National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for attrition floorspace attrition

  1. Attrition reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  2. Attrition reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  3. SF State Attrition Study, October 2012 SF State Attrition Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SF State Attrition Study, October 2012 Page 1 October 2012 SF State Attrition Study Fall 2005 Full s t i t u t i o n a l R e s e a r c h · a i r . s f s u . e d u #12;SF State Attrition Study, October-Graduating Students' Last Semester Attended by Demographic Category #12;SF State Attrition Study, October 2012 Page 3

  4. Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parent, Yves O. (Golden, CO); Magrini, Kim (Golden, CO); Landin, Steven M. (Conifer, CO); Ritland, Marcus A. (Palm Beach Shores, FL)

    2011-03-29

    A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

  5. Study of Faculty Attrition at UW-Madison: Combined Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    -1- Study of Faculty Attrition at UW-Madison: Combined Results 2006 ­ 2008 Christine Maidl..............................................................................................................................................25 Appendix A: Faculty Attrition Study Interview Protocol .............................................................................................................................................30 Acknowledgements: I am grateful for the honesty and candor of the study participants

  6. Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

    2009-05-01

    There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be demonstrated that materials with adequate pore volume can be produced. During the attrition resistance tests, it was learned that the glass-ceramic materials are very abrasive. Attention should be paid in any further developmental efforts to the potential for these hard, abrasive materials to damage reactors.

  7. Confirming the Lanchestrian linear-logarithmic model of attrition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, D.S. III.

    1990-12-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series of reports on the breakthrough research in historical validation of attrition in conflict. Significant defense policy decisions, including weapons acquisition and arms reduction, are based in part on models of conflict. Most of these models are driven by their attrition algorithms, usually forms of the Lanchester square and linear laws. None of these algorithms have been validated. The results of this paper confirm the results of earlier papers, using a large database of historical results. The homogeneous linear-logarithmic Lanchestrian attrition model is validated to the extent possible with current initial and final force size data and is consistent with the Iwo Jima data. A particular differential linear-logarithmic model is described that fits the data very well. A version of Helmbold's victory predicting parameter is also confirmed, with an associated probability function. 37 refs., 73 figs., 68 tabs.

  8. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; James J. Spivey; K. Jothimurugesan; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-03-29

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H2 ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity. The effect of silica addition via coprecipitation and as a binder to a doubly promoted Fischer-Tropsch synthesis iron catalyst (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K) was studied. The catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation, followed by binder addition and drying in a 1 m diameter, 2 m tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt %. A catalyst with 12 wt % binder silica was found to have the highest attrition resistance. F-T reaction studies over 100 hours in a fixed-bed reactor showed that this catalyst maintained around 95 % CO conversion with a methane selectivity of less than 7 wt % and a C5 + selectivity of greater than 73 wt %. The effect of adding precipitated silica from 0 to 20 parts by weight to this catalyst (containing 12 wt % binder silica) was also studied. Addition of precipitated silica was found to be detrimental to attrition resistance and resulted in increased methane and reduced wax formation. An HPR series of proprietary catalysts was prepared to further improve the attrition resistance. Based on the experience gained, a proprietary HPR-43 catalyst has been successfully spray dried in 500 g quantity. This catalyst showed 95 % CO conversion over 125 h and had less than 4 % methane selectivity. Its attrition resistance was one of the highest among the catalyst tested.

  9. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Goodwin, J.S.; Spivey, J.J.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-09-22

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T when using low CO/H{sub 2} ratio synthesis gases derived from modern coal gasifiers. This is because in addition to reasonable F-T activity, the F-T catalysts also possess high water gas shift (WGS) activity. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, making the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research are to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition resistance of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. Catalyst preparations will be based on the use of spray drying and will be scalable using commercially available equipment. The research will employ among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis, including long duration slurry reactor runs in order to ascertain the degree of success of the various preparations. The goal is to develop an Fe catalyst which can be used in a SBCR having only an internal filter for separation of the catalyst from the liquid product, without sacrificing F-T activity and selectivity.

  10. Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.

    1991-10-25

    As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

  11. Attrition Resistant Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Based on FCC Supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyinka Adeyiga

    2010-02-05

    Commercial spent fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts provided by Engelhard and Albemarle were used as supports for Fe-based catalysts with the goal of improving the attrition resistance of typical F-T catalysts. Catalysts with the Ruhrchemie composition (100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/25 spent FCC on mass basis) were prepared by wet impregnation. XRD and XANES analysis showed the presence of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in calcined catalysts. FeC{sub x} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were present in the activated catalysts. The metal composition of the catalysts was analyzed by ICP-MS. F-T activity of the catalysts activated in situ in CO at the same conditions as used prior to the attrition tests was measured using a fixed bed reactor at T = 573 K, P = 1.38 MPa and H{sub 2}:CO ratio of 0.67. Cu and K promoted Fe supported over Engelhard provided spent FCC catalyst shows relatively good attrition resistance (8.2 wt% fines lost), high CO conversion (81%) and C{sub 5}+ hydrocarbons selectivity (18.3%).

  12. ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

    1999-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

  13. Granular Attrition due to Rotary Valve in a Pneumatic Conveying System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jun

    The rotary valve is a widely used mechanical device in many solids-handling industrial processes. However, it may also be responsible for most of the attrition effects occurring in a typical process. In this study, the ...

  14. Effect of recent L1 exposure on Spanish attrition : an eye-tracking study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamorro Galán, Gloria; Chamorro, Gloria; Galán, Gloria Chamorro

    2013-07-02

    Previous research has shown L1 attrition to be selective (Gürel 2004) and often restricted to structures at the interfaces between syntax and context/pragmatics, but not to occur with syntactic properties that do not ...

  15. Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

    2004-11-15

    This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

  16. Mechanistic Based DEM Simulation of Particle Attrition in a Jet Cup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; DeCroix, David; Sun, Xin

    2014-02-01

    The attrition of particles is a major industrial concern in many fluidization systems as it can have undesired effects on the product quality and on the reliable operation of process equipment. Therefore, to accomodate the screening and selection of catalysts for a specific process in fluidized beds, risers, or cyclone applications, their attrition propensity is usually estimated through jet cup attrition testing, where the test material is subjected to high gas velocities in a jet cup. However, this method is far from perfect despite its popularity, largely due to its inconsistency in different testing set-ups. In order to better understand the jet cup testing results as well as their sensitivity to different operating conditions, a coupled computational fluid dynamic (CFD) - discrete element method (DEM) model has been developed in the current study to investigate the particle attrition in a jet cup and its dependence on various factors, e.g. jet velocity, initial particle size, particle density, and apparatus geometry.

  17. Carbon attrition during the circulating fluidized bed combustion of a packaging-derived fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastellone, M.L.; Arena, U.

    1999-05-01

    Cylindrical pellets of a market-available packaging-derived fuel, obtained from a mono-material collection of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, were batchwise fed to a laboratory scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. The apparatus, whose riser was 41 mm ID and 4 m high, was operated under both inert and oxidizing conditions to establish the relative importance of purely mechanical attrition and combustion-assisted attrition in generating carbon fines. Silica sand particles of two size distributions were used as inert materials. For each run, carbon load and carbon particle size distribution in the riser and rates of attrited carbon fines escaping the combustor were determined as a function of time. A parallel investigation was carried out with a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor to point out peculiarities of attrition in CFB combustors. After devolatilization, PET pellets generated fragile aggregates of char and sand, which easily crumbled, leading to single particles, partially covered by a carbon-rich layer. The injected fixed carbon was therefore present in the bed in three phases: an A-phase, made of aggregates of sand and char, an S-phase, made of individual carbon-covered sand particles and an F-phase, made of carbon fines, abraded by the surfaces of the A- and S-phases. The effects of the size of inert material on the different forms under which fixed carbon was present in the bed and on the rate of escape of attrited carbon fines from the combustor were investigated. Features of carbon attrition in CFB and BFB combustors are discussed.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2003-12-01

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of Fe FT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance. The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1 m diameter, 2 m tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt %. The results show that use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO{sub 2} wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than type of SiO{sub 2} incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). Spray-dried catalysts with compositions 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/11 (P) SiO{sub 2} and 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/1.1 (B) SiO{sub 2} have excellent selectivity characteristics (low methane and high C{sub 5}{sup +} yields), but their productivity and stability (deactivation rate) need to be improved. Mechanical integrity (attrition strength) of these two catalysts was markedly dependent upon their morphological features. The attrition strength of the catalyst made out of largely spherical particles (1.1 (B) SiO{sub 2}) was considerably higher than that of the catalyst consisting of irregularly shaped particles (11 (P) SiO{sub 2}).

  19. Personality Predictors of First-Year Attrition From A Military Training Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalupa, Samantha Brooke

    2013-09-24

    In military training programs, program attrition is a problem not only financially but also in terms of its effects on the team environment and team morale. The purpose of this study is to compare freshmen cadets who choose to stay in the Corps...

  20. Attrition resistant bulk iron catalysts and processes for preparing and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Ponca City, OK); Goodwin, Jr., James G. (Clemson, SC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Cary, NC)

    2007-08-21

    An attrition resistant precipitated bulk iron catalyst is prepared from iron oxide precursor and a binder by spray drying. The catalysts are preferably used in carbon monoxide hydrogenation processes such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These catalysts are suitable for use in fluidized-bed reactors, transport reactors and, especially, slurry bubble column reactors.

  1. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+ H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-(FE) based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment; makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult, if not impossible; and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Under a previous Department of Energy (DOE)/University Research Grant (UCR) grant, Hampton University reported, for the first time, the development of demonstrably attrition-resistant Fe F-T synthesis catalysts having good activity, selectivity, and attrition resistance. These catalysts were prepared by spray drying Fe catalysts with potassium (K), copper (Cu), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) as promoters. SiO{sub 2} was also used as a binder for spray drying. These catalysts were tested for activity and selectivity in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. Fundamental understanding of attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried HPR-43 catalyst having average particle size (aps) of 70 {micro}m with high attrition resistance. This HPR-43 attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5+} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of less than 5% at an {alpha} of 0.9. Research is proposed to enable further development and optimization of these catalysts by (1) better understanding the role and interrelationship of various catalyst composition and preparation parameters on attrition resistance, activity, and selectivity of these catalysts, (2) the presence of sulfide ions on a precipitated iron catalyst, and (3) the effect of water on sulfided iron F-T catalysts for its activity, selectivity, and attrition. Catalyst preparations will be based on spray drying. The research employed, among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis at high pressure. Catalyst activity and selectivity is evaluated using a small fixed-bed reactor and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1-m-diameter, 2-m-tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt%. The results show that the use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO2 wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than the type of SiO{sub 2} incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). The two catalysts were also tested at The Center for Applied Energy Research in Lexington, Kentucky of the University of Kentucky. Spray-dried catalysts with compositions 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/11 (P) SiO{sub 2} and

  2. First language attrition and syntactic subjects : a study of Serbian, Croatian, and Bosnian intermediate and advanced speakers in Dutch 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beganovic, Jasminka

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the nature of second language induced first language attrition in the distribution and interpretation of overt and postverbal subjects in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian (S/C/B). Data are collected ...

  3. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

  4. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  5. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Durham, NC); Jain, Suresh C. (Morgantown, WV)

    1993-01-01

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 .mu.m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO.sub.3 ; and then indurating it at 800.degree. to 900.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  6. Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1993-10-19

    Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 [mu]m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO[sub 3]; and then indurating it at 800 to 900 C for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

  7. Parsing Attrition In Spanish As A Second Language: A Study Of Erosion Of L1 Parsing By L2 Effect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olea, Luis

    2012-11-28

    This research investigates parsing attrition by L1 Spanish-L2 English bilinguals in a L2 environment. The aspect taken into consideration is the resolution of ambiguities in relative clauses such as Peter fell in love with the daughter...

  8. A Model for Fiber Length Attrition in Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TuckerIII, Charles L. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Phelps, Jay H [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; El-Rahman, Ahmed Abd [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Long-fiber thermoplastic (LFT) composites consist of an engineering thermoplastic matrix with glass or carbon reinforcing fibers that are initially 10 to 13 mm long. When an LFT is injection molded, flow during mold filling orients the fibers and degrades the fiber length. Fiber orientation models for injection molding are well developed, and special orientation models for LFTs have been developed. Here we present a detailed quantitative model for fiber length attrition in a flowing fiber suspension. The model tracks a discrete fiber length distribution (FLD) at each spatial node. Key equations are a conservation equation for total fiber length, and a breakage rate equation. The breakage rate is based on buckling of fibers due to hydrodynamic forces, when the fibers are in unfavorable orientations. The FLD model is combined with a mold filling simulation to predict spatial and temporal variations in fiber length distribution in a mold cavity during filling. The predictions compare well to experiments on a glassfiber/ PP LFT molding. Fiber length distributions predicted by the model are easily incorporated into micromechanics models to predict the stress-strain behavior of molded LFT materials. Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; electronic mail: ctucker@illinois.edu 1

  9. Analytical modelling for ultrasonic surface mechanical attrition treatment Guan-Rong Huang, W. Y. Tsai, J. C. Huang, and Chin-Kun Hu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in AISI 316L Stainless Steel after Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) AIP Conf. Proc. 1415, 28); 10.1063/1.2227669 Martensitic phase transformations in the nanostructured surface layers induced. INTRODUCTION In traditional engineering treatments, shot peening by using steel balls to bombard onto metal

  10. Floorspace

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 RelativeSoutheast RegionFuture Production10020, 2013July

  11. Floorspace

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 RelativeSoutheast RegionFuture Production10020, 2013July7.

