National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for au thority tva

  1. CASL - CASL and TVA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL and TVA The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) provides operational experience and validation information to CASL. Many of the CASL staff are highly skilled in their nuclear energy-relevant area of expertise, but not necessarily operational experience typified by the day-to-day issues encountered in commercial reactors. For example, the physical process of removing the fuel from the core, inspecting it, and then repacking it for the next cycle, which for TVA is planned for months in advance

  2. TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

  3. TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offers the Energy Right Solutions Program for commercial and industrial facilities.  Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen...

  4. TVA Partner Utilities- eScore Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in partnership with local electric utilities offers eScore program, which provides homeowners financial incentives to increase the energy efficiency of existing...

  5. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Providers program contract term is 20 years. For years 1-10, TVA will purchase 100% of the output from qualifying systems at a premium of 0.02** per kilowatt-hour (kWh)...

  6. TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities.  In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

  7. TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Heat Pump Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat pumps in homes and small businesses. Installation,...

  8. TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right Heat Pump Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Type Loan Program Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat pumps in...

  9. TVA - Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    kWh Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy...

  10. TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right Heat Pump Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Carolina Program Type Loan Program Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat...

  11. TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right Heat Pump Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kentucky Program Type Loan Program Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat...

  12. TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right Heat Pump Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Type Loan Program Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat...

  13. TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right Heat Pump Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Virginia Program Type Loan Program Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat...

  14. TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right Heat Pump Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alabama Program Type Loan Program Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat...

  15. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy efficiency of existing homes. This program replaces the previous In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot program offered by TVA. To participate in the program, homeowner must...

  16. Microsoft Word - TVA fact sheet Oct 17 2011

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 diesel-generator sites (9 units) 14 solar energy sites, 1 wind-energy site 1 ... and proposed changes to TVA facilities that may be used for future tritium production. ...

  17. TVA- Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy generators between 50kW and 20MW to...

  18. TVA- Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TVA bases the standard offer for customer generators off of a seasonal time-of-day averages chart, which sets base prices for the term of the contract. For projects approved after January 2015, p...

  19. TVA - Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0.036kWh Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy...

  20. Outage project productivity improvement of TVA fossil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picard, H.E.; Seay, C.R. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    Competition in the utility industry forces management to look closely at the cost effectiveness of power plant outage projects. At TVA Fossil and Hydro Power, innovative work measurement is proving effective as a project management tool to do more with less. Labor-hours to complete outage work scopes are reduced by some 20 to 30%, not by working harder or sacrificing safety, or quality, but by working and managing smarter. Fossil power plant outages and shutdowns are costly. They are labor-intensive construction projects, often with expanding work scope, and executed on a fast track. Outage work is inherently complex and dynamic, and often unpredictable. Many activities and tasks must be integrated, coordinated and completed safely and efficiently by multiple crafts and work groups. As a result, numerous productivity factors can influence the cost and schedule of outage completion. This provides owners, contractors and labor with unique opportunities for competitive advantage--by making radical changes in how they manage labor-hours and time.

  1. Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Boudreaux, Philip R; New, Joshua Ryan

    2010-10-01

    This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

  2. Concrete growth problems and remedial measures at TVA projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammer, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Most concrete structures are designed and detailed to provide for a volume decrease without excessive cracking. Occasionally, however, a concrete structure exhibits a long-term increase in volume termed concrete growth. Concrete growth may result from a variety of reactions, such as the hydration of unstable oxides included in the concrete mix, or the oxidation of minerals or from an outside attack of sulfates. The most important reaction creating concrete growth is that between minor alkali hydroxides from cement and the concrete aggregates. Two distinctly different harmful reactions have been recognized: the alkali-silicate and alkali-carbonate reactions. Concrete deteriorating from an alkali-aggregate reaction, regardless of the type, develops an obvious network of cracks called pattern or map cracking. These alkali-aggregate reactions and their accompanying concrete growth have presented numerous problems at TVA's Fontana Dam, Chickamauga Dam and lock, and Hiwassee Dam. Much has been learned about alkali-aggregate reaction since 1940. Most harmful reactions can now be prevented in proposed structures by interpreting the results of standard test methods. It is not possible, however, in existing structures to determine how far the growth phenomenon has progressed, how long the effects will have to be dealt with, or what the future effects will be. A program of close surveillance and monitoring is maintained at these projects, and problems are dealt with as they arise.

  3. Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Ellen D; Saulsbury, Bo

    2008-03-01

    This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

  4. Finite element analysis of three TVA dams with alkali-aggregate reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grenoble, B.A.; Meisenheimer, J.K.; Wagner, C.D.; Newell, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Three large Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) dams are currently experiencing problems caused by alkali-aggregate reaction (AAR). Since the fall of 1990, engineers in Stone & Webster`s Denver, Colorado office have been working with TVA to evaluate how AAR is affecting the dams and to identify measures for controlling the adverse effects of the concrete growth. This paper provides an overview of how finite element analysis is being used to understand the affects of AAR on these structures and to evaluate alternatives for minimizing the adverse effects of the concrete growth. Work on Hiwassee Dam is essentially complete, while that on the Chickamauga and Fontana Projects is still in progress. Consequently, this paper will focus primarily on Hiwassee Dam. The ongoing work on the other two projects will only be discussed briefly.

  5. AU Organizational chart

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Debra J. Rosano Acting Director AU-22 Edward P. Regnier Director AU-23 Colette A. Broussard Director AU-30 Garrett A. Smith Jr Acting Director AU-31 Pranab K. Guha Acting Director ...

  6. TVA coal-gasification commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 5. Plant based on Koppers-Totzek gasifier. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This volume presents a technical description of a coal gasification plant, based on Koppers-Totzek gasifiers, producing a medium Btu fuel gas product. Foster Wheeler carried out a conceptual design and cost estimate of a nominal 20,000 TPSD plant based on TVA design criteria and information supplied by Krupp-Koppers concerning the Koppers-Totzek coal gasification process. Technical description of the design is given in this volume.

  7. Automatic UT inspection of economizer at TVA`s Paradise plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brophy, J.W.; Chang, P.

    1995-12-31

    In March 1995, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and Southwest Research Institute (SwRi) conducted testing of a multi-element ultrasonic probe designed to inspect economizer tubing in the Paradise power plant during the spring outage. This evaluation was to determine general loss of wall thickness due to erosion/corrosion and preferential inside diameter (ID) corrosion at butt welds in straight sections of the tube. The erosion/corrosion wall loss occurs during service while the butt weld corrosion occurs out-of-service when water collects in the weld groove during outages and results in localized pitting in the weld groove. The ultrasonic (UT) probe was designed to acquire thickness measurements from the ID of the economizer tubes and to be accurate, very rapid UT inspection. To attain a high rate of speed inside the tubes, an eight-element circular array of transducers were designed into the probe head. Thickness data and location data are collected automatically by a portable computer.

  8. S.2005: This act may be cited as the TVA Customer Protection Act of 1998, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, April 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This Act cited as the TVA Customer Protection Act of 1998 is to amend the Federal Power Act to ensure that certain Federal power customers are provided protection by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and for other purposes. The topics of the act include disposition of property; foreign operations, protections; TVA power sales; filing and full disclosure of TVA documents; applicability of the antitrust laws; savings provision, and provision of construction equipment, contracting and engineering services.

  9. Feasibility studies to rehabilitate TVA`s Chickamauga Navigation Facility due to the effects of concrete growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niznik, J.A.; Conner, G.G.

    1995-12-31

    Chickamauga Dam is a multi-purpose project constructed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in the early 1940s. Shortly after construction it was evident there was an alkali-aggregate reaction taking place in the concrete structures. This reaction resulted in a phenomenon of concrete growth; i.e., unchecked expansion of the concrete which causes high stresses, cracking and movement of concrete structures, and undesirable side effects. This problem has increased in severity resulting in increased concerns about structural integrity of the dam structures and long term outages to navigation.

  10. Metal wastage analysis of carbon steel tubes from TVA 20 MW AFBC (atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.

    1987-11-01

    Evaporator tubes of carbon steel material, obtained from the TVA 20 MW AFBC test facility, were examined for deposit formation and metal wastage. Three different regions of the tube sections were analyzed using electron diffraction and several electron-optical techniques. The results showed that excessive metal wastage in one of the locations can be attributed to erosive wear of chlorine impregnated iron oxide scales. The results also showed that corrosion accelerating elements such as Cl, S, and K act independent of each other on the carbon steel evaporator tubes and it is imperative to characterize the local environment in the vicinity of the tube banks for understanding the complex deposition/corrosion phenomena that occur in FBC systems. 2 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.; Okada, T.

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  12. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  13. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, ...

  14. TVA- Solar Solutions Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program offers performance based incentive of $0.04/kWh for the first 10 years after the project is operational. This incentive is additional to the seasonal and time-of-day price for electri...

  15. TVA- Solar Solutions Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Solutions Initiative (SSI) is a pilot program that offers additional financial incentives for Solar PV systems participating in the Renewable Standard Offer program. Applications for new...

  16. Analysis of organizational options for the uranium enrichment enterprise in relation to asset divesture. [BPA; TVA; SYNFUELS; CONRAIL; British TELECOM; COMSTAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrer, B.J.; Hattrup, M.P.; Dase, J.E.; Nicholls, A.K.

    1986-08-01

    This report presents a comparison of the characteristics of some prominent examples of independent government corporations and agencies with respect to the Department of Energy's (DOE) uranium enrichment enterprise. The six examples studied were: the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); the Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SYNFUELS); the Consolidated Rail Corporation (CONRAIL); the British Telecommunications Corporation (British TELECOM); and the Communications Satellite Organization (COMSAT), in order of decreasing levels of government ownership and control. They range from BPA, which is organized as an agency within DOE, to COMSAT, which is privately owned and free from almost all regulations common to government agencies. Differences in the degree of government involvement in these corporations and in many other characteristics serve to illustrate that there are no accepted standards for defining the characteristics of government corporations. Thus, historical precedent indicates considerable flexibility would be available in the development of enabling legislation to reorganize the enrichment enterprise as a government corporation or independent government agency.

  17. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  18. The electrical and mechanical properties of Au-V and Au-V{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The electrical and mechanical properties of Au-V and Au-Vsub 2Osub 5 thin films for wear-resistant RF MEMS switches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  19. Interpretation of the first data on central Au+Au collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production in central Au+Au collisions taken at RHIC by the PHOBOS Collaboration as well as to existing data on central Pb+Pb collisions taken at the SPS by the NA49 Collaboration. ...

  20. AU Organization Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors FTCP Senior Technical Safety Manager (STSM) Status Report USW Health Safety and Environment ...

  1. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical ...

  2. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex ... and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. ...

  3. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based ...

  4. Au-Pt heteroaggregate dendritic nanostructures and Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles and their use as catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Zhou, Shenghu; Jackson, Gregory Scott

    2011-10-18

    Au--Pt heteroaggregate dendritic nanostructures and AuPt alloy nanoparticles, and their use as anodic catalysts in fuel cells.

  5. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  6. DOElAU62350-43

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOElAU62350-43 REV. 2 BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ... REV. 2 BASELINE RISK ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION AT THE MONUMENT VALLEY ...

  7. DFT study on cysteine adsorption mechanism on Au(111) and Au(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Floare, Calin G.; Calborean, Adrian; Turcu, Ioan

    2013-11-13

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were used to investigate relevant aspects of adsorption mechanisms of cysteine dimers in protonated form on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces. The projected densities of states are explicitly discussed for all main chemical groups of cysteine, i.e. the amino group (NH2), the thiol group (SH) and the carboxylic group (COOH) to identify differences in adsorption mechanism. Special emphasis is put on the analysis of changes in the electronic structure of molecules adsorbed on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces as well as the accompanying charge transfer mechanisms at molecule-substrate interaction.

  8. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  9. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novelo, T.E.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Maldonado, R.D.; Oliva, A.I.; Alonzo-Medina, G.M.

    2015-03-15

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} and Au{sub 3}Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au{sub 3}Cu and Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation.

  10. Suppression of Upsilon production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV (vol 735, pg 127, 2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Gliske, S.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D.G.

    2014-07-30

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for ? (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Aucollisions of RdAu = 0.79 0.24(stat.) 0.03(syst.) 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 0.1(stat.) 0.02(syst.) 0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state ? mesons in Au + Aucollisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined QuarkGluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  11. Electronic Structure of Thiol-Covered Gold Nanoparticles: Au102...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Thiol-Covered Gold Nanoparticles: Au102(MBA)44 Authors: Li, Y., Galli, G., ... properties of thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles Au102(MBA)44 that have ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Attachment 2 AU Org Chart [Compatibility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bill R. McArthur Director AU-12 Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance Bradley K. Davy Director AU-13 Office of Domestic and International Health Studies Dr. Gerald R. ...

  13. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions atsqrt sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-10-06

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for {radical}sNN = 200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y| < 0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  14. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squaredmore » Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  15. Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

    2009-10-29

    The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

  16. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  17. OPERATION OF THE RHIC AU ION SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STESKI,D.B.; ALESSI,J.; BENJAMIN,J.; CARLSON,C.; MANNI,M.; THIEBERGER,P.; WIPLICH,M.

    2001-09-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is beginning its second year of operation. A cesium sputter ion source injecting into a tandem Van de Graaff provides the gold ions for RHIC. The ion source is operated in the pulsed beam mode and produces a 500{micro}sec long pulse of Au{sup -} with a peak intensity of 290pA at the entrance of the tandem. After acceleration in the tandem and post stripping, this results in a beam of Au{sup +32} with an intensity of 80e{micro}A and an energy of 182MeV. Over the last several years, a series of improvements have been made to increase the intensity of the pulsed beam from the ion source. Details of the source performance and improvements will be presented. In addition, an effort is under way to provide other beam species for RHIC collisions.

  18. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  19. Simulation of Electric Field in Semi Insulating Au/CdTe/Au Detector under Flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; Kubat, J.; Belas, E.; Hoschl, P.; Moravec, P.; Praus, P.

    2009-08-02

    We report our simulations on the profile of the electric field in semi insulating CdTe and CdZnTe with Au contacts under radiation flux. The type of the space charge and electric field distribution in the Au/CdTe/Au structure is at high fluxes result of a combined influence of charge formed due to band bending at the electrodes and from photo generated carriers, which are trapped at deep levels. Simultaneous solution of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations is used for the calculation. We show, that the space charge originating from trapped photo-carriers starts to dominate at fluxes 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, when the influence of contacts starts to be negligible.

  20. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  1. Competition between Order and Phase Separation in Au-Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichert, H.; Schoeps, A.; Ramsteiner, I.B.; Bugaev, V.N.; Shchyglo, O.; Udyansky, A.; Dosch, H.; Asta, M.; Drautz, R.; Honkimaeki, V.

    2005-12-02

    We have measured and theoretically analyzed the diffuse scattering in the binary alloy system Au-Ni, which has been proposed as a testing ground for theories of alloy phase stability. We found strong evidence that in the alloys Au{sub 3}Ni and Au{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}, fluctuations of both ordering- and clustering-type are competing with each other. Our results resolve a long-standing controversy on the balance of relaxation and mixing energies in this alloy system and explain recent findings of ordering in thin Au-Ni films.

  2. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  3. AU Funtional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors - July...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Listing by AU Office Director 2 FunctionSubject Director Email Phone Commercial membrane classification guidancetechnical support Andrew Weston-Dawkes Andrew.weston-dawkes@h...

  4. Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    prostate cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laminin receptor specific therapeutic gold nanoparticles (198AuNP-EGCg) show efficacy in treating prostate cancer ...

