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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully-Automated Demand Response Test in Large Facilities14in DR systems. Demand Response using HVAC in Commercialof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Automated Demand Response Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) has progressed over recent years beyond manual and semi-automated DR to include growing implementation and experience with fully automated demand response (AutoDR). AutoDR has been shown to be of great value over manual and semi-automated DR because it reduces the need for human interactions and decisions, and it increases the speed and reliability of the response. AutoDR, in turn, has evolved into the specification known as OpenADR v1.0 (California Energy Commission, PIER Program, C...

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes assessments and test results of four end-use technologies, representing products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard that was introduced to the public in 2008 and currently used in two ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

Automated Demand Response Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, which is an update to EPRI Report 1016082, includes assessments and test results of four end-use vendor technologies. These technologies represent products in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, each configured to automatically receive real-time pricing information and critical peak pricing (CPP) demand response (DR) event notifications. Four different vendors were asked to follow the interface requirements set forth in the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) Communicat...

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

6

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

7

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Commissioning Title Automated Demand Response and Commissioning Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-57384 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary...

8

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their partnership in demand response automation research andand Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayof Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand ResponseConference on Building Commissioning: April 22 – 24, 2008al: Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,study of automated demand response in wastewater treatmentopportunities for demand response control strategies in

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand  Response in Large Facilities.  Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.  Open Automated  Demand Response Communication Standards: 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

15

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsand Techniques for Demand Response. California Energyand S. Kiliccote. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals. Presented atand Automated Demand Response in Industrial RefrigeratedActions for Industrial Demand Response in California. LBNL-

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities"Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings", L Band Commissioning Issues from an Automated Demand Response.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goodin. 2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services. ” InOpen Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project. LBNL-

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. May 2007. LBNL-59975.to facilitate automating  demand response actions at the Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005 Motegi,National Conference on Building Commissioning: May 4-6, 2005Demand Response and Commissioning Mary Ann Piette, David S.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,

22

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing Speaker(s): Naoya Motegi Date: June 9, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 California utilities have been exploring the use of...

23

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Title Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Publication Type Report...

24

A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation and Future of DR Title A Demand Response (DR) Event: Benefits, Strategies, Automation and Future of DR Publication...

25

Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest Title Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for...

26

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources Title Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources Publication...

27

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. 2006 Demand Response Spinning ReserveKueck, and B. Kirby 2008. Demand Response Spinning ReserveReport 2009. Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. Mayand Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability signals for demand response GTA HTTPS HVAC IT kWand Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems. ”and Techniques for Demand Response. California Energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation – Findings andManagement and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. ”

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 9 . Piette et at Automated Demand Response Strategies andDynamic Controls for Demand Response in New and ExistingFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities"

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed strategies if convenient to the facility. From 2003 through 2006 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) developed and tested a series of demand response automation communications technologies known as Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In 2007, LBNL worked with three investor-owned utilities to commercialize and implement Auto-DR programs in their territories. This paper summarizes the history of technology development for Auto-DR, and describes the DR technologies and control strategies utilized at many of the facilities. It outlines early experience in commercializing Auto-DR systems within PG&E DR programs, including the steps to configure the automation technology. The paper also describes the DR sheds derived using three different baseline methodologies. Emphasis is given to the lessons learned from installation and commissioning of Auto-DR systems, with a detailed description of the technical coordination roles and responsibilities, and costs.

Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products Title Field Testing of Automated...

35

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

networks_in_the_home_the_new_growth_market.htm [12] NationalHome Network Technologies and Automating Demand Responsethe University of California. Home Network Technologies and

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated energy consumers, it has been possible to improve the DR 'state of the art' with a manageable commitment of technical resources on both the utility and consumer side. Although numerous C & I DR applications of a DRAS infrastructure are still in either prototype or early production phases, these early attempts at automating DR have been notably successful for both utilities and C & I customers. Several factors have strongly contributed to this success and will be discussed below. These successes have motivated utilities and regulators to look closely at how DR programs can be expanded to encompass the remaining (roughly) half of the state's energy load - the light commercial and, in numerical terms, the more important residential customer market. This survey examines technical issues facing the implementation of automated DR in the residential environment. In particular, we will look at the potential role of home automation networks in implementing wide-scale DR systems that communicate directly to individual residences.

McParland, Charles

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ” In2010. “Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing2009. “Open Automated Demand Response Communications

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

39

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedS. (2008). Automated Demand Response Results from Multi-Yearusing Open Automated Demand Response, California Energy

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below. Fig. 4 Automated demand response general features Thearchitecture Automated Demand Response System ArchitectureCould Bene?t for Demand Response Programs, But Challenges

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Automated Demand Response Demonstration Project” LBNL-2009a). “Open Automated Demand Response Communications inand Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California. ”

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Design and Implementation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities. CEC-Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.Management and Demand Response in Commercial Building. ,

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

title Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR booktitle International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ICEBO year month address Montreal Quebec abstract p class p1 Open Automated Demand Response OpenADR an XML based information exchange model is used to facilitate continuous price responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day ahead hourly pricing We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication prioritization of demand response signals and control methods Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management

45

Summary of the 2006 Automated Demand Response Pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the specific concept for, design of, and results from a pilot program to automate demand response with critical peak pricing. California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak pricing (CPP) to help reduce peak day summer time electric loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response. This Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP) project from 2006 draws upon three years of previous research and demonstrations from the years of 2003, 2004, and 2005. The purpose of automated demand response (DR) is to improve the responsiveness and participation of electricity customers in DR programs and lower overall costs to achieve DR. Auto-CPP is a form of automated demand response (Auto-DR).

Piette, M.; Kiliccote, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Title Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Southeast Water Pollution Control Plant Case Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6056E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report details a study into the demand response potential of a large wastewater treatment facility in San Francisco. Previous research had identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response and automated demand response, and this study was conducted to investigate facility attributes that are conducive to demand response or which hinder its implementation. One years' worth of operational data were collected from the facility's control system, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. These data were analyzed to determine factors which affected facility power demand and demand response capabilities.

47

Automated electricity demand response - Tech Close-Up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated electricity demand response - Tech Close-Up Click here to view this video Date: August 27, 2013 Presenter(s): Many, including EETD's Mary Ann Piette. A Tech Close-Up news...

48

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-2340e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, Girish Ghatikar, Sila Kiliccote, David S. Watson, Edward Koch, and Dan Hennage Journal Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering Volume 9 Issue 2 Keywords communication and standards, market sectors, openadr Abstract This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

49

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Demonstration in New York City Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Title Automated Demand Response Technologies and Demonstration in New York City using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6470E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, Sila Kiliccote, and Rongxin Yin Date Published 09/2013 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Abstract Demand response (DR) - allowing customers to respond to reliability requests and market prices by changing electricity use from their normal consumption pattern - continues to be seen as an attractive means of demand-side management and a fundamental smart-grid improvement that links supply and demand. Since October 2011, the Demand Response Research Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and New York State Energy Research and Development Authority have conducted a demonstration project enabling Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) in large commercial buildings located in New York City using Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) communication protocols. In particular, this project focuses on demonstrating how OpenADR can automate and simplify interactions between buildings and various stakeholders in New York State including the independent system operator, utilities, retail energy providers, and curtailment service providers. In this paper, we present methods to automate control strategies via building management systems to provide event-driven demand response, price response and demand management based on OpenADR signals. We also present cost control opportunities under day-ahead hourly pricing for large customers and Auto-DR control strategies developed for demonstration buildings. Lastly, we discuss the communication architecture and Auto-DR system designed for the demonstration project to automate price response and DR participation.

51

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater TreatmentLaboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.Berkeley National Laboratory. Demand Response ResearchCenter, Demand Response Research Center PIER Team Briefing,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Architecture Concepts and Technical Issues for an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response in large facilities.was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center whichInteroperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure Ed

Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consulting), and Dave Shroyer (SCG). Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for DataIAW Research Team, Demand Response Research Center, Lawrence

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning CommercialBuilding Controls  

SciTech Connect

California electric utilities have been exploring the use of dynamic critical peak pricing (CPP) and other demand response programs to help reduce peaks in customer electric loads. CPP is a new electricity tariff design to promote demand response. This paper begins with a brief review of terminology regarding energy management and demand response, followed by a discussion of DR control strategies and a preliminary overview of a forthcoming guide on DR strategies. The final section discusses experience to date with these strategies, followed by a discussion of the peak electric demand savings from the 2005 Automated CPP program. An important concept identified in the automated DR field tests is that automated DR will be most successful if the building commissioning industry improves the operational effectiveness of building controls. Critical peak pricing and even real time pricing are important trends in electricity pricing that will require new functional tests for building commissioning.

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

57

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes San Diego Gas& Electric Company?s collaboration with the Demand Response Research Center to develop and test automation capability for the Capacity Bidding Program in 2007. The report describes the Open Automated Demand Response architecture, summarizes the history of technology development and pilot studies. It also outlines the Capacity Bidding Program and technology being used by an aggregator that participated in this demand response program. Due to delays, the program was not fully operational for summer 2007. However, a test event on October 3, 2007, showed that the project successfully achieved the objective to develop and demonstrate how an open, Web?based interoperable automated notification system for capacity bidding can be used by aggregators for demand response. The system was effective in initiating a fully automated demand response shed at the aggregated sites. This project also demonstrated how aggregators can integrate their demand response automation systems with San Diego Gas& Electric Company?s Demand Response Automation Server and capacity bidding program.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4982E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Page, Janie, Sila Kiliccote, Junqiao Han Dudley, Mary Ann Piette, Albert K. Chiu, Bashar Kellow, Edward Koch, and Paul Lipkin Date Published 07/2011 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, emerging technologies, market sectors, medium commercial business, openadr, small commercial, small commercial business, technologies Abstract Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

60

Intelligent Building Automation: A Demand Response Management Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years intelligent Building Automation Systems, based on best practice open technology, have succeeded in helping facilities reduce their infrastructure, installation and operating costs. The idea was - 'the less the human intervention and the more automated the system then the more efficient the building'. With that in mind a question may arise as to whether this philosophy has been successful in educating the consumer on the importance of energy efficiency or has it actually alienated him? Would it be more effective if the consumer were to be part of the efficiency process? What about if the energy savings could be passed on to the consumer directly depending on how efficient he was? Demand response is a mechanism by which consumers change the energy consumption in response to energy price fluctuations, demand charges, or a direct request to reduce demand when the power grid reaches critical levels. However, in order for a demand response regime to be effective the building will need to have a number of 'pre-requisites' in place.

Qazi, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

Market transformation lessons learned from an automated demand response test in the Summer and Fall of 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”Learned from an Automated Demand Response Test in the SummerLearned from an Automated Demand Response Test in the Summer

Shockman, Christine; Piette, Mary Ann; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) demonstrated and evaluated open automated demand response (OpenADR) communication infrastructure to reduce winter morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in the Seattle City Light (SCL) service territory at five sites: Seattle Municipal Tower, Seattle University, McKinstry, and two Target stores. This report describes the process and results of the demonstration. OpenADR is an information exchange model that uses a client-server architecture to automate demand-response (DR) programs. These field tests evaluated the feasibility of deploying fully automated DR during both winter and summer peak periods. DR savings were evaluated for several building systems and control strategies. This project studied DR during hot summer afternoons and cold winter mornings, both periods when electricity demand is typically high. This is the DRRC project team's first experience using automation for year-round DR resources and evaluating the flexibility of commercial buildings end-use loads to participate in DR in dual-peaking climates. The lessons learned contribute to understanding end-use loads that are suitable for dispatch at different times of the year. The project was funded by BPA and SCL. BPA is a U.S. Department of Energy agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy generation facilities. Created by the citizens of Seattle in 1902, SCL is the second-largest municipal utility in America. SCL purchases approximately 40% of its electricity and the majority of its transmission from BPA through a preference contract. SCL also provides ancillary services within its own balancing authority. The relationship between BPA and SCL creates a unique opportunity to create DR programs that address both BPA's and SCL's markets simultaneously. Although simultaneously addressing both market could significantly increase the value of DR programs for BPA, SCL, and the end user, establishing program parameters that maximize this value is challenging because of complex contractual arrangements and the absence of a central Independent System Operator or Regional Transmission Organization in the northwest.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Dudley, Junqiao

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedUsing Open Automated Demand Response, Lawrence Berkeley2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emerging standards such as OpenADR enable Demand Response (DR) Resources to interact directly with Utilities and Independent System Operators to allow their facility automation equipment to respond to a variety of DR signals ranging from day ahead to real time ancillary services. In addition, there are Aggregators in today’s markets who are capable of bringing together collections of aggregated DR assets and selling them to the grid as a single resource. However, in most cases these aggregated resources are not automated and when they are, they typically use proprietary technologies. There is a need for a framework for dealing with aggregated resources that supports the following requirements: • Allows demand-side resources to participate in multiple DR markets ranging from wholesale ancillary services to retail tariffs without being completely committed to a single entity like an Aggregator; • Allow aggregated groups of demand-side resources to be formed in an ad hoc fashion to address specific grid-side issues and support the optimization of the collective response of an aggregated group along a number of different dimensions. This is important in order to taylor the aggregated performance envelope to the needs to of the grid; • Allow aggregated groups to be formed in a hierarchical fashion so that each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of DR resources as described above especially within the context of emerging smart grid standards and the role they will play in both the management and interaction of various grid-side entities with those resources.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

