  6. Interactions of woody biofuel feedstock production systems with water resources: Considerations for sustainability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, Carl,C.; Amatya, Devendra; Coleman, Mark.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. Water resources are important for the production of woody biofuel feedstocks. It is necessary to ensure that production systems do not adversely affect the quantity or quality of surface and ground water. The effects of woody biomass plantations on water resources are largely dependent on the prior land use and the management regime. Experience from both irrigated and non-irrigated systems has demonstrated that woody biofuel production systems do not impair water quality. Water quality actually improves from conversion of idle or degraded agricultural lands to woody biomass plantations. Site water balance may be altered by cultivation of woody biomass plantations relative to agricultural use, due to increases in evapostranspiration (ET) and storage. Incorporation of woody biomass production plantations within the landscape provides an opportunity to improve the quality of runoff water and soil conservation. Given the centrality of water resources to the sustainability of ecosystem services and other values derived, the experience with woody biofuels feedstock production systems is positive. Keywords. Short rotation woody crop, forest hydrology, water quality, hardwood plantation.

  7. Pacies (Part Code Identification Expert System): an expert system to generate part codes for the selection of small part feeding and orienting devices for use in automatic assembly 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Tong

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coding System B: Existing Expert Systems C: Listing of Consultation Driver D: Listing of the Knowledge Base E: Listing of SIMPLE Front-End Relations F: Procedure to Log on the System G: Procedure to Query the Same Question VITA 74 78 79 90 104... look-up, generates a three-digit part code for a part based upon its shape, important features, and symmetries. The part code is used in a table look-up procedure to determine the proper feeding and orienting device for the part. Hence, the part...

  8. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

  9. Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

  10. Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Orr, R.S.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tube sheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tube sheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tube sheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch there between. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight. 6 figures.

  11. The Water Purification System for the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Wilhelmi; R. Bopp; R. Brown; J. Cherwinka; J. Cummings; E. Dale; M. Diwan; J. Goett; R. W. Hackenburg; J. Kilduff; L. Littenberg; G. S. Li; X. N. Li; J. C. Liu; H. Q. Lu; J. Napolitano; C. Pearson; N. Raper; R. Rosero; P. Stoler; Q. Xiao; C. G. Yang; Y. Yang; M. Yeh

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the design, installation, and operation of a purification system that is able to provide large volumes of high purity ASTM (D1193-91) Type-I water to a high energy physics experiment. The water environment is underground in a lightly sealed system, and this provides significant challenges to maintaining high purity in the storage pools, each of which contains several thousand cubic meters. High purity is dictated by the need for large optical absorption length, which is critical for the operation of the experiment. The system is largely successful, and the water clarity criteria are met. We also include a discussion of lessons learned.

  12. Detection of contamination of municipal water distribution systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the detection of contaminates of a fluid in a conduit. The conduit is part of a fluid distribution system. A chemical or biological sensor array is connected to the conduit. The sensor array produces an acoustic signal burst in the fluid upon detection of contaminates in the fluid. A supervisory control system connected to the fluid and operatively connected to the fluid distribution system signals the fluid distribution system upon detection of contaminates in the fluid.

  13. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  14. Large-margin Gaussian mixture modeling for automatic speech recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Hung-An, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discriminative training for acoustic models has been widely studied to improve the performance of automatic speech recognition systems. To enhance the generalization ability of discriminatively trained models, a large-margin ...

  15. Using automatically collected data for bus service and operations planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shireman, Matthew Thomas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transit agencies have traditionally used manual data to measure performance and plan service, but many transit agencies now fulfill these tasks by using automated data collection systems (ADCS), including Automatic Vehicle ...

  16. Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    end use point, at the water heater in one second intervalsand monitoring at the water heater and hot water end uses.of water at the trunk (water heater) and twigs (individual

  17. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andhot water from the water heater to each end-use locationMixed Temperature Water Water Heater Drain Indoor Boundary

  18. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andof water at the water heater and at several end-use pointsshowerhead, entering the water heater and leaving the water

  19. Water Quality Monitoring Program In the Mill Creek System, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    during 2008. 22 Figure 4.2.A&B Bar graphs showing (A) Patuxent River mean winter-spring flow (January Patterns and River Flow 21 4.1.Precipitation 21 4.2. River Flow 23 5. Long Term Water Quality Trends 24 5

  20. The dielectric properties of polymer-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joe Bill

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of methylcellulose polymer-water interacti ons". He received a Master of Science degree in 1976. Mr. Lewis is married to Anita Kaye Lewis and they have two children, ". coda Ai 1 ene and Rebecca Jo. His permanent mailing address is B;3 Mestern, Angleton, Texas...

  1. Designing a 'Near Optimum' Cooling-Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crozier, R. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling water is expensive to circulate. Reducing its flow - i.e., hiking exchanger outlet temperatures - can cut tower, pump and piping investment as much as one-third and operating cost almost in half. Heat-exchanger-network optimization has been...

  2. Micropolis: A Virtual City for Water Distribution System Research Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Jacob

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    of contaminant spread are presented, and future applications will include fire flow and water auditing. The data digital files describing Micropolis are available from the authors for others’ use. It is hoped that other virtual cities will follow for the use...

  3. Water Usage for In-Situ Oil Shale Retorting – A Systems Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Larry Hull; Kara Cafferty

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an insitu retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The major water consumption was during the remediation of the insitu retorting zone.