  12. Attrition resistant, zinc titanate-containing, reduced sulfur sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierheilig, Albert A.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.

    2004-11-02

    The disclosure is directed to sorbent compositions for removing reduced sulfur species (e.g., H.sub.2 S, COS and CS.sub.2) a feed stream. The sorbent is formed from a multi-phase composition including a zinc titanate phase and a zinc oxide-aluminate phase. The sorbent composition is substantially free of unreacted alumina.

  13. Evaluation and Selection of Models for Attrition Nonresponse Adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Bailey1 This article considers a longitudinal survey like the U.S. Survey of Income and Program distinguished cells (which are then also randomly re-ordered); and the average over re-orderings of the maximal-sample behavior of model-based nonresponse weight adjustment methods. One recent example is Kim and Kim (2007

  14. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1997-06-10

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  15. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1996-04-16

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  16. Attrition Resistant Catalyst Materials for Fluid Bed Applications - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass andAtoms for Peace after 50

  17. Attrition resistant, zinc titanate-containing, reduced sulfur sorbents and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierheilig, Albert A.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.

    2006-06-27

    Reduced sulfur gas species (e.g., H.sub.2S, COS and CS.sub.2) are removed from a gas stream by compositions wherein a zinc titanate ingredient is associated with a metal oxide-aluminate phase material in the same particle species. Nonlimiting examples of metal oxides comprising the compositions include magnesium oxide, zinc oxide, calcium oxide, nickel oxide, etc.

  18. V I E W P O I N T Attrition and Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    in translational activi- ties is not surprising, given the success of the Human Genome Project (HGP of pragmatism reflected in choosing this strategic option. In the wake of the HGP, it is evident that the time that the essential component of the funding thesis for the HGP has been the promise of its direct and tangible impact

  19. Work-life variables influencing attrition among beginning agriscience teachers of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaney, Cynthia Annelle Ray

    2007-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of former beginning agriscience teachers and to explore the relationships between these perceptions, the characteristics of former beginning agriscience teachers, ...

  20. Process for the manufacture of an attrition resistant sorbent used for gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Venkataramani, Venkat S.; Ayala, Raul E.

    2003-09-16

    This process produces a sorbent for use in desulfurization of coal gas. A zinc titanate compound and a metal oxide are mixed by milling the compounds in an aqueous medium, the resulting mixture is dried and then calcined, crushed, sleved and formed into pellets for use in a moving-bed reactor. Metal oxides suitable for use as an additive in this process include: magnesium oxide, magnesium oxide plus molybdenum oxide, calcium oxide, yttrium oxide, hafnium oxide, zirconium oxide, cupric oxide, and tin oxide. The resulting sorbent has a percentage of the original zinc or titanium ions substituted for the oxide metal of the chosen additive.

  1. Anita. Behav.,1990,39, 954-959 Escalated damselfly territorial contests are energetic wars of attrition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marden, James

    animals defend territories and compete for mates (Davies & Houston 1984), and energy expended. Energy reserves (fat remaining at the end of contests) were more often correlated with winning lowest in immature (teneral) and older males, and highest in young males first appearing at the water

  2. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF THE IMPACT OF THE HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHER REQUIREMENT OF NCLB ON THE ATTRITION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION PERSONNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanCise, Sandra A.

    2013-05-31

    , the teachers perceived the administration as failing to gain the knowledge and the skills to lend support for the special education department. Thornton, Peltier, 10 and Medina (2007) suggested that, “principals must be aware of the responsibilities..., the teachers perceived the administration as failing to gain the knowledge and the skills to lend support for the special education department. Thornton, Peltier, 10 and Medina (2007) suggested that, “principals must be aware of the responsibilities...

  3. Nanopowder Manufacturing via Cost-Effective, Low-Carbon Footprint...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mechanical attrition, laser ablation, vapor condensation, sputtering, chemical precipitation, sol-gel processing, combustion synthesis, and plasma synthesis. Typically, both...

  4. ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezio Marchi

    2006-04-28

    [6] Goberna, M. A., V. Jornet and R. Puente: Optimización Lineal, Teoría, Métodos y. Modelos (In Spanish). [7] Isbell, J. R., and W. H. Marlow: “Attrition Games,“ ...

  5. First-Generation Latina Commuter Students' Perception of Factors that Influence their Persistence toward College Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullings, Faraah Ann

    2015-01-01

    persistence to degree completion: A multilevel approach.attrition and degree completion behavior among first-of Education (2011). College completion toolkit. Washington,

  6. "Table A7. Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1. Selected

  7. Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.8. Percent

  8. Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.8.

  9. Early modern human settlement of Europe north of the Alps occurred 43,500 years ago in a cold steppe-type environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nigst, Philip R.; Haesaerts, Paul; Damblon, Freddy; Frank-Fellner, Christa; Mallol, Carolina; Götzinger, Michael; Niven, Laura; Trnka, Gerhard; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2014-09-22

    attrition and finally a terminal decline during a severe cold event (22). Evaluating these scenarios of the Neanderthal-modern human replacement requires data on Neanderthal and modern human technology, subsistence, and settlement patterns but also high...

  10. Pharmaceutical crystallization design using micromixers, multiphase flow, and controlled dynamic operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization is a key unit operation in the pharmaceutical industry. Control of crystallization processes can be challenging when undesirable phenomena such as particle attrition and breakage occur. This thesis describes ...

  11. Jan/Feb 2014 Newsletter Subscriptions Tobacco Ringspot Virus HopGuard II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    to the Affirmative Action Director, University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources, 1111 Franklin Street Effects (Neurotoxins, with natural attrition and replacement, the two groups became totally divorced from one another. The beekeepers

  12. Hydrogen from Biomass Catalytic Reforming of Pyrolysis Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    kg H2/day) with catalyst attrition rates Biomass Feedstocks 6 CO2 +6 H2O C6 waste Issues: Biomass Availability and Costs Georgia Biomass Feedstock Supply 0 3 6 9 12 2000 2010 2020

  13. "Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,3.9,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Without a Heat Pump",53.5,3.5,12.9,12.7,8.6,5.5,4.2,6.2 "With a Heat Pump",12.3,0.4,2.2,2.9,2.5,1.5,...

  14. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Floorspace Trend Detail

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    because the CBECS is a sample survey (see Overview of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey for further discussion). Changes between successive surveys are...

  15. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

  16. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Detailed Buildings and Floorspace...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ** estimates adjusted to match the 1995 CBECS definition of target population Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Table 2....

  17. Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential Consumers (Number of33 2,297 809 245 155047 Number79.1

  19. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: ModelModule of the

  20. Elastomeric optical fiber sensors and method for detecting and measuring events occurring in elastic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Capps, Gary J. (Knoxville, TN); Smith, David B. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Clifford P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing means for the detection and measurement of events such as dynamic loadings imposed upon elastic materials including cementitious materials, elastomers, and animal body components and/or the attrition of such elastic materials are provided. One or more optical fibers each having a deformable core and cladding formed of an elastomeric material such as silicone rubber are embedded in the elastic material. Changes in light transmission through any of the optical fibers due the deformation of the optical fiber by the application of dynamic loads such as compression, tension, or bending loadings imposed on the elastic material or by the attrition of the elastic material such as by cracking, deterioration, aggregate break-up, and muscle, tendon, or organ atrophy provide a measurement of the dynamic loadings and attrition. The fiber optic sensors can be embedded in elastomers subject to dynamic loadings and attrition such as commonly used automobiles and in shoes for determining the amount and frequency of the dynamic loadings and the extent of attrition. The fiber optic sensors are also useable in cementitious material for determining the maturation thereof.

  1. An occupational therapy intervention for residents with stroke related disabilities in UK care homes (OTCH): cluster randomised controlled trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackley, Catherine M.; Walker, Marion F.; Burton, Chris R.; Watkins, Caroline L.; Mant, Jonathan; Roalfe, Andrea K.; Wheatley, Keith; Sheehan, Bart; Sharp, Leslie; Stant, Katie E.; Fletcher-Smith, Joanna; Steel, Kerry; Wilde, Kate; Irvine, Lisa; Peryer, Guy

    2015-02-05

    sam- ple size in the interest of adequate power. Assuming an attrition rate of 26%12 and a total of 10 residents per home, we estimated that 45 care homes would be required in each treatment arm (n = 900 residents). Analyses were performed in Stata... .h468 attrition and cases of unblinding Retention of care home participation was good through- out the study (fig 1). Completion rates for all primary and secondary measures were balanced between the two groups at each of the follow-up assessments. Pri...

  2. The impact of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction on student self-determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Williams-Diehm, Kendra; Little, Todd D.; Boulton, Aaron Jacob

    2012-01-01

    possible, attrition of teachers/students at control campuses. After obtaining consent and assent to partici- pate, we collected baseline data, including demo- graphic information and two measures of self-determination. We also collected self-determi- nation... data at the end of Year 1 and of Year 2. As expected, there was attrition in the sample over time. At the end of Year 1, 103 control-group stu- dents had completed baseline and Year 1 posttest scores from the SDS (Wehmeyer & Kelchner, 1995) and 94...

  3. Postgraduate information needs and online tools awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingley, Esther

     the concept of ‘the Open Scholar’ and the tools  available to modern researchers. The ‘Open Scholar’ is one who makes their intellectual properties  and processes digitally visible and  invite ongoing critique of their work.   They highlight that there  are a  large number of tools on offer and they draw attention to the high rate of attrition...

  4. 1 University of Illinois University of Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    2 2 1 3rd year 0 0 0 0 1st year 0 21 21 10.6 J.D. Attrition (academic year*) # # # % Academic Other1 University of Illinois University of Illinois Can first year start other than fall Semester The Basics Part-Time $ 0 $ 0 Tuition Guarantee Program Yes Tuition and Fees (academic year*) Full

  5. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Academia-based Translational Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    this relationship to reduce attrition rates in technology development.The seminar will also highlightInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Academia-based Translational Research and Industry Collaboration with Salim Shah, Chief Scientist, Office of Operations and Planning

  6. Xerox Palo Alto Research Center Technical Report P2001-10113, May 2001. Revised July 25, 2001. Scalable Information-Driven Sensor Querying and Routing for ad hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Feng

    battery power, frequent node attrition, and variable data and communication quality. To scale up, California 94304, U.S.A. Abstract This paper describes two novel techniques, information-driven sensor that the information-driven querying and routing techniques are more energy efficient, have lower detection latency

  7. Anita. Behav.,1990,40, 1-14 A test of the sequential assessment game: fighting in the cichlid fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leimar, Olof

    Anita. Behav.,1990,40, 1-14 A test of the sequential assessment game: fighting in the cichlid fish variables (e.g. size or strength). Theoretical models of fighting behaviour such as the war of attrition, the assessment of asymmetries is a major activity during a fight. Recently, a version of the sequential

  8. University of Florida -IFAS Soil and Water Science Department Core Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Vacuum Manifold Extractor (SPVME) and Vacuum Pumps Instruments and Costs - I. LC-MS/MS: 1) Charge, glassware, etc.). (ii) Maintenance and operation costs of equipment required to conduct the procedure. (iii costs on a per sample basis for the following: (i) Attrition of expendable materials (chemicals

  9. (01)UC06/PhD/1 Audiology1 To introduce a new subject, Audiology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    (01)UC06/PhD/1 ­ Audiology1 To introduce a new subject, Audiology, to the Doctor of Philosophy Degree Reference identifier: (01)UC06/PhD/1 ­ Audiology (UC 2006 Calendar, p 479) Section A 1. Purpose processes of hearing is vital to the profession. There is a critical shortage and continuing attrition of PhD

  10. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  11. IMPROVING THE PERSISTENCE OF FIRST-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    IMPROVING THE PERSISTENCE OF FIRST-YEAR UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN IN COMPUTER SCIENCE Rita Manco Powell@cis.upenn.edu Abstract This paper describes a study of undergraduate women's retention in the first-year of the computer Gender Issues, Persistence, Attrition, Curriculum 1. Introduction Enrollment in computer science programs

  12. Microdrilling of Biocompatible Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Sankalp

    2012-02-14

    cutting edge due to higher cutting speeds. However, when drilling 316L stainless steel attrition wear at chisel edge is dominant. Hole quality degradation due to formation of built up edge at the drill tip is observed. Coated drill improves tool life...

  13. In Vitro Embryo Culture in Defined, Sub-microliter Volumes Jessica Melin1,*, Alan Lee2,*, Kira Foygel2, Denise E. Leong2, Stephen R. Quake1,3, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    ) for the treatment of infertility. The highly differentiated egg and sperm fuse to form the zygote (also known as 1 and determine in vitro embryo development and reprogramming is essential for improving infertility treatment The high attrition rate of in vitro human embryo culture presents a major obstacle in the treatment

  14. "Table HC1.1.3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional3 Housing Unit

  15. "Table HC1.2.3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional3 Housing Unit3 Living

  16. Table HC1.1.2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    s",14.4,833,754,379,396,359,181 "Mobile Homes",1.2,866,722,367,305,254,129 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.7,2325,1586,473,945,644,192 "1940 to 1949",7.4,2047,1456,564,840,...