SciTech Connect

This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) performed a technology demonstration and evaluation for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in Seattle City Light's (SCL) service territory. This report summarizes the process and results of deploying open automated demand response (OpenADR) in Seattle area with winter morning peaking commercial buildings. The field tests were designed to evaluate the feasibility of deploying fully automated demand response (DR) in four to six sites in the winter and the savings from various building systems. The project started in November of 2008 and lasted 6 months. The methodology for the study included site recruitment, control strategy development, automation system deployment and enhancements, and evaluation of sites participation in DR test events. LBNL subcontracted McKinstry and Akuacom for this project. McKinstry assisted with recruitment, site survey collection, strategy development and overall participant and control vendor management. Akuacom established a new server and enhanced its operations to allow for scheduling winter morning day-of and day-ahead events. Each site signed a Memorandum of Agreement with SCL. SCL offered each site $3,000 for agreeing to participate in the study and an additional $1,000 for each event they participated. Each facility and their control vendor worked with LBNL and McKinstry to select and implement control strategies for DR and developed their automation based on the existing Internet connectivity and building control system. Once the DR strategies were programmed, McKinstry commissioned them before actual test events. McKinstry worked with LBNL to identify control points that can be archived at each facility. For each site LBNL collected meter data and trend logs from the energy management and control system. The communication system allowed the sites to receive day-ahead as well as day-of DR test event signals. Measurement of DR was conducted using three different baseline models for estimation peak load reductions. One was three-in-ten baseline, which is based on the site electricity consumption from 7 am to 10 am for the three days with the highest consumption of the previous ten business days. The second model, the LBNL outside air temperature (OAT) regression baseline model, is based on OAT data and site electricity consumption from the previous ten days, adjusted using weather regressions from the fifteen-minute electric load data during each DR test event for each site. A third baseline that simply averages the available load data was used for sites less with less than 10 days of historical meter data. The evaluation also included surveying sites regarding any problems or issues that arose during the DR test events. Question covered occupant comfort, control issues and other potential problems.

Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.  Kiliccote.   Estimating Demand Response Load  Impacts: in California.   Demand Response Research Center, Lawrence and Techniques for Demand Response.  LBNL Report 59975.  

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

Direct load control (DLC) refers to the scenario where third party entities outside the home or facility are responsible for deciding how and when specific customer loads will be controlled in response to Demand Response (DR) events on the electric grid. Examples of third parties responsible for performing DLC may be Utilities, Independent System Operators (ISO), Aggregators, or third party control companies. DLC can be contrasted with facility centric load control (FCLC) where the decisions for how loads are controlled are made entirely within the facility or enterprise control systems. In FCLC the facility owner has more freedom of choice in how to respond to DR events on the grid. Both approaches are in use today in automation of DR and both will continue to be used in future market segments including industrial, commercial and residential facilities. This paper will present a framework which can be used to differentiate between DLC and FCLC based upon where decisions are made on how specific loads are controlled in response to DR events. This differentiation is then used to compare and contrast the differences between DLC and FCLC to identify the impact each has on:(1)Utility/ISO and third party systems for managing demand response, (2)Facility systems for implementing load control, (3)Communications networks for interacting with the facility and (4)Facility operators and managers. Finally a survey of some of the existing DR related specifications and communications standards is given and their applicability to DLC or FCLC. In general FCLC adds more cost and responsibilities to the facilities whereas DLC represents higher costs and complexity for the Utility/ISO. This difference is primarily due to where the DR Logic is implemented and the consequences that creates. DLC may be more certain than FCLC because it is more predictable - however as more loads have the capability to respond to DR signals, people may prefer to have their own control of end-use loads and FCLC systems. Research is needed to understand the predictability of FCLC which is related to the perceived value of the DR from the facility manager or home owner's perspective.

Koch, Ed; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the use of OpenADR communications specification, related data models, technologies, and strategies to send dynamic prices (e.g., real time prices and peak prices) and Time of Use (TOU) rates to commercial and industrial electricity customers. OpenADR v1.0 is a Web services-based flexible, open information model that has been used in California utilities' commercial automated demand response programs since 2007. We find that data models can be used to send real time prices. These same data models can also be used to support peak pricing and TOU rates. We present a data model that can accommodate all three types of rates. For demonstration purposes, the data models were generated from California Independent System Operator's real-time wholesale market prices, and a California utility's dynamic prices and TOU rates. Customers can respond to dynamic prices by either using the actual prices, or prices can be mapped into"operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different methods for mapping actual prices. Some of these methods were implemented in demonstration projects. The study results demonstrate show that OpenADR allows interoperability with existing/future systems/technologies and can be used within related dynamic pricing activities within Smart Grid.

Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Assessment of Commercial Building Automation and Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update is an overview of commercial building automation and energy management systems with a focus on their capabilities (current and future), especially in support of demand response (DR). The report includes background on commercial building automation and energy management systems; a discussion of demand response applications in commercial buildings, including building loads and control strategies; and a review of suppliers’ building automation and energy management systems to support d...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comes to Demand Response is FERC is own Worst Enemy? ” The2009. Report No. 1018895. FERC. 2009. A National AssessmentLast accessed: 6/22/10. FERC. 2010. National Action Plan on

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oasis. Last accessed: Con Edison. 2010. “Demand Response/is Southern California Edison’s real-time pricing tariff. 2.and Southern California Edison’s Critical Peak Pricing

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

TY CONF T1 Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers Automated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR T2 International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations ICEBO A1 Joyce Jihyun Kim A1 Rongxin Yin A1 Sila Kiliccote AB p class p1 Open Automated Demand Response OpenADR an XML based information exchange model is used to facilitate continuous price responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day ahead hourly pricing We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication prioritization of demand response signals and control methods Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management

75

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Braun (Purdue). 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingthe average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricityuse charges, demand ratchets, peak demand charges, and other

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Average, minimum, and maximum demand reduction at eachshow the minimum and maximum demand reduction during the7. Average, minimum, and maximum demand reduction at each

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Title Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-58178 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Piette, Mary Ann, David S. Watson, Naoya Motegi, and Norman Bourassa Date Published 10/18/2005 Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract This report describes the results of the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of time dependant activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and provide systems that encourage load shifting or shedding during times when the electric grid is near its capacity or electric prices are high. Demand Response is a subset of demand side management, which also includes energy efficiency and conservation. The overall goal of this research project was to support increased penetration of DR in large facilities through the use of automation and better understanding of DR technologies and strategies in large facilities. To achieve this goal, a set of field tests were designed and conducted. These tests examined the performance of Auto-DR systems that covered a diverse set of building systems, ownership and management structures, climate zones, weather patterns, and control and communication configurations.

79

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 15-minute minimum and maximum demand values are provided.8. Hourly average and maximum demand savings of McKinstry on9. Hourly average and maximum demand savings of McKinstry on

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if the customer’s maximum demand has exceeded 999 kilowattswhose meter indicates a maximum demand of 200 kW or greater2) the customer's maximum billing demand has exceeded 499

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average, minimum and maximum demand reduction for each Average, Minimum and Maximum Demand Reduction Based on 3/1016 Average, Minimum and Maximum Demand Reduction Based on

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the small commercial peak demand.  The majority of the less than 200 kW of peak demand, make up 20?25% of  peak the small commercial  peak demand.  A ten percent reduction 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power generators during peak demand periods. 13 Onsite powerit can be used during peak-demand periods. 15 Implementingtreatment loads from peak demand hours to off-peak hours is

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimization Monthly peak demand management Daily time-of-Some tariff designs have peak demand charges that apply tothat may result in a peak demand that occurs in one month to

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities for industrial refrigerated warehouses in California. The report describes refrigerated warehouses characteristics, energy use and demand, and control systems. It also discusses energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities and provides analysis results from three demand response studies. In addition, several energy efficiency, load management, and demand response case studies are provided for refrigerated warehouses. This study shows that refrigerated warehouses can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for open automated demand response (OpenADR) at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to OpenADR due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Rockoff, Alexandra; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning. May 2002. Motegi,et al: Results and Commissioning Issues from an AutomatedConference on Building Commissioning: May 1e-20, 2004

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

summer peak demand, with hydro power and wind integration,of its hydro system, continued load growth, wind power

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

profile (Figure 10), the load profile over the test day isbelow as well as the load profile of the aggregate demandbelow as well as the load profile of the aggregate demand

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the concept for and lessons from the development and field-testing of an open, interoperable communications infrastructure to support automated demand response (auto-DR). Automating DR allows greater levels of participation, improved reliability, and repeatability of the DR in participating facilities. This paper also presents the technical and architectural issues associated with auto-DR and description of the demand response automation server (DRAS), the client/server architecture-based middle-ware used to automate the interactions between the utilities or any DR serving entity and their customers for DR programs. Use case diagrams are presented to show the role of the DRAS between utility/ISO and the clients at the facilities.

Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Watson, David; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

left) and High (right) Electricity Price References..32 Listin response to dynamic electricity prices using the Opena variety of dynamic electricity price structures. In this

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15percent with an average of 13percent. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Mathieu, Johanna; Parrish, Kristen

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development for Demand Response Calculation - Findings and2003. “Dividends with Demand Response. ” ASHRAE Journal,Management and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings. ”

Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and  Advanced Metering:  Development for Demand Response  Calculation ? Findings and Energy  Efficiency and  Demand Response with Communicating 

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, LBNL-59975, May 2007 [Protocol Development for Demand Response Calculation – Findsand S. Kiliccote, Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Han, Junqiao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specifications (OpenADR) data model capable of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers. We also show how the same data model could be used to for other types of dynamic pricing tariffs (including peak pricing tariffs, which are common throughout the United States). Customers participating in automated demand response programs with building control systems can respond to dynamic prices by using the actual prices as inputs to their control systems. Alternatively, prices can be mapped into"building operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different strategies customers could use to map prices to operation modes. Our results show that OpenADR can be used to communicate dynamic pricing within the Smart Grid and that OpenADR allows for interoperability with existing and future systems, technologies, and electricity markets.

Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

99

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

100

Automation systems for Demand Response, ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems for Demand Response, ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) systems for Demand Response, ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Automation systems for Demand Response, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Committee 135  Capacity Bidding Program  Client and REPORT AUTOMATION OF CAPACITY BIDDING WITH AN AGGREGATORDevelopment and Testing of the Capacity Bidding Program for 

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2.0 Demand ResponseFully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This ?electricity value chain? defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to"demo" potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives.1 In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Piette, MaryAnn

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency,”Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities,technical support from the Demand Response Research Center (

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

340E 340E Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings M.A. Piette, G. Ghatikar, S. Kiliccote, D. Watson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory E. Koch, D. Hennage Akuacom June 2009 Journal of Computing Science and Information Engineering, Vol. 9, Issue 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

110

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3E 3E Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings S. Kiliccote, M.A. Piette, J. Mathieu, K. Parrish Environmental Energy Technologies Division May 2010 Presented at the 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA, August 15-20, 2010, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

111

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated Demand Response Infrastructure for Commercial Buildings Title Design and Operation of an Open, Interoperable Automated...

112

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

113

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

114

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Related Electricity Demand in California. CEC33 percent of our electricity demand in 2020 from renewablebuildings, heating electricity demand is not included in

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicate minimum and maximum demand reduction. There is nopackaged units. In 2009, maximum demand for this facilityat 1.4 MW. Weekday maximum demand is 1.2 MW. Over the last

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrialchanges the time of electricity demand to off-peak hours.Load shedding curtails electricity demand during a DR event.

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15% with anof events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample ofyears. This is done with peak demand intensities and load

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak demand, and natural gas demand forecasts for eachnatural gas and other fossil fuels are the predominant heating fuels for California’s commercial buildings, heating electricity demandDemand. The California End Use Survey 2004 (CEUS 2004) provides statewide hourly electricity and natural gas

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities”.also provided through the Demand Response Research Center (of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Dataand the Role of Automated Demand Response. Lawrence Berkeley

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

123

Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers.and demand conditions. Real-time prices can be set with day-e.g. , mapping real-time prices to “normal, moderate, or

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

125

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

126

The Regents of the University of California. Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to be published in the ProceedingsDISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or The Regents of the University of California. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof or

M. A. Piette; S. Kiliccote; G. Ghatikar; Mary Ann Piette; Sila Kiliccote; Girish Ghatikar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Distributed Automated Demand Response  

... could offer the adaptors under incentive programs in a manner similar to the programs in place for compact fluorescent light bulbs.

128

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

129

Demand response : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand response Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications...

130

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedTool Berkeley, CA, Demand Response Research Center.2008). "What is Demand Response?" Retrieved 10/10/2008, from

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response. California EnergyTest Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large OfficeStorage System and Demand Response at the University of

Granderson, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities”NYSERDA) and the Demand Response Research Center (LLC “Working Group 2 Demand Response Program Evaluation –

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. , 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for DataProcessing Industry Demand Response Participation: A Scoping

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response – SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response – Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response – Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Demand Response Database & Demo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Database & Demo Speaker(s): Mike Graveley William M. Smith Date: June 7, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Mary Ann Piette Infotility...