  4. Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations...

  5. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of water cooling systems for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of water cooling systems for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  6. INTEGRATED CO2 HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS FOR SPACE HEATING AND HOT WATER HEATING IN LOW-ENERGY HOUSES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Stene

    designed as stand-alone systems, i.e. a heat pump water heater (HPWH) in combination with separate units

  7. The effects of the implementation of grey water reuse systems on construction cost and project schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaduvinal Varghese, Jeslin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of the United States due to their effects on construction cost and project schedules. Even though a project could get one or multiple points upon successful implementation of a grey water reuse system and conserving potable water, the following factors may have...

  8. Dynamics and solutions to some control problems for water-tank systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Dynamics and solutions to some control problems for water-tank systems Nicolas Petit , Pierre translations and rotations. The fluid motion is described by linearized wave equations under shallow water describe the lack of approximate controllability. The first contribution of the paper consists of models

  9. Commissioning the Domestic Hot Water System on a Large University Campus: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Bensouda, N.; Claridge, D.; Bruner, H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was to investigate the causes of these problems and help determine how to best operate the system. It was found that reported problems of low flows, low temperatures and long hot water lag time resulted from reverse flows and no hot water circulation caused by: 1...

  10. Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Air and water flows in a large sand box with a two-layer aquifer system Xingxing Kuang & Jiu Jimmy negative air pressure can be generated in the vadose zone during pumping. The negative air pressure. The initial water-table depth has a significant effect on the generated negative air pressure. The shallower

  11. Acceptance test report for high pressure water jet system feed pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crystal, J.B.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes results of WHC-SD-SNF-ATP-016, Rev. 0 ``Acceptance Test Procedure High Pressure Water Jet System``, conducted on December 20, 1995 and December 22, 1995. This jet supplies water at 15,000 psi @ 15 gpm to nozzles to clean surfaces of empty fuel storage canisters.

  12. Solar PV water pumping system for rural development in Nepal: Problems and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, J.N. [Inst. of Engineering, Kathmandu (Nepal). Dept. of Electronics Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although PV water pumping systems have high initial costs, they require virtually no maintenance, require no fuel and thus save foreign exchange. They are easy to install and operate, have no moving parts and hence are highly reliable and durable and are modular in nature for future expansion, PV systems are found to be competitive with conventional diesel generator systems. Despite the above mentioned facts policy makers are still not convinced that solar PV water pumping systems can support rural development. This paper gives reasons for the failures of some solar PV water pumping projects in Nepal. Development of solar electricity totaling about 800 KWp in Nepal is briefly highlighted. Basic preconditions are identified for the successful operation of solar PV water pumping systems. The findings of successful solar PV water pumping systems are highlighted with specific reference to socio-economic impacts in the rural society. Subsidy policy of the government on solar PV water pumping systems is analyzed. Development of a spontaneous market for community solar PV water pumping system is analyzed. Suggestions are given on how solar PV water pumping system can be made more affordable by village people. Typical Nepalese rural areas are found to be suitable and economical for SPVWPS. Site evaluation procedure is given. Finally, the paper indicates the important of training for the local people in installation, operation and routine maintenance to ensure the reliability of the SPVWPS. The paper emphasizes the involvement of end-users from the very beginning of planning stage of SPVWPS. Detail comparison between a SPVWPS and an equivalent diesel generator is also indicated in the paper.

  13. Lateral Water Diffusion in an Artificial Macroporous System: Modeling and Experimental Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    Lateral Water Diffusion in an Artificial Macroporous System: Modeling and Experimental Evidence P systems, lateral mass exchange between macropores and the soil matrix is generally modeled as an apparent diffusion, the system is thus characterized by a single can be determined from moment analysis of the concen

  14. Appropriate Technologies and Systems to respond to Climate Change, Improved Water Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Resources Management, Waste Management and Sanitation A Review of Water Information Systems in the English availability, quality, use and demand. In this regard, Water Information Systems play a key role in the management of the resource. This paper examines the water information systems of St. Lucia, Jamaica

  15. Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS...

  16. THE SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SYSTEM THORIUM NITRATE-WATER-NITRIC ACID AT 25 AND THE HYDRATES OF THORIUM NITRATE Re-direct Destination: times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current...

  17. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDermott, Daniel J. (Export, PA); Schrader, Kenneth J. (Penn Hills, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  18. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  19. Investigation of a Novel Solar Assisted Water Heating System with Enhanced Energy Yield for Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.; Xu, J.; Yu, X.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presented the concept, prototype application, operational performance and benefits relating to a novel solar assisted water heating system for building services. It was undertaken through dedicated theoretical analysis, computer...

  20. Wavelet-based Burst Event Detection and Localization in Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srirangarajan, Seshan

    In this paper we present techniques for detecting and locating transient pipe burst events in water distribution systems. The proposed method uses multiscale wavelet analysis of high rate pressure data recorded to detect ...

  1. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

  2. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

  3. Spirasol : improvements to semi-continuous solar disinfection water treatment systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loux, Brian Michael, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was carried out to determine the feasibility of an original point of use solar water disinfection system created by the author and named "Spirasol." The study primarily focused on the comparison of ...