  17. "Table HC1.1.3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Rented",33,12.6,1983,1419,661,1383,1037,488,866,722,367 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.7,10.9,2855,1878,663,2244,1523,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "1940 to...

  18. Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .1,4.1,1604,1320,458,1116,940,829 "Rented",33,20.4,930,772,305,833,754,379 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.7,3.8,1186,992,56,709,674,"Q" "1940 to 1949",7.4,1.4,1638,1311,"Q...

  19. Table HC1.1.2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocksU.S. shale gas plays:0a. Housing Unit5a. Housing1 Housing2

  20. Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocksU.S. shale gas plays:0a. Housing Unit5a. Housing1 Housing24

  1. Table HC1.2.2 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocksU.S. shale gas plays:0a. Housing Unit5a. Housing12 Living

  2. Table HC1.2.4 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocksU.S. shale gas plays:0a. Housing Unit5a. Housing12

  3. "Table B11. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1999"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.

  4. "Table B16. Employment Size Category, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6. Employment Size

  5. "Table B21. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6. Employment

  6. "Table B23. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6. Employment2.3.

  7. "Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6.

  8. "Table B26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6.6. Water-Heating

  9. Table B1. Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption of7.A9..

  10. Table B16. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.

  11. Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9. Energy

  12. Table B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9. Energy.

  13. Table B24. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9. Energy.4.

  14. Table B27. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.

  15. Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.8.. Census

  16. Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.8..

  17. Table B36. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.8..6.

  18. Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22Primary Consumption6.9.8..6.7.

  19. The Evolution of Economies of Scale Regarding Pollution Control: Cross-Sectional Evidence from a Transition Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnhart, Dietrich H.; Lizal, Lubomir

    2011-01-01

    , such as the installation of electrostatic precipitators (“scrubbers”) and fuel switching, may also explain much of the displayed reduction in air pollutant emissions (World Bank, 1999). Second, consistent with this focus on pollution control efforts, investment...; Arora and Cason, 1996). In order to generate the largest sample possible and to avoid a sample selection bias due to attrition, we create an unbalanced panel of firm-year observations for the time period 1993 to 1998.6 The overlap between...

  20. 1 University of Georgia University of Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    th year 0 0 0 0 2nd year 0 6 6 2.6 3rd year 0 0 0 0 1st year 1 6 7 3.7 J.D. Attrition (prior academic1 University of Georgia University of Georgia Can first year start other than fall? No Application Semester The Basics Part-Time $ 0 $ 0 Tuition Guarantee Program No Tuition and Fees (academic year*) Full

  1. 1 University of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    th year 0 0 0 0 2nd year 0 0 0 0 3rd year 0 2 2 0.8 1st year 0 15 15 6.5 J.D. Attrition (academic1 University of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin Can first year start other than fall No Tuition and Fees (academic year*) Full-Time $ 21,365 $ 40,061 Resident Non-Resident Living Off Campus $ 19

  2. Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, A.H.; Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G.

    1999-08-17

    Processes and catalysts are disclosed for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided. 1 fig.

  3. Processes and catalysts for conducting fischer-tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singleton, Alan H. (Marshall Township, Allegheny County, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Allison Park, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

    1999-01-01

    Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided.

  4. Can first year start other than fall? No Student faculty ratio 11.53 to 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    th year 0 0 0 0 2nd year 2 6 8 6 3rd year 0 1 1 0.8 1st year 3 8 11 8.5 J.D. Attrition (from priorCan first year start other than fall? No Student faculty ratio 11.53 to 1 Type of school PUBLIC Typical first-year section size 65 0 Number of classroom course titles beyond first-year curriculum 108

  5. Three Essays on the Economics of Crime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Jillian Beaugez

    2015-04-24

    ” is coauthored work with Vijetha Koppa and that the fourth section “Keep the Kids Inside: Juvenile Curfews, Bad Weather, and Urban Gun Violence” is coauthored with Jennifer Doleac. I’ve learned more than I can describe from these amazing women. I also want... for attrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 3.6 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 4. KEEP THE KIDS INSIDE: JUVENILE CURFEWS, BAD WEATHER, AND URBAN GUN VIOLENCE...

  6. The Novice Teacher's Experience in Sensemaking and Socialization in Urban Secondary Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Joan Ramey

    2010-10-12

    organizational socialization as well as an examination of the theory of sensemaking as proposed by Louis (1980). The Issue of Teacher Attrition Magnitude of the Problem The National Commission on Teaching and America?s Future (2003) reports that 232... they adapted their own behaviors in response to what they experienced. Viewed within a theoretical framework for examining the ?newcomer experience? developed by Meryl Reis Louis in 1980, the data suggest that traditional group approaches to supporting...

  7. "Table B27. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6.6.

  8. "Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6.6.9. Primary

  9. "Table B32. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page|Monthly","10/2015","1/15/1981"0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate6. Total1.6.6.9. Primary2.

  10. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings*...

  11. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings with Water Heating Water-Heating Energy...

  12. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Lit Buildings Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England...

  14. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Season of Peak Electricity Demand, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million...

  15. Btu)","per Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per...

  16. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    B20. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Number of Establishments in Building One...

  17. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Energy Conservation Features in FBSS Building in Federal Region 3, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1993 Total Floorspace Number of Buildings (thousand square feet) Any Any...

  18. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Principal Building Activity Education...

  19. CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation, 1995 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million...

  20. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Building Activity Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building Activity Comparison Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity,...

  1. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Year Constructed Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Constructed Comparison Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Year Constructed, 1999 Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble...

  2. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings*...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A8. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Number of Establishments in...

  4. Health Care Buildings: Subcategories Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Subcategories Table Selected Data by Type of Health Care Building Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet) Percent of Floorspace Square...

  5. Validation of New Process Models for Large Injection-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Kunc, Vlastimil; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2012-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the CRADA Nr. PNNL/304 between Battelle PNNL and Autodesk whose objective is to validate the new process models developed under the previous CRADA for large injection-molded LFT composite structures. To this end, the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models implemented in the 2013 research version of Moldflow was used to simulate the injection molding of 600-mm x 600-mm x 3-mm plaques from 40% glass/polypropylene (Dow Chemical DLGF9411.00) and 40% glass/polyamide 6,6 (DuPont Zytel 75LG40HSL BK031) materials. The injection molding was performed by Injection Technologies, Inc. at Windsor, Ontario (under a subcontract by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL) using the mold offered by the Automotive Composite Consortium (ACC). Two fill speeds under the same back pressure were used to produce plaques under slow-fill and fast-fill conditions. Also, two gating options were used to achieve the following desired flow patterns: flows in edge-gated plaques and in center-gated plaques. After molding, ORNL performed measurements of fiber orientation and length distributions for process model validations. The structure of this report is as follows. After the Introduction (Section 1), Section 2 provides a summary of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models. A summary of model implementations in the latest research version of Moldflow is given in Section 3. Section 4 provides the key processing conditions and parameters for molding of the ACC plaques. The validations of the ARD-RSC and fiber length attrition models are presented and discussed in Section 5. The conclusions will be drawn in Section 6.

  6. The role of the anaesthetised guinea-pig in the preclinical cardiac safety evaluation of drug candidate compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, Louise, E-mail: louise.marks@astrazeneca.com [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)] [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Borland, Samantha; Philp, Karen; Ewart, Lorna; Lainée, Pierre; Skinner, Matthew [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)] [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Kirk, Sarah [Innovative Medicines, Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)] [Innovative Medicines, Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Valentin, Jean-Pierre [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)] [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Despite rigorous preclinical and clinical safety evaluation, adverse cardiac effects remain a leading cause of drug attrition and post-approval drug withdrawal. A number of cardiovascular screens exist within preclinical development. These screens do not, however, provide a thorough cardiac liability profile and, in many cases, are not preventing the progression of high risk compounds. We evaluated the suitability of the anaesthetised guinea-pig for the assessment of drug-induced changes in cardiovascular parameters. Sodium pentobarbitone anaesthetised male guinea-pigs received three 15 minute intravenous infusions of ascending doses of amoxicillin, atenolol, clonidine, dobutamine, dofetilide, flecainide, isoprenaline, levosimendan, milrinone, moxifloxacin, nifedipine, paracetamol, verapamil or vehicle, followed by a 30 minute washout. Dose levels were targeted to cover clinical exposure and above, with plasma samples obtained to evaluate effect/exposure relationships. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, contractility function (left ventricular dP/dt{sub max} and QA interval) and lead II electrocardiogram were recorded throughout. In general, the expected reference compound induced effects on haemodynamic, contractility and electrocardiographic parameters were detected confirming that all three endpoints can be measured accurately and simultaneously in one small animal. Plasma exposures obtained were within, or close to the expected clinical range of therapeutic plasma levels. Concentration–effect curves were produced which allowed a more complete understanding of the margins for effects at different plasma exposures. This single in vivo screen provides a significant amount of information pertaining to the cardiovascular risk of drug candidates, ultimately strengthening strategies addressing cardiovascular-mediated compound attrition and drug withdrawal. -- Highlights: ? Evaluation of the anaesthetised guinea-pig to determine cardiac liability. ? Haemodynamic, contractility, ECG parameters and plasma exposure all measurable. ? Single small animal model offering extensive evaluation of a drug's CV risk. ? Potential to strengthen drug discovery cardiovascular strategy. ? Potential to halt progression of drugs with CV liability, reducing drug attrition.

  7. Home-Based Therapy: Effectiveness and Processes--A Brief Review of the National Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

    2006-06-01

    -633. Zarski , J.J, Sand-Pringl, C., Greenbank, M., & Cibik, P. (1991). The invisible mirror: in-home family therapy and the supervision, Journal of Marriage and Family Therapy, 17 (2), 133-143. Zarski, J.J., & Fluharty, L.B. (1992). Treating emotionally... show that for a majority of youth difficulties dropped significantly by the end of week eight reaching levels comparable to usual outpatient scores. About 20% of youth did not improve over time. Limitation: Considerable attrition (at 4 th data...

  8. Uses and misuses of bioclimatic envelope modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araú jo, Miguel B.; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2012-07-01

    effects of global warming on biodiversity. BioScience 57:227–236. Bourg, N. A., W. J. McShea, and D. E. Gill. 2005. Putting a CART before the search: successful habitat prediction for a rare forest herb. Ecology 86:2793–2804. Breiman, L. 2001. Random...:131–144. Colwell, R. K., G. Brehm, C. L. Cardelu´s, A. C. Gilman, and J. T. Longino. 2008. Global warming, elevational range shifts, and lowland biotic attrition in the wet tropics. Science 322:258–261. de Siqueira, M. F., G. Durigan, P. de Marco Ju´nior, and A. T...

  9. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2014-12-09

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  10. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    Current coal mining and processing procedures produce a significant quanity of fine coal that is difficult to handle and transport. The objective of this work is to determine if these fines can be economically pelletized with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur capturing sorbent, to produce a clean-burning fuel for fluidized-bed combustors or stoker boilers. To harden these pellets, carbonation, which is the reaction of calcium hydroxide with carbon dioxide to produce a cementitious matrix of calcium carbonate, is being investigated. Previous research indicated that carbonation significantly improved compressive strength, impact and attrition resistance and ``weatherproofed`` pellets formed with sufficient calcium hydroxide (5 to 10% for minus 28 mesh coal fines).

  11. Carbonation as a binding mechanism for coal/calcium hydroxide pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Current coal mining and processing procedures produce a significant quanity of fine coal that is difficult to handle and transport. The objective of this work is to determine if these fines can be economically pelletized with calcium hydroxide, a sulfur capturing sorbent, to produce a clean-burning fuel for fluidized-bed combustors or stoker boilers. To harden these pellets, carbonation, which is the reaction of calcium hydroxide with carbon dioxide to produce a cementitious matrix of calcium carbonate, is being investigated. Previous research indicated that carbonation significantly improved compressive strength, impact and attrition resistance and weatherproofed'' pellets formed with sufficient calcium hydroxide (5 to 10% for minus 28 mesh coal fines).

  12. Starting with the End in Mind: A Case Study of Under-Represented, Teacher Education, Community College Transfers in a Predominantly White Institution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, David Arthur

    2012-10-19

    shock. The intent of my study is to research other variables and situations that students may experience that could lead to attrition from teacher education programs. It is through the narratives of under-represented teacher-education transfer students... decided to leave because his grades reflected a student who was succeeding rather than struggling. It then became clear to me that it may be necessary to re-define transfer shock and explore the criteria that allow students of color to succeed after...

  13. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Marcey L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kolb, Rachel R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  14. System and process for biomass treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunson, Jr., James B; Tucker, III, Melvin P; Elander, Richard T; Lyons, Robert C

    2013-08-20

    A system including an apparatus is presented for treatment of biomass that allows successful biomass treatment at a high solids dry weight of biomass in the biomass mixture. The design of the system provides extensive distribution of a reactant by spreading the reactant over the biomass as the reactant is introduced through an injection lance, while the biomass is rotated using baffles. The apparatus system to provide extensive assimilation of the reactant into biomass using baffles to lift and drop the biomass, as well as attrition media which fall onto the biomass, to enhance the treatment process.

  15. "Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional3 Housing Unit3

  16. "Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional3 Housing Unit34

  17. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square...

  18. California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    End use energy consumption per square-foot and floorspaceof floorspace and energy consumption per square-foot, for 10

  19. set8.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information Administration 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables 130 Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million...