  5. Microsoft Word - AU Funtional Area Points of Contact by Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (301) 903-3526 AU-30 Headquarters Security Representative Garrett Smith Garrett.Smith@hq.doe.gov (301) 903-7440 Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry Pat Worthington ...

  6. Supported bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles with superior electrocatalytic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanoparticles with superior electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Supported bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles with superior ...

  7. Reflow of AuSnSolder Creates Strong Joints [Local Reflow of AuSn Solder: Relating Strength to Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golosker, Ilya V.; Florando, Jeff N.

    2013-02-01

    Local heating of AuSn solder creates reliable bonds. However, small changes in the heat schedule result in significant changes to bond strength and microstructure.

  8. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developedmore » which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

  9. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.

  10. Sideward flow in Au+Au collisions between 2A and 8A GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.; Ajitanand, N.N.; Alexander, J.; Anderson, M.; Best, D.; Brady, F.P.; Case, T.; Caskey, W.; Cebra, D.; Chance, J.; Cole, B.; Crowe, K.; Das, A.; Draper, J.; Gilkes, M.; Gushue, S.; Heffner, M.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Huo, L.; Justice, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Klay, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Lacey, R.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, Y.M.; McGrath, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Porile, N.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Romero, J.; Scharenberg, R.; Schroeder, L.S.; Srivastava, B.; Stone, N.T.B.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wang, S.; Whitfield, J.; Wienold, T.; Witt, R.; Wood, L.; Yang, X.; Zhang, W.N.; Zhang, Y.; E895 Collaboration

    2000-04-05

    Using the large acceptance Time Projection Chamber of experiment E895 at Brookhaven, measurements of collective sideward flow in Au + Au collisions at beam energies of 2A, 4A, 6A, and 8A GeV are presented in the form of in-plane transverse momentum

  11. Elliptic flow: transition from out-of-plane to in-plane emissionin Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkenburg, C.; Ajitanand, N.N.; Alexander, J.M.; Anderson, M.; Best, D.; Brady, F.P.; Case, T.; Caskey, W.; Cebra, D.; Chance, J.L.; Chung, P.; Cole, B.; Crowe, K.; Das, A.C.; Draper, J.E.; Elmaani, A.; Gilkes, M.L.; Gushue, S.; Heffner, M.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Huo,L.; Justice, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.C.; Klay, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Lacey, R.A.; Lauret, J.; Law, C.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.M.; McGrath, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.L.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Porile, N.T.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Romero, J.L.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schroeder, L.; Srivastava, B.; Stone, N.T.B.; Symons,T.J.M.; Whitfield, J.; Wienold, T.; Witt, R.; Wood, L.; Zhang, W.N.; E895Collaboration; Danielewicz, P.; Gossiaux, P.B.

    1999-07-31

    We have measured the proton elliptic flow excitation function for the Au+Au system spanning the beam energy range (2-8)A GeV. The excitation function shows a transition from negative to positive elliptic flow at a beam energy, Etr {approx} 4A GeV. Detailed comparisons with calculations from a relativistic Boltzmann equation are presented. The comparisons suggest a softening of the nuclear equation of state from a stiff form (K {approx} 380 MeV) at low beam energies (Ebeam < 2A GeV) to a softer form (K {approx} 210 MeV) at higher energies ( Ebeam < 4A GeV) where the calculated baryon density rho {approx} 4 rho 0.

  12. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  13. CO Oxidation mechanism on CeO2-supported Au nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

    2013-09-08

    To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters(NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design Au13 and Au12 supported on a flat and a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the Au-CeO2 interface and the Au NC as well.

  14. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore »coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  15. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore » coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  16. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    North Carolina Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount 1,000 upon installation Years 1-10: retail electric rate + premium payment Years 11-20: retail electric rate...

  17. TVA - Solar Solutions Initiative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    years after the project is operational. This incentive is additional to the seasonal and time-of-day price for electricity offered through the Renewable Standard Offer program....

  18. TVA - Solar Solutions Initiative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the project is operational. This incentive is additional to the seasonal and time-of-day price for electricity offered through the Renewable Standard Offer program. The total...

  19. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    these payments out over the life of the program. All new participants in the Generation Power Providers program will receive a 1,000 incentive to offset the upfront cost....

  20. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Years 11-20: retail electric rate 2014 Premium Rates: Solar: 0.04kWh Wind, Biomass, and Hydro: 0.03kWh Summary Note: Enrollment for 2015 was conducted from January 26th to...

  1. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from the following qualifying resources: PV, wind, hydropower, and biomass. The long term Green Power Providers program replaces the Generation Partners* pilot program. The energy...

  2. Electric vehicle battery system testing at TVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J.H.; Blickwedel, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    It was found that lead-acid batteries, because of low specific energy density and life, are marginal for eV use. However, with the established lead-acid industry, they may be more economical for limited future eV applications. The NiFe battery provides sufficient energy density and range for many eV applications and can withstand abusive treatment. With its longer life, this system is attractive for commercial eV applications. It is also anticipated that NiZn, NiCd, and ZnCl systems may also show promise for the future.

  3. TVA - Solar Solutions Initiative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Schools Retail Supplier Agricultural Savings Category Solar Photovoltaics Program Info Sector Name Utility...

  4. TVA_Poster_11-G00424.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  5. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the following qualifying resources: PV, wind, hydropower, and biomass. The long term Green Power Providers program replaces the Generation Partners* pilot program. The energy...

  6. Au plasmonics in a WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} photocatalyst for significantly enhanced hydrogen generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Zhongzhou; Wang, Zhenxing E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Zhan, Xueying; Xu, Kai; He, Jun E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Liu, Quanlin

    2015-11-30

    Promoting the activities of photocatalysts is still the critical challenge in H{sub 2} generation area. Here, a Au plasmon enhanced photocatalyst of WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} is developed by inserting Au nanoparticles between WS{sub 2} nanotubes and CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles. Due to the localized surface plasmonic resonance properties from Au nanoparticles, WS{sub 2}-Au-CIS shows the best performance as compared to Au-CIS, CIS, WS{sub 2}-CIS, CIS-Au, WS{sub 2}-Au, and WS{sub 2}-CIS-Au. The surface plasmonic resonance effects dramatically intensify the absorption of visible light and help to inject hot electrons into the semiconductors. Our findings open up an efficient method to optimize the type-II structures for photocatalytic water splitting.

  7. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  8. Corrigendum to Suppression of ? production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at ? SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of ? meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the ? yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 0.24(stat.) 0.03(syst.) 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 0.1(stat.) 0.02(syst.) 0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined QuarkGluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  9. Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biosensors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene-Au Nanoparticles Composite-Based Electrochemical Aptamer Biosensors Authors: Guo, Shaojun [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1126641 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-28234 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource

  10. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore »rapidity range |y| dAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  11. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  12. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  13. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  14. Azimuthally sensitive hanbury brown-twiss interferometry in Au + Au collisions sqrt S sub NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, L.S.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

    2004-06-30

    We present the results of a systematic study of the shape of the pion distribution in coordinate space at freeze-out in Au+Au collisions at RHIC using two-pion Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry. Oscillations of the extracted HBT radii vs. emission angle indicate sources elongated perpendicular to the reaction plane. The results indicate that the pressure and expansion time of the collision system are not sufficient to completely quench its initial shape.

  15. Measurement of J/? Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/? azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/? elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/? particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  16. Disappearance of back-to-back high p {sub T} hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li , Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; et al.

    2002-10-25

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudo-rapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at = {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes already observed in elementary collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au + Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  17. Heterojunction metal-oxide-metal Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au single nanowire device for spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, K. M. Punnoose, Alex; Hanna, Charles; Padture, Nitin P.

    2015-05-07

    In this report, we present the synthesis of heterojunction magnetite nanowires in alumina template and describe magnetic and electrical properties from a single nanowire device for spintronics applications. Heterojunction Au-Fe-Au nanowire arrays were electrodeposited in porous aluminum oxide templates, and an extensive and controlled heat treatment process converted Fe segment to nanocrystalline cubic magnetite phase with well-defined Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} interfaces as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic measurements revealed Verwey transition shoulder around 120 K and a room temperature coercive field of 90 Oe. Current–voltage (I-V) characteristics of a single Au-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanowire have exhibited Ohmic behavior. Anomalous positive magnetoresistance of about 0.5% is observed on a single nanowire, which is attributed to the high spin polarization in nanowire device with pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase and nanocontact barrier. This work demonstrates the ability to preserve the pristine Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and well defined electrode contact metal (Au)–magnetite interface, which helps in attaining high spin polarized current.

  18. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Wei; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-18

    Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based core–shell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au tomore » replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayer–shell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of core–shell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.« less

  19. Rationalization of Au concentration and distribution in AuNi@Pt core-shell nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Wei; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-18

    Improving the activity and stability of Pt-based coreshell nanocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells while lowering Pt loading has been one of the big challenges in electrocatalysis. Here, using density functional theory, we report the effect of adding Au as the third element to enhance the durability and activity of Ni@Pt coreshell nanoparticles (NPs) during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Our results show that the durability and activity of a Ni@Pt NP can be finely tuned by controlling Au concentration and distribution. For a NiAu@Pt NP, the durability can be greatly promoted by thermodynamically favorable segregation of Au to replace the Pt atoms at vertex, edge, and (100) facets on the shell, while still keeping the ORR activity on the active Pt(111) shell as high as that of Ni@Pt nanoparticles. Such behavior strongly depends on a direct interaction with the Ni interlayer. The results not only highlight the importance of interplay between surface strain on the shell and the interlayershell interaction in determining the durability and activity but also provide guidance on how to maximize the usage of Au to optimize the performance of coreshell (Pt) nanoparticles. As a result, such understanding has allowed us to discover a novel NiAu@Pt nanocatalyst for the ORR.

  20. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, Jr, John T.

    2016-01-12

    Here, we report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10^ 8 to 10^ 4 Torr (dosage up to 10^6 langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au CO complex formation and diffusion, and Aumore » adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au CO complex result from the reduced Au Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO +) on Au. These studies indicate that the mobile Au CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers.« less

  1. Final Technical Report: First Principles Investigations for the Ensemble Effects of PdAu and PtAu Bimetallic Nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruqian Wu

    2012-05-18

    Bimetallic surfaces with tunable chemical properties have attracted broad attention in recent years due to their ample potential for heterogeneous catalysis applications. The local chemical properties of constituents are strongly altered from their parent metals by 'ligand effect', a term encompassing the influences of charge transfer, orbital rehybridization and lattice strain. In comparison to the aforementioned, the 'ensemble effect' associated with particular arrangements of the active constituents have received much less attention, despite their notable importance towards the determination of reactivity and selectivity of bimetallic catalysts. We performed theoretical studies for understanding the ensemble effects on bimetallic catalysis: (i) simulations for the formation of different ensembles on PdAu and PtAu nanoclusters; (ii) studies of the size, shape, and substrate dependence of their electronic properties; and (iii) simulations for model reactions such as CO oxidation, methanol, ethylene and water dehydrogenation on PdAu and PtAu nanoclusters. In close collaboration with leading experimental groups, our theoretical research elucidated the fundamentals of Au based bimetallic nanocatalysts.

  2. Atomic Structure of Au329(SR)84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; Cullen, David; Dass, Amala

    2015-04-03

    To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au329(SR)84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF-STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

  3. Graphene nanoribbons synthesized from molecular precursor polymerization on Au(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massimi, Lorenzo; Ourdjini, Oualid; Della Pia, Ada; Mariani, Carlo; Betti, Maria Grazia; Cavaliere, Emanuele; Gavioli, Luca

    2015-06-23

    A spectroscopic study of 10,10-dibromo-9,9 bianthracene (DBBA) molecules deposited on the Au(110) surface is presented, by means of ultraviolet and X-ray photoemission, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Through a thermally activated procedure, these molecular precursors polymerize and eventually form graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with atomically controlled shape and width, very important building blocks for several technological applications. The GNRs observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) appear as short segments on top of the gold surface reconstruction, pointing out the delicate balance among surface diffusion and surface corrugation in their synthesis on the Au(110) surface.

  4. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Meeee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  5. ΛΛ correlation function in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-01-12

    In this study, we present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  6. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

    2014-06-23

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  7. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Wang, Di; Kotula, Paul G.; Kübel, Christian; Prati, Laura

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a Aucore–Rushell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity, the selectivitymore » and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC core–shell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.« less

  8. Improvements in Modeling Au Sphere Non-LTE X-ray Emission (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Improvements in Modeling Au Sphere Non-LTE X-ray Emission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improvements in Modeling Au Sphere Non-LTE X-ray Emission We've previously ...

  9. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing ...

  10. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  11. Growth of Long Range Forward-Backward Multiplicity Correlations with Centrality in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Forward-backward multiplicity correlation strengths have been measured with the STAR detector for Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Strong short and long range correlations (LRC) are seen in central Au+Au collisions. The magnitude of these correlations decrease with decreasing centrality until only short range correlations are observed in peripheral Au+Au collisions. Both the Dual Parton Model (DPM) and the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) predict the existence of the long range correlations. In the DPM the fluctuation in the number of elementary (parton) inelastic collisions produces the LRC. In the CGC longitudinal color flux tubes generate the LRC. The data is in qualitative agreement with the predictions from the DPM and indicates the presence of multiple parton interactions.

  12. The growth of sulfur adlayers on Au(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yue; Ren, Shendong; Chen, Chi-Lu; Liang, Xihui; Fan, Liang-Jen; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Tang, Jian-Ming; Luh, Dah-An

    2015-02-14

    We have studied the growth of S layers adsorbed on Au(100) with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS), and scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Three phases of S/Au(100)—(2 × 2), trimer, and c(2 × 4)—are identified; the latter two are not previously reported. A dose of S{sub 2} at 300 K transformed Au(100)-(5 × 20) initially into the (2 × 2) phase and formed the c(2 × 4) phase at a saturation coverage. The STM results show that monolayer Au islands formed during the initial S dose and remained throughout the growth, resulting in a rough c(2 × 4) surface. We show that a highly ordered c(2 × 4) phase can be obtained with a flat (2 × 2) phase as an intermediate step during growth. Based on the evolution of XPS and STM images with varied S{sub 2} dose, the components of S 2p are assigned and structural models for the various S/Au(100) phases are proposed. In the (2 × 2) phase, one S atom resides on a four-fold hollow site in each (2 × 2) unit cell, corresponding to a S coverage of 0.25 ML; in the trimer phase, three S atoms form a trimer residing on a four-fold hollow site in each (2 × 2) unit cell, corresponding to a S coverage of 0.75 ML; in the c(2 × 4) phase, there are five S atoms in each primitive unit cell of c(2 × 4); three of them form a trimer residing on a four-fold hollow site, and the other two form a dimer located on the top of the trimer, corresponding to a nominal S coverage of 1.25 ML. With the proposed structural models, the growth of S on Au(100) at 300 K is described in detail.

  13. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2Au, and AuAucollisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV. The non-photonic electron yieldexhibits unexpectedly large suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  14. Transverse-momentum dependent modification of dynamic texture in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2005-01-10

    Correlations in the hadron distributions produced in relativistic Au+Au collisions are studied in the discrete wavelet expansion method. The analysis is performed in the space of pseudorapidity (|{eta}| {le} 1) and azimuth (full 2{pi}) in bins of transverse momentum (p{sub t}) from 0.14 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2.1 GeV/c. In peripheral Au+Au collisions a correlation structure ascribed to minijet fragmentation is observed. It evolves with collision centrality and p{sub t} in a way not seen before which suggests strong dissipation of minijet fragmentation in the longitudinally-expanding medium.