138

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Demand Response In California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency & Energy Efficiency & Demand Response Programs Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich, Commissioner California Public Utilities Commission California Public Utilities Commission FUPWG 2006 Fall Meeting November 2, 2006 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 1 Highest Priority Resource Energy Efficiency is California's highest priority resource to: Meet energy needs in a low cost manner Aggressively reduce GHG emissions November 2, 2006 2 Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 3 http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUBLISHED/REPORT/51604.htm Commissioner Dian M. Grueneich November 2, 2006 4 Energy Action Plan II Loading order continued "Pursue all cost-effective energy efficiency, first." Strong demand response and advanced metering

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. ER06-615-000 CAISO Demand Response Resource User Guide -8 2.1. Demand Response Provides a Range of Benefits to8 2.2. Demand Response Benefits can be Quantified in Several

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response”, Proceedings ofAuthority (NYSERDA), the Demand Response Research Center (

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dividends with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

145

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this scoping study were to develop and test control software and wireless hardware that could enable closed-loop, zone-temperature-based demand response in buildings that have either pneumatic controls or legacy digital controls that cannot be used as part of a demand response automation system. We designed a SOAP client that is compatible with the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) being used by the IOUs in California for their CPP program, design the DR control software, investigated the use of cellular routers for connecting to the DRAS, and tested the wireless DR system with an emulator running a calibrated model of a working building. The results show that the wireless DR system can shed approximately 1.5 Watts per design CFM on the design day in a hot, inland climate in California while keeping temperatures within the limits of ASHRAE Standard 55: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.

Federspiel, Clifford

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Overview of Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 PJM 08 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Overview of Demand Response PJM ©2008 PJM www.pjm.com ©2003 PJM Growth, Statistics, and Current Footprint AEP, Dayton, ComEd, & DUQ Dominion Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Generating Units 1,200 + Generation Capacity 165,000 MW Peak Load 144,644 MW Transmission Miles 56,070 Area (Square Miles) 164,250 Members 500 + Population Served 51 Million Area Served 13 States and DC Current PJM RTO Statistics Current PJM RTO Statistics PJM Mid-Atlantic Integrations completed as of May 1 st , 2005 ©2008 PJM

147

Demand Response Programs, 6. edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a look at the past, present, and future state of the market for demand/load response based upon market price signals. It is intended to provide significant value to individuals and companies who are considering participating in demand response programs, energy providers and ISOs interested in offering demand response programs, and consultants and analysts looking for detailed information on demand response technology, applications, and participants. The report offers a look at the current Demand Response environment in the energy industry by: defining what demand response programs are; detailing the evolution of program types over the last 30 years; discussing the key drivers of current initiatives; identifying barriers and keys to success for the programs; discussing the argument against subsidization of demand response; describing the different types of programs that exist including:direct load control, interruptible load, curtailable load, time-of-use, real time pricing, and demand bidding/buyback; providing examples of the different types of programs; examining the enablers of demand response programs; and, providing a look at major demand response programs.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 ii Retail Demand Response in SPP List of Figures and10 Figure 3. Demand Response Resources by11 Figure 4. Existing Demand Response Resources by Type of

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. “Economic” demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Demand Response for Ancillary Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

156

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) The opportunities for demand reduction and cost saving with building demand responsive control vary tremendously with building type...

157

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

158

Demand Response Research in Spain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Research in Spain Demand Response Research in Spain Speaker(s): Iñigo Cobelo Date: August 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mary Ann Piette The Spanish power system is becoming increasingly difficult to operate. The peak load grows every year, and the permission to build new transmission and distribution infrastructures is difficult to obtain. In this scenario Demand Response can play an important role, and become a resource that could help network operators. The present deployment of demand response measures is small, but this situation however may change in the short term. The two main Spanish utilities and the transmission network operator are designing research projects in this field. All customer segments are targeted, and the research will lead to pilot installations and tests.

159

Thermal Mass and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Mass and Demand Response Speaker(s): Gregor Henze Phil C. Bomrad Date: November 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page The topic of...

160

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and have significant electricity demand during utility peakoperates at an average electricity demand of 1.3 MW, withalso has a high electricity demand. In many wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Title Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3643E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Kiliccote, Sila, Mary Ann Piette, Johanna L. Mathieu, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords market sectors, openadr Abstract California is a leader in automating demand response (DR) to promote low-cost, consistent, and predictable electric grid management tools. Over 250 commercial and industrial facilities in California participate in fully-automated programs providing over 60 MW of peak DR savings. This paper presents a summary of Open Automated DR (OpenADR) implementation by each of the investor-owned utilities in California. It provides a summary of participation, DR strategies and incentives. Commercial buildings can reduce peak demand from 5 to 15% with an average of 13%. Industrial facilities shed much higher loads. For buildings with multi-year savings we evaluate their load variability and shed variability. We provide a summary of control strategies deployed, along with costs to install automation. We report on how the electric DR control strategies perform over many years of events. We benchmark the peak demand of this sample of buildings against their past baselines to understand the differences in building performance over the years. This is done with peak demand intensities and load factors. The paper also describes the importance of these data in helping to understand possible techniques to reach net zero energy using peak day dynamic control capabilities in commercial buildings. We present an example in which the electric load shape changed as a result of a lighting retrofit.

163

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand of 1.3 MW, with peak demand reaching 2 MW. Figure 1summer period. SDG&E’s peak demand period is between 11 AMlast 10 with the highest peak demand (Coughlin 2008). Unlike

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Capitalizing on Two-Way Communications for Demand Response -- Vendor Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume study on communication technologies for demand response. Communications and controls technologies can automate much of the work in a utility's demand response program. This automation can make programs easier for customers to use, therefore making them more attractive and robust. This volume focuses on communication technologies currently available for automated demand response communications. The report also provides an overview of major technology vendors whose produ...

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Action Plan on Demand National Action Plan on Demand Response Response Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group Federal Utilities Partnership Working Group November 18, 2008 November 18, 2008 Daniel Gore Daniel Gore Office of Energy Market Regulation Office of Energy Market Regulation Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Presentation Contents Presentation Contents Statutory Requirements Statutory Requirements National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Assessment [Study] of Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response National Action Plan on Demand Response General Discussion on Demand Response and Energy Outlook

166

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5319E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Aimee T. McKane, Sasank Goli, Peter L. Therkelsen, and Daniel Olsen Date Published 01/2012 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords automated dr, controls and automation, demand response, dynamic pricing, industrial controls, market sectors, openadr Abstract California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

167

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Title Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Eto, Joseph H.,...

168

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Analysis of Distribution Level Residential Demand Response  

SciTech Connect

Control of end use loads has existed in the form of direct load control for decades. Direct load control systems allow a utility to interrupt power to a medium to large size commercial or industrial customer a set number of times a year. With the current proliferation of computing resources and communications systems the ability to extend the direct load control systems now exists. Demand response systems now have the ability to not only engage commercial and industrial customers, but also the individual residential customers. Additionally, the ability exists to have automated control systems which operate on a continual basis instead of the traditional load control systems which could only be operated a set number of times a year. These emerging demand response systems have the capability to engage a larger portion of the end use load and do so in a more controlled manner. This paper will examine the impact that demand response systems have on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Predictive Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project on AddThis.com...

171

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

174

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

Heffner, Grayson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

176

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

devices, and, in California, will likely be on a time-of-use commercial or industrial electricity tariff. Most will have control andor monitoring systems in place. Data Center...

177

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

178

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Measurement and Verification for Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification for Measurement and Verification for Demand Response Prepared for the National Forum on the National Action Plan on Demand Response: Measurement and Verification Working Group AUTHORS: Miriam L. Goldberg & G. Kennedy Agnew-DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability National Forum of the National Action Plan on Demand Response Measurement and Verification for Demand Response was developed to fulfill part of the Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response, a report to Congress jointly issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in June 2011. Part of that implementation proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given that demand response has matured, DOE and FERC decided that a "virtual" project

180

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Analysis of Residential Demand Response and Double-Auction Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and dynamic pricing programs are expected to play increasing roles in the modern Smart Grid environment. While direct load control of end-use loads has existed for decades, price driven response programs are only beginning to be explored at the distribution level. These programs utilize a price signal as a means to control demand. Active markets allow customers to respond to fluctuations in wholesale electrical costs, but may not allow the utility to control demand. Transactive markets, utilizing distributed controllers and a centralized auction can be used to create an interactive system which can limit demand at key times on a distribution system, decreasing congestion. With the current proliferation of computing and communication resources, the ability now exists to create transactive demand response programs at the residential level. With the combination of automated bidding and response strategies coupled with education programs and customer response, emerging demand response programs have the ability to reduce utility demand and congestion in a more controlled manner. This paper will explore the effects of a residential double-auction market, utilizing transactive controllers, on the operation of an electric power distribution system.

Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Chassin, David P.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assets—at no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customer’s participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 5, 2013 ... Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving. G. Zakeri(g.zakeri *** at*** auckland.ac.nz) D. Craigie(David.Craigie ***at*** ...

185

Demand response participation in PJM wholesale markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of demand response resource participation in PJM wholesale ancillary service markets which include: Day Ahead Scheduling Reserves, Synchronized Reserves and Regulation.

Peter L. Langbein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 3.0 Previous Experience with Demand Responsive Lighting11 4.3. Prevalence of Lighting13 4.4. Impact of Title 24 on Lighting

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roger. 2002. Using Demand Response to Link Wholesale andfor advanced metering, demand response, and dynamic pricing.EPRI. 2001. Managing Demand-Response To Achieve Multiple

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson, Michael, 2008, "Demand Response in Midwest ISOPresentation at MISO Demand Response Working Group Meeting,Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the New England ISO Demand Response Collaborative, a NYSERDACEC Staff. Selected Demand Response Pilots in California:New Principles for Demand Response Planning, Electric Power

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Portland, Oregon and serving the Pacific Northwest. BPA operates an electricity transmission system and markets wholesale electrical power at cost from federal dams, one...

192

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

units as well as adjusting temperature setpoints. McKinstry duty cycled roof-top units. HVAC and lighting systems in each of the facilities are summarized in Table 5 . Table 5....

193

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As noted earlier, the number of residential customers willto residential customers, aggregate numbers of DR clientsexceed the number of large commercial customers by at

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distributed Automated Demand Response - Energy Innovation Portal  

... offer the adaptors under incentive programs in a manner similar to the programs in place for compact fluorescent light bulbs.

195

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security "to" the home from security "in" the home. )homes can be controlled to optimize convenience, comfort and securityhome network protocols. Some protocols are adding security

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

freed from this communications technology constraint. Homeinvestigating several communications technologies capable ofdedicated-wire communications technologies as impractical

McParland, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information System or Energy Management System (EMCS) so aimplementation in energy management systems. This effort isTC): Trained energy management control system vendors were

Kiliccote, Sila; Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12: Market Impacts of Price Responsive Load in PJM and ISO-44 Figure 15: PJM Synchronized Reserve Scheduled MW:particularly those in PJM’s service territory, have begun

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Kathan, Ph.D David Kathan, Ph.D Federal Energy Regulatory Commission U.S. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 2 Demand Response * FERC (Order 719) defines demand response as: - A reduction in the consumption of electric energy by customers from their expected consumption in response to an increase in the price of electric energy or to in incentive payments designed to induce lower consumption of electric energy. * The National Action Plan on Demand Response released by FERC staff broadens this definition to include - Consumer actions that can change any part of the load profile of a utility or region, not just the period of peak usage

202

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

203

Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Methodology Methodology Results Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Chris Strasburg, Josh Adams Ames Laboratory, US DOE cstras@ameslab.gov, jadams@ameslab.gov The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 1 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results Outline 1 Introduction About Ames Laboratory Motivation 2 Methodology Data Classifiers Experiments 3 Results The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 2 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results About Ames Laboratory Motivation Ames Physical Environment The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 3 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results About Ames Laboratory Motivation Ames Network Environment The Ames Laboratory, US DOE 4 Dynamic Whitelist Generation for Automated Response Introduction Methodology Results About Ames

204

INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the baseline defining a customer's load profile, and (2) PVs cannot be turned on at will for scheduled tests customers to curtail demand when needed to reduce risk of grid failure during times of peak loading load. The value of this credit may reach or exceed $100/kW/year [1] Demand response is typically

Perez, Richard R.

