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Sample records for aus tra lia

  1. Compilation of TRA Summaries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 2011 Technology Readiness Assessment Summary Number Title Report Date TRA-1 Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory, Balance of Facilities and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities at Hanford March 2007 TRA-2 Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility at Hanford March 2007 TRA-3 Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility at Hanford March 2007 TRA-4 K Basins Sludge Treatment Process at Hanford

  2. Compilation of TRA Summaries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRA Summaries Compilation of TRA Summaries A compilation of all TRA Summaries Compilation of TRA Summaries (1.18 MB) More Documents & Publications K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment Report

  3. Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP) Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition ...

  4. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This ...

  5. Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP) | Department of Energy Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP) Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP) (5.46 MB) Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project (92.33 KB)

  6. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Guide | Department of Energy Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This document is a guide for those involved in conducting TRAs and developing TMPs for DOE-EM. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide (1.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Technology Readiness Assessment Report Small Column Ion Exchange Technology

  7. The quorum sensing transcriptional regulator TraR has separate binding sites for DNA and the anti-activator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhida; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quorum sensing transcription factor TraR is inhibited by forming TraR-TraM complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K213 is a key DNA binding residue, but not involved in interaction with TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraM-interacting TraR residues did not affect DNA-binding of TraR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraR residues reduced the TraR-TraM interaction more than those of TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR is driven by thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Quorum sensing represents a mechanism by which bacteria control their genetic behaviors via diffusible signals that reflect their population density. TraR, a quorum sensing transcriptional activator in the Rhizobiaceae family, is regulated negatively by the anti-activator TraM via formation of a TraR-TraM heterocomplex. Prior structural analysis suggests that TraM and DNA bind to TraR in distinct sites. Here we combined isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) to investigate roles of TraR residues from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 in binding of both TraM and DNA. We found that K213A mutation of TraR{sub NGR} abolished DNA binding, however, did not alter TraM binding. Mutations of TraM-interfacing TraR{sub NGR} residues decreased the TraR-TraM interaction, but did not affect the DNA-binding activity of TraR{sub NGR}. Thus, our biochemical studies support the independent binding sites on TraR for TraM and DNA. We also found that point mutations in TraR{sub NGR} appeared to decrease the TraR-TraM interaction more effectively than those in TraM{sub NGR}, consistent with structural observations that individual TraR{sub NGR} residues contact with more TraM{sub NGR} residues than each TraM{sub NGR} residues with TraR{sub NGR} residues. Finally, we showed that TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR was driven thermodynamically. We discussed subtle mechanistic differences in Tra

  8. Physics constraints on double-pulse LIA engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl August Jr.

    2015-05-20

    The options for advanced-radiography double-pulse linear induction accelerators (LIA) under consideration naturally fall into three categories that differ by the number of cells required. Since the two major physics issues, beam breakup (BBU) and corkscrew, are also dependent on the number of cells, it may be useful for the decision process to review the engineering consequences of beam physics constraints for each class. The LIAs can be categorized three different ways, and this report compares the different categories based upon the physics of their beams.

  9. Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRA R Un Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n

  10. Crystal structures of the F and pSLT plasmid TraJ N-terminal regions reveal similar homodimeric PAS folds with functional interchangeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Ruiying; Adkins, Joshua N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Glover, Mark

    2014-09-16

    In the F-family of conjugative plasmids, TraJ is an essential transcriptional activator of the tra operon that encodes most of the proteins required for conjugation. Here we report for the first time the X-ray crystal structures of the TraJ N-terminal regions from the prototypic F plasmid (TraJF11-130) and from the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSLT (TraJpSLT 1-128). Both proteins form similar homodimeric Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) fold structures. Mutational analysis reveals that the observed dimeric interface is critical for TraJF transcriptional activation, indicating that dimerization of TraJ is required for its in vivo function. An artificial ligand (oxidized dithiothreitol) occupies a cavity in the TraJF dimer interface, while a smaller cavity in corresponding region of the TraJpSLT structure lacks a ligand. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-electron ionization analysis of dithiothreitol-free TraJF suggests indole may be the natural TraJ ligand; however, disruption of the indole biosynthetic pathway does not affect TraJF function. Heterologous PAS domains from pSLT and R100 TraJ can functionally replace the TraJF PAS domain, suggesting that TraJ allelic specificity is mediated by the region C-terminal to the PAS domain.

  11. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structuralmore » basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.« less

  12. A variable DNA recognition site organization establishes the LiaR-mediated cell envelope stress response of enterococci to daptomycin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davlieva, Milya; Shi, Yiwen; Leonard, Paul G.; Johnson, Troy A.; Zianni, Michael R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Ladbury, John E.; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-04-19

    LiaR is a ‘master regulator’ of the cell envelope stress response in enterococci and many other Gram-positive organisms. Mutations to liaR can lead to antibiotic resistance to a variety of antibiotics including the cyclic lipopeptide daptomycin. LiaR is phosphorylated in response to membrane stress to regulate downstream target operons. Using DNA footprinting of the regions upstream of the liaXYZ and liaFSR operons we show that LiaR binds an extended stretch of DNA that extends beyond the proposed canonical consensus sequence suggesting a more complex level of regulatory control of target operons. We go on to determine the biochemical and structural basis for increased resistance to daptomycin by the adaptive mutation to LiaR (D191N) first identified from the pathogen Enterococcus faecalis S613. LiaRD191N increases oligomerization of LiaR to form a constitutively activated tetramer that has high affinity for DNA even in the absence of phosphorylation leading to increased resistance. The crystal structures of the LiaR DNA binding domain complexed to the putative consensus sequence as well as an adjoining secondary sequence show that upon binding, LiaR induces DNA bending that is consistent with increased recruitment of RNA polymerase to the transcription start site and upregulation of target operons.

  13. Safety analysis report for packaging for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TRA Type 1 Shipping Container and TRA Type 2 Shipping Capsule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havlovick, B.J.

    1992-07-27

    The TRA Type I Shipping Container and TRA Type II Shipping Capsule were designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as special form containers for the transport of non-fissile radioisotopes and fissile radioisotopes in exempt quantities. The Type I container measures 0.75 in. outside diameter and 3.000 in long. The Type II capsule is 0.495 in. outside diameter 2.000 in. long. The container and capsule were tested and evaluated to determine their compliance with Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173, which governs packages for special form radioactive material. This report is based upon those tests and evaluations. The results of those tests and evaluations demonstrate the container and capsule are in full compliance with the special form shipping container regulations of 49 CFR 173.

  14. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for the Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  15. TRA Closure Plan REV 0-9-20-06 HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA/MTR Warm Waste System Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterholler, K.

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for portions of the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System located in the Materials Test Reactor Building (TRA-603) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan SITE-TANK-005 for Tank System TRA-007. The reactor drain tank and canal sump to be closed are included in the Test Reactor Area/Materials Test Reactor Warm Waste System. The reactor drain tank and the canal sump were characterized as having managed hazardous waste. The reactor drain tank and canal sump will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  16. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  17. Synthesis of Transient Climate Evolution of the last 21-kyr (SynTraCE-21)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengyu Liu

    2011-05-06

    Climate evolution in the last 21,000 years provides critical observations for testing state-of-the-art climate models on the simulation of climate evolution and abrupt climate changes. Proxy evidences and new modeling activities have led to rapid advances in our understanding of climate change for this past time period. This funding helps to support the first international SynTraCE-21k workshop at Mount Hood, Oregon from 10-13 October, 2010.

  18. HWMA/RCRA CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE MATERIALS TEST REACTOR WING (TRA-604) LABORATORY COMPONENTS VOLUNTARY CONSENT ORDER ACTION PLAN VCO-5.8 D REVISION2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRK WINTERHOLLER

    2008-02-25

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the laboratory components of the Test Reactor Area Catch Tank System (TRA-630) that are located in the Materials Test Reactor Wing (TRA-604) at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under Voluntary Consent Order Action Plan VCO-5.8.d. The TRA-604 laboratory components addressed in this closure plan were deferred from the TRA-630 Catch Tank System closure plan due to ongoing laboratory operations in the areas requiring closure actions. The TRA-604 laboratory components include the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping, undersink drains, subheaders, and the east TRA-604 laboratory drain header. Potentially contaminated surfaces located beneath the TRA-604 laboratory warm wastewater drain piping and beneath the island sinks located in Laboratories 126 and 128 (located in TRA-661) are also addressed in this closure plan. The TRA-604 laboratory components will be closed in accordance with the interim status requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, Subparts G and J. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards.

  19. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  20. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  1. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  2. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  3. Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Montgomery

    2008-05-01

    This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

  4. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Advanced Test Reactor Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum TRA010029

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. R. Adams; R. P. Grant; P. R. Smith; J. L. Weisgerber

    2013-09-01

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of one drum containing contact-handled transuranic (TRU) actinide standards generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) for storage and subsequent shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for final disposal. The drum (i.e., Integrated Waste Tracking System Bar Code Number TRA010029) is currently stored at the Materials and Fuels Complex. The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and applicable sections of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and disposal of this TRU waste generated from ATR. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for this TRU waste originating from ATR.

  5. ANSI/LIA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 ANNUAL FOIA REPORT FOR 2009 The DOE's mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the environmental cleanup of the national nuclear weapons complex. The records maintained by the DOE often involve proprietary matters, classified matters, innovation matters, and environmental matters. The DOE invokes several of the FOIA's exemptions to protect information

  6. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 333: U-3auS DISPOSAL SITE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2005-JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 333, U-3auS Disposal Site, is a closed construction landfill located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of this site was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) dated June 27, 2001. Post-closure requirements are described in a letter from NNSA/NV to NDEP dated October 9, 2001, and were approved by the NDEP in a letter dated November 5, 2001. This report covers the period July 2005 through June 2006 and consists of copies of the inspection checklist and field notes, repair records (if any), photographs, and recommendations and conclusions.

  7. SCIX TRA Final Report Nov2011

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Businesses | Department of Energy

    Expands Access to Contracting Opportunities for Women-Owned Small Businesses SBA Expands Access to Contracting Opportunities for Women-Owned Small Businesses January 22, 2013 - 10:42am Addthis John H. Hale III John H. Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's note: This article was originally published on the Small Business Administration's website. Women-owned small businesses will have greater access to

  8. 4E/LIA-00 t

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Products Supplied, and Ending Stocks .... 40 3.1b Imports, Exports, and Net Imports ... 41 3.2 Crude Oil Supply and...