  15. Injection and acceleration of Au31+ in the BNL AGS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer,W.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Thieberger, P.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, S.Y.; Zeno, K.; Omet, C.; Spiller, P.

    2008-06-23

    Injection and acceleration of ions in a lower charge state reduces space charge effects, and, if further elcctron stripping is needed, may allow elimination of a stripping stage and the associated beam losses. The former is of interest to the accelerators in the GSI FAIR complex, the latter for BNL RHIC collider operation at energies lower than the current injection energy. Lower charge state ions, however, have a higher likelihood of electron stripping which can lead to dynamic pressures rises and subsequent beam losses. We report on experiments in the AGS where Au{sup 31+} ions were injected and accelerated instead of the normally used Au{sup 77+} ions. Beam intensities and the average pressure in the AGS ring are recorded, and compared with calculations for dynamic pressures and beam losses. The experimental results will be used to benchmark the StrahlSim dynamic vacuum code and will be incorporated in the GSI FAIR SIS100 design.

  16. Local spectroscopy of a kondo impurity: Co on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhavan, V.; Chen, W.; Jamneala, T.; Crommie, M.F.; Wingreen, N.S.

    2001-07-15

    We present a detailed study of the local electronic properties of the Kondo system formed from cobalt adatoms deposited onto Au(111) at a temperature of 6.6 K. Cryogenic scanning-tunneling spectroscopy was used to observe impurity-induced resonances at the Fermi energy and at the Au(111) surface-state band edge. The line shape of the Fermi-energy resonance, identified as a Kondo resonance, is observed to vary with lateral position from the impurity center and with impurity binding position on the reconstructed Au(111) surface. Little vertical dependence is seen in the resonance line shape for positions above the center of the impurity. Interaction effects between Kondo impurities are observed to remain small as cobalt coverage is increased up to 1 ML on the gold surface. The Kondo resonance is shown theoretically to be a member of a general class of Fano resonances arising from the interaction of a discrete impurity state with a conduction-electron continuum. The asymmetric line shape of the resonance thus reflects quantum interference between the d orbital and continuum conduction electron channels, as well as their coupling to the STM tip.

  17. Measurements of Transverse Energy Distributions in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Botje, M.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R>; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; et al.

    2004-07-02

    Transverse energy (E{sub T}) distributions have been measured for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV by the STAR collaboration at RHIC. E{sub T} is constructed from its hadronic and electromagnetic components, which have been measured separately. E{sub T} production for the most central collisions is well described by several theoretical models whose common feature is large energy density achieved early in the fireball evolution. The magnitude and centrality dependence of E{sub T} per charged particle agrees well with measurements at lower collision energy, indicating that the growth in E{sub T} for larger collision energy results from the growth in particle production. The electromagnetic fraction of the total E{sub T} is consistent with a final state dominated by mesons and independent of centrality.

  18. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  19. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2014-12-11

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v₂) of dielectrons (e⁺e⁻ pairs) at mid-rapidity from √(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c² the dielectron v₂ measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from π⁰,η,ω, and Φ decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c², the measured dielectron v₂ is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc¯ contributions.

  20. Dielectron Azimuthal Anisotropy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at root s=200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report on the first measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy (v?) of dielectrons (e?e? pairs) at mid-rapidity from ?(sNN)=200 GeV Au + Au collisions with the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), presented as a function of transverse momentum (pT) for different invariant-mass regions. In the mass region Mee<1.1 GeV/c the dielectron v? measurements are found to be consistent with expectations from ??,?,?, and ? decay contributions. In the mass region 1.1ee<2.9GeV/c, the measured dielectron v? is consistent, within experimental uncertainties, with that from the cc contributions.

  1. Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra: A unique probe for monitoring Au-catalyzed reduction and oxidation reactions by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Winget, Sarah A.; Wu, Yiren; Su, Dong; Sun, Xiaojun; Xie, Zhao -Xiong; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-26

    In this paper, we report a facile synthesis of Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra by titrating aqueous HAuCl4 into a suspension of Ag cuboctahedra in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), NaOH, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) at room temperature. Initially, the Au atoms derived from the reduction of Au3+ by AA are conformally deposited on the entire surface of a Ag cuboctahedron. Upon the formation of a complete Au shell, however, the subsequently formed Au atoms are preferentially deposited onto the Au{100} facets, resulting in the formation of a Ag@Au cuboctahedron with concave structures at the sites of {111} facets. The concave cuboctahedramore » embrace excellent SERS activity that is more than 70-fold stronger than that of the original Ag cuboctahedra at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The concave cuboctahedra also exhibit remarkable stability in the presence of an oxidant such as H2O2 because of the protection by a complete Au shell. These two unique attributes enable in-situ SERS monitoring of the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) to 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) by NaBH4 through a 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (trans-DMAB) intermediate and the subsequent oxidation of 4-ATP back to trans-DMAB upon the introduction of H2O2.« less

  2. Formation of Pd/Au Nanostructures from Pd Nanowires via Galvanic Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng,X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, P.; Han, W.; Frenkel, A.; Wen, W.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic nanostructures with non-random metal atoms distribution are very important for various applications. To synthesize such structures via benign wet chemistry approach remains challenging. This paper reports a synthesis of a Au/Pd alloy nanostructure through the galvanic replacement reaction between Pd ultrathin nanowires (2.4 {+-} 0.2 nm in width, over 30 nm in length) and AuCl3 in toluene. Both morphological and structural changes were monitored during the reaction up to 10 h. Continuous changes of chemical composition and crystalline structure from Pd nanowires to Pd68Au32 and Pd45Au55 alloys, and to Au nanoparticles were observed. More interestingly, by using combined techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), UV-vis absorption, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, we found the formation of Pd68Au32 non-random alloy with Au-rich core and Pd-rich shell, and random Pd45Au55 alloy with uniformly mixed Pd and Au atom inside the nanoparticles, respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that alkylamine will strongly stabilize Pd to the surface, resulting in diffusion of Au atoms into the core region to form a non-random alloy. We believe such benign synthetic techniques can also enable the large scale preparation of various types of non-random alloys for several technically important catalysis applications.

  3. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, W.B. |

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  4. K(892)* resonance production in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; de Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-12-09

    The short-lived K(892)* resonance provides an efficient tool to probe properties of the hot and dense medium produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We report measurements of K* in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p collisions reconstructed via its hadronic decay channels K(892)*{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} and K(892)*{sup +-} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +-} using the STAR detector at RHIC. The K*{sup 0} mass has been studied as function of p{sub T} in minimum bias p + p and central Au+Au collisions. The K* p{sub T} spectra for minimum bias p + p interactions and for Au+Au collisions in different centralities are presented. The K*/K ratios for all centralities in Au+Au collisions are found to be significantly lower than the ratio in minimum bias p + p collisions, indicating the importance of hadronic interactions between chemical and kinetic freeze-outs. The nuclear modification factor of K* at intermediate p{sub T} is similar to that of K{sub S}{sup 0}, but different from {Lambda}. This establishes a baryon-meson effect over a mass effect in the particle production at intermediate p{sub T} (2 < p{sub T} {le} 4 GeV/c). A significant non-zero K*{sup 0} elliptic flow (v{sub 2}) is observed in Au+Au collisions and compared to the K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} v{sub 2}.

  5. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  6. AuRu/AC as an effective catalyst for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Alberto; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Bianchi, Claudia L.; Wang, Di; Kotula, Paul G.; Kübel, Christian; Prati, Laura

    2015-03-23

    AuRu bimetallic catalysts have been prepared by sequential deposition of Au on Ru or vice versa obtaining different nanostructures: when Ru has been deposited on Au, a Aucore–Rushell has been observed, whereas the deposition of Au on Ru leads to a bimetallic phase with Ru enrichment on the surface. In the latter case, the unexpected Ru enrichment could be attributed to the weak adhesion of Ru on the carbon support, thus allowing Ru particles to diffuse on Au particles. Both structures result very active in catalysing the liquid phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol and levulinic acid but the activity, the selectivity and the stability depend on the structure of the bimetallic nanoparticles. Ru@Au/AC core–shell structure mostly behaved as the monometallic Ru, whereas the presence of bimetallic AuRu phase in Au@Ru/AC provides a great beneficial effect on both activity and stability.

  7. Microwave Synthesis of Au?Rh Core?Shell Nanoparticles and Implications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microwave Synthesis of Au?Rh Core?Shell Nanoparticles and Implications of the Shell Thickness in Hydrogenation Catalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microwave ...

  8. Examination of charge transfer in Au/YSZ for high-temperature optical gas sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, John P.; Ohodnicki, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Au-nanoparticle incorporated oxide thin film materials demonstrate significant promise as functionalsensor materials for high temperature optical gas sensing in severe environments relevant for fossil andnuclear based power generation. The Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system has been extensivelystudied in the literature and serves as a model system for fundamental investigations that seek to betterunderstand the mechanistic origin of the plasmonic gas sensing response. In this work, X-ray photoelec-tron spectroscopy techniques are applied to Au/YSZ films in an attempt to provide further experimentalevidence for a proposed sensing mechanism involving a change in free carrier density of Au nanoparticles due to charge transfer.

  9. Fabrication of two-dimensional Au at FePt core-shell nanoparticle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this report, we experimentally demonstrate that single platinum nanoparticles exhibit ... This finding is exploited for the parallel Au encapsulation of FePt nanoparticles arranged ...

  10. Gold in the layered structures of R3Au7Sn3: From relativity to versatility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Provino, Alessia; Steinberg, Simon Alexander; Smetana, Volodymyr; Paramanik, Uday; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Dhar, Sudesh Kumar; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2016-07-11

    A new isotypic series of ternary rare earth element-gold-tetrel intermetallic compounds has been synthesized and their structures and properties have been characterized. R3Au7Sn3 (R = Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) crystallize with the hexagonal Gd3Au7Sn3 prototype (Pearson symbol hP26; P63/m, a = 8.110-8.372 Å, c = 9.351-9.609 Å, Vcell = 532.7-583.3 Å3, Z = 2), an ordered variant of the Cu10Sn3-type. Their structure is built up by GdPt2Sn-type layers, which feature edge-sharing Sn@Au6 trigonal antiprisms connected by trigonal R3 groups. Additional insertion of gold atoms leads to the formation of new homoatomic Au clusters, Au@Au6; alternatively, the structure can bemore » considered as a superstructural polyhedral packing of the ZrBeSi-type. The magnetization, heat ca-pacity and electrical resistivity have been measured for R3Au7Sn3 (R = Ce, Pr, Nd and Tb). All four compounds order antiferromagnetically with the highest TN of 13 K for Tb3Au7Sn3. In Ce3Au7Sn3, which has a TN of 2.9 K, the heat capacity and electrical resistivity data in zero and applied fields indicate the presence of Kondo interactions. The coefficient of the linear term in the electronic heat capacity, γ, derived from the heat capacity data below 0.5 K is 211 mJ/Ce mol K2 suggesting strong electronic correlations due to the Kondo interaction. The electronic structure calculations based on the projector augmented wave method for particular representatives of the series suggest different tendencies of the localized R-4f AOs to hybridize with the valence states. LMTO-based bonding analysis on the non-magnetic La3Au7Sn3 indicates that the integrated crystal orbital Hamilton popu-lations (COHPs) are dominated by the heteroatomic Au–Sn contacts; however, contributions from La–Au and La–Sn separations are significant, both together exceeding 40 % in the overall bonding. Furthermore, homoatomic Au–Au interactions are evident for the Au@Au6 units but, despite of the high atomic concentration of

  11. Identified Hadron Compositions in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at High Transverse Momenta at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Geurts, F.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kizka, V.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Lukashov, E. V.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Steadman, S. G.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Witzke, W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2012-02-14

    We report transverse momentum (pT≤15 GeV/c) spectra of π±, K±, p, p̄, K0S, and ρ⁰ at midrapidity in p+p and Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV. Perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with π± spectra in p+p collisions but do not reproduce K and p(p̄) spectra. The observed decreasing antiparticle-to-particle ratios with increasing pT provide experimental evidence for varying quark and gluon jet contributions to high-pT hadron yields. The relative hadron abundances in Au+Au at pT ≳ 8 GeV/c are measured to be similar to the p+p results, despite the expected Casimir effect for parton energy loss.

  12. Identified Hadron Compositions in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at High Transverse Momenta at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; et al

    2012-02-14

    We report transverse momentum (pT≤15 GeV/c) spectra of π±, K±, p, p̄, K0S, and ρ⁰ at midrapidity in p+p and Au+Au collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV. Perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with π± spectra in p+p collisions but do not reproduce K and p(p̄) spectra. The observed decreasing antiparticle-to-particle ratios with increasing pT provide experimental evidence for varying quark and gluon jet contributions to high-pT hadron yields. The relative hadron abundances in Au+Au at pT ≳ 8 GeV/c are measured to be similar to the p+p results, despite the expected Casimir effect for parton energy loss.

  13. Identified Hadron Compositions in p+p and Au+Au Collisions at High Transverse Momenta at ?(sNN)=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B. D.; Anson, C. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; et al

    2012-02-14

    We report transverse momentum (pT?15 GeV/c) spectra of ?, K, p, p?, K0S, and ?? at midrapidity in p+p and Au+Au collisions at ?(sNN)=200 GeV. Perturbative QCD calculations are consistent with ? spectra in p+p collisions but do not reproduce K and p(p?) spectra. The observed decreasing antiparticle-to-particle ratios with increasing pT provide experimental evidence for varying quark and gluon jet contributions to high-pT hadron yields. The relative hadron abundances in Au+Au at pT ? 8 GeV/c are measured to be similar to the p+p results, despite the expected Casimir effect for parton energy loss.

  14. Mechanism of ternary breakup in the reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at 15A MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian Junlong; Wu Xizhen; Li Zhuxia; Zhao Kai; Zhang Yingxun; Li Xian; Yan Shiwei

    2010-11-15

    The mechanism of the ternary breakup of the very heavy system {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at an energy of 15A MeV has been studied by using the improved quantum molecular dynamics model. The calculation results reproduce the characteristic features in ternary breakup events explored in a series of experiments; i.e., the masses of three fragments are comparable in size and the very fast, nearly collinear breakup of the colliding system is dominant in the ternary breakup events. Further, the evolution of the time scales of different ternary reaction modes and the behavior of mass distributions of three fragments with impact parameters are studied. The time evolution of the configurations of the composite reaction systems is also studied. We find that for most of the ternary breakup events with the features found in the experiments, the configuration of the composite system has two-preformed-neck shape. The study shows that those ternary breakup events having the characteristic features found in the experiments happen at relatively small impact parameter reactions, but not at peripheral reactions. The ternary breakup reaction at peripheral reactions belongs to binary breakup with a neck emission.

  15. Photon and neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2004-01-08

    We report the first inclusive photon measurements about mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.5) from {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV at RHIC. Photon pair conversions were reconstructed from electron and positron tracks measured with the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the STAR experiment. With this method, an energy resolution of {Delta}E/E {approx} 2% at 0.5 GeV has been achieved. Reconstructed photons have also been used to measure the transverse momentum (p{sub t}) spectra of {pi}{sup 0} mesons about mid-rapidity (|y| < 1) via the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay channel. The fractional contribution of the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay to the inclusive photon spectrum decreases by 20% {+-} 5% between p{sub t} = 1.65 GeV/c and p{sub t} = 2.4 GeV/c in the most central events, indicating that relative to {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} decay the contribution of other photon sources is substantially increasing.