205

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

SciTech Connect

In 2006 the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) formed an Industrial Demand Response Team to investigate opportunities and barriers to implementation of Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) systems in California industries. Auto-DR is an open, interoperable communications and technology platform designed to: Provide customers with automated, electronic price and reliability signals; Provide customers with capability to automate customized DR strategies; Automate DR, providing utilities with dispatchable operational capability similar to conventional generation resources. This research began with a review of previous Auto-DR research on the commercial sector. Implementing Auto-DR in industry presents a number of challenges, both practical and perceived. Some of these include: the variation in loads and processes across and within sectors, resource-dependent loading patterns that are driven by outside factors such as customer orders or time-critical processing (e.g. tomato canning), the perceived lack of control inherent in the term 'Auto-DR', and aversion to risk, especially unscheduled downtime. While industry has demonstrated a willingness to temporarily provide large sheds and shifts to maintain grid reliability and be a good corporate citizen, the drivers for widespread Auto-DR will likely differ. Ultimately, most industrial facilities will balance the real and perceived risks associated with Auto-DR against the potential for economic gain through favorable pricing or incentives. Auto-DR, as with any ongoing industrial activity, will need to function effectively within market structures. The goal of the industrial research is to facilitate deployment of industrial Auto-DR that is economically attractive and technologically feasible. Automation will make DR: More visible by providing greater transparency through two-way end-to-end communication of DR signals from end-use customers; More repeatable, reliable, and persistent because the automated controls strategies that are 'hardened' and pre-programmed into facility's software and hardware; More affordable because automation can help reduce labor costs associated with manual DR strategies initiated by facility staff and can be used for long-term.

McKane, Aimee T.; Piette, Mary Ann; Faulkner, David; Ghatikar, Girish; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Adesola, Bunmi; Murtishaw, Scott; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Participation through Automation: Fully Automated Critical Peak Pricing in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. Working Group 2 Demand Response Evaluation – Program2006. Au tomated Demand Response Control Strategies inrequired. Figure 2. Demand Response Automation Server and

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predictive Demand Response Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project Integrated Predictive Demand Response Controller Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into integrated predictive demand response (IPDR) controllers. The project team will attempt to design an IPDR controller so that it can be used in new or existing buildings or in collections of buildings. In the case of collections of buildings, they may be colocated on a single campus or remotely located as long as they are served by a single utility or independent service operator. Project Description This project seeks to perform the necessary applied research, development, and testing to provide a communications interface using industry standard open protocols and emerging National Institute of Standards and Technology

208

NCEP_Demand_Response_Draft_111208.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy Fall 2008 i National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the

209

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the user’s discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Demand Response Enabled Appliance Development at GE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Enabled Appliance Development at GE Speaker(s): David Najewicz Date: June 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Dave Najewicz of GE Consumer and Appliances will...

211

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: June 22, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Richard Diamond Peng Xu We...

212

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal...

213

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the user’s discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response Duke Energy is using the name “Save-a-Energy Efficiency Division. Duke Energy describes all of itsPresident, and C.E.O. Duke Energy Kateri Callahan President

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Tri-State Demand Response Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of a demand response framework development project of Tri-State Generation and Transmission, a wholesale provider to a number of rural electric associations in the Rocky Mountain west. Tri-State has developed an assortment of planned demand response and energy shaping products and services designed to both shave peak and shift consumption to off-peak hours. The applications, networks, and devices that will be needed to support these needs will involve many ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Software demonstration: Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: February 4, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. The Demand Response Quick Assessment Tools developed at LBNL will be demonstrated. The tool is built on EnergyPlus simulation and is able to evaluate and compare different DR strategies, such as global temperature reset, chiller cycling, supply air temperature reset, etc. A separate EnergyPlus plotting tool will also be demonstrated during this seminar. Users can use the tool to test EnergyPlus models, conduct parametric analysis, or compare multiple EnergyPlus simulation

218

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Title Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response...

219

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

How to Get More Response from Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite all the rhetoric, demand response's contribution to meet peak load will remain elusive in the absence of enabling technology and standardized business protocols. (author)

Neumann, Scott; Sioshansi, Fereidoon; Vojdani, Ali; Yee, Gaymond

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

FERC sees huge potential for demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FERC study concludes that U.S. peak demand can be reduced by as much as 188 GW -- roughly 20 percent -- under the most aggressive scenario. More moderate -- and realistic -- scenarios produce smaller but still significant reductions in peak demand. The FERC report is quick to point out that these are estimates of the potential, not projections of what could actually be achieved. The main varieties of demand response programs include interruptible tariffs, direct load control (DLC), and a number of pricing schemes.

NONE

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

224

On demand responsiveness in additive cost sharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We propose two new axioms of demand responsiveness for additive cost sharing with variable demands. Group Monotonicity requires that if a group of agents increase their demands, not all of them pay less. Solidarity says that if agent i demands more, j should not pay more if k pays less. Both axioms are compatible in the partial responsibility theory postulating Strong Ranking, i.e., the ranking of cost shares should never contradict that of demands. The combination of Strong Ranking, Solidarity and Monotonicity characterizes the quasi-proportional methods, under which cost shares are proportional to ‘rescaled ’ demands. The alternative full responsibility theory is based on Separability, ruling out cross-subsidization when costs are additively separable. Neither the Aumann-Shapley nor the Shapley-Shubik method is group monotonic. On the other hand, convex combinations of “nearby ” …xed-path methods are group-monotonic: the subsidy-free serial method is the main example. No separable method meets Solidarity, yet restricting the axiom to submodular (or supermodular) cost functions leads to a characterization of the …xed-‡ow methods, containing the Shapley-Shubik and serial methods. JEL Classi…cation numbers: C 71, D 63.

Hervé Moulin; Yves Sprumont

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity Reliability Title Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity...

226

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement...

227

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry Title 2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California...

228

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Title Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries Publication Type...

229

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced Title Chilled Water Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at...

230

Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A Comparison of Opportunities and Challenges in the US Wholesale Markets Title Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services A...

231

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg251500.pdf....

232

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Title Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering...

233

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final Report Title Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final Report Publication Type Report LBNL...

234

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation Title LEED Demand Response Credit: A Plan for Research towards Implementation Publication Type Conference...

235

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. San...

236

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 Federal Energy...

237

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Large Comm. Interval metering system with monthly dataDynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering and Demand Response inE Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Occupancy based demand response HVAC control strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 30% energy usage and for 50% of the electricity usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are ... Keywords: HVAC, demand response, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Alberto E. Cerpa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Estimation of Demand Responses to Ramp Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation of Demand Responses to Ramp Meters by Lei Zhang and David Levinson For the 3rd ICTTS different types of trips respond to ramp meters (work vs. non-work; short vs. long) A bill was passed to shut off ramp meters to study effectiveness in the Twin Cities in Spring 2000 The shut-off experiment

Levinson, David M.

240

Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

None

2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fourth international symposium on distribution automation and demand side management (DA/DSM 94)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the conference proceedings from the 1994 Distribution Automation/Demand Side Management meeting in Orlando, Florida. There are 87 papers presented, and topics include: (1) improved feeder efficiency, (2) automation of older substations, (3) modeling tools for distribution, planning, and operations, (4) sensing and fault detection, (5) outage monitoring, (6) cost and benefits of distribution automation, (7) communications, (8) optimization of feeder systems operations, (9) information technology, (10) demand-side management applications in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors, (11) pricing and regulation, and (12) applications to the natural gas industry.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

244

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities.and Techniques for Demand Response. LBNL Report 59975. May

Wikler, Greg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

Goli, Sasank; McKane, Aimee; Olsen, Daniel

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

248

Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due toaddressed in this report. Maximum Demand Savings Intensity (Echelon Figure 7: Maximum Demands Savings Intensity due to

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Modular Communication Interface Specification for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a technical specification for a modular interface for residential appliances that enables them to be compatible with any utility communication system through the use of customer-installable plug-in communication modules. This specification is the result of collaboration between utilities, appliance makers, communication system providers, demand response service providers, and trade organizations. The specification details the mechanical, electrical, and logical characteristics of a s...

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Demand Response-Ready Technology Capabilities: A Summary of Multi-Stakeholder Workshop and Survey Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes technology capabilities that support more automated and ubiquitous demand response. It begins by describing the Demand Response-Ready (DR-Ready) concept and related industry activities that support realization of the concept. In the DR-Ready vision, consumers receive DR-Ready end-use products at the point of purchase, thus eliminating the need for utility truck service visits to retrofit equipment and significantly reducing the cost of deploying DR-enabling technologies. ...

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

252

Demand Response-Ready Capabilities Roadmap: A Summary of Multi-Stakeholder Workshop and Survey Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report describes a high-level roadmap for premise-level migration towards more automated and ubiquitous demand response. It begins by describing the Demand Response Ready (DR-Ready) concept and related industry activities supporting realization of the concept. In the DR-Ready vision, consumers receive DR-Ready end-use products at the point of purchase, thus eliminating the need for utility truck rolls to retrofit equipment, and thereby significantly reducing costs of deploying DR enabling ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Title Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2294e Year of Publication 2009 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Girish Ghatikar, Jessica Granderson, Paul Haugen, Carlos Romero, and David S. Watson Keywords technologies Abstract Various wireless technologies were field-tested in a six-story laboratory building to identify wireless technologies that can scale for future DR applications through very low node density power consumption, and unit cost. Data analysis included analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), packet loss, and link quality at varying power levels and node densities. The narrowband technologies performed well, penetrating the floors of the building with little loss and exhibiting better range than the wideband technology. 900 MHz provided full coverage at 1 watt and substantially complete coverage at 500 mW at the test site. 900 MHz was able to provide full coverage at 100 mW with only one additional relay transmitter, and was the highest-performing technology in the study. 2.4 GHz could not provide full coverage with only a single transmitter at the highest power level tested (63 mW). However, substantially complete coverage was provided at 2.4 GHz at 63 mW with the addition of one repeater node.

254

Regression Models for Demand Reduction based on Cluster Analysis of Load Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods for Customer and Demand Response Policies SelectionC. McParland,“Open Automated Demand Response Communicationset al, “Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries  

SciTech Connect

California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This,study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

Ghatikar, Girish; McKane, Aimee; Goli, Sasank; Therkelsen, Peter; Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94E 94E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J. Granderson, D. Watson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory P. Haugen, C. Romero Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory February 2009 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

257

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-4837E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Goli, Sasank, Aimee T. McKane, and Daniel Olsen Conference Name 2011 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 08/2011 Conference Location Niagara Falls, NY Keywords market sectors, openadr, refrigerated warehouses Abstract Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

258

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Demand Response Program Design and Implementation Case Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delurey, Dan, and J. Schwartz Date Published 022013 Keywords demand response research, demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group,...

260

Price-responsive demand management for a smart grid world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Price-responsive demand is essential for the success of a smart grid. However, existing demand-response programs run the risk of causing inefficient price formation. This problem can be solved if each retail customer could establish a contract-based baseline through demand subscription before joining a demand-response program. (author)

Chao, Hung-po

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Role of home automation in demand-side management. Topical report, May 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explores the role of home automation (HA) in utility demand-side management (DSM) programs, in order to demonstrate the potential usefulness of a combined HA/DSM strategy in meeting the changing needs of the gas industry and providing the industry with a timely and competitive edge in the coming decade. Research was conducted using primary and secondary sources, on-line databases, and documentary research. Factors leading to the development and implementation of demand-side management and home automation were analyzed in order to best define opportunities and interests for the gas industry.

Davis, K.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Real-time Pricing Demand Response in Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract—Dynamic pricing schemes have been implemented in commercial and industrial application settings, and recently they are getting attention for application to residential customers. Time-of-use and critical-peak-pricing rates are in place in various regions and are being piloted in many more. These programs are proving themselves useful for balancing energy during peak periods; however, real-time (5 minute) pricing signals combined with automation in end-use systems have the potential to deliver even more benefits to operators and consumers. Besides system peak shaving, a real-time pricing system can contribute demand response based on the locational marginal price of electricity, reduce load in response to a generator outage, and respond to local distribution system capacity limiting situations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is teaming with a mid-west electricity service provider to run a distribution feeder-based retail electricity market that negotiates with residential automation equipment and clears every 5 minutes, thus providing a signal for lowering or raising electric consumption based on operational objectives of economic efficiency and reliability. This paper outlines the capability of the real-time pricing system and the operational scenarios being tested as the system is rolled-out starting in the first half of 2012.

Widergren, Steven E.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Berliner, Teri; Graves, Alan

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

263

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW” by 2030, or 14–

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential ofneed to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demandcustomers and a system peak demand of over 43,000 MW. SPP’s

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC) 2006. “Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2007. “Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission (FERC) 2008a. “Wholesale Competition

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 ACTUAL FORECAST National Action Plan on Demand Response the feDeRal eneRgy RegulatoRy commission staff 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 12 6 3 9 National Action Plan on Demand Response THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION STAFF June 17, 2010 Docket No. AD09-10 Prepared with the support of The Brattle Group * GMMB * Customer Performance Group Definitive Insights * Eastern Research Group The opinions and views expressed in this staff report do not necessarily represent those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, its Chairman, or individual Commissioners, and are not binding on the Commission.

268

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Techniques  for  Demand  Response.   Lawrence  Berkeley Communications  for  Demand Response and Energy Efficiency for  Automated  Demand  Response  Demonstration.   2004.  

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comes to demand response is FERC is own worst enemy? Tech.9.1-2 (1986), pp. 5–18. [46] FERC. A national assessment of09-demand-response.pdf. [47] FERC. National action plan on

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Designing a Demand Response Business Network for California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing a Demand Response Business Network for California Speaker(s): Ali Vojdani Date: March 8, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The Demand Response Business Network (DRBizNet)...

272

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Tools and Methods Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on...

273

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Title Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy...