  9. Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a ... ROD (is y a Hot Isostati cess, possibly w monolithic was comparable to lcine ...

  10. STREET CEN TRA L AVE NUE C E N T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arkansas Ave. 662-7131 Lunch: Mon.-Fri., 11 am-12:45 pm Dinner: Mon.-Fri., 5-6:45 pm 26 Morning Glory Bakery 1377 Diamond Drive 662-4000 Mon.-Fri., 6-2 pm Sat., 8-11 am Downtown...

  11. Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of the Use of Synroc to Solidify the Cesium and Strontium Separations Product from Advanced Aqueous Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel, INLEXT-06-01377, Battelle Energy Alliance. ...

  12. Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Between 1963 and 2000, the HLW was treated to convert the liquid form to a dry granular ... The metals in the off-gas require a wet scrubber, which produces secondary waste and ...

  13. Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    coords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"...

  14. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  15. UTILITY CHARACTERISTICS",,,,,,"RESIDENTIAL",,,"COMMERCIAL",,,"INDUSTRIAL",,,"TRA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "RESIDENTIAL",,,"COMMERCIAL",,,"INDUSTRIAL",,,"TRANSPORTATION",,,"TOTAL" ,,,,,,"Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers" "Year","Month","Utility

  16. UTILITY CHARATERISTICS",,,,,,,"RESIDENTIAL",,,"COMMERCIAL",,,"INDUSTRIAL",,,"TRA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CHARATERISTICS",,,,,,,"RESIDENTIAL",,,"COMMERCIAL",,,"INDUSTRIAL",,,"TRANSPORTATION",,,"TOTAL" ,,,,,,,"Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers","Revenue","Sales","Customers"

  17. Materials Data on Ag3AuS2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Identification of Au-S complexes on Au(100) (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PCCP (Print) Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. PCCP ... Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL ...

  19. Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the August 13, 1996, Electrical Shock at TRA-609, Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation report board appointed by John M. Wilcynski, Manager, Idaho Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. EM Performs Tenth Technology Readiness Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM recently completed its tenth Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) since piloting the TRA process in 2006.

  1. EIR SOP Septmebr 2010

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... with EIR Team's Technology Readiness Assessment). ... TRA, reviewed the TRA maturation plan and resolved differences ... estimate. * Assess the method of estimation and the ...

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-013 (1).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (TRA)-774 Substation Equipment Upgrades SECTION B. Project Description: Electricity for heat at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) heaters is fed from the substation yard TRA-774 ...

  3. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-035.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-622 and TRA-628 Voice Paging System SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: Personnel in buildings TRA-622 and TRA-628 cannot hear announcements over the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex voice paging system. The proposed work scope is to install voice paging speakers in each building and tie into speakers in adjacent buildings. The new voice paging speaker in TRA-622 will tie into the speaker in TRA-616. Work scope will include running

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-025.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air (HEPA) Filter in Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 Pump Test Room SECTION B. Project Description: The room commonly called the Pump Test Loop is located in TRA-670 on the south side ...

  5. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-100.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100 SECTION A. Project Title: Lighting Replacements in Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 (Weld Shop) and TRA-662 (Warehouse) SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: In order to lower energy use, the proposed action would upgrade the lighting in the TRA-653 Weld Shop and the TRA-662 warehouse and machine shop with new lighting systems. Benefits also include higher light level at the working surface, better color rendition, and lower operating temperature. This project will include both material and

  6. T-Stenting-and-Small-Protrusion Technique for Bifurcation Stenoses After End-to-Side Anastomosis of Transplant Renal Artery and External Iliac Artery: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yong Ye, Peng; Jiang, Wen-jin; Ma, Shuo-yi Zhao, Jian-bo Zeng, Qing-le

    2015-10-15

    Bifurcation stenoses after end-to-side anastomosis of transplant renal artery (TRA) and external iliac artery (EIA), including stenoses at the anastomosis and the iliac artery proximal to the TRA, are rare. In the present article, we report two successfully managed cases of bifurcation stenoses after end-to-side anastomosis of the TRA and EIA using the technique of T-stenting and small protrusion (TAP stenting)

  7. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-020.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 SECTION A. Project Title: Replacement of Test Reactor Area (TRA)-671 Chemistry Monitoring Unit and Modification of Piping and Components SECTION B. Project Description: Nalco has been awarded the secondary chemistry support contract for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). To implement the Nalco chemistry program, the following replacements and modifications must be made to the ATR Cooling Tower Pumphouse (TRA-671): 1. The chemistry monitoring unit in TRA-671 pump room would be replaced with a new

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-050.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SECTION A. Project Title: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Fuel Oil Leak Excavation and Cleanup SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: A leak in the underground fuel oil transfer piping between buildings Test Reactor Area (TRA)-627 and tank TRA-776 (located in an underground vault immediately north of TRA-670) has been confirmed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex. The line containing the leak is approximately 1000 feet of buried 1.5" carbon steel piping between the pump house

  9. CX-012722: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Conference Room Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  10. Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 1 (CDP) In-Situ Catalytic Fast ...

  11. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the March 27, 1998...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the August 13, 1996, Electrical Shock at TRA-609, Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering ...

  12. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Presentation Archive | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Waste Disposition Project More Documents & Publications Salt Waste Processing Facility Fact Sheet Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting 111810 Compilation of TRA Summaries

  13. Standard Review Plan (SRP) Modules | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Design Expectations Report Technology Readiness Assessment Report External Technical Review Report Preparation for Facility Operations RM Compilation of TRA Summaries Compilation ...

  14. Small Column Ion Exchange at Savannah River Site Technology Readiness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River Site Compilation of TRA Summaries External Technical Review Report for Small Column Ion Exchange Technology at Savannah River ...

  15. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-13-021.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning of Shallow Injection Wells (SIW) (13-Test Reactor Area TRA, ... of the following Shallow Injection Wells (SIWs) at the Advanced Test Reactor ...

  16. CEB Gera o | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CEB Gera o Jump to: navigation, search Name: CEB Gerao Place: Bras-lia, Distrito Federal (Brasilia), Brazil Zip: 70300-905 Sector: Hydro Product: Small hydro generation...

  17. CLEAN Inventory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Union (EU) United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Argentina...

  18. Program Program Organization Country Region Topic Sector Sector

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    European Union EU United Nations Development Programme UNDP Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety BMU Australian Agency for International Development AusAID Argentina South...

  19. Vietnam-Development Policy Operation (DPO) Financing | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy Operation Financing AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of Development (AFD) Partner JICA, CIDA, WB, Korean Exim, AusAid Sector Climate Focus Area Non-renewable...

  20. ARM - TWP Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection...

  1. ARM - TWP Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  2. ARM - TWP Nauru Site-Inactive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  3. ARM - Information for Guest Scientists

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  4. Australia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Australia Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AU 3-letter ISO code AUS Numeric ISO code...

  5. K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process (27.17 MB) Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process (185.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide

  6. Summary of the 1987 soil sampling effort at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Test Reactor Area Paint Shop Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, T.R.; Knight, J.L.; Hertzler, C.L.

    1989-08-01

    Sampling of the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Paint Shop Ditch at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was initiated in compliance with the Interim Agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sampling of the TRA Paint Shop Ditch was done as part of the Action Plan to achieve and maintain compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and applicable regulations. It is the purpose of this document to provide a summary of the July 6, 1987 sampling activities that occurred in ditch west of Building TRA-662, which housed the TRA Paint Shop in 1987. This report will give a narrative description of the field activities, locations of collected samples, discuss the sampling procedures and the chemical analyses. Also included in the scope of this report is to bring together data and reports on the TRA Paint Shop Ditch for archival purposes. 6 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Sandia Energy Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New report offers best practice for transparent contract language of PV O&M agreements http:energy.sandia.govnew-sandia-national-laboratories-report-offers-best-practice-for-tra...

  8. CX-014406: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-1608 Water Fountain Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.24Date: 11/20/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. CX-013461: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-774 Substation Equipment Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 03/02/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  10. CX-012205: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-640 Fire Sprinkler System Modifications CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 05/01/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  11. CX-013682: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replacement of Man Hole Covers Test Reactor Area Confined Space-051 and TRA-CX-091 CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 03/31/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  12. CX-008249: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-1710 Radioactive Materials Storage Area CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 04/26/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  13. CX-009633: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Upgrade to the Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) Wall at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 11/29/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  14. CX-001412: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maintenance and Modification of Well Test Reactor Area (TRA)-08CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3Date: 03/31/2010Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Idaho Operations Office, Nuclear Energy

  15. CX-012723: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Remote Closure Switch for Test Reactor Area (TRA)-786 Output Breaker CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41827 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. CX-014405: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Machine Shop Reconfiguration and Equipment Installation Project CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 11/20/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  17. CX-014575: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation of New Ice Machine in Test Reactor Area (TRA)-628 CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 01/25/2016 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  18. CX-013458: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-609 Switchgear Replacement, Rollup Door Installation, and Diesel Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 03/09/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. BPA-2012-00236-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shooting into our work area. In one o my work area, in more than one instance loaded guns were pointed in my direction(Washington LIC oint Coot to run tra y to SF nor sen 27...

  20. CX-014401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Men's Shower Remodel CX(s) Applied: B4.7Date: 12/07/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  1. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-013 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-774 Substation Equipment Upgrades ... Electricity for heat at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) heaters is fed from the substation ...

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-027 _INL-12-105_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of power to the 670-E-9 electrical bus and would include a ... of a new fire water line to the TRA-676 building. ... feet on other facility components 35 cubic feet on ...