  16. Thermal nature of charmonium transverse momentum spectra from Au-Au collisions at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkelin, S. V.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.

    2010-03-15

    We analyze the transverse momentum distribution of J/psi mesons produced in Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy within a blast-wave model that accounts for a possible inhomogeneity of the charmonium distribution and/or flow fluctuations. The results imply that the transverse momentum spectra of J/psi, phi, and OMEGA hadrons measured at the RHIC can be described well if kinetic freeze-out takes place just after chemical freeze-out for these particles.

  17. Interface Reactions and Electrical Characteristics of Au/GaSb Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Ehsani; R.J. Gutmann; G.W. Charache

    2000-07-07

    The reaction of Au with GaSb occurs at a relatively low temperature (100 C). Upon annealing, a AuSb{sub 2} compound and several Au-Ga phases are produced. Phase transitions occur toward higher Ga concentration with increasing annealing temperatures. Furthermore, the depth of the contact also increases with increased annealing temperature. They found that the AuSb{sub 2} compound forms on the GaSb surface, with the compound crystal partially ordered with respect to the substrate. The transition of Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior in Au/n-type GaSb occurs simultaneously with the formation of the AuGa compound at about a 250 C annealing temperature. This ohmic contact forms without the segregation of dopants at the metallic compound/GaSb interface. Therefore it is postulated that transition from Schottky- to ohmic-contact behavior is obtained through a series of tunneling transitions of electrons through defects in the depletion region in the Au/n-type GaSb contacts. Contact resistivities of 6-7 x 10{sup -6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} were obtained with the annealing temperature between 300 and 350 C for 30 seconds. In Au/p-type GaSb contacts, the resistivity was independent of the annealing temperature. This suggested that the carrier transport in p-type contact dominated by thermionic emission.

  18. Multifunctional hybrid Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles for efficient plasmonic heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murph, Simona E. Hunyadi; Larsen, George K.; Lascola, Robert J.

    2016-02-20

    We describe the synthesis and properties of multifunctional Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles produced by a wet chemical approach and investigate their photothermal properties using laser irradiation. Here, the composite Fe2O3-Au nanoparticles retain the properties of both materials, creating a multifunctional structure with excellent magnetic and plasmonic properties.

  19. The low-temperature form of calcium gold stannide, CaAuSn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Qisheng; Corbett, John D.

    2014-07-19

    The EuAuGe-type CaAuSn phase has been synthesized and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that it has an ortho­rhom­bic symmetry (space group Imm2), with a = 4.5261 (7) Å, b = 7.1356 (11) Å and c = 7.8147 (11) Å. The structure features puckered layers that are connected by homoatomic Au-Au and Sn-Sn inter­layer bonds. This structure is one of the two parent structures of its high-temperature polymorph (ca 873 K), which is an inter­growth structure of the EuAuGe- and SrMgSi-type structures in a 2:3 ratio.

  20. Nanoscale mapping of plasmon and exciton in ZnO tetrapods coupled with Au nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bertoni, Giovanni; Fabbri, Filippo; Villani, Marco; Lazzarini, Laura; Turner, Stuart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Calestani, Davide; Gradečak, Silvija; Zappettini, Andrea; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2016-01-12

    Metallic nanoparticles can be used to enhance optical absorption or emission in semiconductors, thanks to a strong interaction of collective excitations of free charges (plasmons) with electromagnetic fields. Herein we present direct imaging at the nanoscale of plasmon-exciton coupling in Au/ZnO nanostructures by combining scanning transmission electron energy loss and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and mapping. The Au nanoparticles (~30 nm in diameter) are grown in-situ on ZnO nanotetrapods by means of a photochemical process without the need of binding agents or capping molecules, resulting in clean interfaces. Interestingly, the Au plasmon resonance is localized at the Au/vacuum interface, rather than presentingmore » an isotropic distribution around the nanoparticle. Moreover, on the contrary, a localization of the ZnO signal has been observed inside the Au nanoparticle, as also confirmed by numerical simulations.« less

  1. Nuclear matter effects on J/? production in asymmetric Cu+Au collisions at ?SNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/? production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at ?sNN =200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/? yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/? production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in themorelarger Au nucleus. The relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.less

  2. Measurements of dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV from the STAR experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; et al

    2015-08-24

    We report on measurements of dielectron (e⁺e⁻) production in Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair using the STAR detector at RHIC. Systematic measurements of the dielectron yield as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality show an enhancement compared to a cocktail simulation of hadronic sources in the low invariant-mass region (Mee < 1GeV/c2). This enhancement cannot be reproduced by the ρ-meson vacuum spectral function. In minimum-bias collisions, in the invariant-mass range of 0.30 – 0.76GeV/c², integrated over the full pT acceptance, the enhancement factor is 1.76±0.06(stat.)±0.26(sys.)±0.29(cocktail). The enhancement factor exhibits weakmore » centrality and pT dependence in STAR's accessible kinematic regions, while the excess yield in this invariant-mass region as a function of the number of participating nucleons follows a power-law shape with a power of 1.44±0.10. Models that assume an in-medium broadening of the ρ-meson spectral function consistently describe the observed excess in these measurements. In addition, we report on measurements of ω- and Φ-meson production through their e⁺e⁻ decay channel. These measurements show good agreement with Tsallis blast-wave model predictions, as well as, in the case of the Φ meson, results through its K⁺K⁻ decay channel. In the intermediate invariant-mass region (1.1 < Mee < 3GeV/c²), we investigate the spectral shapes from different collision centralities. Physics implications for possible in-medium modification of charmed hadron production and other physics sources are discussed.« less

  3. Effects of the proximity of Au nanoparticles on magnetic and transport properties of LSMO ultrathin layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brivio, S.; Magen Dominguez, Cesar; Sidorenko, A; Petti, D.; Cantoni, M.; Finazzi, M; Ciccacci, F; Renzi, R; Varela del Arco, Maria; Picozzi, S.; Bertacco, R.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the proximity of Au nanoparticles on the transport and magnetic properties of ultrathin La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) films has been investigated. We find a huge increase of the resistivity of the manganite (by four orders of magnitude for a Au nominal thickness of 2 nm), which is accompanied by a strong decrease of the Curie temperature. A combined scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) analysis shows that interfaces are coherent and atomically sharp, and that the structural quality is very high. On the other end, a strong reduction of the Mn oxidation state is seen upon Au capping. NMR data show a strong attenuation of the double exchange signal upon formation of Au nanoparticles. Ab-initio calculations indicate a negligible influence of Au on LSMO at an ideal interface, with the LSMO surface magnetic and electronic properties essentially unchanged upon creation of the Au/LSMO interface. In view of these calculations, the experimental results cannot be explained in terms of purely electrostatic effects induced by the proximity of a noble metal. Here we propose that the main driving force underlying the observed change in physical properties is the high reactivity of Au nanoparticles which can locally pump oxygen from the manganite, thus favouring a phase separation ensuing from O inhomogeneity which deteriorates the transport and electrical properties.

  4. Glycerol Hydrogenolysis on Carbon-Supported PtRu and AuRu Bimetallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maris,E.; Ketchie, W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Bimetallic PtRu and AuRu catalysts were prepared by a surface redox method in which Pt or Au was deposited onto the surface of carbon-supported Ru nanoparticles with an average diameter of 2-3 nm. Characterization by H2 chemisorption, analytical TEM, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Ru K-edge, Pt LIII-edge, and Au LIII-edge confirmed that Pt and Au were successfully deposited onto Ru without disrupting the Ru particles. Depression of the ethane hydrogenolysis rate over Ru after addition of Au provided further evidence of successful deposition. The bimetallic particles were subsequently evaluated in the aqueous-phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol at 473 K and 40 bar H2 at neutral and elevated pH. Although monometallic Pt and Ru exhibited different activities and selectivities to products, the bimetallic PtRu catalyst functioned more like Ru. A similar result was obtained for the AuRu bimetallic catalyst. The PtRu catalyst appeared to be stable under the aqueous-phase reaction conditions, whereas the AuRu catalyst was altered by the harsh conditions. Gold appeared to migrate off the Ru and agglomerate on the carbon during the reaction in liquid water.

  5. MeV Au Ion Irradiation in Silicon and Nanocrystalline Zirconia Film Deposited on Silicon Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yongqin; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Weber, William J.

    2012-09-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO2) film with thickness of 305 nm deposited on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 2 MeV Au ions to different fluences at different temperatures. The implanted ion profiles were measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and simulated using the stopping and range of ions inmatter (SRIM) code, respectively. The experimental results show that a large fraction of the incident Au ions penetrates through the ZrO2 film and are deposited into the Si substrate. At the interface of ZrO2 and Si, a sudden decrease of Au concentration is observed due to the much larger scattering cross section of Au in ZrO2 than in Si. The depth profile of the Au ions is measured in both the ZrO2 films and the Si substrates, and the results show that the Au distribution profiles do not exhibit a dependence on irradiation temperature. The local Au concentration increases proportionally with the irradiation fluence, suggesting that no thermal or irradiation-induced redistribution of the implanted Au ions. However, the Au concentration in the ZrO2 films, as determined by SIMS, is considerably lower than that predicted by the SRIM results, and the penetration depth from the SIMS measurements is much deeper than that from the SRIM predictions. These observations can be explained by an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, used in the SRIM program, for heavy incident ions in light targets. Over-estimation of the heavy-ion electronic stopping power may lead to errors in local dose calculation and underestimation of the projected range of slow heavy ions in targets that contain light elements. A quick estimate based on a reduced target density may be used to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping power in the SRIM program to provide better ion profile prediction.

  6. MeV Au Ion Irradiation in Silicon and Nanocrystalline Zirconia Film Deposited on Silicon Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yongqin; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Edmondson, Dr. Philip; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO2) film with thickness of 305 nm deposited on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 2 MeV Au ions to different fluences at different temperatures. The implanted ion profiles were measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and simulated using the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code, respectively. The experimental results show that a large fraction of the incident Au ions penetrates through the ZrO2 film and are deposited into the Si substrate. At the interface of ZrO2 and Si, a sudden decrease of Au concentration is observed due to the much larger scattering cross section of Au in ZrO2 than in Si. The depth profile of the Au ions is measured in both the ZrO2 films and the Si substrates, and the results show that the Au distribution profiles do not exhibit a dependence on irradiation temperature. The local Au concentration increases proportionally with the irradiation fluence, suggesting that no thermal or irradiation-induced redistribution of the implanted Au ions. However, the Au concentration in the ZrO2 films, as determined by SIMS, is considerably lower than that predicted by the SRIM results, and the penetration depth from the SIMS measurements is much deeper than that from the SRIM predictions. These observations can be explained by an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, used in the SRIM program, for heavy incident ions in light targets. Overestimation of the heavy-ion electronic stopping power may lead to errors in local dose calculation and underestimation of the projected range of slow heavy ions in targets that contain light elements. A quick estimate based on a reduced target density may be used to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping power in the SRIM program to provide better ion profile prediction.

  7. Growth and characterization of AuN films through the pulsed arc technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devia, A. Castillo, H.A.; Benavides, V.J.; Arango, Y.C.; Quintero, J.H.

    2008-02-15

    AuN films were produced through the PAPVD (Plasma Assisted Physics Vapor Deposition) method, using the pulsed arc technique in a mono-vaporizer noncommercial system, which consists of a chamber with two faced electrodes, and a power controlled system. In order to obtain the films, an Au Target with 99% purity and stainless steel 304 were used as target and substrate respectively. Nitrogen was injected in gaseous phase at 2.3 mbar pressure, and a discharge of 160 V was performed, supplied by the power controlled source. Au4f and N1s narrow spectra were analyzed using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy)

  8. Enhanced efficiency of graphene-silicon Schottky junction solar cells by doping with Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, X. W. Yin, Z. G.; Meng, J. H.; Gao, H. L.; Zhang, L. Q.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, H. L.

    2014-11-03

    We have reported a method to enhance the performance of graphene-Si (Gr/Si) Schottky junction solar cells by introducing Au nanoparticles (NPs) onto the monolayer graphene and few-layer graphene. The electron transfer between Au NPs and graphene leads to the increased work function and enhanced electrical conductivity of graphene, resulting in a remarkable improvement of device efficiency. By optimizing the initial thickness of Au layers, the power conversion efficiency of Gr/Si solar cells can be increased by more than three times, with a maximum value of 7.34%. These results show a route for fabricating efficient and stable Gr/Si solar cells.

  9. Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation Supported Au-CuO Catalysts for Low Temperature CO Oxidation Catalytic properties of Au-CuOx/SiO2 are investigated in removing pollutants from simulated automotive exhaust to meet an increasing demand for high emissions control at low temperatures. p-02_bauer.pdf (718.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Low Temperature Emission Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Low Temperature Emission Control to

  10. CO Oxidation at the Interface of Au Nanoclusters and the Stepped-CeO2(111) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

    2013-01-14

    To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design a Au12 supported on a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2-step) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the interface of the Au/CeO2-step: oxygen spillover from the CeO2 to the Au NCs;2 CO oxidation by the O2 bound to the Au-Ce3+ interface;3 and CO oxidation by the Mars-van Krevelen (M-vK) mechanism.4 DFT+U calculations show that lattice oxygen at the CeO2 step edge oxidizes CO bound to Au NCs by the M-vK mechanism. CO2 desorption determines the rate of CO oxidation and the vacancy formation energy (Evac) is a reactivity descriptor for CO oxidation. The maximum Evac that insures spontaneous CO2 production is higher for the Au/CeO2-step than the Au/CeO2-surface suggesting that the CeO2-step is a better supporting material than the CeO2-surface for CO oxidation by the Au/CeO2. Our results also suggest that for CO oxidation by Au NCs supported on nano- or meso-structured CeO2, which is the case of industrial catalysts, the M-vK mechanism accounts for a large portion of the total activity.

  11. Efficient electrocatalytic conversion of CO.sub.2 to CO using ligand-protected Au.sub.25 clusters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kauffman, Douglas; Matranga, Christopher; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Alfonso, Dominic R.

    2015-09-22

    An apparatus and method for CO.sub.2 reduction using an Au.sub.25 electrode. The Au.sub.25 electrode is comprised of ligand-protected Au.sub.25 having a structure comprising an icosahedral core of 13 atoms surrounded by a shell of six semi-ring structures bonded to the core of 13 atoms, where each semi-ring structure is typically --SR--Au--SR--Au--SR or --SeR--Au--SeR--Au--SeR. The 12 semi-ring gold atoms within the six semi-ring structures are stellated on 12 of the 20 faces of the icosahedron of the Au.sub.13 core, and organic ligand --SR or --SeR groups are bonded to the Au.sub.13 core with sulfur or selenium atoms. The Au.sub.25 electrode and a counter-electrode are in contact with an electrolyte comprising CO.sub.2 and H+, and a potential of at least -0.1 volts is applied from the Au.sub.25 electrode to the counter-electrode.

  12. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and themore » number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.« less

  13. Systematic study of azimuthal anisotropy in Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy v2 for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of v2 as a function of transverse momentum pT and centrality in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu+Cu collisions we observe a decrease in v2 values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions we find that v2 depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, Npart. We observe that v2 divided by eccentricity (ε) monotonically increases with Npart and scales as N1/3part. Thus, the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled v2 data. For identified hadrons, v2 divided by the number of constituent quarks nq is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy KET=mT–m between 0.1T/nq<1 GeV. Combining all of the above scaling and normalizations, we observe a near-universal scaling, with the exception of the Cu+Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of v2/(nq∙ε∙N1/3part) vs KET/nq for all measured particles.