  20. Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

  1. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1994-09-20

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attrition mill and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system. 1 fig.

  2. Mechanisms of mechanical fatigue in ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 4, August 15, 1992--August 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, B.

    1994-07-01

    This report covers work done in the second year of the three-year follow-on contract. Theme of our work in this period continued to be the theory and measurement of rate-dependent bridging phenomena in fracture and fatigue. This covers both room temperature phenomena such as cycle-dependent attrition of crack bridging ligaments and high temperature phenomena such as viscosity and creep in bridging or cohesive zones. Our theoretical work focused on analytical solutions to rate dependent bridging problems. Our experimental work focused on developing high temperature in situ imaging methods. We obtained our first crack opening displacement measurements at elevated temperature in a graphite/SiC composite.

  3. Continuous Operation of Spray-Dried Zinc Based Sorbent in a Hot Gas Desulfurization Process Consisting of a Transport Desulfurizer and a Fluidized Regenerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, C-K.; Jo, S-H.; Jin, G-T.; Son, J-E.; Han, M-H.; Ryu, C-K.

    2002-09-19

    We see the sorbent reaction performance in a HGD process consisting of a transport desulfurizer and a fluidized regenerator in this study. We have obtained the solid hold-up and solid circulation rate necessary to reach the target desulfurization efficiency. A major obstacle for fluidized- or transport bed sorbent developments is sorbent durability withstanding attrition. Continuous operation only makes similar conditions of real processes such as rapid temperature swing, chemical transformations between sulfidation and regeneration, stresses induced by fluidization and continuous particle circulation between two reactors. Therefore, an integrated system of transport desulfurizer and bubbling regenerator is operated continuously more than 150 hours to see system reliability, sorbent reaction characteristics, sorbent morphology before and after test.

  4. The Influence of High Pressure Thermal Behavior on Friction-induced material transfer During Dry Machining of Titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-05-04

    In this paper we study failure of coated carbide tools due to thermal loading. The study emphasizes the role assumed by the thermo-physical properties of the tool material in enhancing or preventing mass attrition of the cutting elements within the tool. It is shown that within a comprehensive view of the nature of conduction in the tool zone, thermal conduction is not solely affected by temperature. Rather it is a function of the so called thermodynamic forces. These are the stress, the strain, strain rate, rate of temperature rise, and the temperature gradient. Although that within such consideration description of thermal conduction is non-linear, it is beneficial to employ such a form because it facilitates a full mechanistic understanding of thermal activation of tool wear.

  5. Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 [mu]m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871[degrees]C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750[degrees]C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750[degrees]C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

  6. Evaluation of technologies for volume reduction of plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papelis, C.; Jacobson, R.L.; Miller, F.L.; Shaulis, L.K.

    1996-06-01

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in plutonium (Pu) contamination of the soil over an area of several thousands of acres. The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential of five different processes to reduce the volume of Pu-contaminated soil from three different areas, namely Areas 11, 13, and 52. Volume reduction was to be accomplished by concentrating the Pu into a small but highly contaminated soil fraction, thereby greatly reducing the volume of soil requiring disposal. The processes tested were proposed by Paramag Corp. (PARAMAG), Advanced Processing Technologies Inc. (APT), Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT), Nuclear Remediation Technologies (NRT), and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG). Because of time and budgetary restraints, the NRT and SEG processes were tested with soil from Area 11 only. These processes typically included a preliminary soil conditioning step (e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), followed by a more advanced process designed to separate Pu from the soil, based on physiochemical properties of Pu compounds (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, specific gravity). Analysis of the soil indicates that a substantial fraction of the total Pu contamination is typically confined in a relatively narrow and small particle size range. Processes which were able to separate this highly contaminated soil fraction (using physical methods, e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), from the rest of the soil achieved volume (mass) reductions on the order of 70%. The advanced, more complex processes tested did not enhance volume reduction. The primary reason why processes that rely on the dependence of settling velocity on density differences failed was the very fine grain size of the Pu-rich particles.

  7. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleo, Michael D. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Strock, Christopher J. [Cyprotex US, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Stedman, Donald B. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wang, Huijun [Computational Sciences, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Will, Yvonne, E-mail: yvonne.will@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  8. Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-11-01

    To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 {mu}m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871{degrees}C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750{degrees}C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750{degrees}C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

  9. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motivation and Computation of Lighting Measures Floorspace by Lighting Equipment Configuration As described in Appendix A, for each building b, the CBECS data set has the total...

  10. Impact of Natural Gas Appliances on Pollutant Levels in California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01

    wall furnaces, and portable space heaters **Only one floorspace heater __ Portable space heater that burns fuel __wall heater – § I Portable space heater – § J Heat Pump

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  13. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  14. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  18. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. c13a.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) Table C13A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  5. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  9. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  10. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  12. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

  14. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  15. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  16. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings*",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace...

  17. 1995 CECS C&E Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    15. Season of Peak Electricity Demand, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Season of Peak Demand, 1995...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ......

  4. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Cooling Equipment

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Packaged air conditioning units were the main cooling system for 20,504 million square feet of cooled floorspace, more than twice the...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  7. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  8. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  9. 1995 CECS C&E Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Category (6 pages, 36 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 17. Peak Electricity Demand Category, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 18. Peak Electricity Demand Category, Floorspace, 1995 These...

  10. Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Sumary Comparison Table Return to: A Look at CBECS Building Activities SUMMARY COMPARISON TABLE Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Average Square...

  11. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  12. C3DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) NEW...

  13. Principal Building Activities--1995 CBECS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed Tables > Principal Building Activities Table Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities,...

  14. 1999 CBECS Summary Table for All Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tables 1999 Commercial Buildings Consumption Survey SUMMARY TABLES FOR ALL PRINCIPAL BUILDING ACTIVITIES Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square...

  15. C4DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) NEW ENGLAND...

  16. C15DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) NEW ENGLAND ... 45...

  17. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million...

  18. Commerial Buildings Characteristics, 1995 (Table of Contents...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Number of Buildings and Relative Standard Errors, 1995 Table I.2. Participation in Energy Conservation Programs, Floorspace and Relative Standard Errors, 1995 Table J.1....

  19. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q 0.4 3 or More Units... 5.4 0.3 Q Q Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  20. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 or More Units... 5.4 2.3 1.7 0.6 Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  1. Table HC15.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Four Most...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or More Units... 5.4 0.7 Q 0.5 Q Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  2. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 3 or More Units... 5.4 0.7 0.5 Q Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  3. c13a.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption Site Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  5. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Sum of Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" ,,,,"Primary","Site" "All Buildings...

  6. Health Care Buildings : Basic Characteristics Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Basic Characteristics Tables Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million...

  7. Health Care Buildings: Equipment Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Equipment Table Buildings, Size and Age Data by Equipment Types for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet)...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  9. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO{sub 2} capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (5.1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (5.2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification; (5.3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratoryscale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability; and (5.4) the identification of kinetic data for copper-based oxygen carriers as well as the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material. Subtask 5.1 focused on the development of kinetic expressions for the Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) process and validating them with reported literature data. The kinetic expressions were incorporated into a process model for determination of reactor size and oxygen carrier circulation for the CLOU process using ASPEN PLUS. An ASPEN PLUS process model was also developed using literature data for the CLC process employing an iron-based oxygen carrier, and the results of the process model have been utilized to perform a relative economic comparison. In Subtask 5.2, the investigators studied the trade-off between modeling approaches and available simulations tools. They quantified uncertainty in the high-performance computing (HPC) simulation tools for CLC bed applications. Furthermore, they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

  10. Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-based Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilaly, Ahmad; Georgas, Adam; Leboreiro, Jose; Arora, Salil; Head, Megann; Trembly, Jason; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2011-09-30

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a hydrogen production technology for gasification applications based on a circulating fluid-bed reactor and an attrition resistant iron catalyst. The work towards achieving this objective consisted of three key activities: • Development of an iron-based catalyst suitable for a circulating fluid-bed reactor • Design, construction, and operation of a bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production • Techno-economic analysis of the steam-iron and the pressure swing adsorption hydrogen production processes. This report describes the work completed in each of these activities during this project. The catalyst development and testing program prepared and iron-based catalysts using different support and promoters to identify catalysts that had sufficient activity for cyclic reduction with syngas and steam oxidation and attrition resistance to enable use in a circulating fluid-bed reactor system. The best performing catalyst from this catalyst development program was produced by a commercial catalyst toll manufacturer to support the bench-scale testing activities. The reactor testing systems used during material development evaluated catalysts in a single fluid-bed reactor by cycling between reduction with syngas and oxidation with steam. The prototype SIP reactor system (PSRS) consisted of two circulating fluid-bed reactors with the iron catalyst being transferred between the two reactors. This design enabled demonstration of the technical feasibility of the combination of the circulating fluid-bed reactor system and the iron-based catalyst for commercial hydrogen production. The specific activities associated with this bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor systems that were completed in this project included design, construction, commissioning, and operation. The experimental portion of this project focused on technical demonstration of the performance of an iron-based catalyst and a circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production. Although a technology can be technically feasible, successful commercial deployment also requires that a technology offer an economic advantage over existing commercial technologies. To effective estimate the economics of this steam-iron process, a techno-economic analysis of this steam iron process and a commercial pressure swing adsorption process were completed. The results from this analysis described in this report show the economic potential of the steam iron process for integration with a gasification plant for coproduction of hydrogen and electricity.

  11. Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oyama, Ted; Agblevor, Foster; Battaglia, Francine; Klein, Michael

    2013-01-18

    The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  13. Desulfurization of fuel gases in fluidized bed gasification and hot fuel gas cleanup systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Farber, G.; Pruzansky, J.; Yoo, H.J.; McGauley, P.

    1983-08-26

    A problem with the commercialization of fluidized bed gasification is that vast amounts of spent sorbent are generated if the sorbent is used on a once-through basis, especially if high sulfur coals are burned. The requirements of a sorbent for regenerative service in the FBG process are: (1) it must be capable of reducing the sulfur containing gas concentration of the FBG flue gas to within acceptable environmental standards; (2) it must not lose its reactivity on cyclic sulfidation and regeneration; (3) it must be capable of regeneration with elimination of substantially all of its sulfur content; (4) it must have good attrition resistance; and, (5) its cost must not be prohibitive. It has now been discovered that calcium silicate pellets, e.g., Portland cement type III pellets meet the criteria aforesaid. Calcium silicate removes COS and H/sub 2/S according to the reactions given to produce calcium sulfide silicate. The sulfur containing product can be regenerated using CO/sub 2/ as the regenerant. The sulfur dioxide can be conveniently reduced to sulfur with hydrogen or carbon for market or storage. The basic reactions in the process of this invention are the reactions with calcium silicate given in the patent. A convenient and inexpensive source of calcium silicate is Portland cement. Portland cement is a readily available, widely used construction meterial.

  14. HIV-1 entry inhibition by small-molecule CCR5 antagonists: A combined molecular modeling and mutant study using a high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Lau, Gloria; Darkes, Marilyn C.; Wong, Rebecca S.Y.; Bogucki, David; Carpenter, Bryon; Chen Gang; Li Tongshuang; Nan, Susan; Schols, Dominique; Bridger, Gary J.; Fricker, Simon P.; Skerlj, Renato T.

    2011-05-10

    Based on the attrition rate of CCR5 small molecule antagonists in the clinic the discovery and development of next generation antagonists with an improved pharmacology and safety profile is necessary. Herein, we describe a combined molecular modeling, CCR5-mediated cell fusion, and receptor site-directed mutagenesis approach to study the molecular interactions of six structurally diverse compounds (aplaviroc, maraviroc, vicriviroc, TAK-779, SCH-C and a benzyloxycarbonyl-aminopiperidin-1-yl-butane derivative) with CCR5, a coreceptor for CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains. This is the first study using an antifusogenic assay, a model of the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein with CCR5. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and HIV infection assays, and can be used in a high throughput mode. The assay was validated by comparison with other established CCR5 assays. Given the hydrophobic nature of the binding pocket several binding models are suggested which could prove useful in the rational drug design of new lead compounds.

  15. Green strength of zirconium sponge and uranium dioxide powder compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakrishna, Palanki Murty, B. Narasimha; Sahoo, P.K.; Gopalakrishna, T.

    2008-07-15

    Zirconium metal sponge is compacted into rectangular or cylindrical shapes using hydraulic presses. These shapes are stacked and electron beam welded to form a long electrode suitable for vacuum arc melting and casting into solid ingots. The compact electrodes should be sufficiently strong to prevent breakage in handling as well as during vacuum arc melting. Usually, the welds are strong and the electrode strength is limited by the green strength of the compacts, which constitute the electrode. Green strength is also required in uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder compacts, to withstand stresses during de-tensioning after compaction as well as during ejection from the die and for subsequent handling by man and machine. The strengths of zirconium sponge and UO{sub 2} powder compacts have been determined by bending and crushing respectively, and Weibul moduli evaluated. The green density of coarse sponge compact was found to be larger than that from finer sponge. The green density of compacts from lightly attrited UO{sub 2} powder was higher than that from unattrited category, accompanied by an improvement in UO{sub 2} green crushing strength. The factors governing green strength have been examined in the light of published literature and experimental evidence. The methodology and results provide a basis for quality control in metal sponge and ceramic powder compaction in the manufacture of nuclear fuel.