  3. CX-014581: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 Control Room Break Room and 2nd Basement Bathroom Modification CX(s) Applied: B2.1Date: 01/07/2016 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-013316: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Removal of Flat Bars Around Test Reactor Area (TRA)-671 Cold Well Screens CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 01/06/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  5. Wind Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) / Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Implementation Guide Revision 1 August 2013 U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management Revision 1, August 2013 TRA/TMP Process Implementation Guide Page 2 of 76 REVISION LOG Date Reason for Revision Revision 0, March 2008  Initial issue of EM guide Revision 1, August 2013  Updates based on lessons learned from completed TRAs  Incorporation of "working draft" appendices on TRL 7 calculator, and

  6. INEEL/EXT-99-00669

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    669 June 1999 Identification of the Specific Mechanism by which the CO 2 System in Building TRA-648 Accidentally Discharged Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL/EXT-99-00669 Identification of the Specific Mechanism by which the CO 2 System in Building TRA-648 Accidentally Discharged Published June 1999 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy

  7. INEEL/EXT-99-00778

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    778 August 1999 Review of the Code Compliance, Design, and Installation of the CO 2 Fire Suppression System in Building TRA-648 of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL/EXT-99-00778 Review of the Code Compliance, Design, and Installation of the CO 2 Fire Suppression System in Building TRA-648 of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published August 1999 Idaho National Engineering and

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-042.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-1627 Laboratory Water Supply Modifications SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The current raw water supply to the Radioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory (RaCL), building TRA-1627, at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex is not reliable due to poor condition of underground water lines along Marlin Avenue. Failure of the line causes safety issues that interrupt operations at RaCL for extended periods of time. The proposed action is needed to

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-050 R1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R1 SECTION A. Project Title: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Fuel Oil Leak Excavation and Cleanup SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The purpose of this revision is to expand the project scope to include asbestos disturbance and removal from the fuel line between Test Reactor Area (TRA)-627 and TRA-670. During excavation of the fuel line, asbestos containing insulation was discovered on the pipe. All other activities from the original Environmental Checklist (EC) remain the same, as

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-077.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 New Window in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Production Control Center SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The window in the Production Control Center (PCC) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), building TRA-670, is not operational and a new, functional window is needed. The proposed action would construct a new window to the PCC. The activity would require block removal for installation of a framed opening on the south wall. The new

  11. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-017 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 Conference Room Modifications SECTION B. Project Description: The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Maintenance Shop, building Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653, located at the ATR Complex, has an upstairs conference room capable of being used as one large conference room or can be split into two conference rooms by a sliding curtain divider. The current configuration causes meeting interruptions due to the one available door limiting personnel

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) / Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Implementation Guide Revision 1 August 2013 U.S. DOE Office of Environmental Management Revision 1, August 2013 TRA/TMP Process Implementation Guide Page 2 of 76 REVISION LOG Date Reason for Revision Revision 0, March 2008  Initial issue of EM guide Revision 1, August 2013  Updates based on lessons learned from completed TRAs  Incorporation of "working draft" appendices on TRL 7

  13. Unique Auxin Regulation Mechanism Discovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: X. Tan, C. Zheng, and N. Zheng (University of Washington at Seattle), L.I.A. Calderon-Villalobos and M. Estelle (Indiana University at Bloomington), M. Sharon and C....

  14. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-03-15

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  15. Unique Auxin Regulation Mechanism Discovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tan, C. Zheng, and N. Zheng (University of Washington at Seattle), L.I.A. Calderon-Villalobos and M. Estelle (Indiana University at Bloomington), M. Sharon and C. Robinson...

  16. Economics of induction linac drivers for radiation sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1987-06-15

    Recent developments in high reliability components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) make possible the use of LIAs as large-scale, economical sources of radio-frequency (rf) power for many applications. One particularly attractive example of interest to high energy physicists is a ''two-beam accelerator'' version of a linear e/sup +/-e/sup -/ collider at TeV energies in which the LIA is configured as a monolithic relativistic klystron operating at 10 to 12 GHz. Another example of keen interest to the fusion community is the use of the LIA to drive a free-electron laser operating at 200 to 500 GHz for use in heating fusion plasma via electron resonance cyclotron heating. This paper briefly describes several potential uses of LIA radiation sources. It discusses the physical basis for scaling our present experience with LIAs to the operating characteristics applicable to large-scale sources of rf power and synchrotron radiation. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 of 23 Ulysses solar wind Coronal Magnetic Field and the Solar Wind Ro Streamer B elt ... he S olar w ind A He 1 00* n alpha n proton A He (%) * What c auses t he v ...

  18. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  19. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusions (CX)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Determinations You are here: DOE-ID Home >NEPA National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations CX Posting No. Project Title Posted DOE-ID-INL-16-100 Lighting Replacements in Test Reactor Area (TRA)-653 (Weld Shop) and TRA-662 (Warehouse) SECTION B. -76 Kb 08/29/2016 DOE-ID-INL-16-099 Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC)-1734 Deactivation and Demolition -68 Kb 08/29/2016 DOE-ID-INL-16-098 Installation of Staircase to Access Idaho Falls (IF)-603 Water Storage

  20. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-017.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 SECTION A. Project Title: Demolish and Dispose of Shed Located East of Test Reactor Area (TRA)-607 SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed action would demolish and dispose of the shed located east of TRA-607 due to deterioration that has rendered the facility unusable. It is a stand-alone 15' x 24' x 16' shed with no electrical or piping and consists mostly of a steel frame enclosed with metal siding. There is also a built-in wood frame filled with insulation covering every wall of the

  1. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-040.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 SECTION A. Project Title: Cleanup of Test Reactor Area (TRA)-786 Diesel Spill SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: Diesel fuel from the supply tank for TRA-786-M-1 diesel was released to soil when the supply line failed. This proposed action is to complete the cleanup of diesel contaminated soil that could not be removed at the time of the spill due to the location of the stabilizer barriers located under the 786-M-1 trailer. The 786-M-1 diesel trailer, electrical wiring, control

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-080.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CX Determination Idaho National Laboratory Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-16-080 SECTION A. Project Title: Test Reactor Area (TRA)-621 Fume Hood Removal SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: During the re-roofing of building TRA-621 at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex, the out of service fume hood in the facility was determined to be no longer needed and needs to be removed. The proposed action would remove the fume hood, associated ducting, electronics, heaters,

  3. CX-008778: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    33: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008733: Categorical Exclusion Determination Film Processing Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-678 CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 05/21/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office The proposed action is to install a silver recovery unit to the film processor in the film processing area at TRA-678 for the purpose of minimizing waste generation and implementing pollution prevention. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-012.docx (87.91 KB) More

  4. CX-008733: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    33: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008733: Categorical Exclusion Determination Film Processing Project at Test Reactor Area (TRA)-678 CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 05/21/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office The proposed action is to install a silver recovery unit to the film processor in the film processing area at TRA-678 for the purpose of minimizing waste generation and implementing pollution prevention. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-012.docx (87.91 KB) More

  5. Lead, mercury, and cadmium exposure and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Stephani [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Arora, Monica [Department of Psychiatry, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States)] [Department of Psychiatry, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States); Fernandez, Cristina [Department of Pediatrics, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE 68131 (United States); Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph [Metallomics Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)] [Metallomics Center, Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Chen, Aimin, E-mail: aimin.chen@uc.edu [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)] [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is limited research examining the relationship between lead (Pb) exposure and medically diagnosed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. The role of mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd) exposures in ADHD development is even less clear. Objectives: To examine the relationship between Pb, Hg, and Cd and ADHD in children living inside and outside a Lead Investigation Area (LIA) of a former lead refinery in Omaha, NE. Methods: We carried out a case-control study with 71 currently medically diagnosed ADHD cases and 58 controls from a psychiatric clinic and a pediatric clinic inside and outside of the LIA. The participants were matched on age group (58, 912 years), sex, race (African American or Caucasians and others), and location (inside or outside LIA). We measured whole blood Pb, total Hg, and Cd using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results: Inside the LIA, the 27 cases had blood Pb geometric mean (GM) 1.89 g/dL and the 41 controls had 1.51 g/dL. Outside the LIA, the 44 cases had blood Pb GM 1.02 g/dL while the 17 controls had 0.97 g/dL. After adjustment for matching variables and maternal smoking, socioeconomic status, and environmental tobacco exposure, each natural log unit blood Pb had an odds ratio of 2.52 with 95% confidence interval of 1.075.92. Stratification by the LIA indicated similar point estimate but wider CIs. No associations were observed for Hg or Cd. Conclusions: Postnatal Pb exposure may be associated with higher risk of clinical ADHD, but not the postnatal exposure to Hg or Cd. -- Highlights: Blood Pb levels are associated with ADHD diagnosis in children. No association was found between blood Cd or Hg levels and ADHD. Children living close to hazardous waste site need to reduce metal exposure.

  6. Tuning the DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    2012-04-24

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories, and the Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos produces flash radiographs of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) make the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each test. The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. The 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by kicking them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{mu}s flattop. The Axis-II injector, LIA, kicker, and downstream transport (DST) to the bremsstrahlung converter are described. Adjusting the magnetic focusing and steering elements to optimize the electron-beam transport through an LIA is often called 'tuning.' As in all high-current LIAs, the focusing field is designed to be as close to that of the ideal continuous solenoid as physically possible. In ideal continuous solenoidal transport a smoothly varying beam size can easily be found for which radial forces balance, and the beam is said to be 'matched' to the focusing field. A 'mismatched' beam exhibits unwanted oscillations in size, which are a source of free energy that contributes to emittance growth. This is undesirable, because in the absence of beam-target effects, the radiographic spot size is proportional to the emittance. Tuning the Axis-II LIA is done in two steps. First, the solenoidal focusing elements are set to values designed to provide a matched beam with little or no envelope oscillations, and little or no beam-breakup (BBU) instability growth. Then, steering elements are adjusted to minimize the motion of the centroid of a well-centered beam at the LIA exit. This article only describes the design of the tune for the focusing solenoids. The DARHT Axis-II LIA was required to be re-tuned after installing an accelerator cell to replace a failed

  7. Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessment (TRA) is tric-based process a t y Office of E dge Trea nt ging Basin or ansfer, The ding- y the ent. ch of e below: * * Th ass at t De but Th est ass con a r de dev Re ...