  14. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Provino, Alessia; Steinberg, Simon; Smetana, Volodymyr; Kulkarni, Ruta; Dhar, Sudesh K.; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-18

    Two new polar intermetallic compounds Y3Au7Sn3 (I) and Gd3Au7Sn3 (II) have been synthesized and their structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (P63/m; Z = 2, a = 8.148(1)/8.185(3), and c = 9.394(2)/9.415(3) for I/II, respectively). They can formally be assigned to the Cu10Sn3 type and consist of parallel slabs of Sn centered, edge-sharing trigonal Au6 antiprisms connected through R3 (R = Y, Gd) triangles. Additional Au atoms reside in the centres of trigonal Au6 prisms forming Au@Au6 clusters with Au–Au distances of 2.906–2.960 Å, while the R–R contacts in the R3 groups are considerably larger than themore » sums of their metallic radii. These exclusive structural arrangements provide alluring systems to study the synergism between strongly correlated systems, particularly, those in the structure of (II), and extensive polar intermetallic contacts, which has been inspected by measurements of the magnetic properties, heat capacities and electrical conductivities of both compounds. Gd3Au7Sn3 shows an antiferromagnetic ordering at 13 K, while Y3Au7Sn3 is a Pauli paramagnet and a downward curvature in its electrical resistivity at about 1.9 K points to a superconducting transition. DFT-based band structure calculations on R3Au7Sn3 (R = Y, Gd) account for the results of the conductivity measurements and different spin ordering models of (II) provide conclusive hints about its magnetic structure. As a result, chemical bonding analyses of both compounds indicate that the vast majority of bonding originates from the heteroatomic Au–Gd and Au–Sn interactions, while homoatomic Au–Au bonding is evident within the Au@Au6 clusters.« less

  15. Gold-rich R3Au7Sn3: Establishing the interdependence between electronic features and physical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Provino, Alessia; Steinberg, Simon; Smetana, Volodymyr; Kulkarni, Ruta; Dhar, Sudesh K.; Manfrinetti, Pietro; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-05-18

    Two new polar intermetallic compounds Y3Au7Sn3 (I) and Gd3Au7Sn3 (II) have been synthesized and their structures have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction (P63/m; Z = 2, a = 8.148(1)/8.185(3), and c = 9.394(2)/9.415(3) for I/II, respectively). They can formally be assigned to the Cu10Sn3 type and consist of parallel slabs of Sn centered, edge-sharing trigonal Au6 antiprisms connected through R3 (R = Y, Gd) triangles. Additional Au atoms reside in the centres of trigonal Au6 prisms forming Au@Au6 clusters with Au–Au distances of 2.906–2.960 Å, while the R–R contacts in the R3 groups are considerably larger than themore »sums of their metallic radii. These exclusive structural arrangements provide alluring systems to study the synergism between strongly correlated systems, particularly, those in the structure of (II), and extensive polar intermetallic contacts, which has been inspected by measurements of the magnetic properties, heat capacities and electrical conductivities of both compounds. Gd3Au7Sn3 shows an antiferromagnetic ordering at 13 K, while Y3Au7Sn3 is a Pauli paramagnet and a downward curvature in its electrical resistivity at about 1.9 K points to a superconducting transition. DFT-based band structure calculations on R3Au7Sn3 (R = Y, Gd) account for the results of the conductivity measurements and different spin ordering models of (II) provide conclusive hints about its magnetic structure. As a result, chemical bonding analyses of both compounds indicate that the vast majority of bonding originates from the heteroatomic Au–Gd and Au–Sn interactions, while homoatomic Au–Au bonding is evident within the Au@Au6 clusters.« less

  16. Effect of growth temperature on ballistic electron transport through the Au/Si(001) interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckes, M. W.; Friend, B. E.; Stollenwerk, A. J.

    2014-04-28

    Ballistic electron emission spectroscopy was used to investigate electron transport through Au/Si(001) Schottky diodes grown at 35?C and 22?C. Aside from a decreased Schottky height, this small increase in temperature introduced an energy dependent scattering component, which was absent in the samples grown at 22?C. These differences may be attributed to the increased amount of Au-Si intermixing at the interface. Despite the non-epitaxial nature of the growth technique, strong evidence was found in both sets of samples that indicated the presence of a forward-focused current subject to some degree of parallel momentum conservation at the interface. This evidence was present in all samples grown at 35?C, but was only observed in those samples grown at 22?C when the Au films were 10?nm or thicker. This sensitivity to growth temperature could account for discrepancies in previous studies on Au/Si(001)

  17. Photoactivation experiment on {sup 197}Au and its implications for the dipole strength in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, C.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Bemmerer, D.; Beyer, R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Rusev, G.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Grosse, E.

    2008-11-15

    The {sup 197}Au({gamma},n) reaction is used as an activation standard for photodisintegration studies on astrophysically relevant nuclei. At the bremsstrahlung facility of the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear accelerator of high Brilliance and low Emittance) of Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, photoactivation measurements on {sup 197}Au have been performed with bremsstrahlung endpoint energies from 8.0 to 15.5 MeV. The measured activation yield is compared with previous experiments as well as with calculations using Hauser-Feshbach statistical models. It is shown that the experimental data are best described by a two-Lorentzian parametrization with taking the axial deformation of {sup 197}Au into account. The experimental {sup 197}Au({gamma},n) reaction yield measured at ELBE via the photoactivation method is found to be consistent with previous experimental data using photon scattering or neutron detection methods.

  18. Analysis of vapor-liquid-solid mechanism in Au-assisted GaAs nanowire growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmand, J.C.; Patriarche, G.; Pere-Laperne, N.; Merat-Combes, M-N.; Travers, L.; Glas, F.

    2005-11-14

    GaAs nanowires were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on (111)B oriented surfaces, after the deposition of Au nanoparticles. Different growth durations and different growth terminations were tested. After the growth of the nanowires, the structure and the composition of the metallic particles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. We identified three different metallic compounds: the hexagonal {beta}{sup '}Au{sub 7}Ga{sub 2} structure, the orthorhombic AuGa structure, and an almost pure Au face centered cubic structure. We explain how these different solid phases are related to the growth history of the samples. It is concluded that during the wire growth, the metallic particles are liquid, in agreement with the generally accepted vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. In addition, the analysis of the wire morphology indicates that Ga adatoms migrate along the wire sidewalls with a mean length of about 3 {mu}m.

  19. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Au setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-08-25

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Au stores.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TWPC3) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several ...

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TWPC2) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several ...

  2. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 ...

  3. TVA - Solar Solutions Initiative (Georgia) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Weather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Siding, Roofs, Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Renewable...

  4. TVA - Solar Solutions Initiative (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Weather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Siding, Roofs, Photovoltaics Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Renewable...

  5. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:energyright.comresidentialescore.html State Alabama Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation - 250Home (One...

  6. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:energyright.comresidentialescore.html State Mississippi Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation - 250...

  7. TVA - Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Seasonal and time-of-day prices are set at the date of execution of the contract agreement. Typical pricing for...

  8. TVA - Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Seasonal and time-of-day prices are set at the date of execution of the contract agreement. Typical pricing for...

  9. TVA - Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy generators between 50kW and 20MW to enter into long term price contracts. The goal...

  10. TVA Partner Utilities - eScore Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - 150Unit (No Limit) Geothermal Heat Pump Replacement - 500Unit (No Limit) Dual Fuel Heat Pump Replacement - 250Unit (No Limit) Subsidized Energy Audit Price- 75...

  11. Measurement of J/ψ Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Barnovska, Z.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bruna, E.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Ding, F.; Dion, A.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R. G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Gliske, S.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Grosnick, D.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hajkova, O.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Harris, J. W.; Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jena, C.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lima, L. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Luszczak, A.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitrovski, M. K.; Mohammed, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mustafa, M. K.; Naglis, M.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nogach, L. V.; Novak, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Oliveira, R. A. N.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T. R.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; deSouza, U. G.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/ψ azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at √sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/ψ elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/ψ particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  12. Measurement of J/ψ Azimuthal Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2013-08-02

    The measurement of J/ψ azimuthal anisotropy is presented as a function of transverse momentum for different centralities in Au+Au collisions at √sNN>/sub>=200 GeV. The measured J/ψ elliptic flow is consistent with zero within errors for transverse momentum between 2 and 10 GeV/c. Our measurement suggests that J/ψ particles with relatively large transverse momenta are not dominantly produced by coalescence from thermalized charm quarks, when comparing to model calculations.

  13. Disassembly of hot nuclear matter formed in Au-induced reactions near the Fermi energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delis, D.N.

    1993-09-01

    Complex fragment emission has been studied in the 60 MeV/A {sup 197}Au + {sup 12}C, {sup 27}Al, {sup 51}V, {sup nat}Cu, and {sup 197}Au reactions. Velocity spectra, angular distributions and cross sections have been constructed for each target from the inclusive data. Coincidence data including 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-fold events have also been examined. Furthermore neutron multiplicity distributions have been obtained for the above reactions by utilizing a novel neutron calorimetric approach.

  14. Electronic Structure of Thiol-Covered Gold Nanoparticles: Au102(MBA)44 |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Structure of Thiol-Covered Gold Nanoparticles: Au102(MBA)44 Authors: Li, Y., Galli, G., and Gygi, F. We present first principles, density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the structural and electronic properties of thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles [Au102(MBA)44 ] that have been recently crystallized and measured by X-ray diffraction. Our calculations yield structural properties in very good agreement with experiment and reveal the impact of

  15. Bond-bending isomerism of Au2I3-: Competition between covalent bonding and aurophilicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Wan -Lu; Liu, Hong -Tao; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Piazza, Zachary A.; Huang, Dao -Ling; Chen, Teng -Teng; Su, Jing; Yang, Ping; Chen, Xin; et al

    2015-10-13

    We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical investigation of the gaseous Au2I3– cluster, which is found to exhibit two types of isomers due to competition between Au–I covalent bonding and Au–Au aurophilic interactions. The covalent bonding favors a bent IAuIAuI– structure with an obtuse Au–I–Au angle (100.7°), while aurophilic interactions pull the two Au atoms much closer, leading to an acutely bent structure (72.0°) with an Au–Au distance of 3.08 Å. The two isomers are separated by a small barrier and are nearly degenerate with the obtuse isomer being slightly more stable. At low temperature, only the obtuse isomermore » is observed; distinct experimental evidence is observed for the co-existence of a combination of isomers with both acute and obtuse bending angles at room temperature. As a result, the two bond-bending isomers of Au2I3– reveal a unique example of one molecule being able to oscillate between different structures as a result of two competing chemical forces.« less

  16. Stability of Surface and Subsurface Hydrogen on and in Au/Ni Near-Surface Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celik, Fuat E.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2015-10-01

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA (PW91) calculations were used to study the interaction of hydrogen atoms with the (111) surfaces of substitutional near-surface alloys (NSAs) of Au and Ni with different surface layer compositions and different arrangements of Au atoms in the surface layer. The effect of hydrogen adsorption on the surface and in the first and second subsurface layers of the NSAs was studied. Increasing the Au content in the surface layer weakens hydrogen binding on the surface, but strengthens subsurface binding, suggesting that the distribution of surface and subsurface hydrogen will be different than that on pure Ni(111). While the metal composition of the surface layer has an effect on the binding energy of hydrogen on NSA surfaces, the local composition of the binding site has a stronger effect. For example, fcc hollow sites consisting of three Ni atoms bind H nearly as strongly as on Ni(111), and fcc sites consisting of three Au atoms bind H nearly as weakly as on Au(111). Sites with one or two Au atoms show intermediate binding energies. The preference of hydrogen for three-fold Ni hollow sites alters the relative stabilities of different surface metal atom arrangements, and may provide a driving force for adsorbate-induced surface rearrangement.

  17. Electronic structure and vibrational entropies of fcc Au-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, Jorge A.; Lucas, Matthew; Mauger, L; Halevy, I; Horwath, J; Semiatin, S L; Xiao, Yuming; Stone, Matthew B; Abernathy, Douglas L; Fultz, B.

    2013-01-01

    Phonon density of states (DOS) curves were measured on alloys of face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au-Fe using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The NRIXS and INS results were combined to obtain the total phonon DOS and the partial phonon DOS curves of Au and Fe atoms. The 57Fe partial phonon DOS of the dilute alloy Au0.97 57Fe0.03 shows a localized mode centered 4.3% above the cutoff energy of the phonons in pure Au. The Mannheim model for impurity modes accurately reproduced this partial phonon DOS using the fcc Au phonon DOS with a ratio of host-host to impurity-host force constants of 1.55. First-principles calculations validated the assumption of first-nearest-neighbor forces in the Mannheim model and gave a similar ratio of force constants. The high energy local mode broadens with increasing Fe composition, but this has a small effect on the composition dependence of the vibrational entropy. The main effect on the vibrational entropy of alloying comes from a stiffening of the Au partial phonon DOS with Fe concentration. This stiffening is attributed to two main effects: 1) an increase in electron density in the free-electron-like states, and 2) stronger sd-hybridization. These two effects are comparable in magnitude.

  18. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; et al

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence ofmore » the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.« less

  19. Nucleon-gold collisions at 200A GeV using tagged d + Au interactions in the PHOBOS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B. B.; Nouicer, R.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A; Stienberg, P.; Ioradnova, A.; Pak, R.; Sukhanov, A.

    2015-09-23

    Forward calorimetry in the PHOBOS detector has been used to study charged hadron production in d+Au, p+Au, and n+Au collisions at √sNN =200GeV. The forward proton calorimeter detectors are described and a procedure for determining collision centrality with these detectors is detailed. The deposition of energy by deuteron spectator nucleons in the forward calorimeters is used to identify p+Au and n+Au collisions in the data. A weighted combination of the yield of p+Au and n+Au is constructed to build a reference for Au+Au collisions that better matches the isospin composition of the gold nucleus. The pT and centrality dependence of the yield of this improved reference system is found to match that of d+Au. The shape of the charged-particle transverse momentum distribution is observed to extrapolate smoothly from p+p¯ to central d+Au as a function of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density. The asymmetry of positively and negatively charged hadron production in p+Au is compared to that of n+Au. No significant asymmetry is observed at midrapidity. In conclusion, these studies augment recent results from experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facilities to give a more complete description of particle production in p+A and d+A collisions, essential for the understanding the medium produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  20. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore » the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  1. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore » total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  2. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of themore »total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.« less

  3. Measurement of Υ(1S + 2S +3S) production in p + p and Au + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Asai, J.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chang, B. S.; Chang, W. C.; Charvet, J. -L.; Chen, C. -H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Layton, D.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Tomita, Y.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-02-24

    Measurements of bottomonium production in heavy-ion and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented. The inclusive yield of the three Υ states, Υ(1S + 2S + 3S), was measured in the PHENIX experiment via electron-positron decay pairs at midrapidity for Au+Au and p+p collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=200\\) GeV. The Υ(1S + 2S + 3S) → e⁺e⁻ differential cross section at midrapidity was found to be Beedσ/dy = 108 ± 38 (stat) ± 15 (syst) ± 11 (luminosity) pb in p+p collisions. The nuclear modification factor in the 30% most central Au+Au collisions indicates a suppression of the total Υ state yield relative to the extrapolation from p+p collision data. Thus, the suppression is consistent with measurements at higher energies by the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude ofmore »the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.« less

  5. Initial eccentricity in deformed {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filip, Peter; Lednicky, Richard; Masui, Hiroshi; Xu Nu

    2009-11-15

    Initial eccentricity and eccentricity fluctuations of the interaction volume created in relativistic collisions of deformed {sup 197}Au and {sup 238}U nuclei are studied using optical and Monte Carlo (MC) Glauber simulations. It is found that the nonsphericity noticeably influences the average eccentricity in central collisions, and eccentricity fluctuations are enhanced from deformation. Quantitative results are obtained for Au+Au and U+U collisions at energy {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV.