  4. H?Otel : a new model for integrating water systems and coastal architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Danielle C. (Danielle Collinsworth)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Industrial Era, "dams, water towers, sewage systems, and the like were celebrated as glorious icons, carefully designed, ornamented, and prominently located in the city, testifying to the modern promise of ...

  5. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. Effects of Biochar Recycling on Switchgrass Growth and Soil and Water Quality in Bioenergy Production Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husmoen, Derek Howard

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the logistics for recycling biochar to fields from which the biomass feedstocks are harvested. The contribution of biochar recycling from mobile pyrolysis systems to ecological services provided by agriculture, including sustained soil, water...

  7. Risk Analysis and Adaptive Response Planning for Water Distribution Systems Contamination Emergency Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasekh, Amin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    are investigated. Pressure-driven hydraulic analysis is performed to simulate the complicated system hydraulics under pressure-deficit conditions. Performance of a novel preventive response action ? injection of food-grade dye directly into drinking water...

  8. Automatic Laser Pointer Detection Algorithm for Environment Control Device Systems Based on Template Matching and Genetic Tuning of Fuzzy Rule-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    Systems, Fuzzy Rule-Based Systems, Genetic Fuzzy Systems, Laser Pointer De- tection, Domotic Control

  9. Community water systems recovering from the drought: Lessons learned; plans made 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe Community water systems recovering from the drought LESSONS LEARNED; PLANS MADE Summer 2012 tx H2O 7 ] An East Texas water supply reservoir was so low that water was unable to be withdrawn using the normal...;,#18;#24;#24; was about three weeks away from running out of water. With the entire state experiencing exceptional or extreme drought for most of #25;#24;#23;#23;, Groesbeck stood out as a warning to other Texas communities about what they could experience...

  10. Community water systems recovering from the drought: Lessons learned; plans made

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe Community water systems recovering from the drought LESSONS LEARNED; PLANS MADE Summer 2012 tx H2O 7 ] An East Texas water supply reservoir was so low that water was unable to be withdrawn using the normal...;,#18;#24;#24; was about three weeks away from running out of water. With the entire state experiencing exceptional or extreme drought for most of #25;#24;#23;#23;, Groesbeck stood out as a warning to other Texas communities about what they could experience...

  11. Method for automatically scramming a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Schultz, Richard R.; Terry, William K.

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatically scramming nuclear reactor system. One embodiment comprises a core having a coolant inlet end and a coolant outlet end. A cooling system operatively associated with the core provides coolant to the coolant inlet end and removes heated coolant from the coolant outlet end, thus maintaining a pressure differential therebetween during a normal operating condition of the nuclear reactor system. A guide tube is positioned within the core with a first end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant inlet end of the core, and a second end of the guide tube in fluid communication with the coolant outlet end of the core. A control element is positioned within the guide tube and is movable therein between upper and lower positions, and automatically falls under the action of gravity to the lower position when the pressure differential drops below a safe pressure differential.

  12. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  13. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauter, Paula A. W. (Livermore, CA); Krauter, Gordon W. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  14. Impact of water resource development on the hydrology and sedimentology of the Brazos River system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Larry Lane

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACT OF WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ON THE HYDROLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER SYSTEM A Thesis by Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Geology IMPACT OF WATER RESOURCE DEVFLOPMENT ON THE HYDROLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF THE BRAZOS RIVER SYSTEM A Thesis by LARRY LANE MINTER Approved as to style snd. content by: (Chairman of Committee) n (Head...

  15. Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  16. An evaluation of household drinking water treatment systems in Peru : the table filter and the safe water system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulbert, Brittany, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) storage, and education. Tests on the SWSs in Peru demonstrated 99.6% E.coli removal and 95% total coliform removal. Only 30% of the SWSs tested contained water at or above the WHO-recommended concentration of free ...

  17. Operating agricultural equipment accurately can be difficult, tedious, or even hazardous. Automatic control offers many potential advantages over human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , and automatic control. CDGPS-based control systems have been utilized in a number of applications, including. An automatic control system was developed, simulated in software using a simple kinematic vehicle model. Automatic control offers many potential advantages over human control; however, previous efforts to automate

  18. Documentation of INL’s In Situ Oil Shale Retorting Water Usage System Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D Mattson; Larry Hull

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system dynamic model was construction to evaluate the water balance for in-situ oil shale conversion. The model is based on a systems dynamics approach and uses the Powersim Studio 9™ software package. Three phases of an in situ retort were consider; a construction phase primarily accounts for water needed for drilling and water produced during dewatering, an operation phase includes the production of water from the retorting process, and a remediation phase water to remove heat and solutes from the subsurface as well as return the ground surface to its natural state. Throughout these three phases, the water is consumed and produced. Consumption is account for through the drill process, dust control, returning the ground water to its initial level and make up water losses during the remedial flushing of the retort zone. Production of water is through the dewatering of the retort zone, and during chemical pyrolysis reaction of the kerogen conversion. The document discusses each of the three phases used in the model.