  8. CX-014414: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Installation of Lock-out/Tag-out (LO/TO) Equipment Storage Cabinets in Test Reactor Area (TRA)-670 CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 10/22/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  9. Topographical Risk Assessment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-24

    TRA was developed as a computer tool for the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) that will provides the capability to visualize and rapidly understand information about the risks associated with the River protection Project (RPP). Previously, technical and programmatic risk management within ORP had relied heavily on risk lists and other techniques that presented risk information but did not place it in perspective of the overall project. This made it difficult for ORP seniormore » management to understand the risk information presented, prioritize their activities, and provide direction to ORP staff and contractors about how to manage specific risk events. The TRA visualization tool, provides the appropriate context and perspective that allows senior management to effectively manage risks. Basically, the TRA overlays information about risks associated with specific activities and their magnitudes on top of the project baseline schedule. this provides senior management with information about the magnitudes of specific risk events as well as their timing, and allows them to focus their attention and resources on the risks that merit attention and possible further action. The TRA tool can also be used to display other types of information associated with scheduled activities, such as cost to date, technical performance, schedule performance, etc. Additionally, the base of the 3-dimensional representation can be changed to other types of graphics, such as maps, process flow diagrams, etc., which allows the display of other types of informatio, such as hazards, health and safety risks, and system availability.« less

  10. New Developments in the Technology Readiness Assessment Process in US DOE-EM - 13247

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, Steven; Sutter, Herbert; Johnson, Hoyt

    2013-07-01

    A Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is a systematic, metric-based process and accompanying report that evaluates the maturity of the technologies used in systems; it is designed to measure technology maturity using the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the 1980's. More recently, DoD has adopted and provided systematic guidance for performing TRAs and determining TRLs. In 2007 the GAO recommended that the DOE adopt the NASA/DoD methodology for evaluating technology maturity. Earlier, in 2006-2007, DOE-EM had conducted pilot TRAs on a number of projects at Hanford and Savannah River. In March 2008, DOE-EM issued a process guide, which established TRAs as an integral part of DOE-EM's Project Management Critical Decision Process. Since the development of its detailed TRA guidance in 2008, DOE-EM has continued to accumulate experience in the conduct of TRAs and the process for evaluating technology maturity. DOE has developed guidance on TRAs applicable department-wide. DOE-EM's experience with the TRA process, the evaluations that led to recently developed proposed revisions to the DOE-EM TRA/TMP Guide; the content of the proposed changes that incorporate the above lessons learned and insights are described. (authors)

  11. Office of Sustainability Support

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Sustainability Support serves as AUs organizational lead in partnering with the Departments Sustainability Performance Office to support the understanding and implementation of sustainability programs and requirements within the Department, including through supporting development and implementation of DOEs annual Strategic Sustainability Program Plan.

  12. Fujifilm_NERSC_StorageOutlook.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Workload c an s aturate s ystem a nd c ause i ssues f or s hared u sers - Beam l ine o r e nd s taon w ork s chedule d rives b andwidth n eeds --- 6 --- Addressing large...

  13. Continuity of Operations at Bonneville Power Administration, IG-0781 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Continuity of Operations at Bonneville Power Administration, IG-0781 Continuity of Operations at Bonneville Power Administration, IG-0781 In the event of a major disruption to its nonnal operations, Bonneville must be prepared to continue its essential functions, particularly its power scheduling, tra~lsmission scheduling, and system operations. In this regard, Bonneville is required to follow Federal Preparedness Circular 65 (FPC 65), as prescribed by the Department of

  14. Audit Report: IG-0781 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Audit Report: IG-0781 November 6, 2007 Continuity of Operations at Bonneville Power Administration In the event of a major disruption to its nonnal operations, Bonneville must be prepared to continue its essential functions, particularly its power scheduling, tra~lsmission scheduling, and system operations. In this regard, Bonneville is required to follow Federal Preparedness Circular 65 (FPC 65), as prescribed by the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency. Under

  15. cityOakRidgeWeb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 miles 1 12 HIGH SCHOOL Oak Ridge Playhouse Methodist Medical Center CIVIC CENTER Art Ctr. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Hampton Inn DoubleTree Hotel Days Inn MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND ENERGY Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX Oak Ridge Mall Jameson Inn Numbered and unnumbered tra c lights Staybridge Suites Comfort Inn Commerce Park Jack Case Center New Hope Center Y-12 Visitor Center Children 's Museum OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC & TECHNICAL INFORMATION Oak Ridge Marina Centennial Golf Course

  16. California Energy Commissioner Carla Peterman and James

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Energy Commissioner Carla Peterman and James Bartridge (CEC) discuss electric vehicle technologies with Fraser Murison Smith (right) of i-GATE NEST client, Elec- traDrive. The partnership with i-GATE has made it easier for businesses and the state of California to engage with Sandia and its assets, helping to push our economic goals forward. Louis Stewart Deputy Director Innovation and Entrepreneurship Governor's Office of Business & Economic Development Innovation Hub Connects

  17. Technology Readiness Assessment Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Readiness Assessment Report Technology Readiness Assessment Report This document has been developed to guide individuals and teams that will be involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The Process Guide is intended to be a 'living document' and will be modified periodically as the understandings of TRA/TMP processes evolve. Technology Readiness

  18. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-022.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 SECTION A. Project Title: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex Training Trailer SECTION B. Project Description: There is not enough classroom space available at the Advanced Test Reactor Simulator Training Facility, Test Reactor Area (TRA)- 679, to support the training needs of new operators. The proposed action would lease, setup, and occupy a classroom training trailer that would provide additional classroom space. The trailer would need to be located in close proximity to the simulator in

  19. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-078.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 SECTION A. Project Title: Radiation Monitoring and Seal System (RMSS) Stack Monitor and Damper Replacement SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The Test Reactor Area (TRA)-770 Stack Radiation Monitoring System measures the air exhausted from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for radioactivity and activates a ventilation shutdown if limits are approached or exceeded. Replacement parts are unavailable and age-related calibration difficulties have caused an increase in maintenance activities

  20. Contract Closeout Procedures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Continuity of Operations at Bonneville Power Administration, IG-0781 Continuity of Operations at Bonneville Power Administration, IG-0781 In the event of a major disruption to its nonnal operations, Bonneville must be prepared to continue its essential functions, particularly its power scheduling, tra~lsmission scheduling, and system operations. In this regard, Bonneville is required to follow Federal Preparedness Circular 65 (FPC 65), as prescribed by the Department of

  1. Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment | Department of Energy Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment (1.11 MB) Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project (146.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries EA-1574: Final

  2. Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Pretreatment Facility | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Pretreatment Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Pretreatment Facility Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Pretreatment Facility (1.68 MB) Summary - WTP Pretreatment Facility (109.88 KB) More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Compilation of TRA Summaries Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste

  3. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 (2.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Enterprise Assessments, Review of the Hanford Site Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis, Revision 00 - April 201

  4. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  5. Little Ice Age glaciers in Britain: Glacier–climate modelling in the Cairngorm Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephan Harrison; Ann V. Rowan; Neil F. Glasser; Jasper Knight; Mitchell A. Plummer; Stephanie C. Mills

    2014-02-01

    It is widely believed that the last glaciers in the British Isles disappeared at the end of the Younger Dryas stadial (12.9–11.7 cal. kyr BP). Here, we use a glacier–climate model driven by data from local weather stations to show for the first time that glaciers developed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the Cairngorm Mountains. Our model is forced from contemporary conditions by a realistic difference in mean annual air temperature of -1.5 degrees C and an increase in annual precipitation of 10%, and confirmed by sensitivity analyses. These results are supported by the presence of small boulder moraines well within Younger Dryas ice limits, and by a dating programme on a moraine in one cirque. As a result, we argue that the last glaciers in the Cairngorm Mountains (and perhaps elsewhere in upland Britain) existed in the LIA within the last few hundred years, rather than during the Younger Dryas.

  6. Response to Comment on Motion of a helical vortex filament in superfluid {sup 4}He under the extrinsic form of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 26, 019101 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-01-15

    I agree with the authors regarding their comments on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability for such helical filaments as those obtained in my paper. I also find merit in their derivation of the quantum LIA (local induction approximation) in the manner of the LIA of Boffetta et al. However, I disagree with the primary criticisms of Hietala and Hnninen. In particular, though they suggest LIA and local nonlinear equation modes are not comparable since the former class of models contains superfluid friction parameters, note that since these parameters are small one may take them to zero and consider a qualitative comparison of the models (which is what was done in my paper). Second, while Hietala and Hnninen criticize certain assumptions made in my paper (and the paper of Shivamoggi where the model comes from) since the results break-down when Ak ? ?, note that in my paper I state that any deviations from the central axis along which the filament is aligned must be sufficiently bounded in variation. Therefore, it was already acknowledged that Ak(=|?{sub x}|) should be sufficiently bounded, precluding the Ak ? ? case. I also show that, despite what Hietala and Hnninen claim, the dispersion relation obtained in my paper is consistent with LIA, where applicable. Finally, while Hietala and Hnninen claim that the dispersion parameter should be complex valued, I show that their dispersion relation is wrong, since it was derived incorrectly (they assume the complex modulus of the potential function is constant, yet then use this to obtain a potential function with non-constant modulus)

  7. 2007 Long Range Plan Working Group Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SC) 7 Long Range Plan Working Group Members Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home NSAC Members 2007 Long Range Plan Working Group Members Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Beise, Elizabeth University of Maryland Merninga, Lia TJNAF Bryman, Douglas TRIUMF Meyer, Curtis Carnegie Mellon University Burrows, Adam University of Arizona Meziani,

  8. General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-06-15

    In his study of superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Svistunov [Superfluid turbulence in the low-temperature limit, Phys. Rev. B 52, 3647 (1995)] derived a Hamiltonian equation for the self-induced motion of a vortex filament. Under the local induction approximation (LIA), the Svistunov formulation is equivalent to a nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation. In this paper, we consider a family of rotating vortex filament solutions for the LIA reduction of the Svistunov formulation, which we refer to as the 2D LIA (since it permits a potential formulation in terms of two of the three Cartesian coordinates). This class of solutions holds the well-known Hasimoto-type planar vortex filament [H. Hasimoto, Motion of a vortex filament and its relation to elastica, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 31, 293 (1971)] as one reduction and helical solutions as another. More generally, we obtain solutions which are periodic in the space variable. A systematic analytical study of the behavior of such solutions is carried out. In the case where vortex filaments have small deviations from the axis of rotation, closed analytical forms of the filament solutions are given. A variety of numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the wide range of rotating filament behaviors possible. Doing so, we are able to determine a number of vortex filament structures not previously studied. We find that the solution structure progresses from planar to helical, and then to more intricate and complex filament structures, possibly indicating the onset of superfluid turbulence.