  6. Efficient H{sub 2} production over Au/graphene/TiO{sub 2} induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Yu, Hongtao; Wang, Hua; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: Both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation were used for H{sub 2} production. Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst was synthesized. Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} exhibited enhancement of light absorption and charge separation. H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: H{sub 2} production over Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst induced by surface plasmon resonance of Au and band-gap excitation of TiO{sub 2} using graphene (Gr) as an electron acceptor has been investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance study indicated that, in this composite, Gr collected electrons not only from Au with surface plasmon resonance but also from TiO{sub 2} with band-gap excitation. Surface photovoltage and UVvis absorption measurements revealed that compared with Au/TiO{sub 2}, Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} displayed more effective photogenerated charge separation and higher optical absorption. Benefiting from these advantages, the H{sub 2} production rate of Au/Gr/TiO{sub 2} composite with Gr content of 1.0 wt% and Au content of 2.0 wt% was about 2 times as high as that of Au/TiO{sub 2}. This work represents an important step toward the efficient application of both surface plasmon resonance and band-gap excitation on the way to converting solar light into chemical energy.

  7. INTERSTELLAR PICK-UP IONS OBSERVED BETWEEN 11 AND 22 AU BY NEW HORIZONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randol, B. M.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2013-05-10

    We report new observations by the Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft, which measures energy per charge (E/q) spectra of solar wind and interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs) between 11 AU and 22 AU from the Sun. The data provide an unprecedented look at PUIs as there have been very few measurements of PUIs beyond 10 AU. We analyzed the PUI part of the spectra by comparing them to the classic Vasyliunas and Siscoe PUI model. Our analysis indicates that PUIs are usually well-described by this distribution. We derive parameters relevant to PUI studies, such as the ionization rate normalized to 1 AU. Our result for the average ionization rate between 11 and 12 AU agrees with an independently derived average value found during the same time. Later, we find a general increase in the ionization rate, which is consistent with the increase in solar activity. We also calculate the PUI thermal pressure, which appears to be roughly consistent with previous results. Through fitting of the solar wind proton peaks in our spectra, we derive solar wind thermal pressures. Based on our analysis, we predict a ratio of PUI thermal pressure to solar wind thermal pressure just inside the termination shock to be between 100 and >1000.

  8. Spin correlations and electron transport in MnBi:Au films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharel, P.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    The structural, magnetic, and electron transport properties of Mn{sub 55-x}Au{sub x}Bi{sub 45} (x = 0, 4.5) thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering have been investigated. The magnetization of the MnBi films decreases and the coercivity increases due to Au doping. The temperature dependence of resistivity between 2 to 300 K shows that the films are metallic but the 4.5% Au-doped film shows a Kondo behavior with resistance minimum at 10.2 K. The magnetoresistance is anisotropic and the positive transverse magnetoresistance is significantly enhanced (16.3% at 70 kOe) by Au doping. We interpret these data in terms of a model in which Au atoms preferentially substitute for Mn atoms on the Mn lattice, and some Mn atoms are displaced to interstitial sites in the NiAs structure. These interstitial Mn atoms are coupled antiferromagnetically to the Mn atoms on the original Mn lattice leading to the large decrease in magnetization, Kondo effect, and the positive magnetoresistance.

  9. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  10. Mechanical and Electrical Performance of Thermally Stable Au-ZnO films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeppner, Rachel L.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Moody, Neville R.; Bahr, David F.

    2015-03-28

    The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical performance of AuZnO composite thin films are determined in this work. The co-deposition of ZnO with Au via physical vapor deposition leads to grain refinement over that of pure Au; the addition of 0.1 vol.% ZnO reduces the as-grown grain size by over 30%. The hardness of the as-grown films doubles with 2% ZnO, from 1.8 to 3.6 GPa as measured by nanoindentation. Films with ZnO additions greater than 0.5% show no significant grain growth after annealing at 350 C, while pure gold and smaller additions do exhibit grain growth and subsequent mechanical softening. Films with 1% and 2% ZnO show a decrease of approximately 50% in electrical resistivity and no change in hardness after annealing. A model accounting for both changes in the interface structure between dispersed ZnO particles and the Au matrix captures the changes in mechanical and electrical resistivity. Furthermore, the addition of 12% ZnO co-deposited with Au provides a method to create mechanically hard and thermally stable films with a resistivity less than 80 n?-m. Our results complement previous studies of other alloying systems, suggesting oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) gold shows a desirable hardnessresistivity relationship that is relatively independent of the particular ODS chemistry.

  11. Super-Stable, Highly Monodisperse Plasmonic Nanocrystals with 500 Gold Atoms: Au~500(SR)~120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Chapman, Karena; Cullen, David A; Dass, Amala

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition of plasmonic nanoparticles is challenging due to a deficiency in tools capable of accurately evaluating the number of atoms. Mass spectrometry plays a significant role in determining nanoparticle composition at the atomic level. Significant progress has been made in understanding ultra-small gold nanoparticles, like Au25(SR)18 and Au38(SR)24, with a Au core diameter of 0.97 and 1.3 nm, respectively. However, progress in small plasmonic nanoparticles (2 - 5 nm) is currently challenging, due in part to limitations in synthesizing monodisperse nanoparticles. Here, we report a plasmonic nanocrystal that is highly monodisperse, with an unprecedented variation of less than 20 gold atoms. The composition of the super-stable plasmonic nanocrystals at 115 kDa was determined to contain Au500 10SR120 3. The Au~500 system, named Faraduarate-500, is the largest size to be characterized using high resolution ESI mass spectrometry. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) data shows that the local atomic structure is consistent with a face-centered cubic (fcc) or Marks decahedral arrangement. High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images show that the diameter is 2.4 0.1 nm. The radius of gyration measured by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), is 1.05 0.05 nm, and the size and the shape of SAXS molecular envelope are in agreement with TEM and PDF measurements.

  12. Controlled growth and multi-photon luminescence of hexagonal arrays of Au nanoparticles on anodic aluminum oxide templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jianbo; Yu Ying; Peng Xiaoniu; Yang Zhongjian; Zhou Li; Zhou Zhangkai

    2012-06-15

    Au nanoparticles were deposited onto anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates by using a rotating sputtering technique. Interestingly, hexagonal arrays of Au nanoparticles were obtained at an appropriate rotating rate and deposition time. Strong three-photon luminescence was observed from the hexagonally arrayed Au nanoparticles, which is attributed to the strong enhancements of local electromagnetic fields at both excitation and emission wavelengths. Our findings provide a new method to prepare Au nanoparticle arrays with large field enhancements and could have prospective applications in plasmonic nanodevices, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates, and biosensors.

  13. Enhanced transient reactivity of an O-sputtered Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Friend, C M

    2004-12-02

    The interaction of SO{sub 2} with oxygen-sputtered Au(111) surfaces ({theta}{sub oxygen} {le} 0.35 ML) was studied by monitoring the oxygen and sulfur coverages as a function of SO{sub 2} exposure. Two reaction regimes were observed: oxygen depletion followed by sulfur deposition. An enhanced, transient sulfur deposition rate is observed at the oxygen depletion point. This effect is specifically pronounced if the Au surface is continuously exposed to SO{sub 2}. The enhanced reactivity towards S deposition seems to be linked to the presence of highly reactive, under-coordinated Au atoms. Adsorbed oxygen appears to stabilize, but also to block these sites. In absence of the stabilization effect of adsorbed oxygen, i.e. at the oxygen depletion point, the enhanced reactivity decays on a timescale of a few minutes. These observations shed a new light on the catalytic reactivity of highly dispersed gold nanoparticles.

  14. Hadronization geometry and charge-dependent two-particlecorrelation on momentum subspace (eta, phi) in Au-Au collisions atsqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson,B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski,J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar,A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de laBarca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip,P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Guiterrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry,T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann,G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones,P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrv,V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov,A.I.; et al.

    2004-09-23

    We present the first measurements of charge-dependent two-particle correlations on momentum-space difference variables {eta}{sub 1}-{eta}{sub 2} (pseudorapidity) and {phi}{sub 1}-{phi}{sub 2} (azimuth) for primary charged hadrons with transverse momentum 0.15 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2 GeV/c and |{eta}| {le} 1.3 from Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. We observe correlation structures not predicted by theory but consistent with evolution of hadron emission geometry with increasing centrality from one-dimensional fragmentation of color strings to higher-dimensional fragmentation of a hadron-opaque bulk medium.

  15. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore »dependence of the oscillations.« less

  16. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  17. Event-by-event hexb pt hexb fluctuations in Au-Au collisions atsqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-09-02

    We present the first large-acceptance measurement of event-wise fluctuations in Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. Significant nonstatistical fluctuations are observed. The measured fractional r.m.s. width excess of the event-wise distribution for the 15% most-central events for charged hadrons within |{eta}| < 1 and 0.15 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2 GeV/c is 13.7 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-}1.3(syst)% relative to a statistical reference. The variation of charge-independent fluctuation excess with centrality is non-monotonic but smooth. Charge-dependent nonstatistical fluctuations are also observed.

  18. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclearmodification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman,R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll,J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay,S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Drosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; et al.

    2003-06-18

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v{sub 2} and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R{sub CP} for kaons and lambdas ({Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}}) at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. In combination, the v{sub 2} and R{sub CP} particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p{sub T} {approx} 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}} v{sub 2} values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination.

  19. Rapidity and centrality dependence of proton and anti-proton production from 197Au+197Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-06-20

    We report on the rapidity and centrality dependence of proton and anti-proton transverse mass distributions from {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV as measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. Our results are from the rapidity and transverse momentum range of |y| < 0.5 and 0.35 < p{sub t} < 1.00 GeV/c. For both protons and anti-protons, transverse mass distributions become more convex from peripheral to central collisions demonstrating characteristics of collective expansion. The measured rapidity distributions and the mean transverse momenta versus rapidity are flat within |y| < 0.5. Comparisons of our data with results from model calculations indicate that in order to obtain a consistent picture of the proton(anti-proton) yields and transverse mass distributions the possibility of pre-hadronic collective expansion may have to be taken into account.

  20. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  1. Heavy-quark production and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=62.4 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we present measurements of electrons and positrons from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons at midrapidity (|y|< 0.35) in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 62.4 GeV. The data were collected in 2010 by the PHENIX experiment that included the new hadron-blind detector. The invariant yield of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum in the range 1 < peT < 5 GeV/c. The invariant yield per binary collision is slightly enhanced above the p+p reference in Au+Au 0%20%, 20%40%, and 40%60% centralities at a comparable level. At this low beam energy this may be a result of the interplay between initial-state Cronin effects, final-state flow, and energy loss in medium. The v? of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is nonzero when averaged between 1.3 < peT < 2.5 GeV/c for 0%40% centrality collisions at ?sNN = 62.4 GeV. For 20%40% centrality collisions, the v? at ?sNN = 62.4 GeV is smaller than that for heavy-flavor decays at ?sNN = 200 GeV. The v? of the electrons from heavy-flavor decay at the lower beam energy is also smaller than v? for pions. Both results indicate that the heavy-quarks interact with the medium formed in these collisions, but they may not be at the same level of thermalization with the medium as observed at ?sNN = 200 GeV.

  2. Heavy-quark production and elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=62.4 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, we present measurements of electrons and positrons from the semileptonic decays of heavy-flavor hadrons at midrapidity (|y|< 0.35) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 62.4 GeV. The data were collected in 2010 by the PHENIX experiment that included the new hadron-blind detector. The invariant yield of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum in the range 1 < peT < 5 GeV/c. The invariant yield per binary collision is slightly enhanced above the p+p reference in Au+Au 0%–20%, 20%–40%, and 40%–60% centralities at a comparable level. At this low beam energy thismore » may be a result of the interplay between initial-state Cronin effects, final-state flow, and energy loss in medium. The v₂ of electrons from heavy-flavor decays is nonzero when averaged between 1.3 < peT < 2.5 GeV/c for 0%–40% centrality collisions at √sNN = 62.4 GeV. For 20%–40% centrality collisions, the v₂ at √sNN = 62.4 GeV is smaller than that for heavy-flavor decays at √sNN = 200 GeV. The v₂ of the electrons from heavy-flavor decay at the lower beam energy is also smaller than v₂ for pions. Both results indicate that the heavy-quarks interact with the medium formed in these collisions, but they may not be at the same level of thermalization with the medium as observed at √sNN = 200 GeV.« less

  3. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua; Yu, Kehan; Chen, Junhong

    2010-01-01

    We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and field-effect transistor (FET) measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  4. Photo-induced wettability of TiO{sub 2} film with Au buffer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purkayastha, Debarun Dhar; Sangani, L. D. Varma; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam; Madhurima, V.

    2014-04-24

    The effect of thickness of Au buffer layer (15-25 nm) between TiO{sub 2} film and substrate on the wettability of TiO{sub 2} films is reported. TiO{sub 2} films grown on Au buffer layer have a higher contact angle of 96-;100 as compared to 47.6o for the film grown without buffer layer. The transition from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity under UV irradiation occurs within 10 min. for the buffer layered films whereas it is almost 30 min. for the film grown without buffer layer. The enhanced photo induced hydrophilicity is shown to be surface energy driven.

  5. High-frequency signal transmission through single-atom contacts of Au and Pt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoyama, Shodai; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2015-03-23

    Signal transmission through atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt has been studied at room temperature for frequencies from 9 kHz to 1 GHz and for conductances (1?10)G{sub 0} (G?2e{sup 2}/h is the quantum unit of conductance). We measured the frequency spectrum of S parameter S{sub 21}=|S{sub 21}|e{sup i?} and found ??0 up to 1?GHz for all contacts irrespective of their conductance. Our observations directly prove that the atom-sized contacts of Au and Pt, including their single-atom contacts, behave as a pure resistance in the RF regime.

  6. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  7. PdAgAu alloy with high resistance to corrosion by H{sub 2}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Fernando; Miller, James B.; Gellman, Andrew J.; Tarditi, Ana M.; Fleutot, Benoit; Petro, Kondratyuk, Cornaglia, Laura M

    2012-12-01

    PdAgAu alloy films were prepared on porous stainless steel supports by sequential electroless deposition. Two specific compositions, Pd{sub 83}Ag{sub 2}Au{sub 15} and Pd{sub 74}Ag{sub 14}Au{sub 12}, were studied for their sulfur tolerance. The alloys and a reference Pd foil were exposed to 1000 H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} at 623 K for periods of 3 and 30 hours. The microstructure, morphology and bulk composition of both nonexposed and H{sub 2}S-exposed samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). XRD and SEM analysis revealed time-dependent growth of a bulk Pd{sub 4}S phase on the Pd foil during H{sub 2}S exposure. In contrast, the PdAgAu ternary alloys displayed the same FCC structure before and after H{sub 2}S exposure. In agreement with the XRD and SEM results, sulfur was not detected in the bulk of either ternary alloy samples by EDS, even after 30 hours of H{sub 2}S exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles were acquired for both PdAgAu alloys after 3 and 30 hours of exposure to characterize sulfur contamination near their surfaces. Very low S 2p and S 2s XPS signals were observed at the top-surfaces of the PdAgAu alloys, and those signals disappeared before the etch depth reached ~ 10 nm, even for samples exposed to H{sub 2}S for 30 hours. The depth profile analyses also revealed silver and gold segregation to the surface of the alloys; preferential location of Au on the alloys surface may be related to their resistance to bulk sulfide formation. In preliminary tests, a PdAgAu alloy membrane displayed higher initial H{sub 2} permeability than a similarly prepared pure Pd sample and, consistent with resistance to bulk sulfide formation, lower permeability loss in H{sub 2}S than pure Pd.