  16. Savings from new oil furnaces: A study conducted as part of Washington State`s Oil Help Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.

    1989-12-01

    The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) has been running the Oil Help program for three years. Originally operated as a loan program, Oil Help switched to rebates during the 1987 and 1988. Rebates for oil furnace replacements made up over 70 percent of rebate funds, which totaled about $1.3 million. WSEO Evaluation started research in summer of 1988, with the goal of including 100 new furnace households (with a control group of similar size) in the study. Our intention was to look at long-term oil consumption comparing each household with itself over the two periods. The final study group consists of 43 households and a control group of 87 households. The report begins with a review of related research. A discussion of research methodology, weather normalization procedure, data attrition, and important descriptive details follows. Changes in consumption for the new furnace and control groups are reported and are tested for significance. Finally, we discuss the implications of the results for the cost effectiveness of an oil furnace replacement.

  17. Savings from new oil furnaces: A study conducted as part of Washington State's Oil Help Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, R.

    1989-12-01

    The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) has been running the Oil Help program for three years. Originally operated as a loan program, Oil Help switched to rebates during the 1987 and 1988. Rebates for oil furnace replacements made up over 70 percent of rebate funds, which totaled about $1.3 million. WSEO Evaluation started research in summer of 1988, with the goal of including 100 new furnace households (with a control group of similar size) in the study. Our intention was to look at long-term oil consumption comparing each household with itself over the two periods. The final study group consists of 43 households and a control group of 87 households. The report begins with a review of related research. A discussion of research methodology, weather normalization procedure, data attrition, and important descriptive details follows. Changes in consumption for the new furnace and control groups are reported and are tested for significance. Finally, we discuss the implications of the results for the cost effectiveness of an oil furnace replacement.

  18. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less than 100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the ?-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.

  19. Process development for production of coal/sorbent agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hackley, K.C.; Moran, D.L.; Becvar, S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Berger, R.L. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Griggs, K. (Army Construction Engineering Research Lab., Champaign, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Current coal mining and processing procedures produce significant quantities of fine coal with limited marketability. The objective of this work is to pelletize these fines with a sulfur capturing sorbent such as calcium hydroxide to produce a fuel which will meet future sulfur dioxide emission levels. To decrease binder costs, carbonation, which is the reaction of calcium hydroxide with carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture to produce calcium carbonate, is being investigated as a method for improving pellet quality. The calcium carbonate formed acts as a cementitious matrix which improves pellet strength. In previous work utilizing IBC-106 from the Illinois Basin Coal Sample Program, carbonation was determined to be effective at significantly improving pellet compressive strength, impact and attrition resistance and weatherability. In combustion tests conducted at 850{degree}C, sulfur capture of 80% was achieved for pellets having 17.5% calcium hydroxide (a Ca/S ration of 2/1). In this years work, a flotation concentrate collected from an operating Illinois preparation plant is being used for testing. Results indicate carbonation significantly increases the compressive strength of pellets formed with 10% calcium hydroxide. 6 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Process development for production of coal/sorbent agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hackley, K.C.; Moran, D.L.; Becvar, S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Berger, R.L. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)); Griggs, K. (Army Construction Engineering Research Lab., Champaign, IL (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to pelletize these fines with a sulfur capturing sorbent such as calcium hydroxide to produce a fuel which will meet future sulfur dioxide emission levels. To decrease binder costs, carbonation, which is the reaction of calcium hydroxide with carbon dioxide in the presence of moisture to produce calcium carbonate, is being investigated as a method for improving pellet quality. The calcium carbonate formed acts as a cementitious matrix which improves pellet strength. Two potential combustion options are being considered -- fluidized bed combustors and industrial stoker boilers. During this quarter a pellet characterization test program was conducted using a fine coal (-28 mesh) concentrate collected from a southern Illinois preparation plant. Results indicate that carbonation produces significant improvements in compressive strength, impact and attrition resistance and weatherability. Also, 20 combustion tests were conducted on pellets formed with 0, 5 and 10% levels of calcium hydroxide (10% calcium hydroxide is a 2.3:1 Ca/S ratio for this sample). Tests were conducted at 850 and 1350 {degrees}C. Chemical analyses of the combustion residues are not yet complete so results will be reported next quarter. 8 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. Comminution phenomena during the fluidized bed combustion of a commercial refuse-derived fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, U.; Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R.; D`Anna, G.

    1995-12-31

    A commercial densified refuse-derived fuel (RDF), obtained as pellets from municipal solid wastes, was burned in two laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed combustors, having an internal diameter of 41 mm. The apparatus were both batchwise operated at 850 C by injecting batches of RDF particles into a bed of silica sand (300--400 {micro}m as size range) fluidized at a superficial gas velocity of 0.8 m/s. RDF particles with equivalent mean diameter ranging from 4 to 9 mm were used. Different experimental procedures were set up to separately investigate comminution phenomena of fuel particles. Results were compared with those obtained burning a South African bituminous coal. Results pointed out that RDF particles undergo a strong primary fragmentation phenomenon, with a probability of particle breakage equal to 1 for fuel particles larger than 6 mm. Attrition and char fragmentation phenomena are particularly relevant under both inert and oxidizing conditions, generating a large amount of unburned fines which may affect overall combustion efficiency.

  2. Fine and ultrafine particles generated during fluidized bed combustion of different solid fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urciuolo, M.; Barone, A.; D'Alessio, A.; Chirone, R.

    2008-12-15

    The paper reports an experimental study carried out with a 110-mm ID fluidized bed combustor focused on the characterization of particulates formation/emission during combustion of coal and non-fossil solid fuels. Fuels included: a bituminous coal, a commercial predried and granulated sludge (GS), a refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and a biomass waste (pine seed shells). Stationary combustion experiments were carried out analyzing the fate of fuel ashes. Fly ashes collected at the combustor exhaust were characterized both in terms of particle size distribution and chemical composition, with respect to both trace and major elements. Tapping-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) technique and high-efficiency cyclone-type collector devices were used to characterize the size and morphology of the nanometric-and micronic-size fractions of fly ash emitted at the exhaust respectively. Results showed that during the combustion process: I) the size of the nanometric fraction ranges between 2 and 65 nm; ii) depending on the fuel tested, combustion-assisted attrition or the production of the primary ash particles originally present in the fuel particles, are responsible of fine particle generation. The amount in the fly ash of inorganic compounds is larger for the waste-derived fuels, reflecting the large inherent content of these compounds in the parent fuels.

  3. Human resource needs and development for the gas industry of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klass, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The natural gas industry will confront many challenges in the 1990s and beyond, one of which is the development of human resources to meet future needs. An efficient, trained work force in this era of environmental concern, high technology, and alternative fuels is essential for the industry to continue to meet the competition and to safely deliver our product and service to all customers. Unfortunately, during this period there will be an increasing shortfall of technical personnel to replace those lost to attrition and a steady decline in the availability of new employees who are able to read, write, and perform simple math. Technological and government developments that will impact the industry and the skill levels needed by the industry employees are reviewed. In-house and external training of professional and nonprofessional personnel and the benefits and disadvantages of selected advanced training methods are discussed. Recommendations are presented that can help improve the training of gas industry employees to meet future needs. 22 refs.

  4. Hydrogen sorption characteristics of nanostructured Pd–10Rh processed by cryomilling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, Joshua K.; Zhang, Zhihui; Kurmanaeva, Lilia; Cappillino, Patrick; Stavila, Vitalie; Lavernia, Enrique J.; San Marchi, Chris

    2014-10-03

    Palladium and its alloys are model systems for studying solid-state storage of hydrogen. Mechanical milling is commonly used to process complex powder systems for solid-state hydrogen storage; however, milling can also be used to evolve nanostructured powder to modify hydrogen sorption characteristics. In the present study, cryomilling (mechanical attrition milling in a cryogenic liquid) is used to produce nanostructured palladium-rhodium alloy powder. Characterization of the cryomilled Pd-10Rh using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and surface area analysis reveals that (i) particle morphology evolves from spherical to flattened disk-like particles; while the (ii) crystallite size decreases from several microns to less thanmore »100 nm and (iii) dislocation density increases with increased cryomilling time. Hydrogen absorption and desorption isotherms as well as the time scales for absorption were measured for cryomilled Pd-10Rh, and correlated with observed microstructural changes induced by the cryomilling process. In short, as the microstructure of the Pd-10Rh alloy is refined by cryomilling: (i) the maximum hydrogen concentration in the ?-phase increases, (ii) the pressure plateau becomes flatter, and (iii) the equilibrium hydrogen capacity at 760 Torr increases. In addition, the rate of hydrogen absorption was reduced by an order of magnitude compared to non-cryomilled (atomized) powder.« less

  5. Plasma Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Nanocomposite Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Alex W. Kawczak

    2008-09-01

    The nanocomposite energy applications for plasma reactor produced nanoparticles are reviewed. Nanoparticles are commonly defined as particles less than 100 nm in diameter. Due to this small size, nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio. This increases the surface energy compared to the bulk material. The high surface-to-volume ratio and size effects (quantum effects) give nanoparticles distinctive chemical, electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties from those of the bulk material. Nanoparticles synthesis can be grouped into 3 broad approaches. The first one is wet phase synthesis (sol-gel processing), the second is mechanical attrition, and the third is gas-phase synthesis (aerosol). The properties of the final product may differ significantly depending on the fabrication route. Currently, there are no economical large-scale production processes for nanoparticles. This hinders the widespread applications of nanomaterials in products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is engaging in research and development of advanced modular hybrid plasma reactors for low cost production of nanoparticles that is predicted to accelerate application research and enable the formation of technology innovation alliances that will result in the commercial production of nanocomposites for alternative energy production devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaics and electrochemical double layer capacitors.

  6. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  7. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  8. Technical Support Section annual work plan for FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkisson, B.P.; Hess, R.A.; Kunselman, C.W.; Millet, A.J.; Smelcer, D.R.

    1994-10-01

    The Technical Support Section (TSS) of the Instrumentation and Controls (I and C) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides technical services such as fabrication, modification, installation, calibration, operation, repair, and preventive maintenance of instruments and other related equipment. Work performed by TSS is in support of basic and applied research and development (R and D), engineering, and instrument and computer systems managed by ORNL. Because the activities and priorities of TSS must be adapted to the technical support needs of ORNL, the TSS Annual Work Plan is derived from and driven directly by current trends in the budgets and activities of each ORNL division for which TSS provides support. Trends that will affect TSS planning during this period are reductions in the staffing levels of some R and D programs because of attrition or budget cuts and the establishment of new facilities or environmental safety and health programs. The ``Long-Range Work Plan`` is based on estimates of impact of the long-range priorities and directions of the Laboratory. Identifiable proposed new facilities and programs provide additional basis for long-range planning. After identifying long-range initiatives, TSS planning includes future training requirements, reevaluation of qualifications for new-hires, and identification of essential test equipment needed in new work.

  9. Incineration of residue from paint stripping operations using plastic media blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helt, J.E.; Mallya, N.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PMB) wastes from plant removal operations. PMB is similar to sandblasting although blasting taken place at a much lower pressure. The blasted media can be recovered and recycled several times, but ultimately a residue of paint dust/chips and attrited media dust are left for disposal. This residue is a dry solid that may potentially be classified as a hazardous waste. One possible alternative to depositing the waste residue directly into a hazardous waste landfill is incineration. Incineration would provide desirable volume reduction. However, the fate of heavy metals from the entrained paint waste is not known. Samples of PMB residue were combusted at temperatures between 690/degree/C and 815/degree/C with approximately 125% of the stoichiometric air. The ash remaining after combustion was then analyzed for heavy metal content and tested for leachability using the EPA toxicity characteristics leaching procedures (TCLP). 6 refs., 7 tabs.

  10. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory were 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

  11. The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

  12. Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

  13. Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    containing over 1,000 square feet of floorspace, and intended for human occupancy. Structures that were included in the survey as a specific exception were parking garages not...

  14. CD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and 1983 levels. The mean floorspace per building for all commercial buildings in the United States was 14,000 square feet, while the median was 5,000 square feet. This...

  15. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Off-Hour Equipment...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    such programs (Figure 1). About the same amount of floorspace had either heating system or cooling system off-hour reduction. Off-hour reduction was least for office...

  16. c34a.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ... 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace...

  17. c3a.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ... 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace...

  18. c1.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 2,552...

  19. c24.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 782 43.0 36.0 17.6 37.1 70.9 6.1 0.33 7.77 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 219 78.7...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  1. c14.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 202 14.1 12.2 3.6 8.2 17.1 15.7 1.09 0.078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 47 17.8...

  2. c4.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 2,552...

  3. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Region > Detailed Tables-Census Region Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables-Census Region Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...

  4. Total Space Heat-

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    890 34 116 113 15 335 6 104 19 43 105 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 113 5 13 5 3 27 2 40 2 3 11 5,001 to 10,000 ......

  5. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Conservati...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    as rowstubs in most detailed tables. Total buildings, total floorspace, and average building size for these categories are shown in Table B1. The PDF and spreadsheet data tables...