  9. ARM - TWP Darwin Site - Aussie Trivia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InactiveTWP Darwin Site-InactiveTWP Darwin Site - Aussie Trivia TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists TWP Darwin Site - Aussie Trivia Did you know... The first beer brewed in Australia was in 1796 by John Boston, thus starting Australia's lifelong love for the amber nectar! Christmas is

  10. ARM - Visiting the TWP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Visiting the TWP Nauru Island from the air. Nauru Island from the air. The Tropical Western Pacific site consists of three diverse climate research facilities in Papua New Guinea, the Republic of Nauru, and Australia. Each

  11. Frontiers in Geoscience Colloquium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15, 2016 3:00pm - 4:00pm Physics Auditorium (TA-3, Bldg 215) Parameter Estimation for some Geoscience Applications using a Measure-Theoretic Approach Professor Clint Dawson University of Texas at AusLn Effective modeling of complex physical systems arising in the geosciences is dependent on knowing parameters which are often difficult or impossible to measure in situ. In this talk we focus on two such problems, estimating parameters for groundwater flow and contaminant transport, and estimating

  12. Modular System for Neutronics Calculations of Fission Reactors, Fusion Blankets, and Other Systems.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-07-23

    AUS is a neutronics code system which may be used for calculations of a wide range of fission reactors, fusion blankets and other neutron applications. The present version, AUS98, has a nuclear cross section library based on ENDF/B-VI and includes modules which provide for reactor lattice calculations, one-dimensional transport calculations, multi-dimensional diffusion calculations, cell and whole reactor burnup calculations, and flexible editing of results. Calculations of multi-region resonance shielding, coupled neutron and photon transport, energymore » deposition, fission product inventory and neutron diffusion are combined within the one code system. The major changes from the previous release, AUS87, are the inclusion of a cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI, the addition of the POW3D multi-dimensional diffusion module, the addition of the MICBURN module for controlling whole reactor burnup calculations, and changes to the system as a consequence of moving from IBM mainframe computers to UNIX workstations.« less

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Accelerated Milestones

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RECOVERY PROJECT OR ACTIVITY / ACCELERATED MILESTONE TITLE MILESTONE DUE DATE EXPECTED ACCELERATED COMPLETION DATE WITH ARRA FUNDING STATUS INL - Cleanup of Surplus Nuclear Facilities -- CPP- 601 / 640 Complex D&D Post 2012 9/30/2011 On Schedule to be Met by Expected Accelerated Completion Date (NOTE: CPP-601 is approximately 2 months ahead of schedule, CPP-640 was completed by the end of April 2010). INL - Cleanup of Surplus Nuclear Facilities -- VCO Lines under TRA-632 building 9/30/2013

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-017.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID-INL-10-017 SECTION A. Project Title: ATR Complex Dial Room. SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed project is to construct and operate a new dial room at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR Complex) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area [TRA]) in order to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy programmatic needs and to provide ongoing critical support at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The existing telecommunication and data systems located at the

  15. Deep Well #4 Backup Power Systems Project Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Westwood

    2010-04-01

    The project scope was to install a diesel generated power source to deep well 4 in addition to the existing commercial power source. The diesel power source and its fuel supply system shall be seismically qualified to withstand a Performance Category 4 (PC-4) seismic event. This diesel power source will permit the deep well to operate during a loss of commercial power. System design will incorporate the ability to select and transfer power between the new diesel power source and commercial power sources for the the deep well motor and TRA-672 building loads.

  16. DARHT Axis-I Diode Simulations II: Geometrical Scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-06-14

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a venerable diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. Many of the largest hydrodynamic experiments study mockups of nuclear weapons, and are often called hydrotests for short. The dual-axis radiography for hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility uses two electron linear-induction accelerators (LIA) to produce the radiographic source spots for perpendicular views of a hydrotest. The first of these LIAs produces a single pulse, with a fixed {approx}60-ns pulsewidth. The second axis LIA produces as many as four pulses within 1.6-{micro}s, with variable pulsewidths and separation. There are a wide variety of hydrotest geometries, each with a unique radiographic requirement, so there is a need to adjust the radiographic dose for the best images. This can be accomplished on the second axis by simply adjusting the pulsewidths, but is more problematic on the first axis. Changing the beam energy or introducing radiation attenuation also changes the spectrum, which is undesirable. Moreover, using radiation attenuation introduces significant blur, increasing the effective spot size. The dose can also be adjusted by changing the beam kinetic energy. This is a very sensitive method, because the dose scales as the {approx}2.8 power of the energy, but it would require retuning the accelerator. This leaves manipulating the beam current as the best means for adjusting the dose, and one way to do this is to change the size of the cathode. This method has been proposed, and is being tested. This article describes simulations undertaken to develop scaling laws for use as design tools in changing the Axis-1 beam current by changing the cathode size.

  17. Joint Statement on Brazil-United States Energy Meeting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy on Brazil-United States Energy Meeting Joint Statement on Brazil-United States Energy Meeting August 6, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis Brasília, August 5, 2008 BRASILIA, BRAZIL -- Brazilian Mines and Energy Minister Edison Lobão and United States Acting Deputy Secretary of Energy Jeffrey Kupfer met today for the first time in recognition of the important role each nation plays in promoting safe, reliable, clean, affordable, and diverse energy supplies and reaffirming the strong relationship

  18. Statement from National Security Council Spokesman Tommy Vietor on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Launch | Department of Energy National Security Council Spokesman Tommy Vietor on U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Launch Statement from National Security Council Spokesman Tommy Vietor on U.S.-Brazil Strategic Energy Dialogue Launch August 12, 2011 - 12:36pm Addthis THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy Daniel Poneman will lead an interagency delegation to Brasília, Brazil on August 17, 2011 to

  19. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (see below). b Beams produced using the "Two-accelerator" or "Batch" method (see below). c Allowed maximum radiation may limit beam current. d Used so far for implantation only. Ion Half-Life Reaction Intensity (ions/sec/pnA) Opening Angle (degrees) Production Energy (MeV) Max. Rate (ions/sec) 6Hea,c 0.807 sec d(7Li,6He)3He 150 19 75 1 x 104 8Lia,c 0.838 sec

  20. Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesTropical Western Pacific TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Tropical Western Pacific-Inactive Manus, Papua New Guinea: 2° 3' 39.64" S, 147° 25' 31.43" E Nauru Island: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Darwin, Australia: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53'

  1. TWP Darwin Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darwin Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists TWP Darwin Site-Inactive Location: 12° 25' 28.56" S, 130° 53' 29.75" E Altitude: 29.9 meters The third TWP climate research facility was established in April 2002 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. The facility is

  2. A comparative study of lock-in-amplifiers and improved duffing chaotic oscillators for the detection and processing of weak signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Yanmei; Li, Xinli; Bai, Yan

    2014-04-11

    The measurement of multiphase flow parameters is of great importance in a wide range of industries. In the measurement of multiphase, the signals from the sensors are extremely weak and often buried in strong background noise. It is thus desirable to develop effective signal processing techniques that can detect the weak signal from the sensor outputs. In this paper, two methods, i.e., lock-in-amplifier (LIA) and improved Duffing chaotic oscillator are compared to detect and process the weak signal. For sinusoidal signal buried in noise, the correlation detection with sinusoidal reference signal is simulated by using LIA. The improved Duffing chaotic oscillator method, which based on the Wigner transformation, can restore the signal waveform and detect the frequency. Two methods are combined to detect and extract the weak signal. Simulation results show the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed improved method. The comparative analysis shows that the improved Duffing chaotic oscillator method can restrain noise strongly since it is sensitive to initial conditions.

  3. Vorticity dynamics after the shock–turbulence interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2015-07-23

    In this article, the interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms = 10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.

  4. Vorticity dynamics after the shock–turbulence interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2015-07-23

    In this article, the interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviatemore » the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms = 10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.« less

  5. Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.; Young, J.K.; Berkowitz, J.B.; DeVine, Jr.J.C.; Sutter, H.G.

    2008-07-01

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F and H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department

  6. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-10-25

    ABSTRACT One of U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRCs ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the

  7. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT TECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Young, Joan K.; Berkowitz, Joan B.; Devine, John C.; Sutter, Herbert G.

    2008-03-18

    One of U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary missions at Savannah River Site (SRS) is to retrieve and treat the high level waste (HLW) remaining in SRS tanks and close the F&H tank farms. At present, a significant impediment to timely completion of this mission is the presence of significant organic chemical contamination in Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a 1.3 million gallon tank with full secondary containment, located and interconnected within the SRS tank system. However, the tank has been isolated from the system and unavailable for use since 1983, because its contents - approximately 250,000 gallons of salt solution containing Cs-137 and other radioisotopes - are contaminated with nearly 22,000 Kg of tetraphenylborate, a material which can release benzene vapor to the tank head space in potentially flammable concentrations. An important element of the DOE SRS mission is to remove, process, and dispose of the contents of Tank 48H, both to eliminate the hazard it presents to the SRS H-Tank Farm and to return Tank 48H to service. Tank 48H must be returned to service to support operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility, to free up HLW tank space, and to allow orderly tank closures per Federal Facility Agreement commitments. The Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), the SRS prime contractor, has evaluated alternatives and selected two processes, Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) and Fluidized Steam Bed Reforming (FBSR) as candidates for Tank 48H processing. Over the past year, WSRC has been testing and evaluating these two processes, and DOE is nearing a final technology selection in late 2007. In parallel with WSRC's ongoing work, DOE convened a team of independent qualified experts to conduct a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA). The purpose of the TRA was to determine the maturity level of the Tank 48H treatment technology candidates - WAO and FBSR. The methodology used for this TRA is based on detailed guidance for conducting TRAs contained in the Department of

  8. X-ray crystal structure of (6-n-propyl-2-thiouracilato)(triethylphosphine) gold (I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cookson, P.D.; Tiekink, E.R.T. )

    1993-03-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound [Et[sub 3]PAu(PRU)] is reported. There are two molecules in the asymmetric unit and each of the independent Au atoms exists in a linear geometry defined by a P atom of the phosphine ligand and a thiolate S atom derived from the thionucleobase; molecule 1: Au-P 2.255(5), Au-S 2.314(5)[Angstrom], P-Au-S 176.0(2)[degrees] and molecule 2: Au-P 2.249(5), Au-S 2.328(4)[Angstrom] and hydrogen bonding interactions involving the oxo and N-H groups. Crystals are monoclinic, space group P2[sub 1]/c with unit cell dimensions: a = 21.445(2), b = 8.931(2), c = 17.956(3)[Angstrom]; [Beta] = 96.091(1)[degrees] and Z = 89. The structure was refined by a full-matrix least-squares procedure to final R = 0.053 using 2875 reflections with I [ge] 3.0[sigma](I).