  8. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON

  9. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  10. Low temperature fabrication and doping concentration analysis of Au/Sb ohmic contacts to n-type Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J. Q.; Wang, C.; Zhu, T.; Wu, W. J.; Fan, J.; Tu, L. C.

    2015-11-15

    This paper investigates low temperature ohmic contact formation of Au/Sb to n-type Si substrates through AuSb/NiCr/Au metal stacks. Liquid epitaxy growth is utilized to incorporate Sb dopants into Si substrate in AuSi melt. The best specific contact resistivity achieved is 0.003 Ω ⋅ cm{sup 2} at 425 {sup o}C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals inverted pyramidal crater regions at the metal/semiconductor interface, indicating that AuSi alloying efficiently occurs at such sites. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) shows that Sb atoms are successfully incorporated into Si as doping impurities during the anneal process, and the Sb doping concentration at the contact interface is found to be higher than the solid solubility limit in a Si crystal. This ohmic contacts formation method is suitable for semiconductor fabrication processes with limited thermal budget, such as post CMOS integration of MEMS.

  11. Nuclear matter effects on J/? production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csand, M.; Csrg?, T.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slune?ka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vrtesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/? production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/? yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/? production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  12. Nuclear matter effects on J/ψ production in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bing, X.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; DeBlasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Do, J. H.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D'Orazio, L.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. -J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Novak, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2014-12-18

    We report on J/ψ production from asymmetric Cu+Au heavy-ion collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}} = 200\\) GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at both forward (Cu-going direction) and backward (Au-going direction) rapidities. The nuclear modification of J/ψ yields in Cu+Au collisions in the Au-going direction is found to be comparable to that in Au+Au collisions when plotted as a function of the number of participating nucleons. In the Cu-going direction, J/ψ production shows a stronger suppression. This difference is comparable in magnitude and has the same sign as the difference expected from shadowing effects due to stronger low-x gluon suppression in the larger Au nucleus. Thus, the relative suppression is opposite to that expected from hot nuclear matter dissociation, since a higher energy density is expected in the Au-going direction.

  13. Mechanical and Electrical Performance of Thermally Stable Au-ZnO films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schoeppner, Rachel L.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Moody, Neville R.; Bahr, David F.

    2015-03-28

    The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical performance of Au–ZnO composite thin films are determined in this work. The co-deposition of ZnO with Au via physical vapor deposition leads to grain refinement over that of pure Au; the addition of 0.1 vol.% ZnO reduces the as-grown grain size by over 30%. The hardness of the as-grown films doubles with 2% ZnO, from 1.8 to 3.6 GPa as measured by nanoindentation. Films with ZnO additions greater than 0.5% show no significant grain growth after annealing at 350 °C, while pure gold and smaller additions do exhibit grain growth and subsequent mechanicalmore » softening. Films with 1% and 2% ZnO show a decrease of approximately 50% in electrical resistivity and no change in hardness after annealing. A model accounting for both changes in the interface structure between dispersed ZnO particles and the Au matrix captures the changes in mechanical and electrical resistivity. Furthermore, the addition of 1–2% ZnO co-deposited with Au provides a method to create mechanically hard and thermally stable films with a resistivity less than 80 nΩ-m. Our results complement previous studies of other alloying systems, suggesting oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) gold shows a desirable hardness–resistivity relationship that is relatively independent of the particular ODS chemistry.« less

  14. The effect of alkali metal on the surface properties of potassium doped Au-Beta zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobczak, Izabela; Rydz, Michal; Ziolek, Maria

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Interaction of gold with K leads to the change of electronic state and redox properties of gold. ► The amount of potassium incorporated into Au-zeolites determines the size of gold particles. ► K(0.2 wt.%)/Au-Beta exhibits the best performance in decomposition of N{sub 2}O and removal of Bu{sub 2}S. -- Abstract: Beta zeolite was applied as support for gold introduced by gold-precipitation method and potassium added by impregnation or adsorption. The effect of zeolite composition and the amount of potassium introduced on the surface properties of the final materials was considered. Moreover, the interaction of gold and potassium species was found to be related to the adsorptive and catalytic behaviour of zeolites in NO reduction with propene and deodorization. K/Au-Beta(Impregnated) exhibits the best performance in the above mentioned processes because of the small gold particles (between 2 and 5 nm) and interaction of gold with potassium species leading to the change of electronic properties of the surface (the appearance of cationic gold species). Potassium added as a promoter improves the catalytic properties of Au-zeolite in N{sub 2}O decomposition and also in deodorization (increase of the ability to dibutyl sulphide oxidation). The catalysts prepared were characterized by XRD, XPS, UV–vis, TEM, pyridine adsorption combined with FTIR and test reaction (2-propanol transformation).

  15. Yields of photoneutron reactions on {sup 197}Au nuclei in the giant-dipole-resonance region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ermakov, A. N.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kurilik, A. S.; Stopani, K. A.; Troschiev, S. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    Yields of photonuclear reactions on 197Au nuclei were measured in a beam of bremsstrahlung photons, the endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung spectrum being 29.1 MeV. These measurements were performed by means of the gamma-activation procedure. The results obtained in this way were compared with the results of earlier experiments and theoretical calculations.

  16. Plasmon-enhanced reverse water gas shift reaction over oxide supported Au catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhye, AA; Ro, I; Zeng, X; Kim, HJ; Tejedor, I; Anderson, MA; Dumesic, JA; Huber, GW

    2015-01-01

    We show that localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can enhance the catalytic activities of different oxide-supported Au catalysts for the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. Oxide-supported Au catalysts showed 30 to 1300% higher activity for RWGS under visible light compared to dark conditions. Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation (DP) method with 3.5 nm average Au particle size showed the highest activity for the RWGS reaction. Visible light is converted into chemical energy for this reaction with up to a 5% overall efficiency. A shift in the apparent activation energy (from 47 kJ mol(-1) in dark to 35 kJ mol(-1) in light) and apparent reaction order with respect to CO2 (from 0.5 in dark to 1.0 in light) occurs due to the LSPR. Our kinetic results indicate that the LSPR increases the rate of either the hydroxyl hydrogenation or carboxyl decomposition more than any other steps in the reaction network.

  17. Mechanical and Electrical Performance of Thermally Stable Au-ZnO films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoeppner, Rachel L.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Moody, Neville R.; Bahr, David F.

    2015-03-28

    The mechanical properties, thermal stability, and electrical performance of Au–ZnO composite thin films are determined in this work. The co-deposition of ZnO with Au via physical vapor deposition leads to grain refinement over that of pure Au; the addition of 0.1 vol.% ZnO reduces the as-grown grain size by over 30%. The hardness of the as-grown films doubles with 2% ZnO, from 1.8 to 3.6 GPa as measured by nanoindentation. Films with ZnO additions greater than 0.5% show no significant grain growth after annealing at 350 °C, while pure gold and smaller additions do exhibit grain growth and subsequent mechanical softening. Films with 1% and 2% ZnO show a decrease of approximately 50% in electrical resistivity and no change in hardness after annealing. A model accounting for both changes in the interface structure between dispersed ZnO particles and the Au matrix captures the changes in mechanical and electrical resistivity. Furthermore, the addition of 1–2% ZnO co-deposited with Au provides a method to create mechanically hard and thermally stable films with a resistivity less than 80 nΩ-m. Our results complement previous studies of other alloying systems, suggesting oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) gold shows a desirable hardness–resistivity relationship that is relatively independent of the particular ODS chemistry.

  18. Thermal stability of bimetallic Au/Fe nanoparticles in silica matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannu, Compesh Singh, Udai B. Hooda, Sonu Kabiraj, D. Avasthi, D. K.

    2014-04-24

    Thin silica film containing Au and Fe bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by atom beam cosputtering. The samples were annealed at different temperatures from 400 to 800° C to study the thermal stability of bimetallic nanoparticles using X ray diffraction. It is observed that at 800° C strong structural rearrangement took place leading to thermal decomposition of bimetallic nanoparticles.

  19. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON COMPANIONS AND DUST WITHIN A FEW AU OF VEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Martin, S. R.; Liewer, K.; Mawet, D.; Hanot, C.

    2011-07-20

    We report on high contrast near-infrared ({approx}2.2 {mu}m) observations of Vega obtained with the Palomar Fiber Nuller, a dual sub-aperture rotating coronagraph installed at the Palomar Hale telescope. The data show consistent astrophysical null depth measurements at the {approx_equal} 10{sup -3} level or below for three different baseline orientations spanning 60 deg in azimuth, with individual 1{sigma} uncertainties {<=}7 x 10{sup -4}. These high cancellation and accuracy levels translate into a dynamic range greater than 1000:1 inside the diffraction limit of the 5 m telescope beam. Such high contrast performance is unprecedented in the near-infrared and provides improved constraints on Vega's immediate ({approx_equal}20 to 250 mas, or {approx_equal}0.15 to 2 AU) environment. In particular, our measurements rule out any potential companion in the [0.25-1 AU] region contributing more than 1% of the overall near-infrared stellar flux, with limits as low as 0.2% near 0.6 AU. These are the best upper limits established so far by direct detection for a companion to Vega in this inner region. We also conclude that any dust population contributing a significant ({>=}1%) near-infrared thermal excess can arise only within 0.2 AU of the star, and that it must consist of much smaller grains than in the solar zodiacal cloud. Dust emission from farther than {approx_equal}2 AU is also not ruled out by our observations, but would have to originate in strong scattering, pointing again to very small grains.

  20. Energy dependence of Kπ, pπ and Kp fluctuations in Au+Au collisions from √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-08-07

    A search for the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) critical point was performed by the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, using dynamical fluctuations of unlike particle pairs. Heavy ion collisions were studied over a large range of collision energies with homogeneous acceptance and excellent particle identification, covering a significant range in the QCD phase diagram where a critical point may be located. Dynamical Kπ, pπ, and Kp fluctuations as measured by the STAR experiment in central 0–5% Au+Au collisions from center-of-mass collision energies √sNN=7.7 to 200 GeV are presented. The observable νdyn was used to quantify the magnitude of the dynamical fluctuations in event-by-event measurements of the Kπ, pπ, and Kp pairs. The energy dependences of these fluctuations from central 0–5% Au+Au collisions all demonstrate a smooth evolution with collision energy.

  1. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at √sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to themore » model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (< 1%) deviation is observed.« less

  2. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e?e? pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.62.0moreGeV/c. While the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N ? part, where ? = 1.380.03(stat)0.07(syst).less

  3. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0more »GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).« less

  4. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at √sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to themore »model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (« less

  5. Measurement of higher cumulants of net-charge multiplicity distributions in Au+Au collisions at sNN=7.7–200GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2016-01-19

    Our report presents the measurement of cumulants (Cn,n=1,...,4) of the net-charge distributions measured within pseudorapidity (|η|<0.35) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=7.7–200GeV with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The ratios of cumulants (e.g., C1/C2, C3/C1) of the net-charge distributions, which can be related to volume independent susceptibility ratios, are studied as a function of centrality and energy. These quantities are important to understand the quantum-chromodynamics phase diagram and possible existence of a critical end point. The measured values are very well described by expectation from negative binomial distributions. We do not observe any nonmonotonic behavior in themore » ratios of the cumulants as a function of collision energy. These measured values of C1/C2 and C3/C1 can be directly compared to lattice quantum-chromodynamics calculations and thus allow extraction of both the chemical freeze-out temperature and the baryon chemical potential at each center-of-mass energy. Moreover, the extracted baryon chemical potentials are in excellent agreement with a thermal-statistical analysis model.« less

  6. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; et al

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0more » GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).« less

  7. Dynamics of copper-phthalocyanine molecules on Au/Ge(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sotthewes, K.; Heimbuch, R.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.

    2015-10-07

    Spatially resolved current-time scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with current-distance spectroscopy has been used to characterize the dynamic behavior of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules adsorbed on a Au-modified Ge(001) surface. The analyzed CuPc molecules are adsorbed in a “molecular bridge” configuration, where two benzopyrrole groups (lobes) are connected to a Au-induced nanowire, whereas the other two lobes are connected to the adjacent nanowire. Three types of lobe configurations are found: a bright lobe, a dim lobe, and a fuzzy lobe. The dim and fuzzy lobes exhibit a well-defined switching behavior between two discrete levels, while the bright lobe shows a broad oscillation band. The observed dynamic behavior is induced by electrons that are injected into the LUMO+1 orbital of the CuPc molecule. By precisely adjusting the tip-molecule distance, the switching frequency of the lobes can be tuned accurately.

  8. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.

  9. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenjun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL; Tysoe, Wilfred [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  10. Self-organization of S adatoms on Au(111): ?3R30 rows at low coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Lim, Hyunseob; Evans, J. W.; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2015-07-06

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we observe an adlayer structure that is dominated by short rows of S atoms, on unreconstructed regions of a Au(111) surface. This structure forms upon adsorption of low S coverage (less than 0.1 monolayer) on a fully reconstructed cleansurface at 300 K, then cooling to 5 K for observation. The rows adopt one of three orientations that are rotated by 30 from the close-packed directions of the Au(111) substrate, and adjacent S atoms in the rows are separated by ?3 times the surface lattice constant, a. Monte Carlo simulations are performed on lattice-gas models, we derived using a limited cluster expansion based on density functional theory energetics. Furthermore, models which include long-range pairwise interactions (extending to 5a), plus selected trio interactions, successfully reproduce the linear rows of S atoms at reasonable temperatures.

  11. Surface Plasmon Excitation via Au Nanoparticles in CdSe Semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Konda, R. B.; Mundle, R.; Mustafa, H.; Bamiduro, O.; Roy, U. N.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.

    2008-10-23

    We present experimental evidence for the large Raman and photoluminescence enhancement in CdSe semiconductor films grown on Si and glass substrates due to excitation of surface plasmon resonances in proximate gold metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of CdSe film. Heterojunction diodes containing n-CdSe on p-Si semiconductor were fabricated and the surface of the diodes was in situ coated with Au nanoparticles using the ultra-high vacuum pulsed-laser deposition technique. A significant enhancement of the photocurrent was obtained in CdSe/p-Si containing Au nanoparticles on the surface compared to CdSe/p-Si due to the enhanced photo-absorption within the semiconductor by the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance. These observations suggest a variety of approaches for improving the performance of devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaic, and related devices, including biosensors.

  12. Atomic Structure of Au329(SR)84 Faradaurate Plasmonic Nanomolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumara, Chanaka; Zuo, Xiaobing; Ilavsky, Jan; Cullen, David; Dass, Amala

    2015-04-03

    To design novel nanomaterials, it is important to precisely control the composition, determine the atomic structure, and manipulate the structure to tune the materials property. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of the material whose composition is Au329(SR)84 precisely, therefore referred to as a nanomolecule. The size homogeneity was shown by electron microscopy, solution X-ray scattering, and mass spectrometry. We proposed its atomic structure to contain the Au260 core using experiments and modeling of a total-scattering-based atomic-pair distribution functional analysis. HAADF-STEM images shows fcc-like 2.0 ± 0.1 nm diameter nanomolecules.