274

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand response quick assessment tool image The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. This assessment tool will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfort impact for various demand responsive strategies. Users of the tool will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tool will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points

275

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods, further complicating demand response scenarios. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced is described and its participation in a demand response event during 2008 is detailed. Second, a set of demand response strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated demand response during a 2009 event, which is also evaluated. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility’s DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs.

Granderson, J.; Dudley, J. H.; Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE market through the Real-Time Price Response and Day-Aheadin the prices they pay and include real-time pricing,on a day-ahead or real-time basis. Prices are higher during

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Social Welfare Implications of Demand Response Programs in Competitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

278

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

279

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL-1470E LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

280

Residential demand response using reinforcement learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — We present a novel energy management system for residential demand response. The algorithm, named CAES, reduces residential energy costs and smooths energy usage. CAES is an online learning application that implicitly estimates the impact of future energy prices and of consumer decisions on long term costs and schedules residential device usage. CAES models both energy prices and residential device usage as Markov, but does not assume knowledge of the structure or transition probabilities of these Markov chains. CAES learns continuously and adapts to individual consumer preferences and pricing modifications over time. In numerical simulations CAES reduced average end-user financial costs from 16 % to 40 % with respect to a price-unaware energy allocation. I.

Marco Levorato; Andrea Goldsmith; Urbashi Mitra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

044E 044E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Charles Goldman, Michael Reid, Roger Levy and Alison Silverstein Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2010 The work described in this report was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes

283

Demand Response Screening Assessment Tool Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Screeing Tool for Distribution Planners identifies opportunities for using demand response as a distribution resource. It serves as a screening tool to assist distribution planners to ascertain situations where demand response may be a cost45effective alternative to making distribution system asset investments. WindowsXP, Excel (MS Office 2003)

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

284

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Abbreviations and Acronyms AMI BAS Btu CAISO CEC CSP CPPa building automation system (BAS). 1 When produced in largeControl Features of BAS Centralized on/off controls, timers

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Two market models for demand response in power networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply and shape power demand, respectively. We characterize the resulting equilibria in competitive as well as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models serve as a starting point to include the appliance-level details and constraints for designing practical demand response schemes for smart power grids. I.

Lijun Chen; Na Li; Steven H. Low; John C. Doyle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 FERC Presendation: Demand Response as Power System Resources, October 29, 2010 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) presentation on demand response as power system resources before the Electicity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources More Documents & Publications A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

288

Demand Response - Policy: More Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information Demand Response - Policy: More Information OE's commitment to ensuring non-wires options to modernize the nation's electricity delivery system includes ongoing support of a number of national and regional activities in support of demand response. The New England Demand Response Initiative (NEDRI), OE's initial endeavor to assist states with non-wire solutions, was created to develop a comprehensive, coordinated set of demand response programs for the New England regional power markets. NEDRI's goal was to outline workable market rules, public policies, and regulatory criteria to incorporate customer-based demand response resources into New England's electricity markets and power systems. NEDRI promoted best practices and coordinated

289

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Title Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-55673 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Levy, Roger, Karen Herter, and John Wilson Conference Name 2004 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 06/2004 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Call Number California Energy Commission Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, energy efficiency demand response advanced metering, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Reliance on the standard cumulative kilowatt-hour meter substantially compromises energy efficiency and demand response programs. Without advanced metering, utilities cannot support time-differentiated rates or collect the detailed customer usage information necessary to (1) educate the customer to the economic value of efficiency and demand response options, or (2) distribute load management incentives proportional to customer contribution. These deficiencies prevent the customer feedback mechanisms that would otherwise encourage economically sound demand-side investments and behaviors. Thus, the inability to collect or properly price electricity usage handicaps the success of almost all efficiency and demand response options.

290

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

291

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Title Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-50626 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Herter, Karen, Roger Levy, John Wilson, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Conference Name 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

292

Autimated Price and Demand Response Demonstration for Large Customers in New York City using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR), an XML-based information exchange model, is used to facilitate continuous price-responsive operation and demand response participation for large commercial buildings in New York who are subject to the default day-ahead hourly pricing. We summarize the existing demand response programs in New York and discuss OpenADR communication, prioritization of demand response signals, and control methods. Building energy simulation models are developed and field tests are conducted to evaluate continuous energy management and demand response capabilities of two commercial buildings in New York City. Preliminary results reveal that providing machine-readable prices to commercial buildings can facilitate both demand response participation and continuous energy cost savings. Hence, efforts should be made to develop more sophisticated algorithms for building control systems to minimize customer's utility bill based on price and reliability information from the electricity grid.

Kim, J. J.; Yin, R.; Kiliccote, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand response-enabling technologies, which can help an industrial plant effectively address demand response needs. Finally, the paper is concluded with a discussion of case study projects that illustrate application of some of these demand response enabling technologies for process operations. These case studies, illustrating some key projects from the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction program, will describe the technologies and approaches deployed to achieve the demand reduction at the site, the quantitative impact of the project, and a discussion of the overall successes at each site.

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XIII%20-%20Demand%20Response%20Resou Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/estimating-demand-response-market-pot Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This resource presents demand response (DR) potential results from top-performing programs in the United States and Canada, as well as a DR

295

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission [FERC] (2008). Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission [FERC] (2009). A National AssessmentEIS EMCS EMS EPA ESCO ESPC FERC GE HVAC ISO ISO-NE kW kWh MW

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Proposed Framework for a Demand Response Product Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is now widely recognized as an essential feature of well-functioning wholesale and retail electricity markets. Some utilities have had dynamic pricing plans (a form of demand response) underway for many years. All major wholesale electricity markets in the United States have demand response programs today. Despite this experience, it is difficult to learn from the programs that have been implemented due to a lack of a consistent framework for comparing their major design features (includi...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

AMI and Demand Response Evaluator, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AMI and Demand Response Evaluator software, Version 2.0, permits a utility to discover the possible functions of an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) or demand response (DR) system, and to determine the benefits and requirements arising from selecting particular functions. The tool also enables a utility to evaluate various communications technologies that may be appropriate for implementing such an AMI or DR system. Description AMI and Demand Response Evaluator is a Microsoft® Access databa...

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

demand response - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms › Facebook Twitter ... demand response June 14, 2012 California's electric power market faces challenges heading into summer. March 24, ...

300

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Background Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

302

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities Title Examining Synergies between Energy Management and...

303

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Verification Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Measurement and Verification Working...

304

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

305

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Jump to:...

306

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Design and Implementation Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Program Design and Implementation...

307

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced Energy Storage Infrastructure in UC San Diego's Microgrid Speaker(s): Byron Washom Date: August 14, 2008 -...

308

The Role of Enabling Technologies in Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides a study of the technologies that are crucial to the success of demand response programs. It takes a look at the historical development of demand response programs and analyzes how new technology is needed to enable demand response to make the transition from a small scale pilot operation to a mass market means of improving grid reliability. Additionally, the report discusses the key technologies needed to enable a large scale demand response effort and evaluates current efforts to develop and integrate these technologies. Finally, the report provides profiles of leading developers of these key technologies.

NONE

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Demand response can lower electric power load when needed - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

February 15, 2011 Demand response can lower electric power load when needed . Consumers can play a major role in ensuring reliable electricity supply by reducing ...

310

Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...

311

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Add to Integrated Energy Audit Template for IndustrialLearned from Energy and Demand Response Audit Projects inhave been offering energy efficiency audits to large service

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and produced a maximum demand reduction Proceedings of the 41st Hawaii International Conference on SystemAn Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control Michael LeMay, Rajesh,gross,cgunter}@uiuc.edu Abstract In the competitive electricity structure, demand re- sponse programs

Gross, George

313

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. “Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerCoordination of retail demand response with Midwest ISO2010. 110 pages. Demand Response and Variable Generation

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006. fromEngaging our Customers in Demand Response. Retrieved OctoberAdvanced Metering and Demand Response in Electricity

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to everyone at the Demand Response Research Center, theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with CommunicatingEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Metering, Demand Response, and Dynamic Pricing. ”for Efficiency and Demand Response through Advanced Meteringenergy efficiency and demand response programs. Without

Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

When it comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

made between traditional demand response (DR) programs andpricing. Traditional demand response programs typically payFor overviews of demand response technologies and program

Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin; Wolak, Frank A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy  Efficiency and Demand Response in the California 1   4.0   Energy Efficiency and Demand Response 5   4.2.   Demand Response 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Martin Aspen. 2006. Demand Response Enabling TechnologiesDon. 2007. “Pricing for Demand Response from Residential andthe Level of Demand Response,” Power Point Presentation, 24

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm. The preferred demand response strategy was foundimplements the specific demand response policy chosen by theload shedding and demand response, a literature review of

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Demand Response Programs Oregon Public Utility Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(at 97 deg. F) #12;Cool Keeper Unit Installation #12;Cool Keeper Test Shed Load Profile 3350 3400 3450 operating according to their 'Natural Duty Cycle' 93 o F Expected load profile w/o Cool Keeper intervention, Demand Side Management #12;Current Programs/Tariffs ­ Load Control Programs Cool Keeper, Utah (currently

325

Demand responsive public transportation using wireless technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution has been the bane of society for which we still have not got a satisfying solution. The air pollution due to automobiles constitutes around 60--90% of the total air pollution in the urban area. To curtail this, the mass transportation, ... Keywords: Djiktra's algorithm, on-demand public transportation, routing algorithms, wireless client-server backbone

S. Prashanth; Sp Geetha; Ga Shanmugha Sundaram

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Demand Response-Ready End-Use Devices: Guiding Principles for Defining Criteria to Support Grid Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes technology capabilities that support more automated and ubiquitous demand response. It reviews the Demand Response–Ready (DR-Ready) concept and related industry activities that support realization of the concept. In the DR-Ready vision, consumers receive DR-Ready end-use products at the point of purchase, thus eliminating the need for utility truck service visits to retrofit equipment, and thereby significantly reducing the cost of deploying DR-enabling ...

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

327

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the Variable Effects of Systems with Demand Response Resources Anupama Kowli and George, USA Abstract--The growing environmental concerns and increasing electricity prices have led to wider implementation of demand- side activities and created a new class of consumers, called de- mand response

Gross, George

328

Role of context-awareness for demand response mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently due to major changes in the structure of electricity industry and the rising costs of power generation, many countries have realized the potential and benefits of smart metering systems and demand response programs in balancing between the supply ... Keywords: context-awareness, demand response, smart energy management

Pari Delir Haghighi; Shonali Krishnaswamy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012. Addressing Electricity Demand through Demand Response:has been driving up the electricity demand while widespreadexperiences in addressing electricity demand This section is

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's 2010 Demand Response and Advanced Metering Survey (2010 FERC Survey, covering calendar year 2009) indicates that advanced metering penetration (i.e., the fraction of all installed meters that are advanced meters) reached approximately 8.7 percent in the United States, compared to approximately 4.7 percent in the 2008 FERC Survey (covering calendar year 2007). The upper Midwest, West and Texas have advanced meter penetrations exceeding 13 percent. As in previous surveys, electric cooperatives have the largest penetration, nearly 25 percent, among

331

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's 2010 Demand Response and Advanced Metering Survey (2010 FERC Survey, covering calendar year 2009) indicates that advanced metering penetration (i.e., the fraction of all installed meters that are advanced meters) reached approximately 8.7 percent in the United States, compared to approximately 4.7 percent in the 2008 FERC Survey (covering calendar year 2007). The upper Midwest, West and Texas have advanced meter penetrations exceeding 13 percent. As in previous surveys, electric cooperatives have the largest penetration, nearly 25 percent, among

332

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Letto, Daryl [Enbala Power Networks; Johnson, Brandon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dowling, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); George, Raoule [Enbala Power Networks; Khan, Saqib [University of Texas, Austin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response andEnergy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial building's contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. This paper discusses recent research results and new opportunities for advanced building control systems to provide demand response (DR) to improve electricity markets and reduce electric grid problems. The main focus of this paper is the role of new and existing control systems for HVAC and lighting in commercial buildings. A demand-side management framework from building operations perspective with three main features: daily energy efficiency, daily peak load management and event driven, dynamic demand response is presented. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide potential in commercial buildings is outlined. Case studies involving energy management and control systems and DR savings opportunities are presented. The paper also describes results from three years of research in California to automate DR in buildings. Case study results and research on advanced buildings systems in New York are also presented.

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

SciTech Connect

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

337

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Constructing a Forward View of Energy Prices and Interest5 2.1 Energy Price Forwardin response to changing energy prices. The key uncertainties

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

339

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region.

340

Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)] [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Number of Customers Enrolled Note: Numbers in parenthesesMW 200 MW N/A Reduction N/A Number of Eligible Customers N/Customer Pricing Tariffs Response Initiatives Entities with DR Activities Number

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Electricity Real Time Prices: Short Run and LongOver-the-counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage viiare being exposed to real-time prices (RTP) in their default

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

COMMENTS OF THE DEMAND RESPONSE AND SMART GRID COALITION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 COMMENTS OF THE DEMAND RESPONSE AND SMART GRID COALITION Department of Energy Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy July 12, 2010 The Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition (DRSG) 1 , the trade association for companies that provide products and services in the areas of demand response and smart grid technologies, respectfully submits its comments to the Department of Energy's Request for Information "Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy."