  9. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hyd rog en Tan k Res earc h, LLN L PH EN IX Ex pe rim en t, BN L Fu el Ce ll Re sea rch , AN L Ca rb on Se qu es tra tio n Re se ar ch , PN NL Hi gh Ex pl os iv es Ap pl ic at io ns Fa ci lit y, LL NL Com put er Sim ulat ion The ater , LAN L Al ga e Re se ar ch , NR EL Ad va nc ed Bio fue ls Re se arc h, LB NL T ra in in g Nuc lear Mat eria ls Sto rag e, SRS C o a l G a s if ic a ti o n R e s e a rc h , P N N L Cli ma te Mo de lin g, OR NL AnnuAl PerformAnce rePort fY 2008 Table of Contents

  10. Work Order Generation Macros for Word Perfect 6.X for Windows

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-09-02

    Included are three general WP macros (two independent and one multiple) and a template used at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) for the generation of the Work Orders (WO's) used to perform corrective and preventative maintenance, as well as modifications of existing systems and installation of new systems. They incorporate facility specific requirements as well as selected federal/state orders. These macros are used to generate a WP document which is then converted into ASCII textmore » for import to the maintenance software. Currently we are using MCRS but should be compatible with other platforms such as Passport. Reference the included file Wogen.txt for installation and usage instructions.« less

  11. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Reactor Technology Complex Operable Unit 2-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Wells

    2007-03-23

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan describes the objectives, activities, and assessments that will be performed to support the on-going groundwater monitoring requirements at the Reactor Technology Complex, formerly the Test Reactor Area (TRA). The requirements for groundwater monitoring were stipulated in the Final Record of Decision for Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, signed in December 1997. The monitoring requirements were modified by the First Five-Year Review Report for the Test Reactor Area, Operable Unit 2-13, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to focus on those contaminants of concern that warrant continued surveillance, including chromium, tritium, strontium-90, and cobalt-60. Based upon recommendations provided in the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Status Report for 2006, the groundwater monitoring frequency was reduced to annually from twice a year.

  12. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of catalyst degradation on electrode performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishizaki, K.; Uchida, H.; Watanabe, M.

    1996-12-31

    Aiming commercialization of Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) power plant, many researches and developments have been contributed. Over 20000 hours operations have been demonstrated by many PAFC power plants. But there is no effective method for the estimation of lifetime of electrochemical cells without a practical long-term operation. Conducted by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), cooperative research projects aiming development of PAFC lifetime estimation method have started since 1995 FY in Japan. As part of this project, this work has been performed to clarify basic phenomena of the performance degradation at PAFCs jointly by Yamanashi University, Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) and PAFC manufacturers (Toshiba Co., Mitsubishi Electric Co, Fuji Electric Co.). Among several main causes of the cell performance degradation, effects of catalyst degradation (reduction in metal surface area, dealloying, changes in catalyst support) on PAFC cathode performances are discussed in this work.

  13. 1000kW on-site PAFC power plant development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satomi, Tomohide; Koike, Shunichi; Ishikawa, Ryou

    1996-12-31

    Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) have been conducting a joint project on development of a 5000kW urban energy center type PAFC power plant (pressurized) and a 1000kW on-site PAFC power plant (non-pressurized). The objective of the technical development of 1000kW on-site PAFC power plant is to realize a medium size power plant with an overall efficiency of over 70% and an electrical efficiency of over 36%, that could be installed in a large building as a cogeneration system. The components and system integration development work and the plant design were performed in 1991 and 1992. Manufacturing of the plant and installation at the test site were completed in 1994. PAC test was carried out in 1994, and generation test was started in January 1995. Demonstration test is scheduled for 1995 and 1996.

  14. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from those coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.

  15. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from thosemore » coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.« less

  16. Experimental analysis of elemental factors controlling the life of PAFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    1996-12-31

    Since 1991, 5MW-class and 1MW-class PAFC power plants have been demonstrated with the objective of accelerating development and commercialization by the Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Research Association (PAFC-TRA) jointly with NEDO as one of MITI`s fuel cell programs. As a complimentary research project to the demonstration project, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. Our work has been performed in the Basic Research Project, as part of that project on PAFCs, with the cooperation of Yamanashi University supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, PAFC-TRA supported by NEDO and three PAFC makers. We have selected the following four subjects as the essential factors relating to the life-time, after a year-long study of the literature and the accumulation of a large number of data as to the practical operations of the cells, cell stacks and plants of PAFCs; i.e., (1) Mechanism of the degradation of electrocatalysts and the effect of the degradation on the electrode performances. (2) Effect of the electrolyte fill-level on the electrode performances. (3) Corrosion of cell constructing materials and the effect of the corrosion on the electrode performances. (4) The rate and mechanism of electrolyte loss under various operating conditions of a model cell. The paper briefly introduces the interim results which have been found on the above subjects at this time.

  17. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mc Cuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rose, Chris R; Sanchez, Manolito; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Trainham, C; Williams, John; Scarpetti, Raymond; Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  18. Linear induction accelerator parameter options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Reginato, L.L.

    1986-04-21

    The principal undertaking of the Beam Research Program over the past decade has been the investigation of propagating intense self-focused beams. Recently, the major activity of the program has shifted toward the investigation of converting high quality electron beams directly to laser radiation. During the early years of the program, accelerator development was directed toward the generation of very high current (>10 kA), high energy beams (>50 MeV). In its new mission, the program has shifted the emphasis toward the production of lower current beams (>3 kA) with high brightness (>10/sup 6/ A/(rad-cm)/sup 2/) at very high average power levels. In efforts to produce these intense beams, the state of the art of linear induction accelerators (LIA) has been advanced to the point of satisfying not only the current requirements but also future national needs.

  19. FZl

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    fr> 1" 1, ., v i 617 *"2 ;,+$,+' .- ; : I ,:,; ' "S i FZl lia- ryloag p" %. rsloarrJxh4XIPsaribrdllllZb~~~~) ;Qo~' *8-agrr 103111 af q=w amlm%ar assgbol (rsarBeqpr Irwrw *~-~=Enn~*~l4~~l2ld&001&' wamd." em68 4MiB au?e 4wag~W~~~ qwt t!#mpq, aI& k) be- it ~illangerpgrrw, $4 i,I)Ipsb$84mJwW1f3~~WPIh4k~ d~~~Xttr~~itoirorPrrrrrrl~kltakPnaP;s. ' ,. R&l .________________________ <,,' .d "" _ _----__"-"-----"------- aecIIuIlw ,I'

  20. Chemical Fabrication of Heterometallic Nanogaps for Molecular Transport Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Yeganeh, Sina; Qin, Lidong; Li, Shuzhou; Xue, Can; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Schatz, George C.; Ratner, Mark A.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2009-01-01

    We report a simple and reproducible method for fabricating heterometallic nanogaps, which are made of two different metal nanorods separated by a nanometer-sized gap. The method is based upon on-wire lithography, which is a chemically enabled technique used to synthesize a wide variety of nanowire-based structures (e.g., nanogaps and disk arrays). This method can be used to fabricate pairs of metallic electrodes, which exhibit distinct work functions and are separated by gaps as small as 2 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a symmetric thiol-terminated molecule can be assembled into such heterometallic nanogaps to form molecular transport junctions (MTJs) that exhibit molecular diode behavior. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the coupling strength between gold and sulfur (Au-S) is 2.5 times stronger than that of Pt-S. In addition, the structures form Raman hot spots in the gap, allowing the spectroscopic characterization of the molecules that make up the MTJs.

  1. PDSF User Meeting 10-07-14.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 , 2 014 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past Outages * 9/7/14 - 9 /8/14: E liza18, s wap i n n ew h ardware * 9/30/14 (1 hour): Science Gateways * 10/5/14 ( 6 h ours): P ower e vent c aused n etwork issues o n P DSF. M any j obs w ere l ost Planned Outages * Shellshock - Rolling r eboot o f a ll c omputes * Already i n p rogress, s hould t ake a bout a w eek t o fi nish - Rolling r eboot o f i nterac=ve n odes o n m orning o f 1 0/9 * Should t ake h alf a d ay, w ill b roadcast a m essage

  2. Catalog of databases and reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtis, M.D.

    1997-04-01

    This catalog provides information about the many reports and materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Global Change Research Program (GCRP) and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The catalog is divided into nine sections plus the author and title indexes: Section A--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Research Plans and Summaries; Section B--US Department of Energy Global Change Research Program Technical Reports; Section C--US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Reports; Section D--Other US Department of Energy Reports; Section E--CDIAC Reports; Section F--CDIAC Numeric Data and Computer Model Distribution; Section G--Other Databases Distributed by CDIAC; Section H--US Department of Agriculture Reports on Response of Vegetation to Carbon Dioxide; and Section I--Other Publications.

  3. Diode magnetic-field influence on radiographic spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-09-04

    Flash radiography of hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. The Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos was developed for flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) produce the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each experiment ('hydrotest'). The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. For time resolution of the hydrotest dynamics, the 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by slicing them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{micro}s flattop. Both axes now routinely produce radiographic source spot sizes having full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) less than 1 mm. To further improve on the radiographic resolution, one must consider the major factors influencing the spot size: (1) Beam convergence at the final focus; (2) Beam emittance; (3) Beam canonical angular momentum; (4) Beam-motion blur; and (5) Beam-target interactions. Beam emittance growth and motion in the accelerators have been addressed by careful tuning. Defocusing by beam-target interactions has been minimized through tuning of the final focus solenoid for optimum convergence and other means. Finally, the beam canonical angular momentum is minimized by using a 'shielded source' of electrons. An ideal shielded source creates the beam in a region where the axial magnetic field is zero, thus the canonical momentum zero, since the beam is born with no mechanical angular momentum. It then follows from Busch's conservation theorem that the canonical angular momentum is minimized at the target, at least in principal. In the DARHT accelerators, the axial magnetic field at the cathode is minmized by using a 'bucking coil' solenoid with reverse polarity to cancel out whatever solenoidal beam transport field exists there. This is imperfect in practice, because of

  4. Early Market TRL/MRL Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Stetson, Ned

    2013-12-01

    he focus of this report is TRL/MRL analysis of hydrogen storage; it documents the methodology and results of an effort to identify hydrogen storage technologies technical and manufacturing readiness for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. Motive applications include materials handling equipment (MHE) and ground support equipment (GSE), such as forklifts, tow tractors, and specialty vehicles such as golf carts, lawn mowers and wheel chairs. Non-motive applications are portable, stationary or auxiliary power units (APUs) and include portable laptops, backup power, remote sensor power, and auxiliary power for recreational vehicles, hotels, hospitals, etc. Hydrogen storage technologies assessed include metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, sorbents, gaseous storage, and liquid storage. The assessments are based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies at varying levels of development. The manufacturing status could be established from eight risk elements: Technical Maturity, Design, Materials, Cost & Funding, Process Capability, Personnel, Facilities and Manufacturing Planning. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. This technology readiness assessment (TRA) report documents the process used to conduct the TRA/MRA (technology and manufacturing readiness assessment), reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings. To investigate the state of the art and needs to mature the technologies, PNNL prepared a questionnaire to assign TRL and MRL for each hydrogen storage technology. The questionnaire was sent to

  5. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-07-15

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite

  6. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe

  7. First principles treatment of structural, optical, and thermoelectric properties of Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} as electrode for a Li secondary battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Wilayat; Reshak, A.H.