  19. Water gate array for current flow or tidal movement pneumatic harnessing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorlov, Alexander M. (Brookline, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention, which provides a system for harnessing power from current flow or tidal movement in a body of water, comprises first and second hydro-pneumatic chambers each having ingress and egress below the water surface near the river or ocean floor and water gates operative to open or seal the ports to the passage of water. In an exemplary embodiment, the gates are sychronized by shafts so that the ingress ports of each chamber are connected to the egress ports of each other chamber. Thus, one set of gates is closed, while the other is open, thereby allowing water to flow into one chamber and build air pressure therein and allowing water to flow out of the other chamber and create a partial vacuum therein. A pipe connects the chambers, and an air turbine harnesses the air movement within the pipe. When water levels are equilibrated, the open set of gates is closed by a counterweight, and the other set is allowed to open by natural force of the water differential. The water gates may be comprised of a plurality of louvers which are ganged for simultaneous opening and closing. The system is designed to operate with air turbines or other pneumatic devices. Its design minimizes construction cost and environmental impact, yet provides a clean renewable energy source.

  20. automated watering systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ioannou A, utomatic is todesign and test avehicle control system in order toachieve full vehicle automation in the longitudinal vehicle following isan important feature of a fully...

  1. Energy Savings with High Temperature Water Generation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manicke, A. C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maintenance and operating cost, as well as some of the unfavorable o~erating conditions common to steam systems. A few! of the items and conditions are elimination 01 steam traps, condensate return systems, return I system corros;on, deaerati ng feedwater... systems an~ thei r maintenance, elimination of b10wdown requi~ements, e1 imination of vent and f1 ash losses, a ~ubstan? tia1 reduction in feedwater makeup requi~ements, feedwater treatment equipment, and feedwater chemical additives. I...

  2. Distrbuted Sensing Systems for Water Quality Assesment and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and A. Maccabe. 2004. “Radiation Detection with DistributedRennie, G. 2004. “Radiation Detection on the Front Lines. ”sensing systems for radiation detection has shown great

  3. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  4. Preoperational test report, cross-site transfer water flush system (POTP-001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, G.L.

    1998-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the testing performed per POTP-001, for the Cross-Site Transfer Water Flush System. (HNF-1552, Rev. 0) The Flush System consists of a 47,000 gallon tank (302C), a 20 hp pump, two 498kW heaters, a caustic addition pump, various valves, instruments, and piping. The purpose of this system is to provide flush water at 140 F, 140gpm, and pH 11-12 for the Cross-Site Transfer System operation.

  5. Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

  6. Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark K. Gee

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

  7. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................................................... 140 Time Series Records (2NAT, 2REG, 2UNA, 2CLO, 2CLC, 2RFR, 2URR, 2CPI, 2STO, 2EVA, 2DEP, 2TAR, 2SHT, 2DIV, 2IFT, 2IFS, 2EPD, 2EVR, 2WSE) .......... 141 IDEN Record ? Identifiers for Control points, Reservoirs, Water Rights, or Groups... of all files associated with a particular simulation. The filename extension differentiates the different types of data contained in the files. ? Assigning a different root (root2 in Table 1.2) for the hydrology files (FLO, EVA, HYD, DIS, FAD) may...

  8. Water Treatment System Cleans Marcellus Shale Wastewater | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell DirectorThe Water Power Program, partEnergy DC -

  9. Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySite Screening Decision Tree SolarSolar Water

  10. Regulatory Concerns on the In-Containment Water Storage System of the Korean Next Generation Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Lee, Jae-Hun; Bang, Young-Seok; Kim, Hho-Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-containment water storage system (IWSS) is a newly adopted system in the design of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It consists of the in-containment refueling water storage tank, holdup volume tank, and cavity flooding system (CFS). The IWSS has the function of steam condensation and heat sink for the steam release from the pressurizer and provides cooling water to the safety injection system and containment spray system in an accident condition and to the CFS in a severe accident condition. With the progress of the KNGR design, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety has been developing Safety and Regulatory Requirements and Guidances for safety review of the KNGR. In this paper, regarding the IWSS of the KNGR, the major contents of the General Safety Criteria, Specific Safety Requirements, Safety Regulatory Guides, and Safety Review Procedures were introduced, and the safety review items that have to be reviewed in-depth from the regulatory viewpoint were also identified.

  11. Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  12. automatic gas meter-reading: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Page Topic Index 1 Neighborhood Watch: Security and Privacy Analysis of Automatic Meter Reading Systems Engineering Websites Summary: in transforming the current electrical...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vehicle location Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Software Upload in Summary: 12;control of the vehicle to avoid collision and a vehicle automation system includes automatic... -to-day operations. Intelligent...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vehicle identification Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Software Upload in Summary: 12;control of the vehicle to avoid collision and a vehicle automation system includes automatic... -to-day operations. Intelligent...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vehicle monitoring Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    group as well as generate... 12;control of the vehicle to avoid collision and a vehicle automation system includes automatic... -to-day operations. Intelligent...

  16. Hot Water Heating System Operation and Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Z.; Chen, H.; Wei, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating period, and temperature-flow adjustment with frequency control. The study shows the most energy efficient operating method is a variable flow heating system, which should be popularized to the heating field....

  17. Improving the Water Efficiency of Cooling Production System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maheshwari, G.; Al-Hadban, Y.; Al-Taqi, H. H.; Alasseri, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For most of the time, cooling towers (CTs) of cooling systems operate under partial load conditions and by regulating the air circulation with a variable frequency drive (VFD), significant reduction in the fan power can be achieved. In Kuwait...