344

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to give

345

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are solely responsible for any omissions or errors contained herein. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence More Documents & Publications Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

346

Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection Title Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6417E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Nance Matson, Michael D. Sohn, Cody Rose, Junqiao Han Dudley, Sasank Goli, Sila Kiliccote, Marissa Hummon, David Palchak, Paul Denholm, Jennie Jorgenson, and Ookie Ma Date Published 09/2013 Abstract Demand response (DR) has the potential to improve electric grid reliability and reduce system operation costs. However, including DR in grid modeling can be difficult due to its variable and non-traditional response characteristics, compared to traditional generation. Therefore, efforts to value the participation of DR in procurement of grid services have been limited. In this report, we present methods and tools for predicting demand response availability profiles, representing their capability to participate in capacity, energy, and ancillary services. With the addition of response characteristics mimicking those of generation, the resulting profiles will help in the valuation of the participation of demand response through production cost modeling, which informs infrastructure and investment planning.

347

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Within Hawaiian Electric Company Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reducing power usage during peak demand periods, demand response (DR) programs can help utilities manage power loads and complement energy efficiency activities while providing ratepayers an opportunity to substantially reduce their electric bills. This project assessed the costs and benefits of potential DR programs for Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) commercial and industrial (CI) customers.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

348

Environmental Considerations for Backup Generation Applications to Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the pros and cons of customer backup generation (BUG) for offsetting electric demand through demand response programs. The report examines the environmental issues related to this technology and contrasts this information with air quality and environmental agency regulations prevalent in California, Texas, and the model emissions standards being developed in the United States.

2002-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Demand Response & Smart Grid - State Legislative and Regulatory Policy Actions: October 2008 to May 2010 Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.demandresponsesmartgrid.org/Resources/Documents/State%20Policy%20S Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/demand-response-smart-grid-state-legi Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Enabling Legislation This report reviews the implementation of utility efficiency programs in the United States at both the state and federal levels. In addition, the updated report catalogues regulatory commission action, independent of

351

Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response August 1, 2011 - 3:54pm Addthis EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed this implementation proposal as required by section 529 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).1 In particular, this proposal complies with EISA's mandate "to submit to Congress a proposal to implement the [National] Action Plan [on Demand Response], including specific proposed assignments of responsibility, proposed budget amounts, and any agreements secured for participation from State and other participants."2 The objective of the proposal is to implement the National Action Plan to

352

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Title Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Markets Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6155E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Cappers, Peter, Jason MacDonald, and Charles A. Goldman Date Published 03/2013 Keywords advanced metering infrastructure, aggregators of retail customers, ancillary services, demand response, electric utility regulation, electricity market rules, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, institutional barriers, market and value, operating reserves, retail electricity providers, retail electricity tariffs, smart grid Attachment Size

353

Gateways, Meters and Demand Response: Opportunity or Folly  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gateways, Meters and Demand Response: Opportunity or Folly Speaker(s): Roger Levy Date: November 15, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 For technologists, electric utilities provide...

354

Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together...

355

Valuing Conservation and Demand Response: Using the CPUC's Avoided...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Valuing Conservation and Demand Response: Using the CPUC's Avoided Cost Methodology Speaker(s): Ren Orans Snuller Price Date: June 29, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Background:...

356

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response Speaker(s): John Steinberg Date: August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page...

357

ColorPower: A Structured Approach to Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ColorPower: A Structured Approach to Demand Response Speaker(s): Steven Florek Date: August 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Janie Page...

358

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost-Effectiveness Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Cost-Effectiveness Working Group In July 2011,...

359

Persuading a Puzzled Public to Adopt Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Persuading a Puzzled Public to Adopt Demand Response Speaker(s): Christine Shockman Date: November 6, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Peng Xu Have...

360

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Sila...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A...

362

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or...

363

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response and Advanced Metering. Presentation to NYISO35 Table 12. Industrial Participants in Sub-MeteringSection 2.5. Analysis of sub-metering to monitor DR at six

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Grid Reliability Considerations for High Levels of Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this white paper are to: (1) consider the unique characteristics of demand response relative to bulk electric system reliability needs and present contributions to system reliability, (2) identify potential bulk electric system reliability impacts of high levels of demand response without appropriate characterization of the resource over time and at increasing penetration levels, and (3) identify research needs to address these impacts so that the potential benefits of DR as system ...

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Industrial Lift Truck Battery Charger Demand Response Impact Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and load shifting are two common energy management strategies used by lift truck fleet operators to mitigate on-peak energy consumption, reduce electricity costs, and react to electric system emergency curtailment requests. When customers elect to participate in demand response programs, they are contacted and asked to reduce load during power shortage situations. Alternatively, customers may implement longer-term economic load shifting strategies by reducing power to their lift truck bat...

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Look Ahead at Demand Response in New England  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the demand response programs developed and in operation in New England, and the revised designs for participation in the forward capacity market. This description will include how energy efficiency, demand-side resources, and distributed generation are eligible to participate in this new forward capacity market. The paper will also discuss various methods that can be used to configure and communicate with demand response resources and important concerns in specifying interfaces that accommodate multiple technologies and allow technology choice and evolution.

Burke, Robert B.; Henderson, Michael I.; Widergren, Steven E.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or The Regents of the University of California. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof, or

Ernest Orlando Lawrence; Charles Goldman; Michael Reid; Roger Levy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response throughadvanced metering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliance on the standard cumulative kilowatt-hour metersubstantially compromises energy efficiency and demand response programs.Without advanced metering, utilities cannot support time-differentiatedrates or collect the detailed customer usage information necessary to (1)educate the customer to the economic value of efficiency and demandresponse options, or (2) distribute load management incentivesproportional to customer contribution. These deficiencies prevent thecustomer feedback mechanisms that would otherwise encourage economicallysound demand-side investments and behaviors. Thus, the inability tocollect or properly price electricity usage handicaps the success ofalmost all efficiency and demand response options. Historically,implementation of the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) necessaryfor the successful efficiency and demand response programs has beenprevented by inadequate cost-benefit analyses. A recent California efforthas produced an expanded cost-effectiveness methodology for AMI thatintroduces previously excluded benefits. In addition to utility-centriccosts and benefits, the new model includes qualitative and quantitativecosts and benefits that accrue to both customers and society.

Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Evaluation Framework for Sustainable Demand Response Implementations: A Framework for Evaluating Demand Response Implementation Alte rnatives for Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a framework for evaluating demand response (DR) implementation options with the goal of achieving long-term sustainability. Effective implementation of DR can help reduce energy price volatility and maintain or improve service reliability. The DR evaluation framework provides a structured, systematic approach to help utility personnel and other stakeholders in planning and comparing demand response options, toward the goal of implementing sustainable DR programs that support utility ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, “Using Open Automated Demand Response Communicationsin Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services,” Proc.and Techniques for Demand Response,” Lawrence Berkeley

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumps, improved power supplies and transformers, and freeby adding power delivery (transformer and UPS losses),as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), transformers, and

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data centers that are part of large campuses or office complexes have renewable energy (photovoltaic, fuel cell, thermal storage) and cogeneration (

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data centers, field tests and sub-metering are necessary toAuto-DR. Due to the lack of sub-metering and availability of

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE. 2009. Press release on Smart Grid standards. http://Report to NIST on Smart Grid Interoperability Standardsas a national Smart Grid (U.S. DOE 2009) standard for DR (

Mares, K.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Day-Ahead Schedule) x Real-Time Price This may result in areal-time dispatch of the CAISO controlled grid. Participating load program relies on a simple price-

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Title Demand Response Opportunities and Enabling Technologies for Data Centers: Findings From Field Studies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5763E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ghatikar, Girish, Venkata Ganti, Nance Matson, and Mary Ann Piette Publisher PG&E/SDG&E/CEC/LBNL Keywords communication and standards, control systems, data centers, demand response, enabling technologies, end-use technologies, load migration, market sectors, technologies Abstract The energy use in data centers is increasing and, in particular, impacting the data center energy cost and electric grid reliability during peak and high price periods. As per the 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company territory, data centers are estimated to consume 500 megawatts of annual peak electricity. The 2011 data confirm the increase in data center energy use, although it is slightly lower than the EPA forecast. Previous studies have suggested that data centers have significant potential to integrate with supply-side programs to reduce peak loads. In collaboration with California data centers, utilities, and technology vendors, this study conducted field tests to improve the understanding of the demand response opportunities in data centers. The study evaluated an initial set of control and load migration strategies and economic feasibility for four data centers. The findings show that with minimal or no impact to data center operations a demand savings of 25% at the data center level or 10% to 12% at the whole building level can be achieved with strategies for cooling and IT equipment, and load migration. These findings should accelerate the grid-responsiveness of data centers through technology development, integration with the demand response programs, and provide operational cost savings.

377

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorlycrafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisissubsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared whenthe next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate theevent-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demandresponsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such,demand response can be required as a condition of service, and theoffering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities asan element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore thecosts and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response systemcapable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operatorcontrolled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customercontrolled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Anydemand response program based on this system could consist of either orboth of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled,providing automatic load management through customer-programmed priceresponse, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability inCalifornia. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers toimplementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

378

2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/13/2013 1 © 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand Response their usage. Demand Response ­ PGE Current Status 10 Automated Demand R

379

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. The “Utility or ISO Operator OpenADR Interface” lists1. The “Utility or ISO Operator OpenADR Interface” listsSheets List of Figures Figure 1. OpenADR Version 1.0 Utility

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility Issued DR Event Entity Each UtilityDREvent may contain a list utility IT system that initiated the DR event.   destinations–This is a list Utility Advanced  Metering Infrastructure).   APC?8 Appendix D: DR Program Use Cases This section lists 

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous papers have discussed definitions of energyThis paper provides a framework linking continuous energyThe paper presents a framework about when energy is used,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research  Energy Systems Integration  Environmentally contributes to PIER’s Energy Systems Integration  Program.  integration of common Energy Management and  Control Systems (

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimized relative to the energy services begin delivered.energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems,energy efficiency and advances in controls and service level

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State andand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers to  view their energy usage, but may be  used as on  the  three highest energy usage days with the highest of  the  three  highest energy usage days of 2P2825, and 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aim to minimize energy costs over time. Note that becausedue to increased energy costs over time. Customers couldtime prices and price duration curves for a facility in Year 1 (low energy cost

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the  following:  Customer account number  Load reduction the following:  Customer account number  Load reduction the following:  Customer account number  Load reduction 

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With such a large number of customers who are now on thebe to have customer-specified daily number of hours for eachnumber or percentage) based on historical prices and customer

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In peak pricing tariffs, electricity prices on peak days areIn peak pricing tariffs, electricity prices on peak days areof California electricity pricing tariffs (including RTP,

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loads. C P P is a new electricity tariff design to promotethe structures of electricity tariffs considering the timeand tariffs provide even greater incentives to consider sophisticated building operational and control strategies that reduce electricity

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and time-of-use rates to commercial and industrial electricityprices to commercial and industrial facilities. 2. Evaluate if existing static electricity

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California utility retail electricity rates and independentCalifornia utility retail electricity rates and independenttime-of-use rates to commercial and industrial electricity

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

each group can participate in variety of markets from wholesale ancillary services to distribution level retail tariffs. This paper explores the issues of aggregated groups of...

394

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006Auto-DR Strategies and Commissioning One common questionConference on Building Commissioning: April 19-21, 2006

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for the Study of Energy Markets Paper CSEMWP-105.OASIS SDO. 2010b. “Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX)charges. • Wholesale energy market prices are volatile, and

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Down the Drain: The Hidden Costs of California Energy. 2004,Pacific Institute. California Energy Commission,which is funded by the California Energy Commission (Energy

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.0). ” California Energy Commission, PIER Program.Markets. ” University of California Energy Institute: CenterSystem Communications. California Energy Commission, PIER

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting control systems that integrate with daylighting inlighting control systems that integrate with daylighting in

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energycost from federal dams, one non-federal nuclear plant, and other non-federal hydroelectric and wind energy

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test all of the sites had some sort of Web-based Energy Information System (EIS) and Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) with PC. During 2004, five of the 18 sites used...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EIS) 1 . Additional sub-metering was applied where necessarydata at each site. The sub- metering for the Site B building

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperabilityaccessed: 6/16/2010. Open Smart Grid Users Group. “OpenADRactivities within the Smart Grid. Keywords: Commercial and

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With the ongoingwithin the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With the ongoing

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards & Technology (NIST) Smart Grid Roadmap there haveinvolved in a number of Smart Grid standardization effortsCommittee, and the NAESB Smart Grid Standards Taskforce.