    2015-01-15

    The electronic structure, electronic charge density and linear optical properties of the metallic Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} compound, having cubic symmetry, are calculated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated band structure and density of states using the local density, generalized gradient and EngelVosko approximations, depict the metallic nature of the cubic Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} compound. The bands crossing the Fermi level in the calculated band structure are mainly from the Mn-d states with small support of N-p states. In addition, the Mn-d states at the Fermi level enhance the density of states, which is very useful for the electronic transport properties. The valence electronic charge density depicts strong covalent bond between Mn and two N atoms and polar covalent bond between Mn and Li atoms. The frequency dependent linear optical properties like real and imaginary part of the dielectric function, optical conductivity, reflectivity and energy loss function are calculated on the basis of the computed band structure. Both intra-band and inter-band transitions contribute to the calculated optical parameters. Using the BoltzTraP code, the thermoelectric properties like electrical and thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, power coefficient and heat capacity of the Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} are also calculated as a function of temperature and studied.

  8. Thermoelectric, electronic, optical and chemical bonding properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6}: At temperature 7 K and 150 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshak, A.H.; Khan, Wilayat

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the electronic structure. The Fermi surface of BPRO (7 K and 150 K) is also calculated. The complex dielectric function has been calculated. Thermoelectric properties were also calculated using BoltzTraP code. Power factor shows that both compounds are good thermoelectric materials at 600 K. - Abstract: We present first principles calculations of the band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties of Ba{sub 2}PrRuO{sub 6} single crystals at two different temperatures. The atomic positions were optimized by minimizing the forces acting on the atoms. We have employed the full potential linear augmented plane wave method within local density approximation, generalized gradient approximation and EngelVosko generalized gradient approximation to treat the exchange correlation potential. The calculation shows that the compound is superconductor with strong hybridization near the Fermi energy level. Fermi surface is composed of two sheets. The calculated electronic specific heat capacities indicate, very close agreement with the experimental one. The bonding features of the compounds are analyzed using the electronic charge density in the (1 0 0) and (010) crystallographic planes. The dispersion of the optical constants was calculated and discussed. The thermoelectric properties are also calculated using the BoltzTrap code.

  9. Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2012-07-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

  10. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  11. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-? equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-? approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  12. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  13. Evaluation of the performance degradation at PAFC effect of operating conditions on acid loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyoshi, Hideaki; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    As a complimentary research project to the demonstration project of 5MW and 1 MW PAFC plants, the mechanism and rate of deterioration of the cells and stacks have been studied from 1995 FY conducted by NEDO, with the objective of establishing an estimation method for the service life-time of the cell stacks. As part of this project, this work has been performed to clarify basic phenomena of the performance degradation at PAFCs jointly by Yamanashi University, PAFC-TRA and PAFC manufacturers. The acid loss into exhaust gases is one of life limiting factors in PAFCs. To design the cells of long-life, it is important to estimate the phosphoric acid loss and to contrive ideas eliminating it. With the objective of obtaining basic data for simulating the acid loss in the large size cells, the effect of the operating conditions on the acid loss into exhaust gases has been studied experimentally by using a single cell with an active electrode area of 100 cm{sup 2}.

  14. Selecting RMF Controls for National Security Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witzke, Edward L.

    2015-08-01

    In 2014, the United States Department of Defense started tra nsitioning the way it performs risk management and accreditation of informatio n systems to a process entitled Risk Management Framework for DoD Information Technology or RMF for DoD IT. There are many more security and privacy contro ls (and control enhancements) from which to select in RMF, than there w ere in the previous Information Assurance process. This report is an attempt t o clarify the way security controls and enhancements are selected. After a brief overview and comparison of RMF for DoD I T with the previously used process, this report looks at the determination of systems as National Security Systems (NSS). Once deemed to be an NSS, this report addr esses the categorization of the information system with respect to impact level s of the various security objectives and the selection of an initial baseline o f controls. Next, the report describes tailoring the controls through the use of overl ays and scoping considerations. Finally, the report discusses organizatio n-defined values for tuning the security controls to the needs of the information system.

  15. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohachek, Randolph Charles

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: “contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).” This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  16. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -I -IIcc -PM.-. -_. _ .,- _ _ _ _ a . , . . D o p a r k n e n t o f E n e r g y W a s h i g to n , O K . 2 0 5 8 5 e I . N S ,P -kN M A Y 3 0 1 8 8 0 N O T E ' F O R F R O M t a I;UBJrr L E G A L O P INIO N - N T H G R ITY !l'O D E ! C C ) N W ~ ~ ~ ~ W ~ '~ 'E TIlE M l D D L E S E X M U N ICIPAL L A S D F IL L S ITE , M I D D L E S E X , N E W J C R S E Y t I a m tra n s m ittin g a l a g a m e m o r a n d u m a n th e a u th o r L ty to d e c o n ta m inate th e M iddlesex M u n icipal L a n d

  17. RF generation in the DARHT Axis-II beam dump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-05-03

    We have occasionally observed radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic signals in the downstream transport (DST) of the second axis linear induction accelerator (LIA) at the dual-axis radiographic hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility. We have identified and eliminated some of the sources by eliminating the offending cavities. However, we still observe strong RF in the range 1 GHz t0 2 GHz occurring late in the {approx}2-{micro}s pulse that can be excited or prevented by varying the downstream tune. The narrow frequency width (<0.5%) and near exponential growth at the dominant frequency is indicative of a beam-cavity interaction, and electro-magnetic simulations of cavity structure show a spectrum rich in resonances in the observed frequency range. However, the source of beam produced RF in the cavity resonance frequency range has not been identified, and it has been the subject of much speculation, ranging from beam-plasma or beam-ion instabilities to unstable cavity coupling.

  18. Southwest conference on optics. SPIE Volume 540

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    In 1985 the Los Alamos Conference on Optics, which has been held previously in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, expanded its coverage and moved to Albuquerque as the Southwest Conference on Optics. This was made possible by a broad increase in the Conference sponsorship, which this year included research and educational institutions throughout New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Texas, and old Mexico, as well as SPIE, OSA, and LIA. In that portion of the Conference represented by the present volume, about 115 papers were presented, of which the majority were contributed papers given in poster sessions. The texts of most of these papers, both invited and contributed, are included here. The organization of this volume generally follows that of the Conference, with the papers arranged by the various sessions: General Invited Papers; Optical Components, Materials, and Design; Lasers and Laser Systems; Spectroscopy and Spectroscopic Applications; Applications of Optics; and the Symposium on Optics Along the Rio Grande Research Corridor. There was some rearrangement to provide for a more logical sequence, and the postdeadline papers have been placed in their proper sessions.

  19. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  20. Eight Pulse Performance of DARHT Axis II - Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-12-08

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 1.65-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. Standard operation of the DARHT Axis II accelerator involves extracting four short pulses from the 1.6 us long macro-pulse produced by the LIA. The four short pulses are extracted using a fast kicker in combination with a quadrupole septum magnet and then transported for several meters to a high-Z material target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. The ability of the DARHT Axis 2 kicker to produce more than the standard four pulse format has been previously demonstrated. This capability was developed to study potential risks associated with beam transport during an initial commissioning phase at low energy (8 MeV) and low current (1.0 kA).The ability of the kicker to deliver more than four pulses to the target has been realized for many years. This note describes the initial results demonstrating this capability.

  1. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2013-11-21

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for ?-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices.

  2. A Compute Capable SSD Architecture for Next-Generation Non-volatile Memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, Arup

    2014-01-01

    Existing storage technologies (e.g., disks and ash) are failing to cope with the processor and main memory speed and are limiting the overall perfor- mance of many large scale I/O or data-intensive applications. Emerging fast byte-addressable non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies, such as phase-change memory (PCM), spin-transfer torque memory (STTM) and memristor are very promising and are approaching DRAM-like performance with lower power con- sumption and higher density as process technology scales. These new memories are narrowing down the performance gap between the storage and the main mem- ory and are putting forward challenging problems on existing SSD architecture, I/O interface (e.g, SATA, PCIe) and software. This dissertation addresses those challenges and presents a novel SSD architecture called XSSD. XSSD o oads com- putation in storage to exploit fast NVMs and reduce the redundant data tra c across the I/O bus. XSSD o ers a exible RPC-based programming framework that developers can use for application development on SSD without dealing with the complication of the underlying architecture and communication management. We have built a prototype of XSSD on the BEE3 FPGA prototyping system. We implement various data-intensive applications and achieve speedup and energy ef- ciency of 1.5-8.9 and 1.7-10.27 respectively. This dissertation also compares XSSD with previous work on intelligent storage and intelligent memory. The existing ecosystem and these new enabling technologies make this system more viable than earlier ones.

  3. Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas todiverse environments of their insect and plant hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Ewing, Adam; Miller, Sally A.; Radek, Agnes; Shevchenko, Dimitriy; Tsukerman, Kiryl; Walunas, Theresa; Lapidus, Alla; Campbell, John W.; Hogenhout Saskia A.

    2006-02-17

    Phytoplasmas (Candidatus Phytoplasma, Class Mollicutes) cause disease in hundreds of economically important plants, and are obligately transmitted by sap-feeding insects of the order Hemiptera, mainly leafhoppers and psyllids. The 706,569-bp chromosome and four plasmids of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches broom (AY-WB) were sequenced and compared to the onion yellows phytoplasma strain M (OY-M) genome. The phytoplasmas have small repeat-rich genomes. The repeated DNAs are organized into large clusters, potential mobile units (PMUs), which contain tra5 insertion sequences (ISs), and specialized sigma factors and membrane proteins. So far, PMUs are unique to phytoplasmas. Compared to mycoplasmas, phytoplasmas lack several recombination and DNA modification functions, and therefore phytoplasmas probably use different mechanisms of recombination, likely involving PMUs, for the creation of variability, allowing phytoplasmas to adjust to the diverse environments of plants and insects. The irregular GC skews and presence of ISs and large repeated sequences in the AY-WB and OY-M genomes are indicative of high genomic plasticity. Nevertheless, segments of {approx}250 kb, located between genes lplA and glnQ are syntenic between the two phytoplasmas, contain the majority of the metabolic genes and no ISs. AY-WB is further along in the reductive evolution process than OY-M. The AY-WB genome is {approx}154 kb smaller than the OY-M genome, primarily as a result of fewer multicopy sequences, including PMUs. Further, AY-WB lacks genes that are truncated and are part of incomplete pathways in OY-M. This is the first comparative phytoplasma genome analysis and report of the existence of PMUs in phytoplasma genomes.