  18. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a highly efficient pumping system for their Pontiac Operations Complex in Pontiac, Michigan. In short, GM was able to replace five original 60- to 100-hp pumps with three 15-hp...

  19. Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

  20. Hanford Site ground-water model: Geographic information system linkages and model enhancements, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Devary, J.L.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of the unconfined aquifer are important tools that are used to (1) identify and quantify existing, emerging, or potential ground-water quality problems, (2) predict changes in ground-water flow and contaminant transport as waste-water discharge operations change, and (3) assess the potential for contaminants to migrate from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site through the ground water. Formerly, most of the numerical models developed at the Hanford Site were two-dimensional. However, contaminant concentrations cannot be accurately predicted with a two-dimensional model, which assumes a constant vertical distribution of contaminants in the aquifer. Development of two- and three-dimensional models of ground-water flow based on the Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code began in the mid- 1980s. The CFEST code was selected because of its ability to simulate both ground-water flow and contaminant transport. Physical processes that can be modeled by CFEST include aquifer geometry, heterogeneity, boundary conditions, and initial conditions. The CFEST ground-water modeling library has been integrated with the commercially available geographic information system (GIS) ARC/INFO. The display and analysis capabilities of a GIS are well suited to the size and diversity of databases being generated at the Hanford Site. The ability to visually inspect large databases through a graphical analysis tool provides a stable foundation for site assessments and ground-water modeling studies. Any ground-water flow model being used by an ongoing project should be continually updated and refined to reflect the most current knowledge of the system. The two-dimensional ground-water flow model being used in support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project has recently been updated and enhanced. One major enhancement was the extension of the model area to include North Richland.

  1. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This project is a cooperative effort Bridge, AR and near Portland, AR. The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto;METHODS The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station. It uses an automatic sampler

  2. Economic Analysis of a Brackish Water Photovoltaic-Operated (BWRO-PV) Desalination System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Karaghouli, A.; Kazmerski, L. L.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photovoltaic (PV)-powered reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination system is considered one of the most promising technologies in producing fresh water from both brackish and sea water, especially for small systems located in remote areas. We analyze the economic viability of a small PV-operated RO system with a capacity of 5 m3/day used to desalinate brackish water of 4000 ppm total dissolve solids, which is proposed to be installed in a remote area of the Babylon governorate in the middle of Iraq; this area possesses excellent insolation throughout the year. Our analysis predicts very good economic and environmental benefits of using this system. The lowest cost of fresh water achieved from using this system is US $3.98/ m3, which is very reasonable compared with the water cost reported by small-sized desalination plants installed in rural areas in other parts of the world. Our analysis shows that using this small system will prevent the release annually of 8,170 kg of CO2, 20.2 kg of CO, 2.23 kg of CH, 1.52 kg of particulate matter, 16.41 kg of SO2, and 180 kg of NOx.

  3. Impact flux of asteroids and water transport to the habitable zone in binary star systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bancelin, D; Eggl, S; Dvorak, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By now, observations of exoplanets have found more than 50 binary star systems hosting 71 planets. We expect these numbers to increase as more than 70% of the main sequence stars in the solar neighborhood are members of binary or multiple systems. The planetary motion in such systems depends strongly on both the parameters of the stellar system (stellar separation and eccentricity) and the architecture of the planetary system (number of planets and their orbital behaviour). In case a terrestrial planet moves in the so-called habitable zone (HZ) of its host star, the habitability of this planet depends on many parameters. A crucial factor is certainly the amount of water. We investigate in this work the transport of water from beyond the snow-line to the HZ in a binary star system and compare it to a single star system.

  4. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  5. Modeling threat assessments of water supply systems using markov latent effects methodology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, Consuelo Juanita

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act emphasize efforts toward safeguarding our nation's water supplies against attack and contamination. Specifically, the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 established requirements for each community water system serving more than 3300 people to conduct an assessment of the vulnerability of its system to a terrorist attack or other intentional acts. Integral to evaluating system vulnerability is the threat assessment, which is the process by which the credibility of a threat is quantified. Unfortunately, full probabilistic assessment is generally not feasible, as there is insufficient experience and/or data to quantify the associated probabilities. For this reason, an alternative approach is proposed based on Markov Latent Effects (MLE) modeling, which provides a framework for quantifying imprecise subjective metrics through possibilistic or fuzzy mathematics. Here, an MLE model for water systems is developed and demonstrated to determine threat assessments for different scenarios identified by the assailant, asset, and means. Scenario assailants include terrorists, insiders, and vandals. Assets include a water treatment plant, water storage tank, node, pipeline, well, and a pump station. Means used in attacks include contamination (onsite chemicals, biological and chemical), explosives and vandalism. Results demonstrated highest threats are vandalism events and least likely events are those performed by a terrorist.

  6. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  7. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  8. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Included in this report is detailed information regarding the design and installation of a heating and hot water system in a commercial application. This information includes descriptions of system and building, design philosophy, control logic operation modes, design and installation drawing and a brief description of problems encountered and their solutions.

  9. A Map-Reduce Parallel Approach to Automatic Synthesis of Control Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    A Map-Reduce Parallel Approach to Automatic Synthesis of Control Software Vadim Alimguzhin12 Systems are indeed Software Based Control Systems, i.e. control systems whose controller consists De- sign approaches for automatic synthesis of control software. Available algorithms and tools (e

  10. CC Retrofits and Optimal Controls for Hot Water Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, L.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and exterior zones. Each AHU has design airflow of 45,000 CFM. The high gas usage is caused by a dual-duct system with CAV boxes, which is an outdated and inefficient technology. Pneumatic controls make the operation and maintenance more difficult and do...