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active within the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With ongoingactive within the emerging “Smart Grid” domain. With ongoing

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involved in various Smart Grid standards efforts withinthe context of emerging smart grid standards and the rolewere developed during the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel’

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

actions to influence the load profiles of facilities thatISO needs to influence the load profile of a Facility areUtility/ISO influences the load profile of a facility is to

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Role of Standard Demand Response Signals for Advanced Automated Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control to allow specific load profiles to be created.More flexible load profiles. The increased number of DRmix and match different load profiles of the individual DR

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Results and commissioning issues from an automated demand response pilot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

show an intermittent load profile that started appearingdaily "cooker-like" load profiles that we observed. Rather

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, Dave; Sezgen, Osman; Motegi, Naoya

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

actions to influence load profiles of their customers atISO needs to influence the load profile of a Facility arebe a specific target load profile to be achieved while in

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OASIS SDO. 2010b. “Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX)11 Wholesale Electricity Market InformationWholesale Electricity Market Information Systems Several

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Direct versus Facility Centric Load Control for Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

networks used in energy management systems to IP networkswith residential energy management systems and is beingequipment (e.g. energy management and control system - EMCS)

Piette, Mary Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to use the  Energy Management Control Systems (EMCS) to Facility Energy Management Control System (EMCS) carries either a small energy management control system (EMCS) or 

Dudley, June Han

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s) and the energy management systems within the facilities.use of an energy management control system (EMCS) or energyor hardwire energy management control systems to curtail

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Scenarios for Consuming Standardized Automated Demand Response Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from single end user facility, to third party facilitywidest range of end user facilities can participate in DR

Koch, Ed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with hydro power and wind integration, more DR may be neededload growth, wind power integration, and fish operations are

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may include things like real time prices, shed or  shift participant loads:  1. Real?time prices are propagated from shed or shift loads.   2. Real?time prices are sent by the 

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

though day-ahead hourly real- time prices can be continuous,or 15-minute ahead real time price. A facility manager hasyr (though hour-ahead real-time prices can be continuous,

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

link wholesale and retail real-time prices. 6.0 Referencesdynamic prices such as real-time prices and peak prices andFigure 5. Average Daily Real-Time Prices and Price Duration

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05CH11231. References EPRI, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Research Institute, Energy Audit Manual for Water/Wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges. • Wholesale energy market prices are volatile, andCAISO’s Wholesale Energy Market Prices PG&E’s PDP RetailWe used the CAISO wholesale energy market prices for the RTP

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak prices) to reduce electricity bill volatility. Smallwith higher or lower electricity bills than desired, since

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

static pressure min. Cooling tower, Pump status/VFD, Zonesystem Fans Chillers Pumps Cooling towers Fans Fans Chillerssecondary pumps, cooling towers, and fans were considered as

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpenADR  is one element of the Smart Grid information and OpenADR is  one element of the Smart Grid information and OpenADR is  one element of the Smart Grid information and 

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global health response more accurate with automated influenza Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Public health officials will be able to determine whether an outbreak of an infectious disease comes from a pandemic strain or one less virulent. January 31, 2011 Lance Green of LANL tests an earlier version of a modular laboratory like the ones that will be part of the High-Throughput Laboratory Network Lance Green of LANL tests an earlier version of a modular laboratory like the ones that will be part of the High-Throughput Laboratory Network-a series of compact, self-contained, automated systems for surveillance and screening of potential pandemic strains of influenza and other deadly infectious diseases.

426

Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Kueck, John D [ORNL; Todd, Duane [Alcoa; Caulfield, Michael [Alcoa; Helms, Brian [Alcoa

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Demand Response in the U.S. - Key trends and federal facility participation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in the U.S. in the U.S. Key trends and federal facility participation Phil Coleman Lawrence Berkeley National Lab FUPWG Williamsburg Meeting November 19, 2008 OUTLINE * Demand response defined * Current status in U.S. * Key trends - Increasing opportunities in "economic" DR - Rise of DR in "capacity" markets - Rise of dynamic pricing - Rise of automated DR ("auto-DR") * Federal participation is small - why? * Ramping up federal participation Demand Response * Def.: A short-term decrease in electrical consumption by end-use customers due to either a) increased electricity prices, or b) incentive payments (triggered by high wholesale market prices or compromised grid reliability). * DR participation can be either through load curtailment (short-term

428

EnergySolve Demand Response | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnergySolve Demand Response EnergySolve Demand Response Jump to: navigation, search Name EnergySolve Demand Response Place Somerset, New Jersey Product Somerset-based utility bill outsourcing company that provides electronic utility bill auditing, tariff analysis, late fee avoidance, and flexible bill payment solutions. Coordinates 45.12402°, -92.675379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.12402,"lon":-92.675379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response throughadvanced metering  

SciTech Connect

Reliance on the standard cumulative kilowatt-hour meter substantially compromises energy efficiency and demand response programs. Without advanced metering, utilities cannot support time-differentiated rates or collect the detailed customer usage information necessary to (1)educate the customer to the economic value of efficiency and demand response options, or (2) distribute load management incentives proportional to customer contribution. These deficiencies prevent the customer feedback mechanisms that would otherwise encourage economically sound demand-side investments and behaviors. Thus, the inability to collect or properly price electricity usage handicaps the success of almost all efficiency and demand response options. Historically, implementation of the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) necessary for the successful efficiency and demand response programs has been prevented by inadequate cost-benefit analyses. A recent California effort has produced an expanded cost-effectiveness methodology for AMI that introduces previously excluded benefits. In addition to utility-centric costs and benefits, the new model includes qualitative and quantitative costs and benefits that accrue to both customers and society.

Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Enabling Demand-Response-Ready Appliances and Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update reports on the results of a 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) survey of utilities that was performed as part of a multi-year effort to develop functional specifications for residential demand-response- (DR-) ready appliances and devices. This report also provides an update of industry trends and smart appliance development. DR-ready appliances and devices are defined as those that are able to participate in demand-response programs out of the box. Such devices can receiv...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Summer of 2006: A Milestone in the Ongoing Maturation of Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Figure 7. U.S. Demand Response Resources in 2005Proposals to Augment 2007 Demand Response Programs, Aug. 22,Efforts to Improve Demand Response Programs for State to

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Engel, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response - Policy A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to...

433

Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Market and Policy Barriers for Demand Response Providing Ancillary Services in U.S. Electricity Markets Peter Cappers, Jason MacDonald, Charles Goldman April 2013 Report Summary 1 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Wholesale and Retail Market Environments  Market and Policy Barrier Typology  Prototypical Regional Barrier Assessment 2 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group A Role for Demand Response to Provide Ancillary Services  Increasing penetration of renewable energy generation in U.S. electricity markets means that bulk power system operators will need to manage the variable and uncertain nature of many renewable resources

434

Energy Efficiency Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds and Demand Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 2, 2006 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group San Francisco CA Overview of Talk * National Overview * Energy Efficiency Programs and Funds * Demand Response Programs and Funds * FEMP Resources on Public Benefit Funds *Suggestions for Federal Customers DSM Spending is increasing! * 2006 Utility DSM and Public Benefit spending is ~$2.5B$ - $1B for C&I EE programs * CA utilities account for 35% of total spending 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1994 2000 2005 2006 Costs (in billion $) DSM Costs Load Management Gas EE Other States Electric EE California Electric EE EE Spending in 2006 (by State) $ Million < 1 (23) 1 - 10 (2) 11 - 50 (13) 51 - 100 (7) > 100 (5) 790 101 257

435

An Automation System for Optimizing a Supply Chain Network Design under the Influence of Demand Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

threshold for the maximum variation in demand that can bethreshold for the maximum variation in demand that can bethreshold for the maximum variation in demand that can be

Polany, Rany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Framework for Evaluating the Cost-effectiveness of Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Framework for Evaluating the Cost-effectiveness of Demand Response Title A Framework for Evaluating the Cost-effectiveness of Demand Response Publication Type Report Year of...

437

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opportunities for Energy  Efficiency and Demand Response in Agricultural/Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Program.    i 1   4.0   Energy Efficiency and Demand Response 

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response through advanced metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Practices for Advanced Metering, Demand Response, andGuidance for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure BusinessDemand Response through Advanced Metering Roger Levy, Levy

Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Demand Response Energy Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Response Energy Consulting LLC Response Energy Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Response & Energy Consulting LLC Place Delanson, New York Zip NY 12053 Sector Efficiency Product Delanson-based demand response and energy efficiency consultants. Coordinates 42.748995°, -74.185794° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.748995,"lon":-74.185794,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

440

A demand-responsive decision support system for coal transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a demand-responsive decision support system is proposed by integrating the operations of coal shipment, coal stockpiles and coal railing within a whole system. A generic and flexible scheduling optimisation methodology is developed to ... Keywords: Coal shipment, Coal stockpiles, Coal train scheduling, Decision support system, Mine transportation

Erhan Kozan; Shi Qiang Liu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Managing plug-loads for demand response within buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed and accurate energy accounting is an important first step in improving energy efficiency within buildings. Based on this information, building managers can perform active energy management, especially during demand response situations that require ... Keywords: energy management, energy metering, plug-loads management, wireless sensor network

Thomas Weng; Bharathan Balaji; Seemanta Dutta; Rajesh Gupta; Yuvraj Agarwal

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposes an HVAC control strategy based on occupancy prediction and real time occupancy monitoring via simulation model. We dis- cuss the building parameters and the HVAC control strate- gies used for the energyOccupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California

Cerpa, Alberto E.

443

A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Successful Implementation with the Smart Grid: Demand Response Resources Contribution to the Panel: "Reliability and Smart Grid: Public Good or Commodity" Anupama Kowli Student Member, IEEE, Matias behind the Smart Grid concept - can markedly impact the system reliability. The appropriate utilization

Gross, George

444

ARES: automated response function code. Users manual. [HPGAM and LSQVM  

SciTech Connect

This ARES user's manual provides detailed instructions for a general understanding of the Automated Response Function Code and gives step by step instructions for using the complete code package on a HP-1000 system. This code is designed to calculate response functions of NaI gamma-ray detectors, with cylindrical or rectangular geometries.

Maung, T.; Reynolds, G.M.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Distributed Demand Response and User Adaptation in Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a distributed framework for demand response and user adaptation in smart grid networks. In particular, we borrow the concept of congestion pricing in Internet traffic control and show that pricing information is very useful to regulate user demand and hence balance network load. User preference is modeled as a willingness to pay parameter which can be seen as an indicator of differential quality of service. Both analysis and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the dynamics and convergence behavior of the algorithm.

Fan, Zhong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Director, PIER Demand Response Research CenterAssessment of Demand Response & Advanced Metering, staffPower Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing Support Retail Competition and Demand Response?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competition and Demand Response? Galen Barbose, Ranjitbenefit of stimulating demand response. To evaluate themarket development and demand response – we conducted a

Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protocols  for  Demand  Response  Load  Impacts  Estimates, Potter  2006.     The  Demand  Response Baseline, v.1.75.   Assessment  of  Demand  Response  and  Advanced  Metering, 

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

452

Optimal Design of Demand-Responsive Feeder Transit Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general public considers Fixed-Route Transit (FRT) to be inconvenient while Demand-Responsive Transit (DRT) provides much of the desired flexibility with a door-to-door type of service. However, FRT is typically more cost efficient than DRT to deploy. Therefore, there is an increased interest in flexible transit services including all types of hybrid services that combine FRT and pure DRT. The demand-responsive feeder transit, also known as Demand-Responsive Connector (DRC), is a flexible transit service because it operates in a demand-responsive fashion within a service area and moves customers to/from a transfer point that connects to a FRT network. In this research we develop analytical models, validated by simulation, to design the DRC system. Feeder transit services are generally operated with a DRC policy which might be converted to a traditional FRT policy for higher demand. By using continuous approximations, we provide an analytical modeling framework to help planners and operators in their choice of the two policies. We compare utility functions of the two policies to derive rigorous analytical and approximate closed-form expressions of critical demand densities. They represent the switching conditions, that are functions of the parameters of each considered scenario, such as the geometry of the service area, the vehicle speed and also the weights assigned to each term contributing to the utility function: walking time, waiting time and riding time. We address the problem faced by planners in determining the optimal number of zones for dividing a service area. We develop analytical models representing the total cost functions balancing customer service quality and vehicle operating cost. We obtain close-form expressions for the FRT and approximation formulas for the DRC to determine the optimal number of zones. Finally we develop a real-case application with collected customer demand data and road network data of El Cenizo, Texas. With our analytical formulas, we obtain the optimal number of zones, and the times for switching FRT and DRC policies during a day. Simulation results considering the road network of El Cenizo demonstrate that our analytical formulas provide good estimates for practical use.