  4. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial). We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.

  5. A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Ming; Yin, Hongxi; Archer, David H.

    2010-02-15

    A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

  6. Analysis of the ATR fuel element swaging process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a detailed evaluation of the swaging process used to connect fuel plates to side plates in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel elements. The swaging is a mechanical process that begins with fitting a fuel plate into grooves in the side plates. Once a fuel plate is positioned, a lip on each of two side plate grooves is pressed into the fuel plate using swaging wheels to form the joints. Each connection must have a specified strength (measured in terms, of a pullout force capacity) to assure that these joints do not fail during reactor operation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the swaging process and associated procedural controls, and to provide recommendations to assure that the manufacturing process produces swaged connections that meet the minimum strength requirement. The current fuel element manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) of Lynchburg, Virginia, follows established procedures that include quality inspections and process controls in swaging these connections. The procedures have been approved by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies and are designed to assure repeatability of the process and structural integrity of each joint. Prior to July 1994, ATR fuel elements were placed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (AGNAIL), Test Reactor Area (TRA) for application of Boehmite (an aluminum oxide) film and for checking structural integrity before placement of the elements into the ATR. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the pullout strength of the swaged connections is assured by the current manufacturing process (with several recommended enhancements) without the need for- testing each element in the HTF.

  7. Geologic ages and accumulation rates of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in selected wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Cecil, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    Geologic ages and accumulation rates, estimated from regressions, were used to evaluate measured ages and interpreted stratigraphic and structural relations of basalt and sediment in the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in eastern Idaho. Geologic ages and accumulation rates were estimated from standard linear regressions of 21 mean potassium-argon (K-Ar) ages, selected mean paleomagnetic ages, and cumulative depths of a composite stratigraphic section composed of complete intervals of basalt and sediment that were deposited in areas of past maximum subsidence. Accumulation rates also were estimated from regressions of stratigraphic intervals in three wells in and adjacent to an area of interpreted uplift at and near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and the Test Reactor Area (TRA) to allow a comparison of rates in areas of past uplift and subsidence. Estimated geologic ages range from about 200 thousand to 1.8 million years before present and are reasonable approximations for the interval of basalt and sediment above the effective base of the aquifer, based on reported uncertainties of corresponding measured ages. Estimated ages between 200 and 800 thousand years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all 15 K-Ar ages used in regressions and two out of three -argon ({sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar) ages of duplicate argon samples. Two sets of estimated ages between 800 thousand and 1.8 million years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all seven K-Ar ages used in regressions, which include one shared age of about 800 thousand years. Two sets of ages were estimated for this interval because K-Ar ages make up two populations that agree with previous and revised ages of three paleomagnetic subchrons. The youngest set of ages is consistent with a K-Ar age from the effective base of the aquifer that agrees with previous ages of the Olduvai Normal-Polarity Subchron.

  8. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial).more » We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.« less

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, Wayne; Hughes, Joan; Coffey, Mike; Thompson, Sharon

    2007-09-01

    This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental-monitoring activities, on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23l.IA, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental-monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program.' The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2006. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix A. Environmental monitoring on the ORR consists primarily of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring involves the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents at the point of release to the environment; these measurements allow the quantification and official reporting of contaminants, assessment of radiation and chemical exposures to the public, and demonstration of compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements. Environmental surveillance consists of the collection and analysis of environmental samples from the site and its environs; these activities provide direct measurement of contaminant concentrations in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media. Environmental surveillance data provide information regarding conformity with

  10. MIGRATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-08-20

    Characterization of migration in gravitationally unstable disks is necessary to understand the fate of protoplanets formed by disk instability. As part of a larger study, we are using a three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics code to investigate how an embedded gas giant planet interacts with a gas disk that undergoes gravitational instabilities (GIs). This Letter presents results from simulations with a Jupiter-mass planet placed in orbit at 25 AU within a 0.14 M{sub sun} disk. The disk spans 5-40 AU around a 1 M{sub sun} star and is initially marginally unstable. In one simulation, the planet is inserted prior to the eruption of GIs; in another, it is inserted only after the disk has settled into a quasi-steady GI-active state, where heating by GIs roughly balances radiative cooling. When the planet is present from the beginning, its own wake stimulates growth of a particular global mode with which it strongly interacts, and the planet plunges inward 6 AU in about 10{sup 3} years. In both cases with embedded planets, there are times when the planet's radial motion is slow and varies in direction. At other times, when the planet appears to be interacting with strong spiral modes, migration both inward and outward can be relatively rapid, covering several AUs over hundreds of years. Migration in both cases appears to stall near the inner Lindblad resonance of a dominant low-order mode. Planet orbit eccentricities fluctuate rapidly between about 0.02 and 0.1 throughout the GI-active phases of the simulations.

  11. Sandia's Arbitrary Waveform MEMO Actuator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-08-07

    , they must go through each wavepart individually, recalculate slopes, and modify the ramps accordingly. This is certainly not a problem for single wavepart signals (i.e., the half-sine TRA signal), but for a ramp-created partial sine wave pattern, quick changes to the amplitude require quite a bit of thought and modification time. Finally, the five-ramp molded partial sine wave pattern is not a peace-wise smooth curve, which may or may not be a problem. Given the recent modifications that have been added to SAMS in this second version, Micro Driver may be replaced by this program.« less

  12. Accurate and precise determination of critical properties from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Bai, Peng; Allan, Douglas A.; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2015-09-21

    -core square-well particles with various ranges of the attractive well and for n-decane molecules represented by the TraPPE force field yield data that support the trends observed for Lennard-Jones particles. The finite-size dependence of the critical properties obtained from GEMC simulations is significantly smaller than those from grand-canonical ensemble simulations. Thus, when resources are not available for a rigorous finite-size scaling study, GEMC simulations provide a straightforward route to determine fairly accurate critical properties using relatively small system sizes.

  13. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) Intraspecific Variation and Thermotolerance Classification Using in Vitro Seed Germination Assay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seepaul, Ramdeo; Macoon, Bisoondat; Reddy, K. Raja; Baldwin, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Cardinal temperatures for plant processes have been used for thermotolerance screening of genotypes, geoclimatic adaptability determination and phenological prediction. Current simulation models for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) utilize single cardinal temperatures across genotypes for both vegetative and reproductive processes although in-tra-specific variation exists among genotypes. An experiment was conducted to estimate the cardinal temperatures for seed germination of 14 diverse switchgrass genotypes and to classify genotypes for temperature tolerance. Stratified seeds of each genotype were germinated at eight constant temperatures from 10 °C to 45 °C under a constant light intensity of 35 μmol m-2s-1 for 12 hd-1. Germination wasmore » recorded at 6-h intervals in all treatments. Maximum seed germination (MSG) and germination rate (GR), estimated by fitting Sigmoidal function to germination-time series data, varied among genotypes. Quadratic and bilinear models best described the MSG and GR responses to temperature, respectively. The mean cardinal temperatures, Tmin, Topt, and Tmax, were 8.1, 26.6, and 45.1 °C for MSG and 11.1, 33.1, and 46.0 °C for GR, respectively. Cardinal temperatures for MSG and GR; however, varied significantly among genotypes. Genotypes were classified as sensitive (Cave-in-Rock, Dacotah, Expresso, Forestburg˜, Kanlow, ˜Sunburst, Trailblazer, and ˜Tusca™), intermediate (˜Alamo, Blackwell, Carthage, ˜Shawnee™, and Shelter™) and tolerant (˜Summer) to high temperature based on cumulative temperature response index (CTRI) estimated by summing individual response indices estimated from the MSG and GR cardinal temperatures. Similarly, genotypes were also classified as sensitive (Alamo, Blackwell, Carthage, Dacotah, Shawnee, Shelter and Summer), moderately sensitive (Cave-in-rock, Forestburg, Kanlow, Sunburst, and Tusca), moderately tolerant (Trailblazer), and tolerant (Expresso) to low temperatures. The cardinal

  14. WE-G-17A-08: Electron Gun Operation for in Line MRI-Linac Configurations: An Assessment of Beam Fidelity and Recovery Techniques for Different SIDs and Magnetic Field Strengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P; Constantin, D; Holloway, L; Kolling, S; Oborn, B; Fahrig, R

    2014-06-15

    Council (AUS), National Institute of Health (NIH), and Cancer Institute NSW.

  15. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) Input Coal Analyses and Off-Gass Filter (OGF) Content Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Missimer, David M.; Guenther, Chris P.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; VanEssendelft, Dirk T.; Means, Nicholas C.

    2015-04-23

    A full engineering scale Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) system is being used at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) to stabilize acidic Low Activity Waste (LAW) known as Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW). The INTEC facility, known as the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), underwent an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) in March 2014. The IWTU began non-radioactive simulant processing in late 2014 and by January, 2015 ; the IWTU had processed 62,000 gallons of simulant. The facility is currently in a planned outage for inspection of the equipment and will resume processing simulated waste feed before commencing to process 900,000 gallons of radioactive SBW. The SBW acidic waste will be made into a granular FBSR product (carbonate based) for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In the FBSR process calcined coal is used to create a CO2 fugacity to force the waste species to convert to carbonate species. The quality of the coal, which is a feed input, is important because the reactivity, moisture, and volatiles (C,H,N,O, and S) in the coal impact the reactions and control of the mineralizing process in the primary steam reforming vessel, the Denitration and Mineralizing Reformer (DMR). Too much moisture in the coal can require that additional coal be used. However since moisture in the coal is only a small fraction of the moisture from the fluidizing steam this can be self-correcting. If the coal reactivity or heating value is too low then the coal feedrate needs to be adjusted to achieve the desired heat generation. Too little coal and autothermal heat generation in the DMR cannot be sustained and/or the carbon dioxide fugacity will be too low to create the desired carbonate mineral species. Too much coal and excess S and hydroxide species can form. Excess sulfur from coal that (1) is too rich in sulfur or (2) from overfeeding coal can promote wall scale and contribute to corrosion