  11. Energy Savings with High Temperature Water Generation Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manicke, A. C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~lation and cost savings can be real i zed by all us~rs and markets. With the application of cogeneration, HTW can be added to provide very high system I effic iencies firing all types of fuel s. Saving energy has and will continue to be uppermost in our mind...

  12. A Systems Framework for Assessing Plumbing Products-Related Water Conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alison; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Lutz, James

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing the water use of plumbing products—toilets, urinals, faucets, and showerheads —has been a popular conservation measure. Improved technologies have created opportunities for additional conservation in this area. However, plumbing products do not operate in a vacuum. This paper reviews the literature related to plumbing products to determine a systems framework for evaluating future conservation measures using these products. The main framework comprises the following categories: water use efficiency, product components, product performance, source water, energy, and plumbing/sewer infrastructure. This framework for analysis provides a starting point for professionals considering future water conservation measures to evaluate the need for additional research, collaboration with other standards or codes committees, and attachment of additional metrics to water use efficiency (such as performance).

  13. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Nesbitt, L.B.

    1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs. 3 figs.

  14. Pressure suppression containment system for boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Nesbitt, Loyd B. (San Jose, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for suppressing the pressure inside the containment of a BWR following a postulated accident. A piping subsystem is provided which features a main process pipe that communicates the wetwell airspace to a connection point downstream of the guard charcoal bed in an offgas system and upstream of the main bank of delay charcoal beds which give extensive holdup to offgases. The main process pipe is fitted with both inboard and outboard containment isolation valves. Also incorporated in the main process pipe is a low-differential-pressure rupture disk which prevents any gas outflow in this piping whatsoever until or unless rupture occurs by virtue of pressure inside this main process pipe on the wetwell airspace side of the disk exceeding the design opening (rupture) pressure differential. The charcoal holds up the radioactive species in the noncondensable gas from the wetwell plenum by adsorption, allowing time for radioactive decay before the gas is vented to the environs.

  15. Modeling water uptake by a root system growing in a fixed soil volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrieu, J L Blengino; Tarzia, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water uptake by roots of plants is examined for an ideal situation, with an approximation that resembles plants growing in pots, meaning that the total soil volume is fixed. We propose a coupled water uptake-root growth model. A one-dimensional model for water flux and water uptake by a root system growing uniformly distributed in the soil is presented, and the Van Genuchten model for the transport of water in soil is used. The governing equations are represented by a moving boundary model for which the root length, as a function of time, is prescribed. The solution of the model is obtained by front-fixing and finite element methods. Model predictions for water uptake by a same plant growing in loam, silt and clay soils are obtained and compared. A sensitivity analysis to determine relative effects on water uptake when system parameters are changed is also presented and shows that the model and numerical method proposed are more sensitive to the root growth rate than to the rest of the parameters. This se...

  16. Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) River System Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    monthly evaporation less precipitation depths. The primary HYD output is SIM input FLO and EVA files of IN and EV records or these SIM hydrology input data as a data storage system DSS file. HYD also includes options for reading and writing stream flow... reservoir surface net evaporation less precipitation depths which are input to SIM as a file with filename extension EVA or DSS Chapter 1 Introduction 3 The monthly stream flow volumes and net evaporation-precipitation depths cover a specified...

  17. Dynamic Optimization for Optimal Control of Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertin, Emre

    , Mathew L. Moore and Kevin L. Priddy Battelle Memorial Institute Cognitive Systems Group 505 King Avenue.E.) E.E.: E-mail: ertine@battelle.org, A.N.D.: E-mail: deana@battelle.org M.L.M.: E-mail: mathewml@battelle.org, K.L.P.: E-mail:priddy@battelle.org #12;Figure 1. Boosting station schematics 1977. A uniform

  18. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  19. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

  20. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Corrie E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Harto, Christopher B. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Schroeder, Jenna N. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Martino, Louis E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Horner, Robert M. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2 describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration and is much warmer than normal groundwater sources, for their cooling water needs; thus,

  1. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

  2. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  3. Reducing booster-pump-induced contaminant intrusion in Indian water systems with a self-actuated, back-pressure regulating valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, David Donald James

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermittently-operated water systems struggle to equitably and effectively distribute clean water to customers. One common customer response to intermittency is to supplement the water system's pressure by using a household, ...

  4. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings, is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50% of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 ft/sup 2/ of flat plate collector, two 500 gal storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in 40% fuel savings.

  5. A version of this paper will be presented at the Fifth Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems in Dubrovnik, Croatia, September

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems in Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 2009. ERG/200905 Energy

  6. Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

  7. Clothes Dryer Automatic Termination Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2: Improved Sensor and Control Designs Many residential clothes dryers on the market today provide automatic cycles that are intended to stop when the clothes are dry, as determined by the final remaining moisture content (RMC). However, testing of automatic termination cycles has shown that many dryers are susceptible to over-drying of loads, leading to excess energy consumption. In particular, tests performed using the DOE Test Procedure in Appendix D2 of 10 CFR 430 subpart B have shown that as much as 62% of the energy used in a cycle may be from over-drying. Volume 1 of this report shows an average of 20% excess energy from over-drying when running automatic cycles with various load compositions and dryer settings. Consequently, improving automatic termination sensors and algorithms has the potential for substantial energy savings in the U.S.