  6. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 4 - Case Study on a Computer-testing Center (No. 21)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Can be used interchangeably with Data Center Facility. Alsocommon physical space on the Data Center Floor where serveri.e. server farm). Data Center Floor/Space Data Center

  7. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an IT Equipment-testing Center (No. 20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Can be used interchangeably with Data Center Facility. Alsocommon physical space on the Data Center Floor where serveri.e. server farm). Data Center Floor/Space Data Center

  8. Data Center Energy Benchmarking Part 1 - Case Studies on Two Co-location Data Centers (No. 16 and 17)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Can be used interchangeably with Data Center Facility. Alsocommon physical space on the Data Center Floor where serveri.e. server farm). Data Center Floor/Space Data Center

  9. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 5 - Case Studies on a Corporate Data Center (No. 22)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-01-01

    equipment is located (i.e. server farm). Data Center Floor/Space Data Center Occupancy Server Farm Facility Page 25 ofFacility Diagrams Figure 16. Data Center Plan Layout Page 26

  10. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 or More Units... 5.4 2.4 1.4 0.7 0.9 Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  11. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 or More Units... 5.4 2.1 0.9 0.2 1.0 Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  12. Total..........................................................

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 or More Units... 5.4 2.3 0.7 2.1 0.3 Central Air-Conditioning Usage Air-Conditioned Floorspace (Square Feet)...

  13. c1a.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD...

  14. Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demand for energy Macro-Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demand for energy Macro-Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demand for energy Macro-

  15. Natural Gas",,,"Natural Gas Consumption",,"Natural Gas Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    feet)","Total (million dollars)" "NEW ENGLAND ...",45,1590,35.3,59,57,403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...","Q","Q","Q","Q",...

  16. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    --- All Buildings ... 4,657 4,403 4,395 2,670 434 117 50 451 153 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000...

  17. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    --- NEW ENGLAND ... 45 1,590 35.3 59 57 403 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to...

  18. Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Rizeq; Parag Kulkarni; Wei Wei; Arnaldo Frydman; Thomas McNulty; Roger Shisler

    2005-11-01

    It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research is developing an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on the Phase I program started in October 2000, and work on the Phase II effort started in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) high-purity hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than IGCC with conventional CO2 separation. The Phase I R&D program established the feasibility of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing and investigated operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The Phase I effort integrated experimental testing, modeling and preliminary economic studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. The Phase II effort will focus on three high-risk areas: economics, sorbent attrition and lifetime, and product gas quality for turbines. The economic analysis will include estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs will be benchmarked with IGCC polygen costs for plants of similar size. Sorbent attrition and lifetime will be addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor sorbent performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas from the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) will be evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. This is the eighteenth quarterly technical progress report for the UFP program, which is supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974) and GE. This report summarizes program accomplishments for the Phase II period starting July 01, 2005 and ending September 30, 2005. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including process modeling, scale-up and economic analysis.

  19. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamics Program (Component Development and Integration Facility) in Butte, Montana, continued its site preparation for the TRW first-stage combustor installation. In the area of flue gas cleanup, our in-house research program is continuing its investigation into the causes of sorbent attrition in PETC's fluidized-bed copper oxide process for simultaneous SO/sub 2//NO/sub x/ removal. Interwoven with these tests is a series of spray dryer/electrostatic precipitator tests that are being conducted with the cooperation of Wheelabrator-Frye, Inc. This test series was completed this quarter, and the data show that when using a Kentucky coal, Wheelabrator-Frye's electrostatic precipitator provides excellent particulate control efficiency while using a spray dryer for sulfur dioxide removal. A unique project at Carnegie-Mellon University is looking at the concept of integrated environmental control for coal-fired power plants making use of precombustion, combustion, and postcombustion control, including systems for the simultaneous removal of more than one pollutant. The objective of this research is to develop a computer model and assessment for integrated environmental control systems that utilize conventional or advanced systems. The Liquid Phase Methanol Project Development Unit in LaPorte, Texas, was restarted after a successful shakedown run was completed. PETC has recently begun an in-house research project aimed at exploring the basic chemistry of liquefying coal in the presence of water under supercritical conditions. In the Alternative Fuels Technology Program, the Gulf Research and Development Company has completed the preliminary testing phase of its erosion test loop. Their results indicate that when pumping a coal-water slurry fuel through a flow loop, the erosion rate increases as velocity increases, suggesting a well-defined relationship between these two parameters.

  20. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.; Jain, S.C.

    1998-02-03

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750 to about 950 C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 microns, and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 micron. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  1. Zinc titanate sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Durham, NC); Jain, Suresh C. (Germantown, MD)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a zinc titanate sorbent material useful in desulfurization applications. The zinc titanate material is in the form of generally spherical particles of substantially uniform chemical distribution. The sorbent material is capable of absorbing sulfur compounds from a gaseous feed in an amount of at least about 15 weight percent based on the weight of the sorbent. The sorbent material is prepared by a process including: (a) forming a zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, (b) preparing a substantially uniform aqueous slurry comprising the zinc oxide/titanium dioxide dry blend, organic binder, and at least about 1 weight percent inorganic binder based on the solids weight of the slurry, (c) spray drying the slurry to produce substantially spherical particles, and (d) calcining the particles at a temperature of between about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. The dry blend is formed by mixing between about 0.5 to about 2 parts zinc oxide having a median particle size of less than about 0.5 .mu., and about 1 part titanium dioxide having a median particle size of less than about 1 .mu.. The slurry contains substantially no free silica and may be prepared by the process including (1) preparing an aqueous solution of organic binder, (2) adding the dry blend to the aqueous solution of organic binder, and (3) adding the inorganic binder to the solution of organic binder, and blend. Additional reagents, such as a surfactant, may also be incorporated into the sorbent material. The present invention also provides a process for desulfurizing a gaseous stream. The process includes passing a gaseous stream through a reactor containing an attrition resistant zinc titanate sorbent material of the present invention.

  2. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLUTONIUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE (NTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Hoeffner

    2003-12-31

    The Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL) was contracted by the National Energy Technology Center to evaluate technologies that might be used to reduce the volume of plutonium-contaminated soil at the Nevada Test Site. The project has been systematically approached. A thorough review and summary was completed for: (1) The NTS soil geological, geochemical and physical characteristics; (2) The characteristics and chemical form of the plutonium that is in these soils; (3) Previous volume reduction technologies that have been attempted on the NTS soils; (4) Vendors with technology that may be applicable; and (5) Related needs at other DOE sites. Soils from the Nevada Test Site were collected and delivered to the CETL. Soils were characterized for Pu-239/240, Am-241 and gross alpha. In addition, wet sieving and the subsequent characterization were performed on soils before and after attrition scrubbing to determine the particle size distribution and the distribution of Pu-239/240 and gross alpha as a function of particle size. Sequential extraction was performed on untreated soil to provide information about how tightly bound the plutonium was to the soil. Magnetic separation was performed to determine if this could be useful as part of a treatment approach. Using the information obtained from these reviews, three vendors were selected to demonstration their volume reduction technologies at the CETL. Two of the three technologies, bioremediation and soil washing, met the performance criteria. Both were able to significantly reduce the concentration plutonium in the soil from around 1100 pCi/g to 200 pCi/g or less with a volume reduction of around 95%, well over the target 70%. These results are especially encouraging because they indicate significant improvement over that obtained in these earlier pilot and field studies. Additional studies are recommended.

  3. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  4. Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1993-02-01

    Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

  5. Technical support section annual work plan for FY 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkissson, B.P.; Allison, K.L.; Hess, R.A.; Kunselman, C.W.; Odom, S.M.; Smelcer, D.R.

    1996-04-01

    The Technical Support Section (TSS) of the Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides technical services such as fabrication, modification, installation, calibration, operation, repair, and preventive maintenance of instruments and other related equipment. Work performed by TSS is in support of basic and applied research and development (R&D), engineering and instrument and computer systems managed by ORNL. It is the mission of TSS to support programs and policies of ORNL, emphasizing safety and ensuring cost-effective support for R&D. Because the activities and priorities of TSS must be adapted to the technical support needs of ORNL, the TSS Annual Work Plan is derived from and driven directly by current trends in the budgets and activities of each ORNL division for which TSS provides support. Trends that will affect TSS planning during this period are reductions in the staffing levels of some R&D programs because of attrition or budget cuts and the establishment of new facilities or environmental safety and health programs. TSS does not have an annual budget to cover operating expenses incurred in providing instrumentation maintenance support to ORNL. Each year TSS contacts ORNL division finance managers or division finance officers to obtain information concerning projected funding levels of programs and facilities they manage. Although TSS has no direct responsibility for the maintenance or repair of real property, it does perform breakdown maintenance, preventive maintenance and calibration of laboratory, production, and experimental equipment, all of which is used for programmatic purposes. Operating expense funds from supported divisions support this type of equipment.

  6. Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissett, Larry A.

    2001-11-06

    Using regenerable sorbents and transport or fluid-bed contacting, the Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU) at NETL-Morgantown will be used to demonstrate the process feasibility of removing sulfur from coal gasification or other fuel gas streams at temperatures above dew point of the gas. This technology, also known as hot or warm gas desulfurization, is expected to remove sulfur to concentrations lower than conventional systems at comparable cost. The project was constructed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power system program and is an ''enabling technology'' in the Vision 21 program. The GPDU was designed to be the smallest scale research and development facility capable of providing viable scale-up design data for new integrated transport or fluid-bed desulfurization processes. With the capability to test at process conditions representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, major compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling, the unit is expected to generate important information on process control, configuration, and sorbent suitability. In this way, the GPDU fills a strategic role between past/current small-scale testing and large-scale demonstrations. A primary objective of the project is to gain insight into which reactor combination (i.e., both transport, both fluid bed, or mixed) is more suitable for desulfurization technology and why. Assuming process feasibility is demonstrated, this guides future development or commercial ventures by answering the question of what to build, and provides performance and scale-up data (e.g., required transport reactor densities). Another important objective, which naturally derives from the process development activities, is demonstration of sorbent suitability and readiness for commercial deployment (e.g., sorbent attrition and cycle life). In this sense, the GPDU can serve as a final testing ground to reduce the risks of large-scale sorbent failure.

  7. Improving the Regeneration of CO?-Binding Organic Liquids with a Polarity Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathias, Paul M.; Afshar, Kash; Zheng, Feng; Bearden, Mark D.; Freeman, Charles J.; Andrea, Tamer; Koech, Phillip K.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Zwoster, Andy; Smith, Arnold R.; Jessop, Philip G.; Nik, Omid Ghafari; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an unusual solvent regeneration method unique to CO?BOLs and other switchable ionic liquids; utilizing changes in polarity to shift the free energy of the system. The degree of CO? loading in CO?BOLs is known to control the polarity of the solvent; conversely, polarity could be exploited as a means to control CO? loading. In this process, a chemically inert non-polar “antisolvent” is added to aid in de-complexing CO? from a CO?-rich CO?BOL. The addition of this polarity assist reduces temperatures required for regeneration of CO?BOLs by as much as 76 °C. The lower regeneration temperatures realized with this polarity change allow for reduced solvent attrition and thermal degradation. Furthermore, the polarity assist shows considerable promise for reducing regeneration energy of CO?BOL solvents, and separation of the CO?BOL from the antisolvent is as simple as cooling the mixture below the upper critical solution temperature. Vapour-liquid equilibrium and liquid-liquid equilibrium measurements of a candidate CO?BOL with CO? with and without an antisolvent were completed. From this data, we present the evidence and impacts of a polarity change on a CO?BOL. Thermodynamic models and analysis of the system were constructed using ASPEN Plus, and forecasts preliminary process configurations and feasibility are also presented. Lastly, projections of solvent performance for removing CO? from a sub-critical coal fired power plant (total net power and parasitic load) are presented with and without this polarity assist and compared to DOE’s Case 10 MEA baseline.

  8. Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

  9. c32a.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    . 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001...

  10. Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.; Gupta, R.P.; Turk, B.S.

    2002-09-19

    A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-1 and developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued- Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. During these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H{sub 2}S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has demonstrated high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% which has been shown to remain constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the parts per billion by volume range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration.

  11. Durable Zinc Oxide-Based Regenerable Sorbents for Desulfurization of Syngas in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Cicero, Daniel C. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown); Stiegel, Gary J.; Gupta, Raghubir P. (U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh); Turk, Brian S. (Research Triangle Institute)

    2001-11-06

    A fixed-bed regenerable desulfurization sorbent, identified as RVS-land developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was awarded the R&D 100 award in 2000 and is currently offered as a commercial product by Sued-Chemie Inc. An extensive testing program for this sorbent was undertaken which included tests at a wide range of temperatures, pressures and gas compositions both simulated and generated in an actual gasifier for sulfidation and regeneration. This testing has demonstrated that during these desulfurization tests, the RVS-1 sorbent maintained an effluent H2S concentration of <5 ppmv at temperatures from 260 to 600 C (500-1100 F) and pressures of 203-2026 kPa(2 to 20 atm) with a feed containing 1.2 vol% H{sub 2}S. The types of syngas tested ranged from an oxygen-blown Texaco gasifier to biomass-generated syngas. The RVS-1 sorbent has high crush strength and attrition resistance, which, unlike past sorbent formulations, does not decrease with extended testing at actual at operating conditions. The sulfur capacity of the sorbent is roughly 17 to 20 wt.% and also remains constant during extended testing (>25 cycles). In addition to H{sub 2}S, the RVS-1 sorbent has also demonstrated the ability to remove dimethyl sulfide and carbonyl sulfide from syngas. During regeneration, the RVS-1 sorbent has been regenerated with dilute oxygen streams (1 to 7 vol% O{sub 2}) at temperatures as low as 370 C (700 F) and pressures of 304-709 kPa(3 to 7 atm). Although regeneration can be initiated at 370 C (700 F), regeneration temperatures in excess of 538 C (1000 F) were found to be optimal. The presence of steam, carbon dioxide or sulfur dioxide (up to 6 vol%) did not have any visible effect on regeneration or sorbent performance during either sulfidation or regeneration. A number of commercial tests involving RVS-1 have been either conducted or are planned in the near future. The RVS-1 sorbent has been tested by Epyx, Aspen Systems and McDermott Technology (MTI), Inc for desulfurization of syngas produced by reforming of hydrocarbon liquid feedstocks for fuel cell applications. The RVS-1 sorbent was selected by MTI over other candidate sorbents for demonstration testing in their 500-kW ship service fuel cell program. It was also possible to obtain sulfur levels in the ppbv range with the modified RVS-1 sorbent.