Li, Xiugang

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services Photovoltaic-based Demand Response and Ancillary Services Speaker(s): Bill Vogel Date: June 22, 2012 - 1:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David S. Watson This presentation describes innovations in intelligent micro inverters for use with photovoltaic (PV) systems. The micro-inverters enable remotely adjustable phase angles (+/- up to 45 degrees). The technology includes dynamic impedance matching and ultra-low cost dynamic reactive power management of digital power sources. These attributes can help mitigate grid balancing challenges introduced by most renewable generation resources as we strive to reach aggressive renewable portfolio standards and their associated needs for voltage support and ancillary services. The software-enabled device eliminates several pieces of heavy equipment needed

454

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response Optimized HVAC Management Service to Enhance Demand Response Speaker(s): John Steinberg Date: August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page Many utilities are investing vast sums deploying smart meters to customers, some of whom remain stubbornly opposed to those deployments, in large part because they remain unmoved by the claimed benefits. EcoFactor has developed a thermostat management service that delivers (and quantifies) significant energy savings for consumers and a number of additional benefits to other players in the energy value chain. It does so without relying on consumers to modify behavior, study energy information displays, or even pay attention to their energy use. EcoFactor also significantly boosts DR yield while it increases occupant comfort. It can identify HVAC

455

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

457

Revealing the Value of Demand Response: Regulatory and Market Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market failures have plagued competitive electricity markets worldwide. This report explores market and regulatory options for correcting some of these failures. In doing so, it recognizes the critical role that regulation plays in assuring that the competitive process works, as it should, to the benefit of all. In particular, the report examines ways to better integrate demand response (DR) into electricity markets at both the wholesale and retail levels.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

458

Smart Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demand Response Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a unique pilot project to evaluate electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) capable of demand response (DR) and its integration into the utility smart metering infrastructure.BackgroundThere is an immediate need to research grid interface compatibility of public charging apparatus and to develop requirements and reference design blueprints for the entire plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructure—from the vehicle ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Innovative Lighting-Control and Demand-Response Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI technical update continues the technical assessment of modern lighting-control and demand-response (DR) systems in the following product areas: programmable timer switches, scalable lighting-control systems, Zigbee-based add-on control systems, and Z-Wave–based lighting controllers. This research helps to demonstrate that there is a wide variety of advanced lighting controls entering the marketplace each year, and it describes how they respond to a range of DR and power-quality ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns during system peak demand conditions, and failurerelative to national peak demand, was about 5.0% in 2006 [2]to a region’s summer peak demand (see Fig. 2). Demand

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

load and customer maximum demand are most commonly used as1) minimum and maximum amounts of demand reduction; (2)

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Building Technologies Office: Distributed Intelligent-Automated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Intelligent-Automated Demand Response Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Distributed...

463

Modular Communication Interface Mapping to Demand Response Programs: Mapping CEA-2045 Messages to Existing Demand Response Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the technical results of an evaluation of the Consumer Electronics Association’s ANSI/ CEA-2045 in terms of its ability to support the data requirements of utility demand response programs. This evaluation was performed as part of a collaborative project in which utilities engaged end-device makers and communication technology providers to build protoypes and test for interoperability in a laboratory environment.The specific objective of the evaluation detailed ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

464

Program Strategies and Results for California’s Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Energy Partners provides a review of California’s strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), is presented along with special efforts being made in support of industrial end users. The interrelationship between the CEC and the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) with regard to advancing demand side programs is highlighted. The specific cost recovery mechanisms put in place by the CPUC is discussed, including California’s experience with revenue decoupling, public purpose funds, and avoided cost calculations. Next, the role as energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) program implementer played by each of the state Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs) is outlined. Each utility is responsible for serving major end use market segments with target programs designed to provide unique value. Within the industrial sector, there is special attention paid to the needs of the various sub-markets such as oil refining, agriculture, food processing, water and wastewater, manufacturing, and others. A review is presented of how EE and DR measures are selected, how incentive values are determined, which customers are eligible for programs, and how programs are evaluated to gage effectiveness. Lastly, mechanisms used by the IOU’s to deliver industrial EE and DR incentive programs are discussed. This includes a review of “core” programs administered by the utilities as well as subcontracted programs administered by “third party” implementers and “local government partners”. Global Energy Partners will offer specific examples of program experience in the oil & gas, agriculture, and food processing sectors, and will also highlight program success within the emerging “automateddemand response market.

Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive Conditioning and Increased User Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on Occupant Lighting choices and Satisfaction: A007 "Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsivedirectly. Intelligent Commercial Lighting: Demand-Responsive

Agogino, Alice M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Data center demand response: Avoiding the coincident peak via workload shifting and local generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is a crucial aspect of the future smart grid. It has the potential to provide significant peak demand reduction and to ease the incorporation of renewable energy into the grid. Data centers' participation in demand response is becoming ... Keywords: Data center, Demand response, Online algorithm, Prediction error, Renewable penetration, Workload management

Zhenhua Liu, Adam Wierman, Yuan Chen, Benjamin Razon, Niangjun Chen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Demand Response in the West: Lessons for States and Provinces  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 This paper is submitted in fulfillment of DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-015F22369 on the experience of western states/provinces with demand response (DR) in the electricity sector. Demand-side resources are often overlooked as a viable option for meeting load growth and addressing the challenges posed by the region's aging transmission system. Western states should work together with utilities and grid operators to facilitate the further deployment of DR programs which can provide benefits in the form of decreased grid congestion, improved system reliability, market efficiency, price stabilization, hedging against volatile fuel prices and reduced environmental impacts of energy production. This report describes the various types of DR programs; provides a survey of DR programs currently in place in the West; considers the benefits, drawbacks and barriers to DR; and presents lessons learned and recommendations for states/provinces.

Douglas C. Larson; Matt Lowry; Sharon Irwin

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response under Uncertainty • F P t : wholesale natural gasdemand response and DER under uncertain electricity and natural gasand Demand Response under Uncertainty Energy Price Models We assume that the logarithms of the deseasonalized electricity and natural gas

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Demand response medium sized industry consumers (Smart Grid Project) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

response medium sized industry consumers (Smart Grid Project) response medium sized industry consumers (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Demand response medium sized industry consumers Country Denmark Headquarters Location Aarhus, Denmark Coordinates 56.162937°, 10.203921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.162937,"lon":10.203921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential: Integrating Price and Customer Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions in their class peak demand in response to pricesresidential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) > 1,500 kW > 2000 kW >

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

A Methodology for Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response Market Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions in their class peak demand in response to pricesresidential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) > 1,500 kW > 2000 kW

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Demand Response and Storage Integration Study: Markets Report Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Andy Satchwell Andy Satchwell Scientific Engineering Associate Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, ER&E Committee Meeting, July 24, 2012 Portland, OR Tools and Methods Working Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Outline of Presentation  Introduction and background: DR Estimation Tools and Methods Working Group  Working group members  Work plan  Identification of estimation tools and methods needs  Preliminary gap analysis  Next steps 2 Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Introduction and Background  Tools and techniques have been developed to help characterize demand response (DR) resources  Given diversity in types of DR programs and relative

473

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering Staff Report Federal Energy Regulatory Commission February 2011 The opinions and views expressed in this staff report do not necessarily represent those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, its Chairman, or individual Commissioners, and are not binding on the Commission. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Staff Team Dean Wight, Team Lead Caroline Daly David Kathan Michael P. Lee Kamaria Martin Pamela Silberstein Michael Tita Rebecca Vertes Z, INC. Team Bryan Templeton (Z, INC.) Valerie Richardson (KEMA) Will Gifford (KEMA) Christopher Elsner (Z, INC.) Matthew S. Pettit (KEMA) Geoff Barker (KEMA) Ron Chebra (KEMA) TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary

474

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

475

Automated data system for emergency meteorological response  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Plant (SRP) releases small amounts of radioactive nuclides to the atmosphere as a consequence of the production of radioisotopes. The potential for larger accidental releases to the atmosphere also exists, although the probability for most accidents is low. To provide for emergency meteorological response to accidental releases and to conduct research on the transport and diffusion of radioactive nuclides in the routine releases, a series of high-quality meteorological sensors have been located on towers in and about SRP. These towers are equipped with instrumentation to detect and record temperature and wind turbulence. Signals from the meterological sensors are brought by land-line to the SRL Weather Center-Analysis Laboratory (WC-AL). At the WC-AL, a Weather Information and Display (WIND) system has been installed. The WIND system consists of a minicomputer with graphical displays in the WC-AL and also in the emergency operating center (EOC) of SRP. In addition, data are available to the system from standard weather teletype services, which provide both routine surface weather observations and routine upper air wind and temperature observations for the southeastern United States. Should there be an accidental release to the atmosphere, available recorded data and computer codes would allow the calculation and display of the location, time, and downwind concentration of the atmospheric release. These data are made available to decision makers in near real-time to permit rapid decisive action to limit the consequences of such accidental releases. (auth)

Kern, C.D.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

SciTech Connect

Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Demand Response Performance of GE Hybrid Heat Pump Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a project to evaluate and document the DR performance of HPWH as compared to ERWH for two primary types of DR events: peak curtailments and balancing reserves. The experiments were conducted with GE second-generation “Brillion”-enabled GeoSpring hybrid water heaters in the PNNL Lab Homes, with one GE GeoSpring water heater operating in “Standard” electric resistance mode to represent the baseline and one GE GeoSpring water heater operating in “Heat Pump” mode to provide the comparison to heat pump-only demand response. It is expected that “Hybrid” DR performance, which would engage both the heat pump and electric elements, could be interpolated from these two experimental extremes. Signals were sent simultaneously to the two water heaters in the side-by-side PNNL Lab Homes under highly controlled, simulated occupancy conditions. This report presents the results of the evaluation, which documents the demand-response capability of the GE GeoSpring HPWH for peak load reduction and regulation services. The sections describe the experimental protocol and test apparatus used to collect data, present the baselining procedure, discuss the results of the simulated DR events for the HPWH and ERWH, and synthesize key conclusions based on the collected data.

Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

When it comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 1978, pp. 42-47. FERC, "Final Rule, Order 719,comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy? Jamesit comes to demand response, is FERC its own worst enemy? By

Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin; Wolak, Frank A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

480

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Area Lead Energy Systems Integration Mike GravelyCommission, PIER Energy Systems Integration Program.  CEC?Research  Energy Systems Integration  Environmentally 

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "automated demand response" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Site Controls 21  Aggregated Load Profile of the  Test on 24  Retail C3 Load Profile with Its C6 Figure 5. Aggregated Load Profile of the Test on October

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Automation of Capacity Bidding with an Aggregator Using Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implementation in energy management systems.   This effort linked to energy management control systems (EMCS) 4  or Systems  Energy Management and Control Systems  Electric 

Kiliccote, Sila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL-2124E LBNL-2124E Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Principal Authors Peter Cappers a , Charles Goldman a , and David Kathan b a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 b Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20426, Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720-8136 Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html Pre-print version of the article to be published in Energy, forthcoming 2009. The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S.

484

Does RTP Deliver Demand Response?: Case Studies of Niagara Mohawk RTP and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ educational 40% 46% Average monthly maximum demand 3.0 MW 3.4 MW Option 2 9% 18% The survey response rateDoes RTP Deliver Demand Response?: Case Studies of Niagara Mohawk RTP and ~43 Voluntary Utility RTP Programs Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Mid-Atlantic Demand Response Initiative

485

A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State and Regional Policy Assistance » Technical Assistance » Demand State and Regional Policy Assistance » Technical Assistance » Demand Response - Policy » A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential A National Forum on Demand Response: What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the rapid development of the demand response industry, DOE and FERC decided

486

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand (RT- Demand), Real-Time Price (RT-Price) and Day-to reduce load in real-time when a specific price point iscloser to real-time when energy market prices rose above a

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information also suggests that many LSEs provide "price-sensitive demand bids" in MISO day-ahead energy markets

Bharvirkar, Ranjit

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Tools and Methods Working Group A National Forum on Demand Response: Results on What Remains to Be Done to Achieve Its Potential - Tools and Methods Working Group In July 2011, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) staff and the Department of Energy (DOE) jointly submitted to Congress a required "Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response." The Implementation Proposal was for FERC's June 2010 National Action Plan for Demand Response. Part of the July 2011 Implementation Proposal called for a "National Forum" on demand response to be conducted by DOE and FERC. Given the rapid development of the demand response industry, DOE and FERC decided

489

Comfort-aware home energy management under market-based demand-response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To regulate energy consumption and enable Demand-Response programs, effective demand-side management at home is key and an integral part of the future Smart Grid. In essence, the home energy management is a mix between discrete appliance scheduling problem ... Keywords: demand-response, energy management, smart grid

Jin Xiao, Jian Li, Raouf Boutaba, James Won-Ki Hong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between Strike Price & forecast wholesale priceon day-ahead forecast of demand & price Wholesale utilitiesday-of forecast, or actual hourly spot price. A quick

Heffner, Dr. Grayson C.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

A new wholesale bidding mechanism for enhanced demand response in smart grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calls to improve customer participation as a key element of smart grids have reinvigorated interest in demand-side features such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response. In the context of deregulated ...

Wang, Jiankang

492

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response, add uncertainties ...

Wang, Jiankang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: How do we make the most...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

benefitting the grid 3 Supply and Demand Tell the (short run) Basic Story Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets - US DOE Feb 2006 4 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000...

494

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and achieve demand response. For example, on a hot August after- noon during the energy crisis, high demand-in trans- former used for everything from cell phones to computers could be up to 50 percent more efficient

495

Empirical Analysis of the Spot Market Implications of Price-Responsive Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA, USA. Siddiqui, AS (2004), “Price-Elastic Demand inand Demand Response in Electricity Markets,” CSEM Working Paper CSEM-WP-105, University of California Energy Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Bartholomew, Emily S.; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Resource allocation for demand surge mitigation during disaster response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale public health emergencies can result in an overwhelming demand for healthcare resources. Regional aid in the form of central stockpiles and resource redistribution can help mitigate the resulting demand surge. This paper discusses a resource ... Keywords: Decision support, Optimization, Pandemic flu, Resource allocation

Hina Arora; T. S. Raghu; Ajay Vinze

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with