  8. Automatic Conversion Software for the Safety Verification of Goal-based Control Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    , an automatic software algorithm for converting goal network control programs into linear hybrid systemsAutomatic Conversion Software for the Safety Verification of Goal-based Control Programs Julia M. B. Braman and Richard M. Murray Abstract-- Fault tolerance and safety verification of control systems

  9. Potential for Hepa filter damage from water spray systems in filter plenums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, W.; Fretthold, J.K.; Slawsld, J.W.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water spray systems in high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums that are used in nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for protection against fire was designed under the assumption that the HEPA filters would not be damaged by the water sprays. The most likely scenario for filter damage involves filter plugging by the water spray, followed by the fan blowing out the filter medium. A number of controlled laboratory tests that were previously conducted in the late 1980s are reviewed in this paper to provide a technical basis for the potential HEPA filter damage by the water spray system in HEPA filter plenums. In addition to the laboratory tests, the scenario for HEPA filter damage during fires has also occurred in the field. Afire in a four-stage, HEPA filter plenum at Rocky Flats in 1980 caused the first three stages of HEPA filters to blow out of their housing and the fourth stage to severely bow. Details of this recently declassified fire are presented in this paper. Although these previous findings suggest serious potential problems exist with the current water spray system in filter plenum , additional studies are required to confirm unequivocally that DOE`s critical facilities are at risk.

  10. Automatic safety rod for reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Germer, John H. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic safety rod for a nuclear reactor containing neutron absorbing material and designed to be inserted into a reactor core after a loss-of-core flow. Actuation is based upon either a sudden decrease in core pressure drop or the pressure drop decreases below a predetermined minimum value. The automatic control rod includes a pressure regulating device whereby a controlled decrease in operating pressure due to reduced coolant flow does not cause the rod to drop into the core.

  11. Effects of Water in Synthetic Lubricant Systems and Clathrate Formation: A Literature Search and Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, Ngoc Dung T.

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive literature search and a confidential survey were critically analyzed to determine the effects of water on the stability of hydrofluorocarbon/synthetic lubricant systems and to identify key areas requiring further investigation. Following are highlights from the analysis: Clathrate hydrates are solid solutions formed when water molecules are linked through hydrogen bonding creating cavities that can enclose various guest molecules from hydrate formers, such as hydrofluorocarbons R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-407C and R-410A. The four methods for preventing clathrate formation were drying the gas, heating it, reducing its pressure, or using inhibitors. The hydrolysis of polyolester lubricants was mostly acid-catalyzed and its reaction rate constant typically followed the Arrhenius equation of an activated process. Hydrolytic stability improved with hindered molecular structures, and with the presence of acid catcher additives and desiccants. Water vapor can effect the adsorption of long-chain fatty acids and the chemistry of formation of protective oxide film. However, these effects on lubrication can be either positive or negative. Fifty to sixty percent of the moisture injected into an air-conditioning system remained in the refrigerant and the rest mixed with the compressor oil. In an automotive air-conditioning system using R-134a, ice would form at 0 C evaporating temperature when the water content in the vapor refrigerant on the low-pressure side was more than 350 ppm. Moisture would cause the embrittlement of polyethylene terephthalate and the hydrolysis of polyesters, but would reduce the effect of amine additives on fluoroelastomer rubbers. The reactions of water with refrigerants and lubricants would cause formicary and large-pit corrosion in copper tubes, as well as copper plating and sludge formation. Moreover, blockage of capillary tubes increased rapidly in the presence of water. Twenty-four companies responded to the survey. From the responses, the water concentrations specified and expected for different refrigerant/lubricant systems varied depending on the products, their capacities and applications, and also on the companies. Among the problems associated with high moisture level, lubricant breakdown was of greatest concern, followed by acid formation, compressor failure and expansion valve sticking. The following research topics are suggested: 1. The air-conditioning and refrigeration industry needs to measure and record the water content and total acid number of the lubricant of newly installed systems as well as operating systems that are shutdown for service or repair. The reason for the shutdown needs to be documented. A database can then be established to correlate water content with type and cause of breakdown. 2. Detailed studies on the distribution of water in refrigeration and air-conditioning systems should be conducted to pinpoint problem areas associated with free water. 3. Research is needed to validate the current theories and mechanisms of formicary corrosion. Corrosion inhibitors need to be developed. 4. The conditions for clathrate formation and decomposition of other alternative refrigerants, such as R-23, R-41, R-116, R-125, R-143a, R-404A and R-507C, and water should be determined to avoid possible problems associated with tube plugging. The mechanism by which water facilitates or hinders lubrication needs to be studied.