  13. The confinement effect on the activity of Au NPs in polyols oxidation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Villa, Alberto; Wang, Di; Chan-Thaw, Carine E.; Campisi, Sebastiano; Veith, Gabriel M; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a confinement effect where gold nanoparticles trapped within N-functionalized carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) are more active for polyol oxidation and promote selectivity towards di-acid products, whereas AuNPs trapped on the surface produce as a major by-product the one derived from C C cleavage. The behaviour of NPs confined inside the N-CNF channels can be attributed to a different, possibly multiple, coordination of glycerol on the active site

  14. Radio observations reveal a smooth circumstellar environment around the extraordinary type Ib supernova 2012au

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Chakraborti, Sayan; Dittmann, Jason; Drout, Maria; Sanders, Nathan; Chomiuk, Laura; Medvedev, Mikhail; Chevalier, Roger; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-12-10

    We present extensive radio and X-ray observations of SN 2012au, an energetic, radio-luminous supernova of Type Ib that exhibits multi-wavelength properties bridging subsets of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae, hypernovae, and normal core-collapse supernovae. The observations closely follow models of synchrotron emission from a shock-heated circumburst medium that has a wind density profile (??r {sup 2}). We infer a sub-relativistic velocity for the shock wave v ? 0.2 c and a radius of r ? 1.4 10{sup 16}cm at 25 days after the estimated date of explosion. For a wind velocity of 1000 km s{sup 1}, we determine the mass-loss rate of the progenitor to be M-dot =3.610{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}, consistent with the estimates from X-ray observations. We estimate the total internal energy of the radio-emitting material to be E ? 10{sup 47} erg, which is intermediate to SN 1998bw and SN 2002ap. The evolution of the radio light curve of SN 2012au is in agreement with its interaction with a smoothly distributed circumburst medium and the absence of stellar shells ejected from previous outbursts out to r ? 10{sup 17} cm from the supernova site. We conclude that the bright radio emission from SN 2012au was not dissimilar from other core-collapse supernovae despite its extraordinary optical properties, and that the evolution of the SN 2012au progenitor star was relatively quiet, marked with a steady mass loss, during the final years preceding explosion.

  15. Plasmonic Based Sensing Using an Array of Au-Metal Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy, N.; Rogers, Phillip H.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2012-12-04

    An optical plasmonic-based sensing array has been developed and tested for the selective and sensitive detection of H2, CO, and NO2 at a temperature of 500C in an oxygen-containing background. The three element sensing array used Au nanoparticles embedded in separate thin films of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), CeO2, and TiO2. A peak in the absorbance spectrum due to a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on the Au nanoparticles was monitored for each film during gas exposures and showed a blue shift in the peak positions for the reducing gases, H2 and CO, and a red shift for the oxidizing gas NO2. A more in-depth look at the sensing response was performed using the multivariate methods of principal component analysis (PCA) analysis and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on data from across the entire absorbance spectrum range. Qualitative results from both methods showed good separation between the three analytes for both the full array and the Au-TiO2 sample. Quantification of LDA cluster separation using the Mahalanobis distance showed better cluster separation for the array, but there were some instances with the lowest concentrations where the single Au-TiO2 film had better separation than the array. A second method to quantify cluster separation in LDA space was developed using multidimensional volume analysis of the individual cluster volume, overlapped cluster volume and empty volume between clusters. Compared to the individual sensing elements, the array showed less cluster overlap, smaller cluster volumes, and more space between clusters, all of which were expected for improved separability between the analytes.

  16. Comparative study of the alloying effect on the initial oxidation of Cu-Au(100) and Cu-Pt(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Langli; Zhou, Guangwen; Kang, Yihong; Yang, Judith C.; Su, Dong; Stach, Eric A.

    2014-03-24

    Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we show that the oxidation of the Cu-Au(100) results in the formation of Cu{sub 2}O islands that deeply embed into the Cu-Au substrate while the oxidation of the Cu-Pt(100) leads to the formation of Cu{sub 2}O islands that highly protrude above the Cu-Pt substrate. Their difference is attributed to the different mobilities of Pt and Au in the Cu base alloys for which the sluggish mobility of Pt in Cu results in trapped Pt atoms at the oxide/alloy interface while the faster mobility of Au in Cu leads to enhanced rehomogenization of the alloy composition.

  17. Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 MAX phases (M: early transition metal; A: elements in group 13 or 14; X: C or N), such as titanium silicon carbide ...

  18. Periodicity, Electronic Structures, and Bonding of Gold Tetrahalides [AuX4](-) (X = F, CI, Br, I, At, Uus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wan-Lu; Li, Yong; Xu, Congqiao; Wang, Xue B.; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Li, Jun

    2015-12-07

    Systematic theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed to understand the periodicity and electronic structures of trivalent-gold halides using gold tetrahalides [AuX4]⁻ anions (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At, Uus). The [AuX4]⁻ (X = Cl, Br, I) anions were produced in gas phase and their negative-ion photoelectron spectra were obtained, which exhibited rich and well-resolved spectral peaks. We calculated the adiabatic as well as vertical electron detachment energies using density functional methods with scalar and spin-orbit coupling relativistic effects. The simulated photoelectron spectra based on these calculations are in good agreement with the experimental spectra. Our results show that the trivalent Au(III) oxidation state becomes progressively less stable while Au(I) is preferred when the halides become heavier along the Period Table. This trend reveals that the oxidation state of metals in complexes can be manipulated through ligand design

  19. Au impact on GaAs epitaxial growth on GaAs (111){sub B} substrates in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Ya-Nan; Sun, Wen; Zhang, Zhi; Yang, Lei; Lu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Ping-Ping; Lu, Wei; Zou, Jin; Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072

    2013-02-11

    GaAs growth behaviour under the presence of Au nanoparticles on GaAs {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub B} substrate is investigated using electron microscopy. It has been found that, during annealing, enhanced Ga surface diffusion towards Au nanoparticles leads to the GaAs epitaxial growth into {l_brace}113{r_brace}{sub B} faceted triangular pyramids under Au nanoparticles, governed by the thermodynamic growth, while during conventional GaAs growth, growth kinetics dominates, resulting in the flatted triangular pyramids at high temperature and the epitaxial nanowires growth at relatively low temperature. This study provides an insight of Au nanoparticle impact on GaAs growth, which is critical for understanding the formation mechanisms of semiconductor nanowires.

  20. Catalytic epoxidation of propene with H2O-O2 reactants on Au/TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, Manuel; Iglesia, Enrique

    2008-11-05

    Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts form hydroperoxy species from H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2} mixtures at near-ambient temperatures. These species can be used in the selective epoxidation of propene to propylene oxide.

  1. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR HYDROGEN'S DISAPPEARANCE AT 1 AU: FOUR YEARS OF IBEX IN THE RISING SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saul, Lukas; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Sokol, Justina; Fuselier, Stephen; McComas, Dave; Moebius, Eberhard

    2013-04-20

    NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission has recently opened a new window on the interstellar medium (ISM) by imaging neutral atoms. One ''bright'' feature in the sky is the interstellar wind flowing into the solar system. Composed of remnants of stellar explosions as well as primordial gas and plasma, the ISM is by no means uniform. The interaction of the local ISM with the solar wind shapes our heliospheric environment with hydrogen being the dominant component of the very local ISM. In this paper, we report on direct sampling of the neutral hydrogen of the local ISM over four years of IBEX observations. The hydrogen wind observed at 1 AU has decreased and nearly disappeared as the solar activity has increased over the last four years; the signal at 1 AU has dropped off in 2012 by a factor of {approx}8 to near background levels. The longitudinal offset has also increased with time presumably due to greater radiation pressure deflecting the interstellar wind. We present longitudinal and latitudinal arrival direction measurements of the bulk flow as measured over four years beginning at near solar minimum conditions. The H distribution we observe at 1 AU is expected to be different from that outside the heliopause due to ionization, photon pressure, gravity, and filtration by interactions with heliospheric plasma populations. These observations provide an important benchmark for modeling of the global heliospheric interaction. Based on these observations we suggest a further course of scientific action to observe neutral hydrogen over a full solar cycle with IBEX.

  2. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  3. Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Andio, Mark; Lewis, James P.; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO2 and H2 reactants to CH4 and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au–ZnO from 30 to ~600 °C and simultaneously tune the CH4 : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH4 : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperature-programmed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resultingmore » from the plasmonic heating of the Au-ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO2 conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The Au-ZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO2 reduction is low ( ~2.5 x 105 W m-2) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO2 utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.« less

  4. Growth of Single- and Bilayer ZnO on Au(111) and Interaction with Copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Xingyi; Yao, Kun; Sun, Keju; Li, Wei-Xue; Lee, Junseok; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-05-30

    The stoichiometric single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) have been prepared by reactive deposition of Zn on Au(111) and studied in detail with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Both single- and bi-layer ZnO(0001) adopt a planar, graphite-like structure similar to freestanding ZnO(0001) due to the weak van der Waals interactions dominating their adhesion with the Au(111) substrate. At higher temperature, the single-layer ZnO(0001) converts gradually to bi-layer ZnO(0001) due to the twice stronger interaction between two ZnO layers than the interfacial adhesion of ZnO with Au substrate. It is found that Cu atoms on the surface of bi-layer ZnO(0001) are mobile with a diffusion barrier of 0.31 eV, and likely to agglomerate and form nanosized particles at low coverages; while Cu atoms tend to penetrate a single layer of ZnO(0001) with a barrier of 0.10 eV, resulting in a Cu free surface.

  5. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S; Kevin, Beyer; et al

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatchmore » between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.« less

  6. Structural Changes in Self-Catalyzed Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on 1,4-Phenylene Diisocyanide Modified Au(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kestell, John; Boscoboinik, J. Anibal; Cheng, Lanxia; Garvey, Michael; Bennett, Dennis W.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2015-07-23

    The self-accelerated adsorption of CO on 1,4-phenylene diisocyanide (PDI)-derived oligomers on Au(111) is explored by reflectionabsorption infrared spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. PDI incorporates gold adatoms from the Au(111) surface to form one-dimensional (AuPDI)n chains that can also connect between gold nanoparticles on mica to form a conductive pathway between them. CO adsorption occurs in two stages; it first adsorbs adjacent to the oligomers that move to optimize CO adsorption. Further CO exposure induces PDI decoordination to form AuPDI adatom complexes thereby causing the conductivity of a PDI-linked gold nanoparticle array on mica to decrease to act as a chemically drive molecular switch. This simple system enables the adsorption process to be explored in detail. DFT calculations reveal that both the (AuPDI)n oligomer chain and the AuPDI adatom complex are stabilized by coadsorbed CO. A kinetic foot-in-the-door model is proposed in which fluctuations in PDI coordination allow CO to diffuse into the gap between gold adatoms to prevent the PDI from reattaching, thereby allowing additional CO to adsorb, to provide kinetic model for allosteric CO adsorption on PDI-covered gold.

  7. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wustite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite

  8. Structure, stability, and electronic property of carbon-doped gold clusters Au{sub n}C{sup ?} (n = 110): A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Li-Li; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Wen, Hui; Gai, Yan-Bo; Zhang, Wei-Jun E-mail: wjzhang@aiofm.ac.cn; Huang, Wei E-mail: wjzhang@aiofm.ac.cn; School of Environmental Science and Optoelectronic Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026

    2013-12-28

    The equilibrium geometric structures, relative stabilities, and electronic properties of Au{sub n}C{sup ?} and Au{sub n+1}{sup ?} (n = 110) clusters are systematically investigated using density functional theory with hyper-generalized gradient approximation. The optimized geometries show that one Au atom capped on Au{sub n?1}C{sup ?} clusters is a dominant growth pattern for Au{sub n}C{sup ?} clusters. In contrast to Au{sub n+1}{sup ?} clusters, Au{sub n}C{sup ?} clusters are most stable in a quasi-planar or three-dimensional structure because C doping induces the local non-planarity while the rest of the structure continues to grow in a planar mode, resulting in an overall non-2D configuration. The relative stability calculations show that the impurity C atom can significantly enhance the thermodynamic stability of pure gold clusters. Moreover, the effect of C atom on the Au{sub n}{sup ?} host decreases with the increase of cluster size. The HOMO-LUMO gap curves show that the interaction of the C atom with Au{sub n}{sup ?} clusters improves the chemical stability of pure gold clusters, except for Au{sub 3}{sup ?} and Au{sub 4}{sup ?} clusters. In addition, a natural population analysis shows that the charges in corresponding Au{sub n}C{sup ?} clusters transfer from the Au{sub n}{sup ?} host to the C atom. Meanwhile, a natural electronic configuration analysis also shows that the charges mainly transfer between the 2s and 2p orbitals within the C atom.

  9. THE INNER COMA OF COMET C/2012 S1 (ISON) AT 0.53 AU AND 0.35 AU FROM THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Paganini, Lucas; DiSanti, Michal A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Mumma, Michael J.

    2014-11-20

    Using long-slit spectroscopy at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we extracted H{sub 2}O production rates and spatial profiles of gas rotational temperature and molecular column abundance in comet C/2012 S1 ISON, observed at heliocentric distances of 0.53 and 0.35 AU. These measurements uniquely probed the physical environment in the inner collisional coma of this comet during its first (and last) approach to the Sun since being emplaced in the Oort Cloud some 4.5 billion years ago. Our observations revealed a comet evolving on various timescales, both over hours and days. At 0.35 AU, ISON showed a considerable decrease in water production rate in less than 2 hr, likely declining from a major outburst. Our measured temperature spatial distributions reflect the competition between the processes that cause heating and cooling in the coma, and also provide insight about the prevalent mechanism(s) of releasing gas-phase H{sub 2}O. The observed temperatures suggest that the comet was likely ejecting icy material continuously, which sublimated in the coma and heated the ambient gas, augmenting fast H-atoms produced by H{sub 2}O photolysis. ISON adds to the very limited sample of comets for which spatial-spectral studies of water temperatures have been conducted. These studies are now feasible and can be extended to comets having a variety of gas production rates. Continued synergy of such observations with both space missions like Rosetta and with physical models is strongly encouraged in order to gain a deeper understanding of the processes in the inner collisional zone of the cometary coma.

  10. Characterization of one-dimensional molecular chains of 4,4'-biphenyl diisocyanide on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Yan; Zahl, Percy; Sutter, Peter; Stacchiola, Dario J.; White, Michael G.

    2015-03-14

    The morphology and electronic structure of vapor deposited 4,4'-biphenyldiisocyanide (BPDI) on a Au(111) surface were investigated using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). When deposited at room temperature, BPDI molecules form one-dimensional molecular chains similar to that recently observed for the structurally related 1,4-phenyl diisocyanide (PDI). Compared to PDI, the longer periodicity for the BPDI molecular chains is consistent with the addition of a second phenyl ring and supports a structural model in which the BPDI molecules lie parallel to the surface and interconnected by Au-adatoms. The molecular chains are mostly aligned along the [110] direction of the Au(111) substrate, but exhibit frequent changes in angle that are consistent with directions between fcc and hcp three-fold hollow sites. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations for one-dimensional chains of BPDI molecules bound end-to-end via their isocyanide groups to Au-adatoms reproduce the observed periodicity of the chains and show that this morphology is energetically favored over upright binding with one free –NC group. The spatially resolved conductance (dI/dV) map for BPDI on Au(111) exhibits a feature centered at -0.67 eV below the Fermi level which are delocalized along the chain with maxima at the Au-adatom and biphenyl positions. This occupied resonant feature is close to that previously observed for the PDI in both photoemission and conductance measurements and is attributed to an occupied interfacial state resulting from BPDI-Au interactions