  12. FY12 Quarter 3 Computing Utilization Report – LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wampler, Cheryl L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McClellan, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    DSW continues to dominate the capacity workload, with a focus in Q3 on common model baselining runs in preparation for the Annual Assessment Review (AAR) of the weapon systems. There remains unmet demand for higher fidelity simulations, and for increased throughput of simulations. Common model baselining activities would benefit from doubling the resolution of the models and running twice as many simulations. Capacity systems were also utilized during the quarter to prepare for upcoming Level 2 milestones. Other notable DSW activities include validation of new physics models and safety studies. The safety team used the capacity resources extensively for projects involving 3D computer simulations for the Furrow series of experiments at DARHT (a Level 2 milestone), fragment impact, surety theme, PANTEX assessments, and the 120-day study. With the more than tripling of classified capacity computing resources with the addition of the Luna system and the safety team's imminent access to the Cielo system, demand has been met for current needs. The safety team has performed successful scaling studies on Luna up to 16K PE size-jobs with linear scaling, running the large 3D simulations required for the analysis of Furrow. They will be investigating scaling studies on the Cielo system with the Lustre file system in Q4. Overall average capacity utilization was impacted by negative effects of the LANL Voluntary Separation Program (VSP) at the beginning of Q3, in which programmatic staffing was reduced by 6%, with further losses due to management backfills and attrition, resulting in about 10% fewer users. All classified systems were impacted in April by a planned 2 day red network outage. ASC capacity workload continues to focus on code development, regression testing, and verification and validation (V&V) studies. Significant capacity cycles were used in preparation for a JOWOG in May and several upcoming L2 milestones due in Q4. A network transition has been underway on the unclassified networks to increase access of all ASC users to the unclassified systems through the Yellow Turquoise Integration (YeTI) project. This will help to alleviate the longstanding shortage of resources for ASC unclassified code development and regression testing, and also make a broader palette of machines available to unclassified ASC users, including PSAAP Alliance users. The Moonlight system will be the first capacity resource to be made available through the YETI project, and will make available a significant increase in cycles, as well as GPGPU accelerator technology. The Turing and Lobo machines will be decommissioned in the next quarter. ASC projects running on Cielo as part of the CCC-3 include turbulence, hydrodynamics, burn, asteroids, polycrystals, capability and runtime performance improvements, and materials including carbon and silicone.

  13. A Fault Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKie, Jim

    2014-11-20

    The FOX project, funded under the ASCR X-stack I program, developed systems software and runtime libraries for a new approach to the data and work distribution for massively parallel, fault oblivious application execution. Our work was motivated by the premise that exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today’s machines. To deliver the capability of exascale hardware, the systems software must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. Our OS research has prototyped new methods to provide efficient resource sharing, synchronization, and protection in a many-core compute node. We have experimented with alternative task/dataflow programming models and shown scalability in some cases to hundreds of thousands of cores. Much of our software is in active development through open source projects. Concepts from FOX are being pursued in next generation exascale operating systems. Our OS work focused on adaptive, application tailored OS services optimized for multi ? many core processors. We developed a new operating system NIX that supports role-based allocation of cores to processes which was released to open source. We contributed to the IBM FusedOS project, which promoted the concept of latency-optimized and throughput-optimized cores. We built a task queue library based on distributed, fault tolerant key-value store and identified scaling issues. A second fault tolerant task parallel library was developed, based on the Linda tuple space model, that used low level interconnect primitives for optimized communication. We designed fault tolerance mechanisms for task parallel computations employing work stealing for load balancing that scaled to the largest existing supercomputers. Finally, we implemented the Elastic Building Blocks runtime, a library to manage object-oriented distributed software components. To support the research, we won two INCITE awards for time on Intrepid (BG/P) and Mira (BG/Q). Much of our work has had impact in the OS and runtime community through the ASCR Exascale OS/R workshop and report, leading to the research agenda of the Exascale OS/R program. Our project was, however, also affected by attrition of multiple PIs. While the PIs continued to participate and offer guidance as time permitted, losing these key individuals was unfortunate both for the project and for the DOE HPC community.

  14. Biomass-derived Syngas Utilization for Fuels and Chemicals - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Dayton

    2010-03-24

    Executive Summary The growing gap between petroleum production and demand, mounting environmental concerns, and increasing fuel prices have stimulated intense interest in research and development (R&D) of alternative fuels, both synthetic and bio-derived. Currently, the most technically defined thermochemical route for producing alternative fuels from lignocellulosic biomass involves gasification/reforming of biomass to produce syngas (carbon monoxide [CO] + hydrogen [H2]), followed by syngas cleaning, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) or mixed alcohol synthesis, and some product upgrading via hydroprocessing or separation. A detailed techno-economic analysis of this type of process has recently been published [1] and it highlights the need for technical breakthroughs and technology demonstration for gas cleanup and fuel synthesis. The latter two technical barrier areas contribute 40% of the total thermochemical ethanol cost and 70% of the production cost, if feedstock costs are factored out. Developing and validating technologies that reduce the capital and operating costs of these unit operations will greatly reduce the risk for commercializing integrated biomass gasification/fuel synthesis processes for biofuel production. The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate new catalysts and catalytic processes that can efficiently convert biomass-derived syngas into diesel fuel and C2-C4 alcohols. The goal is to improve the economics of the processes by improving the catalytic activity and product selectivity, which could lead to commercialization. The project was divided into 4 tasks: Task 1: Reactor Systems: Construction of three reactor systems was a project milestone. Construction of a fixed-bed microreactor (FBR), a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) were completed to meet this milestone. Task 2: Iron Fischer-Tropsch (FT) Catalyst: An attrition resistant iron FT catalyst will be developed and tested. Task 3: Chemical Synthesis: Promising process routes will be identified for synthesis of selected chemicals from biomass-derived syngas. A project milestone was to select promising mixed alcohol catalysts and screen productivity and performance in a fixed bed micro-reactor using bottled syngas. This milestone was successfully completed in collaboration withour catalyst development partner. Task 4: Modeling, Engineering Evaluation, and Commercial Assessment: Mass and energy balances of conceptual commercial embodiment for FT and chemical synthesis were completed.

  15. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the possibility of higher strength graphite. Moreover, the inclusion of carbon fibers may provide a toughening mechanism, resulting in tougher, stronger graphite at an attractive cost. The objective of this work was to further develop the ORNL slurry molding technology and apply it to the following tasks: (1) the development of low cost, high surface area CFCMS materials and structures; (2) the development of ultra-fine-grained graphite; and (3) to identify suitable applications for the materials developed in (1) and (2). The work was conducted jointly by SGL and ORNL.

  16. What Hansel and Gretel’s Trail Teach Us about Knowledge Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Simpson; Troy Hiltbrand

    2011-09-01

    Background At Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are on the cusp of a significant era of change. INL is the lead Department of Energy Nuclear Research and Development Laboratory, focused on finding innovative solutions to the nation’s energy challenges. Not only has the Laboratory grown at an unprecedented rate over the last five years, but also has a significant segment of its workforce that is ready for retirement. Over the next 10 years, it is anticipated that upwards of 60% of the current workforce at INL will be eligible for retirement. Since the Laboratory is highly dependent on the intellectual capabilities of its scientists and engineers and their efforts to ensure the future of the nation’s energy portfolio, this attrition of resources has the potential of seriously impacting the ability of the Laboratory to sustain itself and the growth that it has achieved in the past years. Similar to Germany in the early nineteenth century, we face the challenge of our self-identity and must find a way to solidify our legacy to propel us into the future. Approach As the Brothers Grimm set out to collect their fairy tales, they focused on gathering information from the people that were most knowledgeable in the subject. For them, it was the peasants, with their rich knowledge of the region’s sub-culture of folk lore that was passed down from generation to generation around the evening fire. As we look to capture this tacit knowledge, it is requisite that we also seek this information from those individuals that are most versed in it. In our case, it is the scientists and researchers who have dedicated their lives to providing the nation with nuclear energy. This information comes in many forms, both digital and non-digital. Some of this information still resides in the minds of these scientists and researchers who are close to retirement, or who have already retired. Once the information has been collected, it has to be sorted through to identify where the “shining stones” can be found. The quantity of this information makes it improbable for an individual or set of individuals to sort through it and pick out those ideas which are most important. To accomplish both the step of information capture and classification, modern advancements in technology give us the tools that we need to successfully capture this tacit knowledge. To assist in this process, we have evaluated multiple tools and methods that will help us to unlock the power of tacit knowledge. Tools The first challenge that stands in the way of success is the capture of information. More than 50 years of nuclear research is captured in log books, microfiche, and other non-digital formats. To transform this information from its current form into a format that can “shine,” requires a number of different tools. These tools fall into three major categories: Information Capture, Content Retrieval, and Information Classification. Information Capture The first step is to capture the information from a myriad of sources. With knowledge existing in multiple formats, this step requires multiple approaches to be successful. Some of the sources that require consideration include handwritten documents, typed documents, microfiche, images, audio and video feeds, and electronic images. To make this step feasible for a large body of knowledge requires automation.

  17. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV operations. The high gas hold-up was confirmed by a dynamic gas disengagement test conducted at the end of the run. Heat transfer in the reactor was better than expected. Heat, mass and elemental balance calculations indicated excellent closure. After the initial learning curve with system dynamics, the plant was restarted very quickly (24 hours and 17 hours) following two plant trips. This demonstrates the ease and flexibility of the slurry technology. In-situ reduction of catalyst pre-cursor was completed successfully during F-T IV operations. Water measurements proved to be inaccurate due to wax/oil contamination of the analytical system. However, the reduction appeared to proceed well as close to expected syngas conversion was obtained at the beginning of the run. The selectivity to wax was lower than expected, with higher methane selectivity. Returning to the baseline condition indicated a productivity decline from 135-140 to 125-130 gm HC/hr-lit. of reactor volume in two weeks of operation. This may be a result of some catalyst loss from the reactor as well as initial catalyst deactivation. Significant quantities of product and samples were collected for further processing and analysis by the participants. Gas, liquid and solid phase mixing were studied as planned at two operating conditions using radioactive materials. A large amount of data were collected by ICI Tracerco using 43 detectors around the reactor. The data are being analyzed by Washington University as part of the Hydrodynamic Program with DOE.

  18. Transactive Control and Coordination of Distributed Assets for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Somani, Abhishek; Pratt, Robert G.; Widergren, Steven E.; Chassin, David P.

    2013-09-18

    The need to diversify energy supplies, the need to mitigate energy-related environmental impact, and the entry of electric vehicles in large numbers present challenges and opportunities to power system professionals. Wind and solar power provide many benefits, and to reap the benefits the resulting increased variability—forecasted as well as unforecasted—should be addressed. Demand resources are receiving increasing attention as one means of providing the grid balancing services. Control and coordination of a large number (~millions) of distributed smart grid assets requires innovative approaches. One such is transactive control and coordination (TC2)—a distributed, agent-based incentive and control system. The TC2 paradigm is to create a market system with the following characteristics: • Participation should be entirely voluntary. • The participant decides at what price s/he is willing to participate. • The bids and responses are automated. Such an approach has been developed and demonstrated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for energy markets. It is the purpose of this project to develop a similar approach for ancillary services. In this report, the following ancillary services are considered: • spinning reserve • ramping • regulation. These services are to be provided by the following devices: • refrigerators • water heaters • clothes dryers • variable speed drives. The important results are summarized below: The regulation signal can be divided into an energy-neutral high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency component is particularly well suited for demand resources. The low frequency component, which carries energy non-neutrality, can be handled by a combination of generators and demand resources. An explicit method for such a separation is obtained from an exponentially weighted moving average filter. Causal filters (i.e., filters that process only present and past values of a signal) introduce delays that can be issues in some signal processing applications that treat the high frequency part as a noise to be eliminated. For regulation, the high frequency component is an essential part of the signal. The delay in the low frequency component is not a problem. A stochastic self-dispatch algorithm determines the response of the devices to the regulation signal. • In an ensemble of devices under normal operation, some devices turn on and some turn off in any time interval. Demand response necessitates turning off devices that would normally be on, or turning on devices that would normally be off. Over time, some of these would have turned off on their own. A formalism to determine expectation values under a combination of natural and forced attrition has been developed. This formalism provides a mechanism for accomplishing a desired power profile within a bid period. In particular, a method to minimize regulation requirement can be developed. The formulation provides valuable insights into control. • Some ancillary services—ramping to absorb unforecasted increase in renewable generation, and regulation down—require the demand resources to increase their energy use. Some resources such as HVAC systems can do this readily, whereas some others require enabling technology. Even without such technology, it is possible to arrange refrigerators and water heaters to have an energy debt and be ready to increase their energy use. A transactive bid mechanism of revolving debt can be developed for this purpose. Dramatic changes in control systems, architecture and markets are expected in the electrical grid. The technical capabilities of a large number of devices interacting with the grid are changing. While it is too early to describe complete solutions, TC2 has attractive features suitable for adapting to the changes. The analyses in this report and the activities planned for FY 14 and beyond are designed to facilitate this transition.