  12. 1 CO2 Heat Pump System for Space Heating and Hot Water Heating in Low-Energy Houses and Passive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Stene

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designed as a stand-alone system, i.e. a heat pump water heater in combination with a separate unit for

  13. Title III Evaluation Report for the Subsurface Fire Water System and Subsurrface Portion of the Non-Portable Water System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Flye

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed SFWS/SNPWS. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed systems, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guidelines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

  14. Design of a rural water provision system to decrease arsenic exposure in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) a material that effectively and affordably removes high concentrations of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate?bottom ash from coal fired power plants?is a waste material readily available in South Asia. During fieldwork in four sub-districts ofBangladesh, ARUBA reduced groundwater arsenic concentrations as high as 680 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Key results from three trips in Bangladesh and one trip to Cambodia include (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from contaminated water within the first five minutes of contact, andcontinues removing arsenic for 2-3 days; (2) ARUBA?s arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through fractionated dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once); (3) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic concentrations ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well; and (4) the amount of arsenic removed per gram of ARUBA is linearly related to the initial arsenic concentrationof the water. Through analysis of existing studies, observations, and informal interviews in Bangladesh, eight design strategies have been developed and used in the design of a low-cost, community-scale water treatment system that uses ARUBA to remove arsenic from drinking water. We have constructed, tested, and analyzed a scale version of the system. Experiments have shown that the system is capable of reducing high levels of arsenic (nearly 600 ppb) to below 50 ppb, while remaining affordable to people living on less than $2 per day. The system could be sustainably implemented as a public-private partnership in rural Bangladesh.

  15. Water Chemistry Control System for Recovery of Damaged and Degraded Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.; Fisher, D.; Thomas, J.

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the government of Serbia have led the project cosponsored by the U.S, Russia, European Commission, and others to repackage and repatriate approximately 8000 spent fuel elements from the RA reactor fuel storage basins at the VIN?A Institute of Nuclear Sciences to Russia for reprocessing. The repackaging and transportation activities were implemented by a Russian consortium which includes the Sosny Company, Tekhsnabeksport (TENEX) and Mayak Production Association. High activity of the water of the fuel storage basin posed serious risk and challenges to the fuel removal from storage containers and repackaging for transportation. The risk centered on personnel exposure, even above the basin water, due to the high water activity levels caused by Cs-137 leached from fuel elements with failed cladding. A team of engineers from the U.S. DOE-NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Vinca Institute, and the IAEA performed the design, development, and deployment of a compact underwater water chemistry control system (WCCS) to remove the Cs-137 from the basin water and enable personnel safety above the basin water for repackaging operations. Key elements of the WCCS system included filters, multiple columns containing an inorganic sorbent, submersible pumps and flow meters. All system components were designed to be remotely serviceable and replaceable. The system was assembled and successfully deployed at the Vinca basin to support the fuel removal and repackaging activities. Following the successful operations, the Cs-137 is now safely contained and consolidated on the zeolite sorbent used in the columns of the WCCS, and the fuel has been removed from the basins. This paper reviews the functional requirements, design, and deployment of the WCCS.

  16. A model of vapor-liquid equilibria for acid gas-alkanolamine-water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austgen, D.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A physico-chemical model was developed for representing liquid phase chemical equilibria and vapor-liquid (phase) equilibria of H{sub 2}SCO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water systems. The equilibrium composition of the liquid phase is determined by minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Activity coefficients are represented with the Electrolyte-NRTL equation treating both long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range binary interactions between liquid phase species. Vapor phase fugacity coefficients are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong-Soave Equation of State. Adjustable parameters of the model, binary interaction parameters and carbamate stability constants, were fitted on published binary system alkanolamine-water and ternary system (H{sub 2}S-alkanolamine-water, CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water) VLE data. The Data Regression System of ASPEN PLUS, based upon the Maximum Likelihood Principle, was used to estimate adjustable parameters. Ternary system measurements used in parameter estimation ranged in temperature from 25 to 120{degree}C in alkanolamine concentration from 1 to 5 M, in acid gas loading from 0 to 1.5 moles per mole alkanolamine, and in acid gas partial pressure from 0.1 to 1,000 kPa. Maximum likelihood estimates of ternary system H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} equilibrium partial pressures and liquid phase concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measurements for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) indicating that the model successfully represents ternary system data. The model was extended to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous mixtures of MDEA with MEA or DEA. The solubility was measured at 40 and 80{degree}C over a wide range of CO{sub 2} partial pressures. These measurements were used to estimate additional binary parameters of the mixed solvent systems.

  17. EIS-0121: Alternative Cooling Water Systems, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is to provide environmental input into the selection and implementation of cooling water systems for thermal discharges from K– and C-Reactors and from a coal-fired powerhouse in the D-Area at the Savannah River Plant (SRP)

  18. Preliminary design report for the K basins integrated water treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a revised concept for the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS). This PDR incorporates the 11 recommendations made in a May 1996 Value Engineering session into the Conceptual Design, and provides new flow diagrams, hazard category assessment, cost estimate, and schedule for the IWTS Subproject.

  19. Statement of work for definitive design of the K basins integrated water treatment system project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauly, T.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Statement of Work (SOW) identifies the scope of work and schedule requirements for completing definitive design of the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment Systems (IWTS) Subproject. This SOW shall form the contractual basis between WHC and the Design Agent for the Definitive Design.

  20. An evolutionary annealing-simplex algorithm for global optimisation of water resource systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    An evolutionary annealing-simplex algorithm for global optimisation of water resource systems The evolutionary annealing-simplex algorithm is a probabilistic heuristic global optimisation technique that joins concept is based on a controlled random search scheme, where a generalised downhill simplex methodology