  19. Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen C. Yborra

    2007-04-30

    Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

  20. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : iron-containing particulate catalysts. Activity report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronauer, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-12

    Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry--specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It is desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The goal is to produce shape-selective catalysts that have the potential to limit the formation of longchain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage'. This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. This activity report centers upon this first stage of experimentation with particulate FT catalysts. (For reference, a second experimental stage is under way to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes.) To date, experimentation has centered upon the evaluation of a sample of iron-based, spray-dried catalyst prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER) and samples of his catalyst onto which inorganic 'shells' were deposited. The reference CAER catalyst contained a high level of dispersed fine particles, a portion of which was removed by differential settling. Reaction conditions have been established using a FT laboratory unit such that reasonable levels of CO conversion can be achieved, where therefore a valid catalyst comparison can be made. A wide range of catalytic activities was observed with SiO{sub 2}-coated FT catalysts. Two techniques were used for SiO{sub 2}coating. The first involved a caustic precipitation of SiO{sub 2} from an organo-silicate onto the CAER catalyst. The second was the acidic precipitation of an organo-silicate with aging to form fractal particles that were then deposited onto the CAER catalyst. Several resulting FT catalysts were as active as the coarse catalyst on which they were prepared. The most active ones were those with the least amount of coating, namely about 2.2 wt% SiO{sub 2}. In the case of the latter acid technique, the use of HCl and HNO{sub 3} was much more effective than that of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe and analyze as-received and treated FT catalysts. It was observed that (1) spherical particles of CAER FT catalyst were made up of agglomerates of particles that were, in turn, also agglomerates; (2) the spray drying process of CAER apparently concentrated the Si precursor at the surface during drying; (3) while SEM pointed out broad differences in the appearance of the prepared catalyst particles, there was little indication that the catalysts were being uniformly coated with a cage-like protective surface, with perhaps the exception of HNO{sub 3}-precipitated catalyst; and (4) there was only a limited penetration of carbon (i.e., CO) into the FT catalyst during the conditioning and FT reaction steps.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

  2. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System:ChangesL1. Floorspace

  3. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Final report : January 1, 2001 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2011-04-11

    Argonne National Laboratory carried out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry-specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it was desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. It was desired that selectivity be directed toward producing diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. The original goal was to produce shape-selective catalysts that had the potential to limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' This cage would also restrict their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. The first stage of this program was to prepare and evaluate iron-containing particulate catalysts. Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity and strength was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. Since there was no improvement, the program plan was modified as discussed below. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. An effective FT catalyst consisting of ALD-deposited Co and Pt on a silica support has been prepared and demonstrated. This catalyst was more effective than a similar catalyst deposited upon a support of ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on silica. This result implies that the deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to form a support is not as effective as desired. The addition of Pt as a Co-containing catalyst promoter has been demonstrated; it appears to primarily affect the catalyst pre-conditioning step. Co on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) is more effective than Argonne-prepared ALD-deposited Co on ALD-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The FT activity of ALD-coated Co catalyst on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is about linear with Co level from about 9 to 25%. A cooperative research effort was undertaken to test the deposition of platinum on Co FT catalysts; this Pt influences the effectiveness of catalyst conditioning and its continuing activity. In summary, the ALD Pt at a low concentration (0.1 wt %) was as effective as that of the wet chemical deposition technique of CAER (specifically incipient deposition on a Co catalyst that had been prepared and calcined before the Pt deposition.) The ALD technique appeared to be nominally better than the incipient wetness technique that involved co-deposition of

  4. Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, Gopala; Hornbostel, Marc; Bao, Jianer; Perez, Jordi; Nagar, Anoop; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2013-11-30

    An innovative, low-cost, and low-energy-consuming carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture technology was developed, based on CO{sub 2}adsorption on a high-capacity and durable carbon sorbent. This report describes the (1) performance of the concept on a bench-scale system; (2) results of parametric tests to determine the optimum operating conditions; (3) results of the testing with a flue gas from coal-fired boilers; and (4) evaluation of the technical and economic viability of the technology. The process uses a falling bed of carbon sorbent microbeads to separate the flue gas into two streams: a CO{sub 2} -lean flue gas stream from which > 90% of the CP{sub 2} is removed and a pure stream of CO{sub 2} that is ready for compression and sequestration. The carbo sorbent microbeads have several unique properties such as high CO{sub 2} capacity, low heat of adsorption and desorption (25 to 28 kJ/mole), mechanically robust, and rapid adsorption and desorption rates. The capture of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas is performed at near ambient temperatures in whic the sorbent microbeads flow down by gravity counter-current with the up-flow of the flue gas. The adsorbed CO{sub 2} is stripped by heating the CO{sub 2}-loaded sorbent to - 100°C, in contact with low-pressure (- 5 psig) steam in a section at the bottom of the adsorber. The regenerated sorben is dehydrated of adsorbed moisture, cooled, and lifted back to the adsorber. The CO{sub 2} from the desorber is essentially pure and can be dehydrated, compressed, and transported to a sequestration site. Bench-scale tests using a simulated flue gas showed that the integrated system can be operated to provide > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a 15% CO{sub 2} stream in the adsorber and produce > 98% CO{sub 2} at the outlet of the stripper. Long-term tests ( 1,000 cycles) showed that the system can be operated reliably without sorbent agglomeration or attrition. The bench-scale reactor was also operated using a flue gas stream from a coal-fired boil at the University of Toledo campus for about 135 h, comprising 7,000 cycles of adsorption and desorption using the desulfurized flue gas that contained only 4.5% v/v CO{sub 2}. A capture efficiency of 85 to 95% CO{sub 2} was achieved under steady-state conditi ons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity did not change significantly during the field test, as determined from the CO{sub 2} adsorptio isotherms of fresh and used sorbents. The process is also being tested using the flue gas from a PC-fired power plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC), Wilsonville, AL. The cost of electricity was calculated for CO{sub 2} capture using the carbon sorbent and compared with the no-CO{sub 2} capture and CO{sub 2} capture with an amine-based system. The increase i the levelized cost of electricity (L-COE) is about 37% for CO{sub 2} capture using the carbon sorbent in comparison to 80% for an amine-based system, demonstrating the economic advantage of C capture using the carbon sorbent. The 37% increase in the L-COE corresponds to a cost of capture of $30/ton of CO{sub 2}, including compression costs, capital cost for the capture system, and increased plant operating and capital costs to make up for reduced plant efficiency. Preliminary sensitivity analyses showed capital costs, pressure drops in the adsorber, and steam requirement for the regenerator are the major variables in determining the cost of CO{sub 2} capture. The results indicate that further long-term testing with a flue gas from a pulverized coal­ fired boiler should be performed to obtain additional data relating to the effects of flue gas contaminants, the ability to reduce pressure drop by using alternate structural packing , and the use of low-cost construction materials.

  5. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  6. Analysis of the Chinese Market for Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Shi, Qing

    2014-03-20

    China will account for about half of the new construction globally in the coming decade. Its floorspace doubled from 1996 to 2011, and Chinese rural buildings alone have as much floorspace as all of U.S. residential buildings. Building energy consumption has also grown, increasing by over 40% since 1990. To curb building energy demand, the Chinese government has launched a series of policies and programs. Combined, this growth in buildings and renovations, along with the policies to promote green buildings, are creating a large market for energy efficiency products and services. This report assesses the impact of China’s policies on building energy efficiency and on the market for energy efficiency in the future. The first chapter of this report introduces the trends in China, drawing on both historical analysis, and detailed modeling of the drivers behind changes in floorspace and building energy demand such as economic and population growth, urbanization, policy. The analysis describes the trends by region, building type and energy service. The second chapter discusses China’s policies to promote green buildings. China began developing building energy codes in the 1980s. Over time, the central government has increased the stringency of the code requirements and the extent of enforcement. The codes are mandatory in all new buildings and major renovations in China’s cities, and they have been a driving force behind the expansion of China’s markets for insulation, efficient windows, and other green building materials. China also has several other important policies to encourage efficient buildings, including the Three-Star Rating System (somewhat akin to LEED), financial incentives tied to efficiency, appliance standards, a phasing out of incandescent bulbs and promotion of efficient lighting, and several policies to encourage retrofits in existing buildings. In the third chapter, we take “deep dives” into the trends affecting key building components. This chapter examines insulation in walls and roofs; efficient windows and doors; heating, air conditioning and controls; and lighting. These markets have seen significant growth because of the strength of the construction sector but also the specific policies that require and promote efficient building components. At the same time, as requirements have become more stringent, there has been fierce competition, and quality has at time suffered, which in turn has created additional challenges. Next we examine existing buildings in chapter four. China has many Soviet-style, inefficient buildings built before stringent requirements for efficiency were more widely enforced. As a result, there are several specific market opportunities related to retrofits. These fall into two or three categories. First, China now has a code for retrofitting residential buildings in the north. Local governments have targets of the number of buildings they must retrofit each year, and they help finance the changes. The requirements focus on insulation, windows, and heat distribution. Second, the Chinese government recently decided to increase the scale of its retrofits of government and state-owned buildings. It hopes to achieve large scale changes through energy service contracts, which creates an opportunity for energy service companies. Third, there is also a small but growing trend to apply energy service contracts to large commercial and residential buildings. This report assesses the impacts of China’s policies on building energy efficiency. By examining the existing literature and interviewing stakeholders from the public, academic, and private sectors, the report seeks to offer an in-depth insights of the opportunities and barriers for major market segments related to building energy efficiency. The report also discusses trends in building energy use, policies promoting building energy efficiency, and energy performance contracting for public building retrofits.

  7. Building Energy Efficiency in Rural China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Yu, Sha; Song, Bo; Deng, Qinqin; Liu, Jing; Delgado, Alison

    2014-04-01

    Rural buildings in China now account for more than half of China’s total building energy use. Forty percent of the floorspace in China is in rural villages and towns. Most of these buildings are very energy inefficient, and may struggle to meet basic needs. They are cold in the winter, and often experience indoor air pollution from fuel use. The Chinese government plans to adopt a voluntary building energy code, or design standard, for rural homes. The goal is to build on China’s success with codes in urban areas to improve efficiency and comfort in rural homes. The Chinese government recognizes rural buildings represent a major opportunity for improving national building energy efficiency. The challenges of rural China are also greater than those of urban areas in many ways because of the limited local capacity and low income levels. The Chinese government wants to expand on new programs to subsidize energy efficiency improvements in rural homes to build capacity for larger-scale improvement. This article summarizes the trends and status of rural building energy use in China. It then provides an overview of the new rural building design standard, and describes options and issues to move forward with implementation.

  8. Buildings and energy in the 1980`s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Many energy programs were put into place during the 1970`s and 1980`s to lessen the dependence upon foreign oil supplies and to improve how all forms of energy are used. A significant percent of total energy consumption occurred in the residential and commercial sectors. This report concentrates on the physical makeup of the residential and commercial buildings sectors and their use of energy, and examines changes that occurred during the 1980`s. Chapter 1 presents a summary of major findings. The following three chapters focus on different aspects of the overarching theme of buildings and energy in the 1980`s. Chapter 2 discusses major characteristics of residential and commercial buildings. Chapter 3 considers the major energy sources and end uses in terms of number of buildings and floorspace. Chapter 4 focuses on energy consumption and expenditures. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 contain tables at the end of each chapter that summarize data from detailed tables that are available separately on diskette or via EIA`s Electronic Publishing System (EPUB). Following the body of the report, appendices and a glossary provide additional information on the methodologies used in this report and on the residential and commercial building consumption surveys on which this report is based. 62 figs., 30 tabs.

  9. A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

  10. Scenarios of Building Energy Demand for China with a Detailed Regional Representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Zhou, Yuyu; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-02-07

    Building energy consumption currently accounts for 28% of China’s total energy use and is expected to continue to grow induced by floorspace expansion, income growth, and population change. Fuel sources and building services are also evolving over time as well as across regions and building types. To understand sectoral and regional difference in building energy use and how socioeconomic, physical, and technological development influence the evolution of the Chinese building sector, this study developed a building energy use model for China downscaled into four climate regions under an integrated assessment framework. Three building types (rural residential, urban residential, and commercial) were modeled specifically in each climate region. Our study finds that the Cold and Hot Summer Cold Winter regions lead in total building energy use. The impact of climate change on heating energy use is more significant than that of cooling energy use in most climate regions. Both rural and urban households will experience fuel switch from fossil fuel to cleaner fuels. Commercial buildings will experience rapid growth in electrification and energy intensity. Improved understanding of Chinese buildings with climate change highlighted in this study will help policy makers develop targeted policies and prioritize building energy efficiency measures.

  11. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government – the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBC’s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  12. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2009-07-16

    The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems