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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Attrition reactor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Second Language Attrition Brief Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such that procedural knowledge of syntax is embedded in lexical memory (Bardovi-Harlig & Stringer, under review). The next stage of our attrition work will be to focus on empirical research, contributing to the field Factors of input motivation explicit knowledge Variables literacy duration/nature duration/nature duration/nature

Indiana University

3

Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

Parent, Yves O. (Golden, CO); Magrini, Kim (Golden, CO); Landin, Steven M. (Conifer, CO); Ritland, Marcus A. (Palm Beach Shores, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Model for attrition in fluidized beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model developed to predict the particle-size distribution and amount of fines generated during the attrition of particles in fluidized beds agrees well with experimental data for siderite iron ore and lignite char. Certain parameters used in the model are independent of particle size, orifice size, system pressure, bed weight, and attrition time, thus making the model suitable for scale-up purposes. Although the analysis was limited to a single jet with the attrition occurring at room temperature, the model can be extended to multi-jet, high-temperature operations.

Chen, T.P.; Sishtla, C.I.; Punwani, D.V.; Arastoopour, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be demonstrated that materials with adequate pore volume can be produced. During the attrition resistance tests, it was learned that the glass-ceramic materials are very abrasive. Attention should be paid in any further developmental efforts to the potential for these hard, abrasive materials to damage reactors.

Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 7. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total Floorspace in All Buildings*","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildings c" ,,"Total Floor- space a","Heated Floor- space b","Total Floor- space a","Cooled Floor- space b","Total Floor- space a","Lit Floor- space b" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,53473,56940,41788,62060,51342 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,4988,5007,4017,6038,4826 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5010,5408,3978,6090,4974

7

Gender Disparity in STEM Disciplines: A Study of Faculty Attrition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Attrition and Turnover Intentions Author(s): Yonghong Jade Xu Reviewed work(s): Source: Research in Higher Education, Vol. 49, No. 7 (November 2008), pp. 607-624 Published by:...

8

Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Building (thousand)" "All Buildings ................",4859,71658,14.7,5 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2586,6922,2.7,2.4 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",948,7033,7.4,7.2 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",810,12659,15.6,15 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",261,9382,36,35 "50,001 to 100,000 ............",147,10291,70.2,67 "100,001 to 200,000 ...........",74,10217,138.6,130 "200,001 to 500,000 ...........",26,7494,287.6,260

9

Attrition and abrasion models for oil shale process modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil shale is processed, fine particles, much smaller than the original shale are created. This process is called attrition or more accurately abrasion. In this paper, models of abrasion are presented for oil shale being processed in several unit operations. Two of these unit operations, a fluidized bed and a lift pipe are used in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hot-Recycle-Solid (HRS) process being developed for the above ground processing of oil shale. In two reports, studies were conducted on the attrition of oil shale in unit operations which are used in the HRS process. Carley reported results for attrition in a lift pipe for oil shale which had been pre-processed either by retorting or by retorting then burning. The second paper, by Taylor and Beavers, reported results for a fluidized bed processing of oil shale. Taylor and Beavers studied raw, retorted, and shale which had been retorted and then burned. In this paper, empirical models are derived, from the experimental studies conducted on oil shale for the process occurring in the HRS process. The derived models are presented along with comparisons with experimental results.

Aldis, D.F.

1991-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

10

A critical assessment of imbalanced class distribution problem: The case of predicting freshmen student attrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting student attrition is an intriguing yet challenging problem for any academic institution. Class-imbalanced data is a common in the field of student retention, mainly because a lot of students register but fewer students drop out. Classification ... Keywords: Attrition, Imbalanced class distribution, Prediction, SMOTE, Sampling, Sensitivity analysis, Student retention

Dech Thammasiri; Dursun Delen; Phayung Meesad; Nihat Kasap

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Attrition of coal ash particles in a fluidized-bed reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data of ash-particles attrition in a fluidized bed is presented, and also the results of modeling. Five sizes of ash particles (1.02-1.25; 1.25-1.6; 1.6-2.0; 2.0-5.0; 5.0-10.0 mm) produced in an industrial CFB boiler were examined. A new model of mechanical attrition has been proposed which incorporates new parameters: the shape factor of particles and the ratio of the bed height to bed diameter, strongly influencing the rate of bed mass loss. The model describes very well experimental data for coal-ash particles attrition. The attrition-rate coefficient for ash particles was evaluated.

Tomeczek, J.; Mocek, P. [Silesian Technical University, Katowice (Poland)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effect of treatment time on characterization and properties of nanocrystalline surface layer in copper induced by surface mechanical attrition treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline surface layers were synthesized on pure copper by means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) at various treatment times. The microstructural features of the surface layers produced by ...

Farzad Kargar; M. Laleh; T. Shahrabi; A. Sabour Rouhaghdam

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Attrition resistant catalysts for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T because they are relatively inexpensive and possess reasonable activity for F-T synthesis (FTS). Their most advantages trait is their high water-gas shift (WGS) activity compared to their competitor, namely cobalt. This enables Fe F-T catalysts to process low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas without an external shift reaction step. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, make the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, an d result in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance.

K. Jothimurugesan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fluidizable zinc titanate materials with high chemical reactivity and attrition resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly durable and chemically reactive zinc titanate materials are prepared in a particle size range of 50 to 400 .mu.m suitable for a fluidized-bed reactor for removing reduced sulfur species in a gaseous form by granulating a mixture of fine zinc oxide and titanium oxide with inorganic and organic binders and by optional additions of small amounts of activators such as CoO and MoO.sub.3 ; and then indurating it at 800.degree. to 900.degree. C. for a time sufficient to produce attrition-resistant granules.

Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Durham, NC); Jain, Suresh C. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, Santosh (Cary, NC); Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Hampton, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

"Table A7. Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace" Enclosed Floorspace and Conditioned Floorspace" " by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994" ,,"Approximate",,"Average" ,,"Enclosed",,"Enclosed"," Conditioned(c) Floorspace" ,,"Floorspace of All",,"Floorspace per"," of All Buildings Onsite",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Buildings Onsite","Establishments(b)","Establishment",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million sq ft)","(counts)","(1000 sq ft)","(million sq ft)","(percents)","Factors" ,,"Total United States"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

22

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

23

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

24

Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",67338,43343,10582,3574,3260,4811,1769 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5358,857,"Q","Q","Q",512 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5952,1630,137,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,7812,1982,784,"Q","Q",296

25

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Trends in Buildings Floorspace Data tables Commercial Buildings Trend—Detail Commercial Floorspace Trend—Detail Background: Adjustment to data Trends in Buildings and Floorspace Each year buildings are added to and removed from the commercial buildings sector. Buildings are added by new construction or conversion of existing buildings from noncommercial to commercial activity. Buildings are removed by demolition or conversion from commercial to noncommercial activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the United States; by 1992, the number increased 27 percent to 4.8 million (an average annual increase of 1.8%) (Figure 1). In 1995, the estimated number declined to 4.6 million buildings, but it is unlikely that there was an actual decline in the number of buildings. To understand the apparent decline, two factors should be considered—the change in the way that the target population of commercial buildings was defined in 1995 and the uncertainty of estimates from sample surveys:

26

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

27

Table B36. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets",,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets" "All Buildings ................",4657,950,658,255,719,67338,25652,19713,8808,19938 "Building Floorspace"

28

Table B16. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings ................",4657,1362,142,67338,26049,7101 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,604,"Q",6774,1706,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,297,"Q",8238,2211,"Q"

29

"Table HC1.2.3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" 3 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total1","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,86.6,2522,1970,1310,1812,1475,821,1055,944,554 "Total Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,261,336,162,"Q","Q","Q",334,260,"Q"

30

"Table B11. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings ................",67338,14321,6325,8028,10814,8898,8356,10595 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,4230,1502,791,235,"Q","Q","N" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,3748,1331,1792,1174,"Q","Q","N" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,3922,1557,2263,2510,819,"Q","Q"

31

"Table B21. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",67338,61612,32291,37902,5611,5534,2728,945 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,2651,3250,598,"Q",469,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,2808,4613,573,"Q",688,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,5079,6069,773,307,682,"Q"

32

"Table B16. Employment Size Category, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Employment Size Category, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Employment Size Category, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,15492,6166,7803,10989,7934,6871,9528 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,4659,1264,689,155,"Q","Q","N" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,3323,1373,1109,689,"Q","Q","N" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,4006,2075,2456,2113,692,"Q","N"

33

Table B1. Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation, 1999" . Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Worker","Mean Hours per Week" "All Buildings ................",4657,67338,81852,14.5,823,60 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,6774,11125,2.9,609,57 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,8238,10968,7.4,751,53 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,11153,11378,15.7,980,65 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,9311,9243,36.2,1007,78

34

Table B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" . Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Worker","Median Hours per Week","Median Age of Buildings (years)" "All Buildings ................",4657,67338,81852,5,909,50,30.5 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,6774,11125,2.5,667,50,30.5 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,8238,10968,7,1000,50,34.5 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,11153,11378,15,1354,55,28.5

35

"Table B26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 6. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings ................",67338,56115,24171,29196,2218,4182,1371 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,4280,2307,1719,"Q","Q","Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5748,2287,3204,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9000,4220,4221,224,164,493

36

Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" . Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","North- east","Midwest ","South","West","All Buildings","North- east","Midwest","South","West" "All Buildings ................",4657,686,1188,1762,1021,67338,12360,16761,23485,14731 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,305,620,916,506,6774,901,1835,2536,1503 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,169,273,413,255,8238,1302,2045,3058,1834 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,130,188,260,130,11153,1954,2881,4194,2124

37

"Table B25. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,56940,56478,22237,3138 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,5007,4759,997,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,5408,5348,1136,214 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,9922,9562,1954,472 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,7776,7734,2511,"Q"

38

"Table B23. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Useda" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,17627,32729,3719,5077 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,1567,3080,482,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,1496,4292,557,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,3035,5320,597,232 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,8565,2866,4416,486,577

39

Table HC1.2.2 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace, " 2 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace, " " Per Housing Unit and Per Household Member, 2005" ,,"Average Square Feet" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Per Housing Unit",,,"Per Household Member" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total1","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,2033,1618,1031,791,630,401 "Total Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Fewer than 500",3.2,357,336,113,188,177,59 "500 to 999",23.8,733,667,308,343,312,144 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,1157,1086,625,435,409,235 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1592,1441,906,595,539,339 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2052,1733,1072,765,646,400

40

Table HC1.2.4 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.4 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" 2.4 Living Space Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441 "Total Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Fewer than 500",3.1,2.3,403,360,165,366,348,93 "500 to 999",22.2,14.4,763,660,277,730,646,303 "1,000 to 1,499",19.1,5.8,1223,1130,496,1187,1086,696 "1,500 to 1,999",14.4,1,1700,1422,412,1698,1544,1348

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Z-Tiles: Building Blocks for Modular, Pressure-Sensing Floorspaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z-Tiles: Building Blocks for Modular, Pressure-Sensing Floorspaces Bruce Richardson, Krispin Leydon, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland {bruce.richardson | krispin.leydon | mikael.fernstrom}@ul.ie Joseph acting parallel to the z axis. Copyright is held by the author/owner(s). CHI 2004, April 24-29, 2004

42

Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" 4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,6.7,1247,1032,"Q",811,788,147 "New England",5.5,1.9,1365,1127,"Q",814,748,107 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,4.8,1182,978,"Q",810,800,159 "Midwest",25.6,4.6,1349,1133,506,895,810,346

43

"Table B27. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,28600,36959,5988,5198,3204,842 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,2367,2829,557,"Q",665,183 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,2560,3358,626,"Q",529,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,4872,6407,730,289,597,"Q"

44

"Table B32. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,56478,27490,28820,1880,3088,1422 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,4759,2847,1699,116,"N",169 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5348,2821,2296,"Q","Q",205 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,9562,4809,4470,265,"Q",430

45

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

46

Caregivers of Elders and the "Caregiver Career:" Predictions of Institutionalization and Caregiver Attrition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through home-based transition management, J Palliat Med, 6,and home-based transition management (Stuart et al. , 2003).

Lee, Suzanne E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - attrition resistant iron-based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels 5 FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Summary: this operational problem, we used a two-step approach...

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - attrition-resistant zinc titanate Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, M. Mendilloa a Center for Space... ; accepted 23 June 1999 Abstract We estimate the wind speeds in Titan's thermosphere by considering... , but in Titan's thermosphere they...

49

Personality Predictors of First-Year Attrition From A Military Training Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their actions (Watson, Clark, & Harkness, 1994). (3.) Extraversion generally describes someone who is assertive, energetic, outgoing, and enthusiastic. Extraverts generally behave in an assertive manner and are talkative (McCrae & John, 1992...) but there is a link proposed between extraversion and aggression in view of their apparent assertiveness and forceful nature (Goldberg, 1990). Extraverts may also experience positive emotions more frequently (Watson & Clark, 1999) and be more likely to recall...

Chalupa, Samantha Brooke

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

An attrition-resistant zinc titanate sorbent for sulfur. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the continuing search for good sorbent materials to remove sulfur for hot, coal-derived gases, zinc titanate sorbents have shown great promise. The objective of this project was to extend the work of prior investigators by developing improvements in the compressive strength and, therefore, the cycle life of these sorbents while maintaining good chemical reactivity. Fifteen formulations were prepared and evaluated. The best properties were obtained by blending relatively course (two micron) ZnO and TiO{sub 2} powders to obtain a composition of 50%Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}-50%TiO{sub 2}. When sintered at 1000{degrees}C, it had a compressive strength of 28 MPa or 147 N/mm, which is four times higher than values obtained by prior investigators. It also performed well in thermogravimetric analysis measurements of reactivity, both in screening tests and in simulated coal gas.

Swisher, J.H. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Foreign Language Enrollment Attrition: Exploring the Key Factors of Motivation, Academic Success, Instruction, and Anxiety at the Elementary Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1998; Stewart, 2005; Weatherford, 1986). However, proficiency in a second language does not happen overnight. On the contrary, developing a level of proficiency that provides a minimal level of communicative ability for the learner takes many years... ones L1 was to increase an individuals intellectual capacity (Weatherford, 1986). Now, however, investigators have indicated that studying a foreign language can be beneficial in multiple areas and therefore goes well beyond the notion...

Meyer, Sarah Nicole

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

"Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Heated Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "No Main Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","N","N","N","N","N","N" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6

53

"Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Cooled Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,49.2,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,31.3,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,30.4,14.6,15.4,11.1,6.9,5.2,7.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,1,0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,17.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N"

54

Telomere Attrition and Decreased Fetuin-A Levels Indicate Accelerated Biological Aging and Are Implicated in the Pathogenesis of Colorectal Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cancer Fraser Maxwell 1 Liane M. McGlynn 1 Hannah C. Muir 1 Dinesh Talwar 2 Michaela Benzeval 3 Tony Robertson 3 Campbell S. Roxburgh...Exp Cell Res 1961;25:585-621. 6. Misri S , Pandita S, Kumar R Pandita TK. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response...

Fraser Maxwell; Liane M. McGlynn; Hannah C. Muir; Dinesh Talwar; Michaela Benzeval; Tony Robertson; Campbell S. Roxburgh; Donald C. McMillan; Paul G. Horgan; and Paul G. Shiels

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Konstruktion av anordning fr att underska frslitning av syrebrarpartiklar fr kemcyklisk frbrnning.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this work is to design and construct a device able to measure the mechanical attrition of oxygen carrier particles. Those particles are (more)

Gunnarsson, Adrian; Gylln, Patrik; Larsson, Johan; Lindqvist, Simon; Hedstrm, Joakim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

57

5027 resistance [n] to wear and tear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

constr. (Property of surfacing materials to withstand abrasion or attrition);sresistencia [f] al desgaste (Capacidad de materiales de resistir las inclemencias del uso; resistente...f1rsistance [...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

27.03.20071 Grain size distributions of fault rocks: a comparison between experimentally and3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploration, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology11 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama; further displacement of fragments causes further comminution by wear and attrition.56 Cracked grains have

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

59

Solid State Blending of Poly(ethylene terephthalate) with Polystyrene: Extent of PET Amorphization and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state via cryogenic mechanical attrition (CMA) and in the melt through conventional twin-screw extrusion of compatibilization was previously deter- mined to be both higher than that of extruded blends and also dependent upon

Mitchell, Brian S.

60

AIAA 2002-3455 EVOLUTIONARY APPROACHES TO PATH PLANNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include areas such as reconnaissance, search and rescue, and weather obser- vation. However attrition to consider nonlinear performance metrics. This includes such things as time of arrival con- straints

Washington at Seattle, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Professional Human Capital Flows: Temporal Structure of Loss, Replacement and Contingent Bundling Effects on Firm Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diversification, but the opposite is true of prior performance and the manager-subordinate ratio. Implications for RBT, the attraction-selection-attrition (ASA) model, and strategic human capital theory are discussed....

Brymer, Rhett

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Food Service ...",349,349,305,"Q","Q",1851,1846,1548,"Q","Q" "Health Care ...",127,126,103,"Q",6,2918,2903,1755,363,785 " Inpatient...

63

SexPlant Reprod(1993)6:275-281 SexualPlant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ovary. These have been termed pseudo-incompatibility reactions for species that are normally self-incompatible to re- ducing selfing, incompatibility systems may a][lowplants to modify the levels of bi on variation in stylar attrition of pollen tubes in self-fertile plants of Petunia hybrida. Pollinations

Thomson, James D.

64

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Leader personal influences on membership decisions in moderated online social networking groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Moderated online social networking (MOSN) groups have become a prominent way for Internet users to form relationships, learn about specialized topics, and share their understandings with others. However, unlike traditional social and work groups, very ... Keywords: Attraction-selection-attrition (ASA) theory, Homogeneity, Leader-member congruence, Leadership style, Moderated online social network, Personal values, Personality

Gary F. Templeton; Xin (Robert) Luo; Tomas R. Giberson; Natalie Campbell

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Genome Biology 2007, 8:308 Meeting report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and global warming. Van Montagu warned that in order to build a more sustainable economy in the future the key to some of the most threatening problems of our time, namely energy consumption and global warming-increasing population on shrinking areas of arable land; the attrition of fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas

Gent, Universiteit

67

Offered: Offered: Position(s): Position(s)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:00-4:00pm Yes Engineer, Quality Assurance Enterasys specialize in the secure data network space. Our,000 sq foot facility in Salem, NH. We have less than 5% annual employee attrition. Our Engineering, R environment. We are an Innovator on the Gartner Magic Quadrant and hold over 400 active patents

Pringle, James "Jamie"

68

Fabrication and Wear Behavior of Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed 6061Al-SiCp Composite Coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

6061Al powder with 15wt.% SiC particulate (SiCp...) reinforcement was mechanically alloyed (MA) in a high-energy attrition mill. The MA powder was then plasma sprayed onto weathering steel (Cor-Ten A242) substra...

Satish Tailor; R. M. Mohanty; V. K. Sharma

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

100 Area Hanford soil washing treatability tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil washing laboratory tests performed at Hanford in support of 100 Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility studies included characterization of soils, physical separation, chemical extraction, and water treatment. Results to date show that < 20 % of the soil is finer than 0.25 mm ({minus}40 mesh). The highest concentration of {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 137}Cs contaminants is generally associated with fine soil particles. However, measurable concentrations of contaminants were found in all sizes of soil particles. In initial testing, attrition scrubbing was generally sufficient to treat soils to meet selected performance levels for {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu. However, more intense attrition scrubbing, autogenous grinding, or chemical extraction was required to enhance removal of {sup 137}Cs. Additional tests and assessment of the feasibility of using soil washing techniques are in progress.

Field, J.G.; Belden, R.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.; Freeman, H.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Scheck, R.W. [Mactec/Dames and Moore (United States); Goller, E.D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analytical solutions for steady and unsteady state particle size distributions in FBC and CFBC boilers for non-breaking char particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous analytical solutions for the particle size distributions of char in steady and unsteady states in fluidized beds, when the inlet fuel feed is presented by monosize, lognormal, Rosin-Rammler or gamma distributions, are derived from a population balance model. The stationary size distribution is directly related to the rate of reduction of the particle size. Combustion and attrition reduce the particle size. Thus, it is possible to extract the dependence of the rate of reduction of radius (affected by a fuels reactivity and attrition) on radius from a measured steady-state particle size distribution. Unsteady particle size distributions are derived for impulse, step and square pulse changes in the fuel feed, when the oxygen level in the reactor is maintained constant.

J.J. Saastamoinen; A. Tourunen; J. Hmlinen; T. Hyppnen; M. Loschkin; A. Kettunen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

73

The devil's shoestring, Tephrosia virginiana (L.) pers., as a domestic source of rotenone and rotenoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* They were finely ground in an attrition mill and tested on a number of insects. Tests on the cotton or melon aphis, Aphis gossyppii, the turnip louse, Rhopaloslphum pseudobrassicae, the American tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americana, the caterpillar... in Texas, particularly in Carrizo or fine Norfolk sand of northeastern Texas. Of the seventeen species of Tephrosia growing in the South and East, twelve were examined and only Tephrosia virginiana and Tephrosia latldens were promising. No taxo? nomic...

Little, V. A.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Minipig and beagle animal model genomes aid species selection in pharmaceutical discovery and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving drug attrition remains a challenge in pharmaceutical discovery and development. A major cause of early attrition is the demonstration of safety signals which can negate any therapeutic index previously established. Safety attrition needs to be put in context of clinical translation (i.e. human relevance) and is negatively impacted by differences between animal models and human. In order to minimize such an impact, an earlier assessment of pharmacological target homology across animal model species will enhance understanding of the context of animal safety signals and aid species selection during later regulatory toxicology studies. Here we sequenced the genomes of the Sus scrofa Gttingen minipig and the Canis familiaris beagle, two widely used animal species in regulatory safety studies. Comparative analyses of these new genomes with other key model organisms, namely mouse, rat, cynomolgus macaque, rhesus macaque, two related breeds (S. scrofa Duroc and C. familiaris boxer) and human reveal considerable variation in gene content. Key genes in toxicology and metabolism studies, such as the UGT2 family, CYP2D6, and SLCO1A2, displayed unique duplication patterns. Comparisons of 317 known human drug targets revealed surprising variation such as species-specific positive selection, duplication and higher occurrences of pseudogenized targets in beagle (41 genes) relative to minipig (19 genes). These data will facilitate the more effective use of animals in biomedical research. - Highlights: Genomes of the minipig and beagle dog, two species used in pharmaceutical studies. First systematic comparative genome analysis of human and six experimental animals. Key drug toxicology genes display unique duplication patterns across species. Comparison of 317 drug targets show species-specific evolutionary patterns.

Vamathevan, Jessica J., E-mail: jessica.j.vamathevan@gsk.com [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Hall, Matthew D.; Hasan, Samiul; Woollard, Peter M. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Xu, Meng; Yang, Yulan; Li, Xin; Wang, Xiaoli [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Kenny, Steve [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Brown, James R. [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA (United States); Huxley-Jones, Julie [UK Platform Technology Sciences (PTS) Operations and Planning, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Lyon, Jon; Haselden, John [Safety Assessment, PTS, GlaxoSmithKline, Ware (United Kingdom); Min, Jiumeng [BGI-Shenzen, Shenzhen (China); Sanseau, Philippe [Computational Biology, Quantitative Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage (United Kingdom)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Title Project Number  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project DE-FE0001808 Novel Oxygen Carriers For Coal-Fueled Chemical Looping Combustion Western Kentucky University Presenter: Dr. Yan Cao Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology February 25, 2011 Project Participants * PIs: Dr. Wei-Ping Pan Dr. Yan Cao * Students: Ms. Wen Ying (Master student) Mr. Andy Wang (Undergraduate student) Mr. Yanwen Cui (Master student) Introduction (limit - 1 slide) * Background on the project * Anticipated benefits Solid Oxygen Carriers 1. Commercially accepted kinetics - coupling and potential uncoupling (free oxygen) 2. Thermal Stability, Lower degradation, and Lower Attrition loss 3. Favored thermodynamics for pure CO 2 4. Opportunity to release of free oxygen for improvement of process kinetics;

76

Psychological characteristics of elite and non-elite level gymnasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the 1988 Olympics, they were also 4 trying to put together data that could be used for future coaching and training. One of their biggest obstacles for acquiring data for this longitudinal study was the high attrition rate of the athletes.... An interesting observation by the researchers was that the coaches needed as much or more help with stress and anxiety at the Olympics as did the athletes. It is likely that the coach?s anxiety and stress was communicated to the athlete. While the utility...

Waples, Steven Ballard

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

Examination of oxygen uncoupling behaviour and reactivity towards methane for manganese silicate oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cheap and environmental friendly MnSi oxygen carriers manufactured from Mn3O4 and SiO2 by spray-drying have been investigated with respect to properties for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) and chemical-looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU). Fifteen oxygen carriers with SiO2 content varying from 2wt% to 75wt% were prepared and calcined at 1050C and 1150C. The ability of material to release O2 and their reactivity towards CH4 were examined in the temperature range 9001100C. Particles with a SiO2 content of more than 45wt% and calcined at 1150C showed limited CLOU behaviour and poor reactivity towards CH4 at all temperatures investigated. The rest of the materials had significant CLOU properties and provided high conversion of CH4 under the experimental conditions chosen. Increasing the temperature of operation enhanced the CLOU behaviour and reactivity towards CH4. At temperatures above 950C, the CH4 conversion was 90100% for these materials. Crystalline phases identified by XRD in the oxidized samples with more than 45wt% SiO2 and calcined at 1150C were mainly rhodonite MnSiO3. For materials with SiO2 content below 45wt%, braunite Mn7SiO12 was detected as the main phase in most of the samples after oxidation. This indicates that braunite Mn7SiO12 is the main active phase for oxygen transfer in CLC and CLOU, which is supported by thermodynamic calculations. The reactivity of all of the materials were also studied with syngas (50% CO and 50% H2), showing complete gas conversion at 950C, except for materials with a SiO2 content of more than 45wt% and calcined at 1150C. The mechanical integrity and attrition resistance of the oxygen carriers were examined in a jet-cup attrition rig, and although the attrition rates varied, some reactive material showed low rates of attrition, making them very promising oxygen carrier materials for applications related to CLC and CLOU. However, measures should probably be taken to improve the crushing strength to some extent.

Dazheng Jing; Mehdi Arjmand; Tobias Mattisson; Magnus Rydn; Frans Snijkers; Henrik Leion; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Contribution to kinetic modeling of catalyst deactivation by coke in the MTG process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adequacy of a kinetic model for deactivation of a catalyst based on a H-ZSM5 used in the transformation of methanol into hydrocarbons has been proven. The model takes into account the pronounced effect on coke deposition of the concentration of reaction lumps and coke preferable deposition at the reactor inlet by degradation of oxygenates (methanol and dimethylether) on the catalyst acid sites. The kinetic model is in agreement with the experimental results of fixed and fluidized bed reactors within the 300-400 {degrees}C range. The deactivation is slightly smaller in fluidized bed but contribution of catalyst attrition to deactivation must be considered. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Gayubo, A.G.; Ortega, J.M.; Benito, P.L.; Aguayo, A.T.; Bilbao, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Impact of force withdrawal on options for conventional defenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soviet withdrawal from the Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO) could open new defensive options. This report gives some background on those options from post-war nuclear and conventional strategies and the quantitative Soviet threat tot he role of firepower, close air support, and battlefield attrition. Withdrawal under the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty could provide a buffer between opposing armies that aggressor armies drop the bridges and disrupt the roads and rails that would have to be used. If forces were brought into battle piecemeal, they would be annihilated. That would permit effective use of advanced and prepositioned weapons, which would favor the defense. 9 refs.

Canavan, G.H.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

Bitterwolf, Thomas E. [University of Idaho

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

82

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" 2.1. Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

83

" Row: NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment","Row"

84

Successful scale-up of the fluid-bed methanol to gasoline (MTG) process to 100 BPD demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100 BPD fluid-bed methanol to gasoline (MTG) demonstration plant operation has exceeded the original process objectives. Specifically, the results show: stable unit operation is achieved with excellent gas/catalyst mixing resulting in complete methanol conversion; bed temperature control is readily accomplished although the process is highly exothemic; catalyst attrition is low, which confirms the mechanical strength of the catalyst; the small make-up used for activity control at normal conditions exceeds the low attrition rate; process parameters can be varied to obtain the desired gasoline yield and quality; and engineering design parameters have been confirmed at the pilot plant stage and scale-up to a commercial-size MTG fluid-bed system is now deemed feasible. The results obtained gave a broad basis for the conceptual design of a coal based commercial size plant for the production of MTG gasoline. This study is presently in preparation and will be completed by the middle of 1985. The conceptual design will be based on a 2500 tonnes/day methanol feeding a single fluid-bed. Six trains will be used for a maximum plant capacity of 15,000 tonnes/day. 12 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Gierlich, H.H.; Keim, K.H.; Thiagarajan, N.; Nitschke, E.; Kam, A.Y.; Daviduk, N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Conversion of methanol to gasoline. Operation of the demonstration plant. Milestone report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100 BPD fluid-bed methanol to gasoline (MTG) demonstration plant operation has exceeded the original process objectives. Specifically, the results show: stable unit operation is achieved with excellent gas/catalyst mixing resulting in complete methanol conversion; bed temperature control is readily accomplished, although the process is highly exothermic; catalyst attrition is low, which confirms the mechanical strength of the catalyst - the small make-up used for activity control at normal conditions exceeds the low attrition rate; process parameters can be varied to obtain the desired gasoline yield and quality; and engineering design parameters have been confirmed at the pilot plant stage and a scale-up to a commercial-size MTG fluid-bed system is now deemed feasible. The results obtained gave a broad basis for the conceptual design of a coal-based commercial-size plant for the production of MTG gasoline. This study is presently in preparation and will be completed by the middle of 1985. The conceptual design will be based on a 2500 tonnes/day methanol plant feeding a single MTG fluid-bed reactor. Six trains will be used for a maximum plant capacity of 15,000 tonnes/day. 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Edwards, M.; Gierlich, H.; Gould, R.; Thiagarajan, N.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

40th annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that declines characterize the 1992 rig census-in the number of available drilling rigs, in the number of active rigs, in rig utilization rate, in the number of rig owners and in industry optimism. The number of rotary rigs available for U.S. drilling fell by 255 units (11.3%) during the past 12 months, an attrition rate almost four times greater than in 1991. But despite the high attrition, only 59.7% of remaining rigs were working during the time the census was taken. Results of the 1992 census bring emphasis to an industry trend that became apparent in early 1991. The major oil companies, and many independents, continued their exodus form the U.S., and the remaining independents, which were hurt by low natural gas prices and unfavorable tax treatment of intangible drilling costs, were not able to pick u the drilling slack. Consequently, the past year has been disastrous for many U.S. drilling contractors, and the outlook for this industry segment remains bleak.

Fitts, R.L.; Stokes, T.A. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Advanced atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion design - spouted bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Spouted-Fluidized Bed Boiler that is an advanced atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (FBC). The objective of this system design study is to develop an advanced AFBC with improved performance and reduced capital and operating costs compared to a conventional AFBC and an oil-fired system. The Spouted-Fluidized Bed (SFB) system is a special type of FBC with a distinctive jet of air in the bed to establish an identifiable solids circulation pattern. This feature is expected to provide: reduced NO/sub x/ emissions because of the fuel rich spout zone; high calcium utilization, calcium-to-sulfur ratio of 1.5, because of the spout attrition and mixing; high fuel utilization because of the solids circulation and spout attrition; improved thermal efficiency because of reduced solids heat loss; and improved fuel flexibility because of the spout phenomena. The SFB was compared to a conventional AFBC and an oil-fired package boiler for 15,000 pound per hour system. The evaluation showed that the operating cost advantages of the SFB resulted from savings in fuel, limestone, and waste disposal. The relative levelized cost for steam from the three systems in constant 1985 dollars is: SFB - $10 per thousand pounds; AFBC - $11 per thousand pounds; oil-fired - $14 per thousand pounds. 18 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

Shirley, F.W.; Litt, R.D.

1985-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Principal Building...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

floorspace compared by building activity (Figure 5). The two exceptions are education and health care buildings. Both rank higher in amount of lit floorspace because a larger...

89

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Floorspace - Housing Characteristics PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.1.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.1.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.1.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.1.4) PDF XLS Usage Indicators Heated Floorspace (HC1.3) PDF XLS Cooled Floorspace (HC1.4) PDF XLS Floorspace - Living Space PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.2.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.2.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.2.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.2.4) PDF XLS

90

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

91

Knowledge Management Initiatives Used to Maintain Regulatory Expertise in Transportation and Storage of Radioactive Materials - 12177  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1974 with the mission to license and regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials for commercial, industrial, academic, and medical uses in order to protect public health and safety, and the environment, and promote the common defense and security. Currently, approximately half (?49%) of the workforce at the NRC has been with the Agency for less than six years. As part of the Agency's mission, the NRC has partial responsibility for the oversight of the transportation and storage of radioactive materials. The NRC has experienced a significant level of expertise leaving the Agency due to staff attrition. Factors that contribute to this attrition include retirement of the experienced nuclear workforce and mobility of staff within or outside the Agency. Several knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been implemented within the Agency, with one of them including the formation of a Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation (SFST) KM team. The team, which was formed in the fall of 2008, facilitates capturing, transferring, and documenting regulatory knowledge for staff to effectively perform their safety oversight of transportation and storage of radioactive materials, regulated under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 71 and Part 72. In terms of KM, the SFST goal is to share critical information among the staff to reduce the impact from staff's mobility and attrition. KM strategies in place to achieve this goal are: (1) development of communities of practice (CoP) (SFST Qualification Journal and the Packaging and Storing Radioactive Material) in the on-line NRC Knowledge Center (NKC); (2) implementation of a SFST seminar program where the seminars are recorded and placed in the Agency's repository, Agency-wide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS); (3) meeting of technical discipline group programs to share knowledge within specialty areas; (4) development of written guidance to capture 'administrative and technical' knowledge (e.g., office instructions (OIs), generic communications (e.g., bulletins, generic letters, regulatory issue summary), standard review plans (SRPs), interim staff guidance (ISGs)); (5) use of mentoring strategies for experienced staff to train new staff members; (6) use of Microsoft SharePoint portals in capturing, transferring, and documenting knowledge for staff across the Division from Division management and administrative assistants to the project managers, inspectors, and technical reviewers; and (7) development and implementation of a Division KM Plan. A discussion and description of the successes and challenges of implementing these KM strategies at the NRC/SFST will be provided. (authors)

Lindsay, Haile; Garcia-Santos, Norma; Saverot, Pierre; Day, Neil; Gambone Rodriguez, Kimberly; Cruz, Luis; Sotomayor-Rivera, Alexis; Vechioli, Lucieann; Vera, John; Pstrak, David [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop EBB-03D-02M, 6003 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Audit Report: OAS-L-03-08 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Audit Report: OAS-L-03-08 January 22, 2003 Recruitment and Retention of Personnel in the Department of Energy In July 2001, the Office of Inspector General reported on Recruitment and Retention of Scientific and Technical Personnel (DOE/IG-0512). That report disclosed, that the Department of Energy (Department) had been unable to recruit and retain critical scientific and technical staff. Moreover, historical hiring and attrition rates indicated that there might be greater shortages in less than five years' time. To help ensure needed scientific and technical resources would be available to meet mission requirements, we recommended that the Department develop performance measures and take other actions to improve recruitment and retention efforts. In addition to scientific and technical needs, the Department employs a

93

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

94

FTCP FY09 Operational Plan GOAL 2 White Paper - Mid-level Recruitment Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

White Paper White Paper Topic: Identifying and documenting mid-level recruitment programs. Issue: Due to increasing attrition rates of senior technical staff, a large percentage of Site Office positions are in need of both knowledge management and succession planning programs to ensure the continuity of DOE's mission. A long term strategy has been to identify entry level talent that could work along side experienced technical personnel to build the competencies necessary for our mission critical positions while filling forecasted skill gaps. As a result, Site Offices find it very difficult to identify a short term strategy that can identify and place new, mid-level employees into positions requiring the immediate application of mature technical skills.

95

1Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May May 9,2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: .yc,..,%$'! L.W.T oseph Arango, Facl ity Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. You will note that the indicators show the attrition of five Facility Representatives from the program during this reporting period. Of those five, two were promoted

96

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives from the Facility

97

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-302 Post-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 benCh-sCale DeveloPment anD testing of raPiD Pressure swing absorPtion for Carbon DioxiDe CaPture primary project goals WR Grace and the University of South Carolina are developing a rapid pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process to evaluate concept cost and performance benefits by testing a bench-scale system using a low-cost, structured adsorbent with low-pressure drop, high mass-transfer rates, high capacity, and high availability that will enable large feed through- puts. technical goals * Develop an attrition-resistant and low-pressure drop structured adsorbent based on a

98

Ulited States Government  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ulited States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 22, 2003 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PT025) SUBJECT: Audit on "Recruitment and Retention of Personnel in the Department of Energy" TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1I INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In July 2001, the Office of Inspector General reported on Recruitment and Retention of Scientific and Technical Personnel (DOE/IG-0512). That report disclosed, that the Department of Energy (Department) had been unable to recruit and retain critical scientific and technical staff. Moreover, historical hiring and attrition rates indicated that there might be greater shortages in less than five years' time. To help ensure

99

December 17, 1998 Memo, Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

mE mE F 1325.8 (a89) EFG (U7-W) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: December 17, 1998 REPLY TO ATTN OF: FM- 10(J. Hassenfeldt, 202 586-1643) SUBJECT Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program TO:Distribution The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly qualified employees and placing them in our critical technical positions is vital to fi.dfilling this commitment. You have identified 95'% of your Facility Representative positions as critical technical positions. The Office of Field Management has noted a 12'?40 annual attrition rate of Facility Representatives

100

NETL: Onsite Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities NETL researchers are seeking technical solutions to pressing problems related to fossil fuel extraction, processing, and utilization. To this end, laboratory-scale facilities are used to prepare, test, and analyze sorbents and catalysts used in fixed-, moving-, and fluid-bed reactors — three types of reactors often used in advanced fossil-fueled power plants. Equipment in these facilities is also available for standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) attrition tests, crush measurements, and particle size analysis to confirm the suitability of the sorbents and catalysts for their intended applications. NETL researchers use these facilities in conjunction with facilities for sorbent/catalyst bench-scale testing and for in-situ (in-place) reaction studies. In 2000, NETL received an R&D 100 Award for its RSV-1 Regenerable Desulfurization Sorbent. The process for preparation of this sorbent has been patented, licensed, and published.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Na and K-Based Development of Na and K-Based Sorbents for CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Chong Kul Ryu, Korea Electric Power Research Institute Joong Beom Lee, Korea Electric Power Research Institute Tae Hyoung Eom, Korea Electric Power Research Institute Je Myung Oh, Korea Electric Power Research Institute Chang Keun Yi, Korea Institute of Energy Research CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/NETL May 2-5, 2005 Abstract This paper describes the dry regenerable sorbent technology, one of the cost-effective and energy- efficient technologies for CO 2 capture from flue gas. The purpose of this work is to prepare alkali metal- based sorbents, especially focused on the high attrition resistance and high CO 2 sorption capacity

102

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

103

Presentation to the EAC - Center for Energy Workforce Development - Ann Randazzo  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CEWD Mission CEWD Mission Build the alliances, processes, and tools to develop tomorrow's energy workforce Career Awareness Education Workforce Planning and Metrics Structure and Support Industry Solutions - Regional Implementation Total Industry Jobs have decreased since last survey 2 2007 Jobs 2008 Jobs 2009 Jobs 2010 Jobs 2011 Jobs Series1 519,744 530,928 536,716 527,931 525,517 510,000 515,000 520,000 525,000 530,000 535,000 540,000 Total Jobs for Electric and Natural Gas NAICS Codes Electric and Natural Gas Utility Jobs 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 2011 Jobs Half of all the Electric and Natural Gas Utility Jobs are in 9 States 62 % of the workforce may need to be replaced in the next 10 years Retained 38% 5 year Non- Retirement Attrition 18% Retirement Ready Now 9%

104

Microsoft Word - WandaRederCleanEnergy Central-pc-3-2.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wanted: Students in the Smart Grid Pipeline Wanted: Students in the Smart Grid Pipeline by Wanda Reder Chair, IEEE Smart Grid, vice president, S&C Electric Company By 2020 about half the utility workforce could retire, taking with them vital experience, skills and knowledge. These retirees include engineers and technicians. Faculty in related, higher education are retiring, too. Who is going to step in and take on the challenges involved in making Smart Grid a reality? In a survey of electricity providers and integrated utilities, the Center for Energy Workforce Development found that, despite the projection for massive retirements, many workers may stay on for awhile due to the uncertain financial climate. This in turn has caused employers to refrain from hiring many new employees. Yet it is reasonable to expect accelerating attrition over the coming

105

EM Quality Assurance Centralized Training Platform Project Plan for 2009-2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE EM CENTRALIZED TRAINING PLATFORM PROJECT PLAN Prepared by: Date: Approved by: Date: Revision 0 Page 3 of 30 05/11/09 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) expertise in quality assurance (QA) has degraded significantly over the last 10 years due to workforce attrition and the lack of emphasis on QA principles. Since the 2007 establishment and subsequent implementation of the Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Improvement Initiative, the need for trained QA specialists and personnel familiar with the role of QA in integrated safety management and project management is becoming critical. As EM Field Offices struggle to identify sufficient resources to properly implement the EM Quality

106

Fluidizable particulate materials and methods of making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides fluidizable, substantially spherical particulate material of improved attrition resistance having an average particle size from about 100 to about 400 microns useful as sorbents, catalysts, catalytic supports, specialty ceramics or the like. The particles are prepared by spray drying a slurry comprising inorganic starting materials and an organic binder. Exemplary inorganic starting materials include mixtures of zinc oxide with titanium dioxide, or with iron oxide, alumina or the like. Exemplary organic binders include polyvinyl alcohol, hydroxypropylemethyl cellulose, polyvinyl acetate and the like. The spray dried particles are heat treated at a first temperature wherein organic binder material is removed to thereby provide a porous structure to the particles, and thereafter the particles are calcined at a higher temperature to cause reaction of the inorganic starting materials and to thereby form the final inorganic particulate material.

Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurement of normal contact stiffness of fractal rough surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effects of roughness and fractality on the normal contact stiffness of rough surfaces. Samples of isotropically roughened aluminium surfaces are considered. The roughness and fractal dimension were altered through blasting using different sized particles. Subsequently, surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) was applied to the surfaces in order to modify the surface at the microscale. The surface topology was characterised by interferometry based profilometry. The normal contact stiffness was measured through nanoindentation with a flat tip utilising the partial unloading method. We focus on establishing the relationships between surface stiffness and roughness, combined with the effects of fractal dimension. The experimental results, for a wide range of surfaces, showed that the measured contact stiffness depended very closely on surfaces' root mean squared (RMS) slope and their fractal dimension, with correlation coefficients of around 90\\%, whilst a relatively weak correlation coefficient of 57\\% was found between the contact stiffness and RMS roughness.

Chongpu Zhai; Sbastien Bevand; Yixiang Gan; Dorian Hanaor; Gwnalle Proust; Bruno Guelorget; Delphine Retraint

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

108

Syngas chemical looping gasification process: oxygen carrier particle selection and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syngas chemical looping (SCL) process coproduces hydrogen and electricity. The process involves reducing metal oxides with syngas followed by regeneration of reduced metal oxides with steam and air in a cyclic manner. Iron oxide is determined to be a desired oxygen carrier for hydrogen production considering overall properties including oxygen carrying capacity, thermodynamic properties, reaction kinetics, physical strength, melting points, and environmental effects. An iron oxide based particle can maintain good reactivity for more than 100 reduction-oxidation (redox) cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The particle exhibits a good crushing strength (>20 MPa) and low attrition rate. Fixed bed experiments are carried out which reaffirm its reactivity. More than 99.75% of syngas is converted during the reduction stage. During the regeneration stage, hydrogen with an average purity of 99.8% is produced. 23 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Fanxing Li; Hyung Ray Kim; Deepak Sridhar; Fei Wang; Liang Zeng; Joseph Chen; L.-S. Fan [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Processing and characterization of nanocrystalline molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work studied the effect nanocrystalline processing may have on mechanical properties of MoSi{sub 2} and the ease with which MoSi{sub 2} powder can be processed into a bulk shape. (MoSi{sub 2} presently is limited by poor strength above 1000 C and brittleness below DBTT.) This work studied cold and hot isostatic pressing (CIP, HIP). The attrited, CIPed, and HIPed samples were characterized by chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, microhardness, optical microscopy, and quantitative metallography (porosity, density). Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline MoSi{sub 2} was found to be a factor of two higher than conventional MoSi{sub 2} and the hardness of 1500 C-HIPed compacts were higher, as well. Modulus test showed the calculated elastic constants to be higher than the original Cerac material.

Haji-Mahmood, M.S.

1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

MTG fluidized bed reactorregenerator unit with catalyst circulation: process simulation and operation of an experimental setup  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of the MTG process carried out in a fluidized bed reactorregenerator system with catalyst circulation is studied by using the kinetic results obtained in an experimental unit. Data considered covered a wide range of operating conditions including temperature, space time and average residence times in both reactor and regenerator. This simulation is based on the use of adequate kinetic equations for the main MTG reaction, for the catalyst deactivation and for catalyst regeneration. In addition, a third stage in the process allowing for coke equilibration, prior to its combustion, is also included. Catalyst loss due to attrition has also been taken into account. An objective function based on relative production rate is optimized by changing systematically the process parameters such as temperature, space time and catalyst activity. Results are also validated in the experimental unit and demonstrate the simplicity of the reactorregenerator system with catalyst circulation and the versatility of this configuration for carrying out the MTG process.

Ana G. Gayubo; Jose M. Ortega; Andres T. Aguayo; Jose M. Arandes; Javier Bilbao

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

Peizheng Zhou

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 {mu}m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871{degrees}C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750{degrees}C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750{degrees}C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 [mu]m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871[degrees]C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750[degrees]C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750[degrees]C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

b21.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

HDD ... 11,788 9,521 6,904 4,275 Q 466 Q Q Table B21. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings...

115

Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO{sub 2} capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (5.1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (5.2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification; (5.3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratoryscale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability; and (5.4) the identification of kinetic data for copper-based oxygen carriers as well as the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material. Subtask 5.1 focused on the development of kinetic expressions for the Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) process and validating them with reported literature data. The kinetic expressions were incorporated into a process model for determination of reactor size and oxygen carrier circulation for the CLOU process using ASPEN PLUS. An ASPEN PLUS process model was also developed using literature data for the CLC process employing an iron-based oxygen carrier, and the results of the process model have been utilized to perform a relative economic comparison. In Subtask 5.2, the investigators studied the trade-off between modeling approaches and available simulations tools. They quantified uncertainty in the high-performance computing (HPC) simulation tools for CLC bed applications. Furthermore, they performed a sensitivity analysis for velocity, height and polydispersity and compared results against literature data for experimental studies of CLC beds with no reaction. Finally, they present an optimization space using simple non-reactive configurations. In Subtask 5.3, through a series of experimental studies, behavior of a variety of oxygen carriers with different loadings and manufacturing techniques was evaluated under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The influences of temperature, degree of carrier conversion and thermodynamic driving force resulting from the difference between equilibrium and system O{sub 2} partial pressures were evaluated through several experimental campaigns, and generalized models accounting for these influences were developed to describe oxidation and oxygen release. Conversion of three solid fuels with widely ranging reactivities was studied in a small fluidized bed system, and all but the least reactive fuel (petcoke) were rapidly converted by oxygen liberated from the CLOU carrier. Attrition propensity of a variety of carriers was also studied, and the carriers produced by freeze granulation or impregnation of preformed substrates displayed the lowest rates of attrition. Subtask 5.4 focused on gathering kinetic data for a copper-based oxygen carrier to assist with modeling of a functioning chemical looping reactor. The kinetics team was also responsible for the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material.

Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NOXSO: A no-waste emission control technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NOXSO Process is a dry, regenerable flue gas treatment system that simultaneously removes 90% of the SO{sub 2} and 70-90 % of the NO{sub x} from flue gas generated from the combustion of coal. The process has been successfully tested at small scale (0.017 MW) on high sulfur coal (2.5%) at the TVA Shawnee Steam Plant. The test results are contained in two U.S. Department of Energy reports. Tests of a NOXSO Process Development Unit (PDU, 0.75MW) were conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) under a cooperative research agreement between NOXSO and the Department of Energy (DOE). Testing in the adsorber was done by continuously feeding a batch of sorbent into a fluidized bed adsorber and collecting the spent sorbent from the adsorber overflow. Regeneration took place in a separate batch reactor. The test results were reported by Yeh et al. in 1987, and by Haslbeck et al. in 1988. A Life-Cycle Test Unit (LCTU, 0.06MW) was built at the PETC in 1988 to test the NOXSO Process in an integrated, continuous-operation mode. The LCTU test program was designed to determine long-term effects of the process on the sorbent reactivity and attrition properties. The sorbent was successfully tested for over 2000 hours on flue gas. The test results were published by Ma et al. in 1991, and by Yeh et al. in 1992. The POC test is the last test prior to the full-scale demonstration. The POC test will collect all of the information to design the full-scale NOXSO plant: e.g., data pertaining to materials of construction, process performance and cost, process safety, process control, sorbent activity, sorbent attrition, heat recovery, etc. The POC plant (5 MW) is located at Ohio Edison`s Toronto Station in Toronto, Ohio. Flue gas was first introduced to the plant on November 23, 1991. The current test results and process performance along with a summary of process economics are presented in this paper.

Bolli, R.E.; Woods, M.C. [NOXSO Corp., Library, PA (United States); Madden, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Build- ings*","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,1020,985,629,2011,64783,7843,16598,13211,27132 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,710,407,279,1155,6789,1782,1206,781,3021 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,157,226,133,374,6585,1177,1704,995,2710

118

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Year Constructed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Constructed Year Constructed Year Constructed More than one-third (37 percent) of the floorspace in commercial buildings was constructed since 1980 and more than one-half (55 percent) after 1969 (Figure 1). Less than one-third of floorspace was constructed before 1960. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Overall, relatively more buildings than floorspace were represented in the older age categories and more floorspace than buildings in the newer categories (see graphical comparison) because older buildings were smaller than more recently constructed buildings (Figure 2). Buildings constructed prior to 1960 were 11,700 square feet in size on average while those constructed after 1959 were 37 percent larger at 16,000 square feet per building.

119

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Build- ings*","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,663,523,498,2962,64783,4756,6850,8107,45071 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,452,262,258,1580,6789,1121,738,731,4198 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,107,112,99,570,6585,799,889,724,4173

120

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Not Lit a","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Build- ings*","Not Lit a","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,432,929,1108,2176,64783,3503,10203,18288,32789 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,304,524,540,1184,6789,777,1372,1482,3158 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,77,149,220,444,6585,558,1124,1671,3233

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

table9.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002; 1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite RSE NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0 0 0 0 0 311 Food 751 15,089 102,589.2 26,438 3.0 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 49 239,993.7 428 13.0 0 31131 Sugar 17 77 418,497.0 821 15.2 0

122

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

123

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

124

Impact of the life sciences on organisation and management of R&D in large pharmaceutical firms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The life sciences are having a significant impact on the organisation and management of R&D in large pharmaceutical firms, as well as restructuring the markets for new therapeutic products. However, there is continuing scepticism about large firms' ability or inclination to build in-house capacity for biologics and extract value from the life sciences. This paper explores the effect of life science innovation on early and late-stage R&D, and considers the implications for strategic management and the transition of compounds through the middle stages of the R&D pathway. The analysis, which includes two company case studies, reveals that new life science technologies have had a marginal impact on late-stage R&D, but companies are exploring new organisational or translational models to better exploit the science and reduce the phase 2 attrition rates. Findings suggest that firms have the capability to adapt to a new innovation trajectory, but external pressures on strategic and organisational management will continue to determine the level and rate of success.

James Mittra

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Determinants of physicians' career choices in Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Political and economic changes have created challenges for physician attrition rates in Ukraine. This study examined how a cross-section of Ukrainian physicians prioritised the factors hypothesised to influence decisions about continuing to work in medicine. A survey was conducted with 443 physicians in Ukraine. Latent class choice analysis (LCA) was used to model the heterogeneity in pair-wise comparisons of factors related to physician continued employment in medicine. The response rate was 70% (N = 310). Respondents, on average, were 45.4 years old, practiced 21.6 years. Four groups were identified on the basis of how they prioritised factors about work. Group 1 (47.7%) was 'culture-focused', group 2 (27.7%) was 'advancement-focused', group 3 (16.2%) was 'routinisation-focused', and group 4 (8.5%) was 'externally-focused'. The use of a person-centred analytical approach represents an alternative for examining career decision issues that should be considered for subgroups within the workforce.

Olena Mazurenko; Haiyan Qu; Olesya Hulchiy; S. Robert Hernandez; Richard Shewchuk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Novel Fast Pyrolysis/Catalytic Technology for the Production of Stable Upgraded Liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed research is the demonstration and development of a novel biomass pyrolysis technology for the production of a stable bio-oil. The approach is to carry out catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and upgrading together with pyrolysis in a single fluidized bed reactor with a unique two-level design that permits the physical separation of the two processes. The hydrogen required for the HDO will be generated in the catalytic section by the water-gas shift reaction employing recycled CO produced from the pyrolysis reaction itself. Thus, the use of a reactive recycle stream is another innovation in this technology. The catalysts will be designed in collaboration with BASF Catalysts LLC (formerly Engelhard Corporation), a leader in the manufacture of attrition-resistant cracking catalysts. The proposed work will include reactor modeling with state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics in a supercomputer, and advanced kinetic analysis for optimization of bio-oil production. The stability of the bio-oil will be determined by viscosity, oxygen content, and acidity determinations in real and accelerated measurements. A multi-faceted team has been assembled to handle laboratory demonstration studies and computational analysis for optimization and scaleup.

Ted Oyama, Foster Agblevor, Francine Battaglia, Michael Klein

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Performance of a low-cost iron ore as an oxygen carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion of gaseous fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work evaluates the performance of an iron ore, mainly composed of Fe2O3, as an oxygen carrier (OC) for Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) with gaseous fuels. The OC was characterized by TGA and evaluated in a continuous 500Wth CLC unit, using CH4, syngas and a PSA off-gas as fuels. The OC was able to fully convert syngas at 880C. However, lower conversion rates were observed with methane-containing fuels. The addition of a Ni-based OC was evaluated in order to increase the reactivity of the OC with methane. In spite of this, an absence of catalytic effect was observed for the Ni-based OC. A deep analysis was carried out into the reasons for the absence of catalytic effect of the Ni-based OC. The performance of the iron ore with regard to attrition and fluidization behaviour was satisfactory throughout 50h of hot operation in the continuous CLC plant. Thus, this low cost material is a suitable OC for gaseous fuels mainly composed of H2 and CO.

Miguel A. Pans; Pilar Gayn; Luis F. de Diego; Francisco Garca-Labiano; Alberto Abad; Juan Adnez.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Nuclear Education and Staffing Challenge: Rebuilding Critical Skills in Nuclear Science and Technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Laboratories, including the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are facing a serious attrition of nuclear scientists and engineers and their capabilities through the effects of aging staff. Within the DOE laboratories, 75% of nuclear personnel will be eligible to retire by 2010. It is expected that there will be a significant loss of senior nuclear science and technology staff at PNNL within five years. PNNL's nuclear legacy is firmly rooted in the DOE Hanford site, the World War II Manhattan Project, and subsequent programs. Historically, PNNL was a laboratory where 70% of its activities were nuclear/radiological, and now just under 50% of its current business science and technology are nuclear and radiologically oriented. Programs in the areas of Nuclear Legacies, Global Security, Nonproliferation, Homeland Security and National Defense, Radiobiology and Nuclear Energy still involve more than 1,000 of the 3,800 current laboratory staff, and these include more than 420 staff who are certified as nuclear/radiological scientists and engineers. This paper presents the current challenges faced by PNNL that require an emerging strategy to solve the nuclear staffing issues through the maintenance and replenishment of the human nuclear capital needed to support PNNL nuclear science and technology programs.

Wogman, Ned A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Waltar, Alan E.; Leber, R. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Additional wet milling step for fractionation of barley flour after hull separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel ethanol production from barley is increasing and there is a need to develop more efficient production processes. In the conventional ethanol production process, the hulls (fiber) in barley do not get fermented. The objective of this study is to evaluate a wet fractionation method, similar to the one used in corn wet milling in the endosperm fiber separation step, on the flour remaining after hull separation from barley in order to increase the starch content of barley flour. Hulls were separated from hammer milled barley flour using a combination of sieving and air classification. The remaining flour was soaked in water and the slurry was ground using an attrition mill. The cell wall material was screened out from the fine slurry. The fermentation material produced by hull separation followed by wet fractionation comprised 80.9% by weight of the original flour and contained 10.1% higher starch and 7.9% lower fiber (neutral detergent fiber; NDF) contents than the original flour. The cell wall coproduct has potential as a functional food ingredient because it has high fiber (NDF of 42.7%), high beta-glucan (4.5%) and high protein (20.2%) contents. The increase in starch content may be beneficial in fuel ethanol production.

Radhakrishnan Srinivasan; Kaleb Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Bubbling bed catalytic hydropyrolysis process utilizing larger catalyst particles and smaller biomass particles featuring an anti-slugging reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for thermochemically transforming biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks into high quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels. In particular, a catalytic hydropyrolysis reactor, containing a deep bed of fluidized catalyst particles is utilized to accept particles of biomass or other oxygenated feedstocks that are significantly smaller than the particles of catalyst in the fluidized bed. The reactor features an insert or other structure disposed within the reactor vessel that inhibits slugging of the bed and thereby minimizes attrition of the catalyst. Within the bed, the biomass feedstock is converted into a vapor-phase product, containing hydrocarbon molecules and other process vapors, and an entrained solid char product, which is separated from the vapor stream after the vapor stream has been exhausted from the top of the reactor. When the product vapor stream is cooled to ambient temperatures, a significant proportion of the hydrocarbons in the product vapor stream can be recovered as a liquid stream of hydrophobic hydrocarbons, with properties consistent with those of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel. Separate streams of gasoline, kerosene, and diesel fuel may also be obtained, either via selective condensation of each type of fuel, or via later distillation of the combined hydrocarbon liquid.

Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Staining of in vivo subsurface degradation in dental composites with silver nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously reported technique for staining areas of degradation in dental composite restorations was evaluated in 51 removed restorations. The staining reagent was silver nitrate, which penetrated the degraded subsurface as ionic silver and was subsequently developed into colored deposits of metallic silver. Several artefacts were recognized that resulted in an apparent image of subsurface stain. Most importantly, the presence of a layer of adsorbed silver on the edge of the specimen exaggerated the extent of staining. In order for the true depth of stain to be determined, thin sections of the materials should first be examined with a stereomicroscope to distinguish any contribution from adsorbed silver on the specimen edge. With this regimen, no stain was present in 41% of the restorations, and in a further 30%, the depth of stain was less than 50 microns. In two composites, the depth of stain was greater than 900 microns, and in a number of specimens, localized stain was found in association with attrition scars. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated that the amount of silver present in the degraded layers was very small. Overall, the results indicated that the staining technique is useful in the study of composite degradation.

Mair, L.H. (Univ. of Liverpool (England))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Chemical pore closure of zeolite A using tetraethyl orthosilicate: A potential method for enhancing the use of zeolites as part of a long-term waste immobilization strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of zeolites as an integral part of long-term toxic waste storage strategies are hindered by the very ion-exchange properties which make them so useful in cleaning waste water of toxic contaminants. Previous literature shows that a range of surface modifications have been proposed for changing the catalytic properties of zeolites, this study examines one of these techniques, the control of pore opening size by coating the zeolite surface with silica using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), as a means of reducing ion-exchange. After initial removal of waste material from solution, pores are sealed using liquid TEOS at 80 C, and the ion exchange is remeasured in comparison to a sample of untreated zeolite. Sealing the surface with a silica deposit has yielded up to 95% reduction in waste leached from the zeolite without significant reduction in the overall crystallinity of the material. The stability of the coating against physical abrasion has also been studied and been shown to be resistant to simple attrition forces.

Christopher D. Johnson; Fred Worrall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Impact assessment: Eroding benefits through streamlining?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper argues that Governments have sought to streamline impact assessment in recent years (defined as the last five years) to counter concerns over the costs and potential for delays to economic development. We hypothesise that this has had some adverse consequences on the benefits that subsequently accrue from the assessments. This hypothesis is tested using a framework developed from arguments for the benefits brought by Environmental Impact Assessment made in 1982 in the face of the UK Government opposition to its implementation in a time of economic recession. The particular benefits investigated are consistency and fairness, early warning, environment and development, and public involvement. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Western Australia are the jurisdictions tested using this framework. The conclusions indicate that significant streamlining has been undertaken which has had direct adverse effects on some of the benefits that impact assessment should deliver, particularly in Canada and the UK. The research has not examined whether streamlining has had implications for the effectiveness of impact assessment, but the causal link between streamlining and benefits does sound warning bells that merit further investigation. -- Highlights: Investigation of the extent to which government has streamlined IA. Evaluation framework was developed based on benefits of impact assessment. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Western Australia were examined. Trajectory in last five years is attrition of benefits of impact assessment.

Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom) [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [Integral Sustainability (Australia) [Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute (Australia); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa) [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa)] [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Gunn, Jill A.E., E-mail: jill.gunn@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning and School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

42nd Annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The eleven-year trend of attrition in the US rig fleet slowed significantly this year as only 12 rigs, or less than 1%, left the available fleet. The number of rotary rigs available for drilling in the US now stands at 1,841. but for the 42-year history of the Reed Tool Co. Rotary Rig Census, the 1973 available rig count of 1,767 remains the record low for yet another year. The count of rigs active during the 45-day census period also declined since last year's census. The active count was down 4.5% to 1,221 from 1,279 in 1993. As a consequence, rig utilization fell to 66.3% in 1994, from 69.0% last year. Notably, a strong shift to gas from oil drilling has occurred. Of the 1,221 rigs active in the census period, 540 were drilling for gas on the last well vs. 356 drilling for oil. Compared to last year, this is an increase in gas drilling of 29% and a decrease in oil drilling 22%. (Rigs targeting both oil and gas totaled 325 in 1994.)

Stokes, T.A.; Rodriquez, M.R. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

36th annual Reed rig census  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the sixth straight year, the number of rigs available in the U.S. declined. Five hundred and seventy-nine rotary rigs dropped out of drilling industry competition during the past 12 months as attrition forced rig supply closer toward balance with demand. Significant highlights of this year's census are: The U.S. rig fleet now stands at 2,752 drilling rigs, a 17.4% reduction from the census count in 1987. This is the largest percentage decline and the third largest absolute decline in available rigs in census history; The 1988 census active count was 1,532 rigs, up 10% over 1987; The 1988 census utilization rate was 55.7%, up from the 41.7% reported last year and a 110% improvement over the all-time low of 26.3% in 1986; Every region in the country reported a reduction in total available rigs. Each region also reported an increase in the active ring count with the exception of Ark-La-Tex; California had the highest utilization rate in the census (63.9%), and all regions reported a utilization rate greater than 50% with the exception of Ark-La-Tex, which reported a 45.5% rate; The number of rig owners declined 12% from 691 to 608. The decline in available rigs would have been greater, but owners brought back 226 rigs that had been dropped from previous census tabulations.

Fitts, R.L.; Crowhurst, M.E. (Reed Tool Co., Houston, TX (US))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Preliminary design and assessment of circulating-bed boilers. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The circulating bed boiler (CBB) represents an alternative, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) technology which offers distinct advantages over both the current FBC systems, and pulverized-coal boilers with scrubbers. This report describes the findings of a study undertaken to evaluate these advantages. The information obtained made it possible to identify potential CBB design and operating problems and to propose further plans for developing this technology. Several significant determinations resulted from the study. The circulating bed boiler capital costs should not exceed the cost for a conventional atmospheric fluid bed combustor, primarily due to the reduced combustor size; however, any cost advantage for a pressurized circulating bed boiler is questionable. Overall efficiency for an electric utility power plant using an atmospheric CBB should be increased by at least 1% over using a pulverized-coal boiler and the increase would be at least 3% using a pressurized CBB. The circulating bed boiler has several of the advantages of an FBC over pulverized coal, and in addition, it has turndown capabilities, greater throughput, and simplified feeding. Both the atmospheric and the pressurized CBB's can be designed with technology currently available in the process industry, but only after additional study and development has been completed for cyclones, pollution control, solids attrition, feed systems, and combustion reactions. Pilot plant studies are required for these investigations.

Fraley, L.D.; Hsiao, K.H.; Do, L.N.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 8. Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",67338,65753,65716,45525,13285,5891,2750,6290,2322 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,6309,6280,3566,620,"Q","Q",635,292 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7721,7721,5088,583,"Q","Q",986,"Q"

140

Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc" ,,"Total Floorspacea","Heated Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Cooled Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Lit Floorspaceb" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,53812,58474,42420,64085,54696 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,5055,4879,3958,5859,4877 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,5744,6212,4333,7421,5583 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,8196,9530,6195,10358,8251

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Heating Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Heating Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,8814,19615,12545,5166,20423,18021,3262 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,685,2902,1047,"Q",461,1159,330 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,462,2891,1282,"Q",773,1599,"Q"

142

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

12.0 Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 Q Q N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

143

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

144

TableHC14.5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

145

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

146

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

147

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

148

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

149

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

150

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

151

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

152

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

153

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

154

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

155

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

156

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

157

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

158

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

159

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

160

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

162

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

163

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ......

164

Strategies for Local Low-Carbon Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zero net energy for all residential construction by 2020 andnet zero energy buildings by 2013 in Ireland, 75% NZEBs ( at 2006 stock of floorspace) by 2020

Zhou, Nan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

166

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

167

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

168

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

169

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

170

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

171

--No Title--  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

172

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

173

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

174

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

175

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

176

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

177

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

178

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

179

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

180

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

182

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings. Since they comprised 7 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their energy intensity was slightly above average. Lodging buildings were one of the few...

183

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

184

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

185

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

186

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

187

Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1999" B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings ................",67338,3735,8625,11205,5556,11001,5220,7264,4579,10152 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,287,614,1186,648,1006,514,1015,493,1009 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,287,1015,1480,566,1430,644,983,612,1222

188

Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,1477,116,64783,24735,6604 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,771,"Q",6789,2009,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,259,"Q",6585,1912,"Q"

189

b31pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace Floorspace a Heated Floorspace b Total Floorspace a Cooled Floorspace b Total Floorspace a Lit Floorspace b All Buildings ............................................... 67,338 61,602 53,812 58,474 42,420 64,085 54,696 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 5,684 5,055 4,879 3,958 5,859 4,877 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 7,090 5,744 6,212 4,333 7,421 5,583 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,865 8,196 9,530 6,195 10,358 8,251 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 8,565 7,439 8,116 5,767 8,986 7,528 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 10,112 9,597 8,676 9,401 6,817 9,970 8,753 100,001 to 200,000 ......................................

190

ENGINEERING A NEW MATERIAL FOR HOT GAS CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project was to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas with the sorbent being in the form of small pellets made with a layered structure such that each pellet consists of a highly reactive lime core enclosed within a porous protective shell of strong but relatively inert material. The sorbent can be very useful for hot gas cleanup in advanced power generation systems where problems have been encountered with presently available materials. An economical method of preparing the desired material was demonstrated with a laboratory-scale revolving drum pelletizer. Core-in-shell pellets were produced by first pelletizing powdered limestone or other calcium-bearing material to make the pellet cores, and then the cores were coated with a mixture of powdered alumina and limestone to make the shells. The core-in-shell pellets were subsequently calcined at 1373 K (1100 C) to sinter the shell material and convert CaCO{sub 3} to CaO. The resulting product was shown to be highly reactive and a very good sorbent for H{sub 2}S at temperatures in the range of 1113 to 1193 K (840 to 920 C) which corresponds well with the outlet temperatures of some coal gasifiers. The product was also shown to be both strong and attrition resistant, and that it can be regenerated by a cyclic oxidation and reduction process. A preliminary evaluation of the material showed that while it was capable of withstanding repeated sulfidation and regeneration, the reactivity of the sorbent tended to decline with usage due to CaO sintering. Also it was found that the compressive strength of the shell material depends on the relative proportions of alumina and limestone as well as their particle size distributions. Therefore, an extensive study of formulation and preparation conditions was conducted to improve the performance of both the core and shell materials. It was subsequently determined that MgO tends to stabilize the high-temperature reactivity of CaO. Therefore, a sorbent prepared from dolomite withstands the effects of repeated sulfidation and regeneration better than one prepared from limestone. It was also determined that both the compressive strength and attrition resistance of core-in-shell pellets depend on shell thickness and that the compressive strength can be improved by reducing both the particle size and amount of limestone in the shell preparation mixture. A semiempirical model was also found which seems to adequately represent the absorption process. This model can be used for analyzing and predicting sorbent performance, and, therefore, it can provide guidance for any additional development which may be required. In conclusion, the overall objective of developing an economical, reusable, and practical material was largely achieved. The material appears suitable for removing CO{sub 2} from fuel combustion products as well as for desulfurizing hot coal gas.

T.D. Wheelock; L.K. Doraiswamy; K.P. Constant

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLUTONIUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE (NTS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL) was contracted by the National Energy Technology Center to evaluate technologies that might be used to reduce the volume of plutonium-contaminated soil at the Nevada Test Site. The project has been systematically approached. A thorough review and summary was completed for: (1) The NTS soil geological, geochemical and physical characteristics; (2) The characteristics and chemical form of the plutonium that is in these soils; (3) Previous volume reduction technologies that have been attempted on the NTS soils; (4) Vendors with technology that may be applicable; and (5) Related needs at other DOE sites. Soils from the Nevada Test Site were collected and delivered to the CETL. Soils were characterized for Pu-239/240, Am-241 and gross alpha. In addition, wet sieving and the subsequent characterization were performed on soils before and after attrition scrubbing to determine the particle size distribution and the distribution of Pu-239/240 and gross alpha as a function of particle size. Sequential extraction was performed on untreated soil to provide information about how tightly bound the plutonium was to the soil. Magnetic separation was performed to determine if this could be useful as part of a treatment approach. Using the information obtained from these reviews, three vendors were selected to demonstration their volume reduction technologies at the CETL. Two of the three technologies, bioremediation and soil washing, met the performance criteria. Both were able to significantly reduce the concentration plutonium in the soil from around 1100 pCi/g to 200 pCi/g or less with a volume reduction of around 95%, well over the target 70%. These results are especially encouraging because they indicate significant improvement over that obtained in these earlier pilot and field studies. Additional studies are recommended.

Steve Hoeffner

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60[degree]C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO[sub 4] in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Progress report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminated or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. This facility is presently called the Femald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Carbonate extractions generally removed from 70 to 90% of the uranium from the Fernald storage pad soil. Uranium was slightly more difficult to extract from the Fernald incinerator and the Y-12 landfarm soils. Very small amounts of uranium could be extracted from the storm sewer sediment. Extraction with carbonate at high solution-to-soil ratios were as effective as extractions at low solution-to-soil ratios, indicating attrition by the paddle mixer was not significantly different than that provided in a rotary extractor. Also, pretreatments such as milling or pulverizing the soil sample did not appear to increase extraction efficiency when carbonate extractions were carried out at elevated temperatures (60{degree}C) or long extraction times (23 h). Adding KMnO{sub 4} in the carbonate extraction appeared to increase extraction efficiency from the Fernald incinerator soil but not the Fernald storage pad soil. The most effective leaching rates (> 90 % from both Fernald soils) were obtained using a citrate/dithionite extraction procedure designed to remove amorphous (noncrystalline) iron/aluminum sesquioxides from surfaces of clay minerals. Citric acid also proved to be a very good extractant for uranium.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Carbon dioxide sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution has caused concerns about global warming. Fossil-fuel-fired power plants contribute approximately one third of the total human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide. Increased efficiency of these power plants will have a large impact on carbon dioxide emissions, but additional measures will be needed to slow or stop the projected increase in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. By accelerating the naturally occurring carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals it is possible to sequester carbon dioxide in the geologically stable mineral magnesite (MgCO3). The carbonation of two classes of magnesium silicate minerals, olivine (Mg2SiO4) and serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4), was investigated in an aqueous process. The slow natural geologic process that converts both of these minerals to magnesite can be accelerated by increasing the surface area, increasing the activity of carbon dioxide in the solution, introducing imperfections into the crystal lattice by high-energy attrition grinding, and in the case of serpentine, by thermally activating the mineral by removing the chemically bound water. The effect of temperature is complex because it affects both the solubility of carbon dioxide and the rate of mineral dissolution in opposing fashions. Thus an optimum temperature for carbonation of olivine is approximately 185 degrees C and 155 degrees C for serpentine. This paper will elucidate the interaction of these variables and use kinetic studies to propose a process for the sequestration of the carbon dioxide.

Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

TESTING IN SITU ASSEMBLY WITH THE KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATE SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a Monte Carlo model for the structure of low-mass (total mass <25 M{sub ?}) planetary systems that form by the in situ gravitational assembly of planetary embryos into final planets. Our model includes distributions of mass, eccentricity, inclination, and period spacing that are based on the simulation of a disk of 20 M{sub ?}, forming planets around a solar-mass star, and assuming a power-law surface density distribution that drops with distance a as ? a {sup 1.5}. The output of the Monte Carlo model is then subjected to the selection effects that mimic the observations of a transiting planet search such as that performed by the Kepler satellite. The resulting comparison of the output to the properties of the observed sample yields an encouraging agreement in terms of the relative frequencies of multiple-planet systems and the distribution of the mutual inclinations when moderate tidal circularization is taken into account. The broad features of the period distribution and radius distribution can also be matched within this framework, although the model underpredicts the distribution of small period ratios. This likely indicates that some dissipation is still required in the formation process. The most striking deviation between the model and observations is in the ratio of single to multiple systems in that there are roughly 50% more single-planet candidates observed than are produced in any model population. This suggests that some systems must suffer additional attrition to reduce the number of planets or increase the range of inclinations.

Hansen, Brad M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Murray, Norm, E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: murray@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Use Tables Buildings Use Tables (24 pages, 129 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 12. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 13. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1995 Table 14. Weekly Operating Hours, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 15. Weekly Operating Hours, Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 17. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Other a " "All Buildings* ...............",64783,63343,63307,43468,15157,5443,2853,7076,1401 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6362,6346,3084,600,"Q","Q",806,199 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6212,6197,3692,716,"Q","Q",725,"Q"

202

Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings" ,,"Nongov- ernment- Owned Buildings","Owner Occupied","Nonowner Occupied","Unocc- upied","Govern- ment- Owned Buildings","Federal","State","Local" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,49421,23591,23914,1916,15363,1956,3808,9599 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6043,2682,3162,199,746,"Q",206,498 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5827,2858,2791,"Q",758,"Q","Q",620

203

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities All Buildings* Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities All Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 1,477 116 64,783 24,735 6,604 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 771 Q 6,789 2,009 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 259 Q 6,585 1,912 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 263 33 11,535 4,158 520 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 92 18 8,668 3,277 630

204

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","One Floor","Two Floors","Three Floors","Four to Nine Floors","Ten or More Floors","All Build- ings*","One Floor","Two Floors","Three Floors","Four to Nine Floors","Ten or More Floors" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3136,1031,339,128,12,64783,25981,16270,7501,10085,4947 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2014,411,115,"Q","N",6789,5192,1217,343,"Q","N"

205

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

206

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

207

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A2. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A2. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","North east","Mid- west ","South","West","All Buildings","North- east","Mid- west","South","West" "All Buildings ................",4859,761,1305,1873,920,71658,13995,18103,26739,12820 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2586,374,728,985,499,6922,1059,1908,2618,1337 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",948,155,228,386,179,7033,1169,1676,2844,1343 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",810,138,211,308,152,12659,2122,3317,4859,2361

208

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" . Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Worker","Median Hours per Week","Median Age of Buildings (years)" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,64783,72807,4.6,1000,50,30.5 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,6789,9936,2.4,750,48,30.5 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,6585,7512,7.2,1300,50,30.5 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,11535,10787,15,1611,55,28.5

209

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,12208,3939,1090,3754,4050,10078 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,1382,336,122,416,1034,895 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,938,518,"Q",744,722,868 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,1887,1077,"Q",1235,1021,2064 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,1506,301,"Q",930,560,1043

210

North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings ................",71658,3452,10543,12424,5680,13999,3719,9022,4207,8613 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6922,383,676,986,922,1283,547,788,466,871 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7033,369,800,939,738,1468,420,957,465,878

211

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 0. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,45144,10960,1958,1951,2609,2161 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5613,916,"Q","Q","N",223 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5304,1031,"Q","N","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,9098,1732,383,"Q","Q","Q"

212

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

213

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Geographic Location Tables Geographic Location Tables (24 pages, 136kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1995 Table 6. Climate Zone, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 7. Metropolitan Status, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

214

Released: October 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A8. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",71658,45144,12565,3358,3369,5060,2161 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6922,5613,1028,"Q","Q","N",223 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7033,5304,1383,"Q","N","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",12659,9098,2259,839,227,"Q","Q"

215

Buildings","Year Constructed"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B9. Year Constructed, Floorspace, 1999" B9. Year Constructed, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Year Constructed" ,,"1919 or Before","1920 to 1945","1946 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999" "All Buildings ................",67338,4034,6445,9127,10866,11840,13931,11094 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,655,798,1025,928,1056,1153,1159 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,791,776,1777,1165,1392,1150,1188 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,972,1504,1488,1267,2045,2767,1110 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,489,673,1343,1987,1587,1594,1638

216

Compare All CBECS Activities: Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Building Size By Building Size Compare Activities by ... Building Size Total Floorspace by Building Type There was approximately 67.3 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. in 1999. Because there are many of them, office buildings comprised the largest amount of commercial floorspace. Figure showing total floorspace by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Square Feet per Building by Building Type Inpatient health buildings were by far the largest building type, on average, while food service and food sales buildings were the smallest. Figure showing square feet per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Establishments per Building by Building Type

217

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

218

Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incand- escent","Standard Fluor- escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,38528,59688,27571,20643,17703 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,2918,5579,1123,312,604 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,3061,5726,1109,686,781 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,6424,10458,2944,1721,1973

219

Central Air Conditioners","Heat Pumps","Individual Air Conditioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Packaged  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Cooled Buildings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Residential-Type Central Air Conditioners","Heat Pumps","Individual Air Conditioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Packaged Air Conditioning Units","Swamp Coolers","Other" "All Buildings ................",67338,58474,8329,9147,14276,2750,12909,36527,2219,1312 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,4879,890,700,962,"Q","Q",2613,253,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,6212,1606,707,1396,"Q","Q",3197,181,"Q"

220

Total U.S. Housing Units.................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Have But Do Not Use Equipment... 0.8 Q Q Q Q 0.3 Q N Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

b33.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Propane Elec- tricity Natural Gas Propane All Buildings* ... 4,645 801 410 457 108 64,783 22,237 13,161 15,438 1,460 Building Floorspace (Square...

222

1990 RECS Public Use Microdata Files  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: Structural Characteristics of the Dwelling text.gif cvs file File 2: Floorspace Measurement Variables text file cvs file File 3: Equipment Variables text file cvs file File 4:...

223

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

224

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace...

225

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

226

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

227

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

228

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace...

229

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 2003 Floorspace and Energy Consumption for Hotels and MotelsInns (1) Hotels MotelsInns Average Electricity Consumption(kBtusSF): 61.3 40.5 Average Natural Gas...

230

Description of 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables and Categories of Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

floorspace heated, cooled, and lit, and energy-using equipment types (heating, cooling, water heating, lighting, and refrigeration). Tables C1-C12 and C1A-C12A contain energy usage...

231

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Heating Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,8923,14449,17349,5534,19522,25743,4073 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,679,2271,1183,"Q",463,1779,250 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,745,2848,1350,"Q",1040,2301,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,1288,3047,3021,307,2047,3994,401

232

Any Refrig-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Any Refrig- eration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Commercial Refrigeration",,,,"Other Refrigeration " ,,,"Any","Walk-In Units","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets","Resid- ential- Type Units","Vending Machines" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,52974,26768,20254,10425,17218,38884,35335 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,4333,1310,916,366,935,3174,830 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,4738,1406,909,497,894,3609,1407

233

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" . Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Worker","Mean Hours per Week" "All Buildings*.......",4645,64783,72807,13.9,890,61 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,6789,9936,2.7,683,57 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,6585,7512,7.4,877,61 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,11535,10787,15.6,1069,67 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,8668,8881,35.9,976,72

234

,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5859,2946,5154,738,245,600 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7464,4047,6722,1108,663,991 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,10393,6055,9815,1759,1701,1996 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,9053,5004,8344,2296,2224,1611

235

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

236

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 5. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Not Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Build- ings* Not Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 1,020 985 629 2,011 64,783 7,843 16,598 13,211 27,132 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 710 407 279 1,155 6,789 1,782 1,206 781 3,021 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 157 226 133 374 6,585 1,177 1,704 995 2,710 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 109 225 126 277 11,535 1,612 3,517 2,034 4,372

237

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 663 523 498 2,962 64,783 4,756 6,850 8,107 45,071 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 452 262 258 1,580 6,789 1,121 738 731 4,198 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 107 112 99 570 6,585 799 889 724 4,173 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 79 107 89 463 11,535 1,148 1,742 1,420 7,225

238

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 6. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Not Lit a 1 to 50 Percent Lit 51 to 99 Percent Lit 100 Percent Lit All Build- ings* Not Lit a 1 to 50 Percent Lit 51 to 99 Percent Lit 100 Percent Lit All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 432 929 1,108 2,176 64,783 3,503 10,203 18,288 32,789 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 304 524 540 1,184 6,789 777 1,372 1,482 3,158 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 77 149 220 444 6,585 558 1,124 1,671 3,233 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 28 184 203 323 11,535 373 2,810 3,179 5,173

239

1992 CBECS BC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings 4. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) RSE Row Factor All Buildings Not Heated Less than 51 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Buildings Total Heated Floorspace in All Buildings Not Heated Less than 51 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated 0.6 1.6 1.2 1.1 0.7 0.6 0.6 2.2 1.6 1.2 0.7 All Buildings ................................... 4,806 653 688 618 2,846 67,876 51,200 6,211 11,195 10,211 40,260 5.6 Building Floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,681 448 340 294 1,600 7,327 5,281 1,150 1,014 844 4,319 7.2 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 975 99 156 152 568 7,199

240

Rotating machinery dynamics simulation. I. Rigid systems with ball bearing nonlinearities and outer ring ovality under rotating unbalance excitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radial clearance in rolling bearing systems required to compensate for dimensional changes associated with thermal expansion of the various parts during operation may cause dimensional attrition and comprise bearing life if unloaded operation occurs and balls skid [D. Childs and D. Moyer ASME J. Eng. Gas Turb. Power 107 152159 (1985)]. Also it can cause jumps in the response to unbalance excitation. These undesirable effects may be eliminated by introducing two or more loops into one of the bearing races so that at least two points of the ring circumference provide a positive zero clearance [D. Childs Handbook of Rotordynamics edited by F. Ehrich (McGraw-Hill NY 1992)]. The deviation of the outer ring with two loops known as ovality is one of the bearing distributed defects. Although this class of imperfections has received much work none of the available studies has simulated the effect of the outer ring ovality on the dynamic behavior of rotating machinery under rotating unbalance with consideration of ball bearing nonlinearities shaft elasticity and speed of rotation. To fill this gap the equations of motion of a rotorball bearing system are formulated using finite-elements (FE) discretization and Lagranges equations. The analyses are specialized to a rigid-rotor system by retaining the rigid body modes only in the FE solution. Samples of the results are presented in both time domain and frequency domain for a system with and without outer ring ovality. It is found that with ideal bearings (no ovality) the vibration spectrum is qualitatively and quantitatively the same in both the horizontal and vertical directions. When the ring ovality is introduced however the spectrum in both orthogonal planes is no longer similar. And magnitude of the bearing load has increased in the form of repeated random impacts between balls and rings in the horizontal direction (direction of maximum clearance) compared to a continuous contact along the vertical direction (direction of positive zero clearance). This underlines the importance of the vibration measuring probes direction with respect to the outer ring axes to capture impact-induced vibrations. Moreover when the harmonic excitation is increased for a system with ideal bearings the spectral peaks above forcing frequency have shifted to a higher-frequency region indicating some sort of a hard spring mechanism inherent in the system. Another observation is that for the same external excitation vibration amplitude at forcing frequency in the bearing force spectrum is the same for systems with or without outer ring ovality.

Fawzi M. A. El-Saeidy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Recovery Act: Novel Oxygen Carriers for Coal-fueled Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) could totally negate the necessity of pure oxygen by using oxygen carriers for purification of CO{sub 2} stream during combustion. It splits the single fuel combustion reaction into two linked reactions using oxygen carriers. The two linked reactions are the oxidation of oxygen carriers in the air reactor using air, and the reduction of oxygen carriers in the fuel reactor using fuels (i.e. coal). Generally metal/metal oxides are used as oxygen carriers and operated in a cyclic mode. Chemical looping combustion significantly improves the energy conversion efficiency, in terms of the electricity generation, because it improves the reversibility of the fuel combustion process through two linked parallel processes, compared to the conventional combustion process, which is operated far away from its thermo-equilibrium. Under the current carbon-constraint environment, it has been a promising carbon capture technology in terms of fuel combustion for power generation. Its disadvantage is that it is less mature in terms of technological commercialization. In this DOE-funded project, accomplishment is made by developing a series of advanced copper-based oxygen carriers, with properties of the higher oxygen-transfer capability, a favorable thermodynamics to generate high purity of CO{sub 2}, the higher reactivity, the attrition-resistance, the thermal stability in red-ox cycles and the achievement of the auto-thermal heat balance. This will be achieved into three phases in three consecutive years. The selected oxygen carriers with final-determined formula were tested in a scaled-up 10kW coal-fueled chemical looping combustion facility. This scaled-up evaluation tests (2-day, 8-hour per day) indicated that, there was no tendency of agglomeration of copper-based oxygen carriers. Only trace-amount of coke or carbon deposits on the copper-based oxygen carriers in the fuel reactor. There was also no evidence to show the sulphidization of oxygen carriers in the system by using the high-sulfur-laden asphalt fuels. In all, the scaled-up test in 10 kW CLC facility demonstrated that the preparation method of copper-based oxygen carrier not only help to maintain its good reactivity, also largely minimize its agglomeration tendency.

Pan, Wei-Ping; Cao, Yan

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 7. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Floorspace in All Buildings* Heated Buildings Cooled Buildings Lit Buildings c Total Floor- space a Heated Floor- space b Total Floor- space a Cooled Floor- space b Total Floor- space a Lit Floor- space b All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 60,028 53,473 56,940 41,788 62,060 51,342 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,668 4,988 5,007 4,017 6,038 4,826 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,786 5,010 5,408 3,978 6,090 4,974 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 10,387 8,865 9,922 6,927 11,229 8,618 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,060 7,260 7,776 5,663 8,297 6,544

243

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Commercial Floorspace and Number of Buildings, by Year 1980 50.9 (1) N.A. 3.1 (3) 1990 64.3 N.A. 4.5 (3) 2000 (4) 68.5 N.A. 4.7 (5) 2008 78.8 15% N.A. 2010 81.1 26% N.A. 2015 84.1 34% N.A. 2020 89.2 43% N.A. 2025 93.9 52% N.A. 2030 98.2 60% N.A. 2035 103.0 68% N.A. Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127-128 for 2000 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A5, p. 11-12 for 2008-2035 floorspace; EIA Commercial Building Characteristics 1989, June 1991, Table A4, p. 17 for 1990 number of buildings; EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 1999, Aug. 2002, Table 3 for 1999 number of buildings and floorspace; and EIA, Buildings and Energy in the 1980s, June 1995, Table 2.1, p. 23 for number of buildings in 1980.

244

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conservation Tables Conservation Tables (16 pages, 86 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 41. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 42. Building Shell Conservation Features, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 43. Building Shell Conservation Features, Floorspace, 1995 Table 44. Reduction in Equipment Use During Off Hours, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

245

Buildings","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B7. Building Size, Floorspace, 1999" B7. Building Size, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",67338,6774,8238,11153,9311,10112,8271,6851,6628 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",8651,338,444,883,1803,2144,1484,1311,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",994,302,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

246

b34.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 178 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 663 523 498 2,962 64,783 4,756 6,850 8,107 45,071 Table B34. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 570 353 292 1,921 25,981 3,237 3,336 2,534 16,875 Two ................................................... 1,031 70 135 111 714 16,270 862 2,027 1,643 11,739 Three ................................................

247

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

248

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 451 15,157 34 222 1,602 1,776 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 209 600 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 99 716 7 36 261 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 61 966 16 27 196 232 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 22 825 38 16 117 127 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 23 1,740 76 26 188 203

249

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

250

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

251

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 7. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 67 5,443 81 634 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

252

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

253

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structure Tables Structure Tables (16 pages, 93 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 8. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 9. Building Size, Floorspace, 1995 Table 10. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 11. Year Constructed, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. The 1995 data are available for the four Census

254

Buildings","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",71658,6922,7033,12659,9382,10291,10217,7494,7660 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",9874,409,399,931,1756,2690,2167,1420,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",1255,409,356,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

255

Buildings*","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,6789,6585,11535,8668,9057,9064,7176,5908 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",9874,409,399,931,1756,2690,2167,1420,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",1255,409,356,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

256

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Water Heating","Type of Water Heating Equipment",,,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Water Heating","Type of Water Heating Equipment" ,,,"Central- ized System","Distrib- uted System","Combin- ation Central- ized and Distrib- uted Systems",,,"Central- ized System","Distrib- uted System","Combin- ation Central- ized and Distrib- uted Systems" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,2513,785,175,64783,56478,34671,11540,10267

257

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half Bathroom 0 | Dishwasher Windows | Color Televisions 3 Area (3) 222 | Ceiling Fans 3 Number (4) 15 | Computer 2 Type Double-Pane | Printer Insulation: Well or Adequate | Note(s): Source(s): 2-Door Top and Bottom Electric Top-Loading Electric 1) This is a weighted-average house that has combined characteristics of the Nation's stock homes. Although the population of homes with

258

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14% 14% District Heat 10% 8% 8% District Chilled Water 4% 4% 4% Other 11% 6% 5% Swamp Coolers 4% 3% 2% Other 2% 2% 2% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Heating and cooling equipment percentages of floorspace total more than 100% since equipment shares floorspace. 2) Malls are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs.

259

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

260

 

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3.2.2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) 3.2.2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

262

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

263

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

264

1992 CBECS BC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Principal Building Activity, Number of Buildings 8. Principal Building Activity, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) RSE Row Factor 0.9 1.1 All Buildings ........................................................ 4,806 67,876 3.7 Principal Building Activity Education ............................................................ 301 8,470 7.5 Food Sales ......................................................... 130 757 14.5 Food Service ..................................................... 260 1,491 8.7 Health Care Inpatient ............................................................. 19 1,287 18.7 Outpatient .......................................................... 44 476 17.8 Laboratory

265

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

266

"RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" 2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;" " Units: Percents." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" "NAICS"," ","of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All Buildings","of Buildings Onsite" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Onsite","Establishments(b)","per Establishment","Onsite","per Establishment" ,,"Total United States" , 311,"Food",2,0,2,1,1 311221," Wet Corn Milling",0,0,0,0,0 312,"Beverage and Tobacco Products",11,0,15,14,14

267

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 63,343 63,307 43,468 15,157 5,443 2,853 7,076 1,401 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 6,362 6,346 3,084 600 Q Q 806 199 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 6,212 6,197 3,692 716 Q Q 725 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 11,370 11,370 7,053 966 289 Q 1,014 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,385 8,385 6,025 825 369 240 638 Q

268

Table 1a. Effective, Occupied, and Vacant Square Footage, 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Occupied and Vacant Sq Ft a. Occupied and Vacant Sq Ft Table 1a. Effective, Occupied, and Vacant Square Footage, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Occupied Floorspace (million square feet) Total Vacant Floorspace (million square feet) Occupied Square Footage as a Percent of Total All Buildings 4,779 67,072 61,325 5,746 91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,678 7,321 6,662 659 90 5,001 to 10,000 966 7,140 6,544 596 91 10,001 to 25,000 641 10,285 9,432 853 91 25,001 to 50,000 274 9,872 8,963 909 90 50,001 to 100,000 114 7,957 7,297 659 91 100,001 to 200,000 70 9,619 8,966 652 93 200,001 to 500,000 25 7,788 7,201 586 92 Over 500,000 9 7,087 6,257 829 88 Principal Building Activity Education 309 8,815 8,221 593 93 Food Sales and Service 413 2,375 2,166

269

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A4. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 71,658 3,452 10,543 12,424 5,680 13,999 3,719 9,022 4,207 8,613 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465 878 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 12,659 674 1,448 2,113 1,204 2,443 861 1,555 933 1,429

270

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................ 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 9,936 2.7 683 57 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7,512 7.4 877 61 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 10,787 15.6 1,069 67 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 8,881 35.9 976 72

271

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Build- ings with Cooking Cooking Energy Sources (more than one may apply) All Build- ings* Build- ings with Cooking Cooking Energy Sources (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Propane Elec- tricity Natural Gas Propane All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 801 410 457 108 64,783 22,237 13,161 15,438 1,460 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 354 170 183 63 6,789 997 493 549 165 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 155 82 88 Q 6,585 1,136 621 641 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 127 59 75 Q 11,535 1,954 961 1,115 Q

272

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 2. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Principal Building Activity Education Food Sales Food Service Health Care Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Inpatient Outpatient All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 9,874 1,255 1,654 1,905 1,258 5,096 4,317 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 409 409 544 N 165 99 638 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 399 356 442 N 280 160 725 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 931 Q 345 Q 312 631 1,284 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 1,756 Q Q Q Q 803 578 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 9,057 2,690 Q Q Q 206 841 Q

273

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*........................ 54,068 51,570 45,773 6,746 34,910 1,161 3,725 779 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000....................... 6,272 5,718 4,824 986 3,767 50 22 54 5,001 to 10,000.................... 7,299 6,667 5,728 1,240 4,341 61 169 45 10,001 to 25,000.................. 10,829 10,350 8,544 1,495 6,442 154 553 Q 25,001 to 50,000.................. 7,170 7,022 6,401 789 5,103 151 485 86

274

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 5. Energy End Uses, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Energy Used For (more than one may apply) Space Heating Cooling Water Heating Cooking Manu- facturing All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 60,028 56,940 56,478 22,237 3,138 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,668 5,007 4,759 997 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,786 5,408 5,348 1,136 214 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 10,387 9,922 9,562 1,954 472 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,060 7,776 7,734 2,511 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 9,057 8,718 8,331 8,412 3,575 540

275

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Lit Buildings Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply) Incand- escent Standard Fluor- escent Compact Fluor- escent High-Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 62,060 38,528 59,688 27,571 20,643 17,703 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 6,038 2,918 5,579 1,123 312 604 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 6,090 3,061 5,726 1,109 686 781 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 11,229 6,424 10,458 2,944 1,721 1,973 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,297 5,176 8,001 3,662 2,191 2,013

276

1992 CBECS BC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) RSE Row Factor All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West All Buildings Northeast Midwest South West 0.6 1.2 1.1 1.0 1.3 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.2 All Buildings ................................... 4,806 771 1,202 1,963 870 67,876 13,400 17,280 24,577 12,619 6.3 Building Floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,681 383 676 1,171 451 7,327 1,074 1,889 3,155 1,208 9.7 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 975 180 241 370 184 7,199 1,337 1,763 2,723 1,376 7.6 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 647 109 163 239 136 10,375 1,663 2,689 3,782 2,241 8.5 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 280 54 66 106 56

277

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 2. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings with Water Heating Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Propane All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 56,478 27,490 28,820 1,880 3,088 1,422 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 4,759 2,847 1,699 116 N 169 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,348 2,821 2,296 Q Q 205 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 9,562 4,809 4,470 265 Q 430 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 7,734 3,924 4,055 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 9,057 8,412 3,659 5,005 Q 303 Q

278

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Cooled Build- ings Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply) Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners Heat Pumps Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners District Chilled Water Central Chillers Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units Swamp Coolers Other All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 56,940 11,035 9,041 12,558 2,853 11,636 29,969 1,561 1,232 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,007 1,568 675 972 Q Q 1,957 179 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,408 1,523 563 1,012 Q Q 2,741 207 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 9,922 2,173 1,441 1,740 Q 456 5,260 378 Q

279

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Build- ings with Cooling Cooling Energy Sources (more than one may apply) All Build- ings* Build- ings with Cooling Cooling Energy Sources (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,625 3,589 17 33 64,783 56,940 54,321 1,018 2,853 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 1,841 1,838 Q Q 6,789 5,007 4,994 Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 732 727 Q Q 6,585 5,408 5,367 Q Q

280

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 7. Space Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings with Space Heating Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Propane Other a All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 60,028 28,600 36,959 5,988 5,198 3,204 842 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,668 2,367 2,829 557 Q 665 183 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,786 2,560 3,358 626 Q 529 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 10,387 4,872 6,407 730 289 597 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,060 4,040 5,394 436 325 392 Q

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Buildings with Any Refrig- eration Equipment Type of Equipment (more than one may apply) Commercial Refrigeration Other Refrigeration Any Walk-In Units Open Cases or Cabinets Closed Cases or Cabinets Resid- ential- Type Units Vending Machines All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 52,974 26,768 20,254 10,425 17,218 38,884 35,335 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 4,333 1,310 916 366 935 3,174 830 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 4,738 1,406 909 497 894 3,609 1,407 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 8,646 2,230 1,188 614 1,665 6,725 4,072

282

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 2. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* Build- ings with Water Heating Type of Water Heating Equipment All Build- ings* Build- ings with Water Heating Type of Water Heating Equipment Central- ized System Distrib- uted System Combin- ation Central- ized and Distrib- uted Systems Central- ized System Distrib- uted System Combin- ation Central- ized and Distrib- uted Systems All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,472 2,513 785 175 64,783 56,478 34,671 11,540 10,267 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 1,715 1,267 418 Q 6,789 4,759 3,452 1,206 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 725 557 150 Q 6,585 5,348 4,154 1,057 Q

283

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003 L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*............................. 64,783 62,060 51,342 5,556 37,918 4,004 4,950 2,403 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000............................. 6,789 6,038 4,826 678 3,932 206 76 124 5,001 to 10,000........................... 6,585 6,090 4,974 739 3,829 192 238 248 10,001 to 25,000........................ 11,535 11,229 8,618 1,197 6,525 454 506 289 25,001 to 50,000........................ 8,668 8,297 6,544 763 4,971 527 454 240

284

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B20. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 B20. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Number of Establishments in Building One Two to Five Six to Ten Eleven to Twenty More than Twenty Currently Unoccupied All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 45,144 10,960 1,958 1,951 2,609 2,161 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,613 916 Q Q N 223 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,304 1,031 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 9,098 1,732 383 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 5,807 1,837 355 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 9,057 6,218 1,739 273 337 Q Q

285

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Size of Buildings Size of Buildings Size of Buildings The 1999 CBECS estimated that 2,348,000 commercial buildings, or just over half (50.4 percent) of total buildings, were found in the smallest building size category (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) (Figure 1). Only 7,000 buildings occupied the largest size category (over 500,000 square feet). Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The middle size categories (10,001 to 100,000 square feet) had relatively more floorspace per category than smaller or larger size categories (Figure 2). The greatest amount of floorspace, about 11,153,000 square feet (or 17 percent of total floorspace) was found in the 10,001 to 25,000 square feet category. Figure 2. Distribution of Floorspace by Size of Building, 1999

286

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999 L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings* ............................. 61,707 58,693 49,779 6,496 37,150 3,058 5,343 1,913 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 6,750 5,836 4,878 757 3,838 231 109 162 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 7,940 7,166 5,369 1,044 4,073 288 160 109 10,001 to 25,000 ....................... 10,534 9,773 7,783 1,312 5,712 358 633 232 25,001 to 50,000 ....................... 8,709 8,452 6,978 953 5,090 380 771 281

287

 

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2.1 Federal Building Gross Floorspace, by Year and Agency 2.1 Federal Building Gross Floorspace, by Year and Agency 2007 Percent of Fiscal Year Floorspace (10^9 SF) Agency Total Floorspace FY 1985 3.37 DOD 63% FY 1986 3.38 USPS 10% FY 1987 3.40 GSA 6% FY 1988 3.23 VA 5% FY 1989 3.30 DOE 3% FY 1990 3.40 Other 13% FY 1991 3.21 Total 100% FY 1992 3.20 FY 1993 3.20 FY 1994 3.11 FY 1995 3.04 FY 1996 3.03 FY 1997 3.02 FY 1998 3.07 FY 1999 3.07 FY 2000 3.06 FY 2001 3.07 FY 2002 3.03 FY 2003 3.04 FY 2004 2.97 FY 2005 2.96 FY 2006 3.10 FY 2007 3.01 Note(s): The Federal Government owns/operates over 500,000 buildings, including 422,000 housing structures (for the military) and 51,000 nonresidential buildings

288

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Employment Size Category, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 6. Employment Size Category, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Number of Workers Fewer than 5 Workers 5 to 9 Workers 10 to 19 Workers 20 to 49 Workers 50 to 99 Workers 100 to 249 Workers 250 or More Workers All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 15,492 6,166 7,803 10,989 7,934 6,871 9,528 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 4,659 1,264 689 155 Q Q N 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 3,323 1,373 1,109 689 Q Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 4,006 2,075 2,456 2,113 692 Q N 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 1,222 836 1,327 2,920 1,648 667 Q

289

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and...  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2009 Energy Consumption per Square Foot of Office Floorspace by Vintage (Thousand BtuSF) (1) Vintage 2000-2009 81.4 1990-1999 74.1 1980-1989 73.1 1970-1979 102.8 1960-1969 71.4...

290

Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's presentation Where we are in the planning process Review of Economic Drivers- from July 8 2014 P4 Proposed for use in draft 7th Plan BACKGROUND: Presenter: Massoud Jourabchi Summary: Using latest economic forecast (economic drivers, baseline efficiency of appliances, number of homes, commercial floorspace) are used

291

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Northeast Midwest South West New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 2,964 9,941 11,595 5,485 12,258 3,393 7,837 3,675 7,635 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 360 666 974 922 1,207 538 788 464 871 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 359 764 843 722 1,387 393 879 418 820 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 553 1,419 1,934 1,164 2,240 810 1,329 831 1,256

292

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 726 1,266 1,775 878 64,783 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 364 725 965 498 6,789 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 149 213 361 165 6,585 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 127 198 278 135 11,535 1,972 3,098 4,378 2,087 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 36 71 88 46 8,668 1,292 2,567 3,168 1,643

293

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Heating Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 9. Heating Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Heated Buildings Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 60,028 8,814 19,615 12,545 5,166 20,423 18,021 3,262 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 5,668 685 2,902 1,047 Q 461 1,159 330 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 5,786 462 2,891 1,282 Q 773 1,599 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 10,387 1,400 4,653 2,129 289 2,164 2,765 456 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 8,060 1,150 2,761 1,748 325 2,829 2,449 419

294

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Worker Median Hours per Week Median Age of Buildings (years) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 4.6 1,000 50 30.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 9,936 2.4 750 48 30.5 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7,512 7.2 1,300 50 30.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 10,787 15.0 1,611 55 28.5

295

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Build- ings* One Floor Two Floors Three Floors Four to Nine Floors Ten or More Floors All Build- ings* One Floor Two Floors Three Floors Four to Nine Floors Ten or More Floors All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,136 1,031 339 128 12 64,783 25,981 16,270 7,501 10,085 4,947 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 2,014 411 115 Q N 6,789 5,192 1,217 343 Q N 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 564 239 70 Q N 6,585 4,150 1,814 504 Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 399 248 74 18 Q 11,535 6,160 3,966 1,115 292 Q

296

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B9. Year Constructed, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 B9. Year Constructed, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Year Constructed 1919 or Before 1920 to 1945 1946 to 1959 1960 to 1969 1970 to 1979 1980 to 1989 1990 to 1999 2000 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 3,769 6,871 7,045 8,101 10,772 10,332 12,360 5,533 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 6,789 490 796 860 690 966 1,149 1,324 515 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 6,585 502 827 643 865 1,332 721 1,209 486 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11,535 804 988 1,421 1,460 1,869 1,647 2,388 958 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 8,668 677 838 935 1,234 1,720 1,174 1,352 739

297

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

298

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories core strengths in modeling and simulation, bringing together the best capabilities at NETL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The CCSIs industrial partners provide representation from the power generation industry, equipment manufacturers, technology providers and engineering and construction firms. The CCSIs academic participants (Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, West Virginia University, Boston University and the University of Texas at Austin) bring unparalleled expertise in multiphase flow reactors, combustion, process synthesis and optimization, planning and scheduling, and process control techniques for energy processes. During Fiscal Year (FY) 13, CCSI announced the initial release of its first set of computational tools and models during the October 2012 meeting of its Industry Advisory Board. This initial release led to five companies licensing the CCSI Toolset under a Test and Evaluation Agreement this year. By the end of FY13, the CCSI Technical Team had completed development of an updated suite of computational tools and models. The list below summarizes the new and enhanced toolset components that were released following comprehensive testing during October 2013. 1. FOQUS. Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity. Package includes: FOQUS Graphic User Interface (GUI), simulation-based optimization engine, Turbine Client, and heat integration capabilities. There is also an updated simulation interface and new configuration GUI for connecting Aspen Plus or Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) simulations to FOQUS and the Turbine Science Gateway. 2. A new MFIX-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to predict particle attrition. 3. A new dynamic reduced model (RM) builder, which generates computationally efficient RMs of the behavior of a dynamic system. 4. A completely re-written version of the algebraic surrogate model builder for optimization (ALAMO). The new version is several orders of magnitude faster than the initial release and eliminates the MATLAB dependency. 5. A new suite of high resolution filtered models for the hydrodynamics associated with horizontal cylindrical objects in a flow path. 6. The new Turbine Science Gateway (Cluster), which supports FOQUS for running multiple simulations for optimization or UQ using a local computer or cluster. 7. A new statistical tool (BSS-ANOVA-UQ) for calibration and validation of CFD models. 8. A new basic data submodel in Aspen Plus forma

Miller, David C; Syamlal, Madhava; Cottrell, Roger; Kress, Joel D; Sundaresan, S; Sun, Xin; Storlie, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Tong, Charles; Zitney, Stephen E; Dale, Crystal; Engel, Dave; Agarwal, Deb; Calafiura, Paolo; Shinn, John

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

300

Transactive Control and Coordination of Distributed Assets for Ancillary Services  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to diversify energy supplies, the need to mitigate energy-related environmental impact, and the entry of electric vehicles in large numbers present challenges and opportunities to power system professionals. Wind and solar power provide many benefits, and to reap the benefits the resulting increased variabilityforecasted as well as unforecastedshould be addressed. Demand resources are receiving increasing attention as one means of providing the grid balancing services. Control and coordination of a large number (~millions) of distributed smart grid assets requires innovative approaches. One such is transactive control and coordination (TC2)a distributed, agent-based incentive and control system. The TC2 paradigm is to create a market system with the following characteristics: Participation should be entirely voluntary. The participant decides at what price s/he is willing to participate. The bids and responses are automated. Such an approach has been developed and demonstrated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for energy markets. It is the purpose of this project to develop a similar approach for ancillary services. In this report, the following ancillary services are considered: spinning reserve ramping regulation. These services are to be provided by the following devices: refrigerators water heaters clothes dryers variable speed drives. The important results are summarized below: The regulation signal can be divided into an energy-neutral high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency component is particularly well suited for demand resources. The low frequency component, which carries energy non-neutrality, can be handled by a combination of generators and demand resources. An explicit method for such a separation is obtained from an exponentially weighted moving average filter. Causal filters (i.e., filters that process only present and past values of a signal) introduce delays that can be issues in some signal processing applications that treat the high frequency part as a noise to be eliminated. For regulation, the high frequency component is an essential part of the signal. The delay in the low frequency component is not a problem. A stochastic self-dispatch algorithm determines the response of the devices to the regulation signal. In an ensemble of devices under normal operation, some devices turn on and some turn off in any time interval. Demand response necessitates turning off devices that would normally be on, or turning on devices that would normally be off. Over time, some of these would have turned off on their own. A formalism to determine expectation values under a combination of natural and forced attrition has been developed. This formalism provides a mechanism for accomplishing a desired power profile within a bid period. In particular, a method to minimize regulation requirement can be developed. The formulation provides valuable insights into control. Some ancillary servicesramping to absorb unforecasted increase in renewable generation, and regulation downrequire the demand resources to increase their energy use. Some resources such as HVAC systems can do this readily, whereas some others require enabling technology. Even without such technology, it is possible to arrange refrigerators and water heaters to have an energy debt and be ready to increase their energy use. A transactive bid mechanism of revolving debt can be developed for this purpose. Dramatic changes in control systems, architecture and markets are expected in the electrical grid. The technical capabilities of a large number of devices interacting with the grid are changing. While it is too early to describe complete solutions, TC2 has attractive features suitable for adapting to the changes. The analyses in this report and the activities planned for FY 14 and beyond are designed to facilitate this transition.

Subbarao, Krishnappa; Fuller, Jason C.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Somani, Abhishek; Pratt, Robert G.; Widergren, Steven E.; Chassin, David P.

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

What Hansel and Gretels Trail Teach Us about Knowledge Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background At Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are on the cusp of a significant era of change. INL is the lead Department of Energy Nuclear Research and Development Laboratory, focused on finding innovative solutions to the nations energy challenges. Not only has the Laboratory grown at an unprecedented rate over the last five years, but also has a significant segment of its workforce that is ready for retirement. Over the next 10 years, it is anticipated that upwards of 60% of the current workforce at INL will be eligible for retirement. Since the Laboratory is highly dependent on the intellectual capabilities of its scientists and engineers and their efforts to ensure the future of the nations energy portfolio, this attrition of resources has the potential of seriously impacting the ability of the Laboratory to sustain itself and the growth that it has achieved in the past years. Similar to Germany in the early nineteenth century, we face the challenge of our self-identity and must find a way to solidify our legacy to propel us into the future. Approach As the Brothers Grimm set out to collect their fairy tales, they focused on gathering information from the people that were most knowledgeable in the subject. For them, it was the peasants, with their rich knowledge of the regions sub-culture of folk lore that was passed down from generation to generation around the evening fire. As we look to capture this tacit knowledge, it is requisite that we also seek this information from those individuals that are most versed in it. In our case, it is the scientists and researchers who have dedicated their lives to providing the nation with nuclear energy. This information comes in many forms, both digital and non-digital. Some of this information still resides in the minds of these scientists and researchers who are close to retirement, or who have already retired. Once the information has been collected, it has to be sorted through to identify where the shining stones can be found. The quantity of this information makes it improbable for an individual or set of individuals to sort through it and pick out those ideas which are most important. To accomplish both the step of information capture and classification, modern advancements in technology give us the tools that we need to successfully capture this tacit knowledge. To assist in this process, we have evaluated multiple tools and methods that will help us to unlock the power of tacit knowledge. Tools The first challenge that stands in the way of success is the capture of information. More than 50 years of nuclear research is captured in log books, microfiche, and other non-digital formats. To transform this information from its current form into a format that can shine, requires a number of different tools. These tools fall into three major categories: Information Capture, Content Retrieval, and Information Classification. Information Capture The first step is to capture the information from a myriad of sources. With knowledge existing in multiple formats, this step requires multiple approaches to be successful. Some of the sources that require consideration include handwritten documents, typed documents, microfiche, images, audio and video feeds, and electronic images. To make this step feasible for a large body of knowledge requires automation.

Wayne Simpson; Troy Hiltbrand

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Plate-Based Fuel Processing System Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-board reforming of liquid fuels into hydrogen is an enabling technology that could accelerate consumer usage of fuel cell powered vehicles. The technology would leverage the convenience of the existing gasoline fueling infrastructure while taking advantage of the fuel cell efficiency and low emissions. Commercial acceptance of on-board reforming faces several obstacles that include: (1) startup time, (2) transient response, and (3) system complexity (size, weight and cost). These obstacles are being addressed in a variety of projects through development, integration and optimization of existing fuel processing system designs. In this project, CESI investigated steam reforming (SR), water-gas-shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PrOx) catalysts while developing plate reactor designs and hardware where the catalytic function is integrated into a primary surface heat exchanger. The plate reactor approach has several advantages. The separation of the reforming and combustion streams permits the reforming reaction to be conducted at a higher pressure than the combustion reaction, thereby avoiding costly gas compression for combustion. The separation of the two streams also prevents the dilution of the reformate stream by the combustion air. The advantages of the plate reactor are not limited to steam reforming applications. In a WGS or PrOx reaction, the non-catalytic side of the plate would act as a heat exchanger to remove the heat generated by the exothermic WGS or PrOx reactions. This would maintain the catalyst under nearly isothermal conditions whereby the catalyst would operate at its optimal temperature. Furthermore, the plate design approach results in a low pressure drop, rapid transient capable and attrition-resistant reactor. These qualities are valued in any application, be it on-board or stationary fuel processing, since they reduce parasitic losses, increase over-all system efficiency and help perpetuate catalyst durability. In this program, CESI took the initial steam reforming plate-reactor concept and advanced it towards an integrated fuel processing system. A substantial amount of modeling was performed to guide the catalyst development and prototype hardware design and fabrication efforts. The plate-reactor mechanical design was studied in detail to establish design guidelines which would help the plate reactor survive the stresses of repeated thermal cycles (from start-ups and shut-downs). Integrated system performance modeling was performed to predict system efficiencies and determine the parameters with the most significant impact on efficiency. In conjunction with the modeling effort, a significant effort was directed towards catalyst development. CESI developed a highly active, sulfur tolerant, coke resistant, precious metal based reforming catalyst. CESI also developed its own non-precious metal based water-gas shift catalyst and demonstrated the catalysts durability over several thousands of hours of testing. CESI also developed a unique preferential oxidation catalyst capable of reducing 1% CO to < 10 ppm CO over a 35 C operating window through a single pass plate-based reactor. Finally, CESI combined the modeling results and steam reforming catalyst development efforts into prototype hardware. The first generation 3kW(e) prototype was fabricated from existing heat-exchanger plates to expedite the fabrication process. This prototype demonstrated steady state operation ranging from 5 to 100% load conditions. The prototype also demonstrated a 20:1 turndown ratio, 10:1 load transient operation and rapid start-up capability.

Carlos Faz; Helen Liu; Jacques Nicole; David Yee

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

303

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effective Occupied and Vacant Square Footage in Commercial Buildigs in 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Effective Occupied and Vacant Sq. Ft. Effective Occupied and Vacant Sq. Ft. Effective Occupied and Vacant Square Footage in Commercial Buildings in 1992 -- A Useful Benchmark of Commercial Floorspace Vacancy Rates -- Introduction One of the major approaches to analyzing energy use in end-use sectors is to relate energy use to measures of the extent of utilization of the sector, either in absolute terms or in terms relative to some maximum utilization level. For example, vehicle miles traveled is a measure of vehicle utilization in the transportation sector. The percent of maximum production capability at which an industry or an individual plant is operating is a measure of industrial capacity utilization in the industrial sector. For the commercial buildings sector, two concepts that measure how intensely a building is utilized seem to predominate: the number of hours the building is in operation and the amount of floorspace in the building that is occupied (or conversely, the amount that is vacant).

305

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

306

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview > Publication and Tables Overview > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS buildings and floorspace by selected agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Separater Bar Separater Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey, 1993 (file size 1.15 MB) pages: 183 Selected Sections Main Text (file size 161,775 bytes) pages: 17. - Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader Contacts Preface Contents Introduction At a Glance Highlights on Federal Buildings Detailed Tables Appendices Appendix A. How the Survey Was Conducted (file size 45,191 bytes) pages: 8.

307

allbc.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Detailed Tables Contents ii All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings .............................................. 4,657 67,338 81,852 14.5 823 60 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 6,774 11,125 2.9 609 57 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 8,238 10,968 7.4 751 53 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 11,153 11,378 15.7 980 65 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 9,311 9,243 36.2 1,007

308

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

309

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Office Buildings Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the office sub-category information in the detailed tables we make information

310

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

311

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

312

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Table B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 10,305 12.4 1,031 60 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 17,340 14.8 1,000 63 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 14,007 17.1 821 66 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276

313

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey > Overview Survey > Overview Overview Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line Highlights on Federal Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the Government. Extensive analysis of the data was not conducted because this report represents the 881 responding buildings (buildings for which interviews were completed) and cannot be used to generalize about Federal buildings in each region. Crosstabulations of the data from the 881 buildings are provided in the Detailed Tables section.

314

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Disaggregated Principal Building  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Disaggregated Principal Building Activities Disaggregated Principal Building Activities Disaggregated Principal Building Activities The 1999 CBECS collected information for 20 general building activities. Five of the activities were aggregated and data for 16 activities are displayed in the detailed tables. Within the aggregated warehouse and storage category, nonrefrigerated warehouses greatly exceeded refrigerated warehouses both in amount of floorspace and number of buildings (compare Figure 1 with Figure 2). Within the mercantile category, the number of retail buildings greatly exceeded strip shopping buildings which, in turn, greatly exceeded enclosed shopping malls (Figure 2). The amount of mercantile floorspace was more evenly distributed (Figure 1) because of differences in average building size-enclosed malls were largest and retail buildings the smallest.

315

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

316

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

317

CBECS 1992 - Building Characteristics, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 The following 70 tables present extensive cross-tabulations of commercial buildings characteristics. These data are from the Buildings Characteristics Survey portion of the 1992 CBECS. The "Quick-Reference Guide," indicates the major topics of each table. Directions for calculating an approximate relative standard error (RSE) for each estimate in the tables are presented in Figure A1, "Use of RSE Row and Column Factor." The Glossary contains the definitions of the terms used in the tables. See the preceding "At A Glance" section for highlights of the detailed tables. Table Organization

318

"Table HC12.2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.5,0.3,"Q" "500 to 999",23.8,3.9,2.4,1.5 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,4.4,3.2,1.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,3.5,2.4,1.1 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,3.2,2.1,1.1 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,2.7,1.8,0.9 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,2.1,1.6,0.5

319

c13a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Electricity Expenditures Primary Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings .................................... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559 1,043 82,783 Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) Table C13A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Site Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 836 11,300 13.5 1,412 468 137 10,479 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,185 18,549 15.7 2,621 868 254 19,181 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 670 12,374 18.5 1,947 645

320

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 - Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics Data > Publication and Tables Buildings Characteristics Data > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 figure on percent of building and floorspace by census region, 1992 separater bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992 with only selected tables (file size 1.34 MB) pages: 157 Selected Sections: Main Text (file size 883,980 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background Organization of the report

322

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Lighting in Commercial Buildings Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

323

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 13 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 14 for eleven building categories 15 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

324

c13a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dec 2006 Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Electricity Expenditures Primary Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings .................................... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559 1,043 82,783 Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) Table C13A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Site Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 836 11,300 13.5 1,412 468 137 10,479 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,185 18,549 15.7 2,621 868 254 19,181 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 670 12,374 18.5 1,947 645

325

"Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

326

"Table HC13.2 Living Space Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.6,"Q","Q" "500 to 999",23.8,9,4.2,1.5,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,8.6,4.7,1.5,2.5 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,6,2.9,1.2,1.9 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,4.1,2.1,0.7,1.3 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,3,1.8,0.5,0.7

327

CBECS 1993 - Federal Buildings Supplement Survey - Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication > Detailed Tables Publication > Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Line You have the option of downloading the entire set of tables or selected tables by data item. Full Set of Tables - Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey, 1993 (file size 770,290 bytes) pages: 123 Detailed Table Information (file size 45,044 bytes) pages: 7, includes:

328

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

329

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

330

"Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

331

"Table HC11.2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,4.6,3.6,1.1 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,2.8,2.2,0.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1.9,1.4,0.5 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.3,1.7,0.5 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,2.2,1.7,0.6 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,1.6,1,0.6

332

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.4,"Q",0.6,1.7,0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,4.8,1.4,4.2,10.2,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,10.6,1.8,1.8,4,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,12.4,1.5,0.5,0.5,0.4

333

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities -- Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication Publication Publication - Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities Percent of Buildings, Floorspace, and Consumption in Multibuilding Facilities, 1989 Figure on percent of buildings, floorspace, and consumption in multibuilding facilities, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities (file size .53 MB) pages: 105

334

Table HC1.2.1. Living Space Characteristics by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Living Space Characteristics by" 1. Living Space Characteristics by" " Total, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace, 2005" ,,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units",,"Total1",,"Heated",,"Cooled" "Living Space Characteristics","Millions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent" "Total",111.1,100,225.8,100,179.8,100,114.5,100 "Total Floorspace (Square Feet)1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.9,1.2,0.5,1.1,0.6,0.4,0.3 "500 to 999",23.8,21.4,17.5,7.7,15.9,8.8,7.3,6.4 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,18.7,24.1,10.7,22.6,12.6,13,11.4 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,13.9,24.5,10.9,22.2,12.4,14,12.2

335

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

336

Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective, Occupied, and Vacant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b.Relative Standard Errors b.Relative Standard Errors Table 1b. Relative Standard Errors for Effective Occupied, and Vacant Square Footage, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Occupied Floorspace (million square feet) Total Vacant Floorspace (million square feet) Occupied Square Footage as a Percent of Total All Buildings 3.7 3.8 3.9 8.2 0.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5.3 5.5 5.4 10.3 0.8 5,001 to 10,000 3.7 3.7 3.9 10.3 0.9 10,001 to 25,000 5.2 5 5.1 14.3 1.2 25,001 to 50,000 6.6 7 7.1 17.2 1.6 50,001 to 100,000 7.1 7.1 7.5 12 1.1 100,001 to 200,000 8.6 8.6 8.6 20 1.3 200,001 to 500,000 10.1 10.5 10.7 20.5 1.5 Over 500,000 25.8 20.3 21.9 34.2 4.6 Principal Building Activity Education 8.4 7.4 6.8 35.1 2.2 Food Sales and Service 7.5 8.7 8.6 29.9 2.6

337

a1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2003 Commercial Buildings 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables October 2006 Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables Introduction................................................................................................................................ vii Change in Data Collection Procedures in Malls ........................................................................ viii Guide to the 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables............................................................................... ix Building Characteristics Tables All Buildings (Including Malls) Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls) ............................................... 1 Table A2. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for All Buildings

338

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 71,658 6,922 7,033 12,659 9,382 10,291 10,217 7,494 7,660 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ..................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ................................. 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N

339

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Light Usage by Heated Floorspace Category, Million U.S. . Light Usage by Heated Floorspace Category, Million U.S. Households, 1993 Heated Floorspace Category (square feet) Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total Fewer than 600 600 to 999 1,000 to 1,599 1,600 to 1,999 2,000 to 2,399 2,400 to 2,999 3,000 or More RSE Column Factors: 0.4 1.7 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 RSE Row Factors Total................................................. 96.6 7.5 21.8 27.8 12.4 9.6 8.2 9.3 3.62 Indoor Electric Lights Total Number Lights 1 to 4 Hours None........................................... 9.6 1.2 2.2 2.7 1.1 0.9 0.7 0.6 11.83 1 ................................................. 22.1 2.4 6.7 6.5 2.5 1.5 1.5 1.1 7.39 2 ................................................. 27.4 2.4 6.9 8.0 3.6 2.4 2.1 2.0 6.60 3 ................................................. 16.8 0.8 3.4 5.2 2.2 2.0

340

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 12,812 5.0 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 9,398 10.6 1.43 18.22 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 13,140 17.8 1.14 16.93 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 10,392 43.1 1.20 15.44

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table 4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Light Usage by Heated Floorspace Category, Percent of U.S. . Light Usage by Heated Floorspace Category, Percent of U.S. Households, 1993 Heated Floorspace Category (square feet) Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total Fewer than 600 600 to 999 1,000 to 1,599 1,600 to 1,999 2,000 to 2,399 2,400 to 2,999 3,000 or More RSE Column Factors: 0.4 1.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.2 RSE Row Factor Total................................................. 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Indoor Electric Lights Total Number Lights 1 to 4 Hours None........................................... 10.0 16.5 10.2 9.9 9.2 9.4 9.1 6.7 11.42 1 ................................................. 22.9 31.3 30.9 23.5 19.9 15.3 17.9 11.5 6.62 2 ................................................. 28.4 32.3 31.9 28.7 28.7 24.8 26.0 21.5 5.64 3 .................................................

342

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* Building Size 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* ............................... 64,783 6,789 6,585 11,535 8,668 9,057 9,064 7,176 5,908 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ..................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ................................. 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N

343

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics March 2012 4.2.1 Federal Building Gross Floorspace, by Year and Agency Fiscal Year Agency FY 1985 3.37 DOD 63% FY 1986 3.38 USPS 10% FY 1987 3.40 GSA 6% FY 1988 3.23 VA 5% FY 1989 3.30 DOE 3% FY 1990 3.40 Other 13% FY 1991 3.21 Total 100% FY 1992 3.20 FY 1993 3.20 FY 1994 3.11 FY 1995 3.04 FY 1996 3.03 FY 1997 3.02 FY 1998 3.07 FY 1999 3.07 FY 2000 3.06 FY 2001 3.07 FY 2002 3.03 FY 2003 3.04 FY 2004 2.97 FY 2005 2.96 FY 2006 3.10 FY 2007 3.01 Note(s): Source(s): 2007 Percent of Floorspace (10^9 SF) Total Floorspace The Federal Government owns/operates over 500,000 buildings, including 422,000 housing structures (for the military) and 51,000 nonresidential buildings. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2008, Table

344

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 107,897 22.2 1.51 16.54 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 13,083 5.1 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 10,443 11.0 1.48 18.56 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15,689 19.4 1.24 17.46 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 11,898 45.6 1.27 16.04

345

1992 CBECS BC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings 7. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) RSE Row Factor All Buildings Any Conser- vation Features Build- ing Shell HVAC Light- ing Other All Buildings Any Conser- vation Features Build- ing Shell HVAC Light- ing Other 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.9 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.7 All Buildings ................................... 4,806 4,357 4,223 2,604 1,178 264 67,876 64,403 62,056 50,281 29,453 5,952 4.7 Building Floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,681 2,376 2,305 1,194 452 102 7,327 6,575 6,375 3,370 1,302 291 7.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 975 887 864 569 275 62 7,199 6,566 6,405 4,221 2,066 467 5.6 10,001 to 25,000

346

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

347

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

348

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

349

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

350

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1999" B4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings ................",4657,208,479,782,406,748,396,618,315,705 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,99,206,390,230,368,189,360,155,351 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,41,128,200,72,194,80,139,80,175

353

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

354

1995 Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Detailed Tables 1995 Detailed Tables Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Summary Table—All Principal Buildings Activities (HTML Format) Background information on detailed tables: Description of Detailed Tables and Categories of Data Statistical Significance of Data

355

EIA Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Analysis of Consumer Buildings Analysis of Consumer Behavior in NEMS Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC David Peterson Buildings Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis Overview Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 2 * NEMS Structure * Housing/floorspace and service demand in Residential Demand Module (RDM) and Commercial Demand Module (CDM) * Market share calculation for equipment in RDM and CDM * Price responses / elasticities * Distributed generation (DG) & combined heat and power (CHP) NEMS Structure Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting, Washington DC, July 17, 2013 3 * Represents energy supply, conversion, and demand in a unified, but modular system * Detailed structural and process models in most energy sectors

356

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

357

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

358

North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007" 2007" "Table A3. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All Buildings ................",4859,252,509,728,577,926,360,587,316,603 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2586,134,240,372,356,474,217,294,166,333 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",948,49,106,128,100,200,59,127,62,117

359

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.1,0.6,"Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,13.6,3.7,3.2,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,9.5,3.7,3.4,4.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,6.6,2.7,2.5,3.6 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,5,2.1,2.8,2.4 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,3.7,1.8,2.8,2.1 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,2,1.4,1.7,1.6

360

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 178 238 104 3,788 7,286 2,521 47.0 32.7 41.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 27 11 346 360 218 66.6 75.8 51.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 14 36 Q 321 662 Q 45.1 53.8 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 31 33 Q 796 1,102 604 39.5 29.9 Q

362

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................. 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0

363

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 454 715 356 378 134 8,486 14,122 8,970 11,796 5,098 53.5 50.6 39.7 32.0 26.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 57 84 35 58 16 666 1,015 427 832 234 84.8 83.1 81.9 69.6 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 50 57 33 61 17 666 1,030 639 1,243 392 75.2 54.9 51.2 49.2 44.0

364

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q

365

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 2. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* .............................. 571 871 427 12,097 19,763 11,608 47.2 44.1 36.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................... 85 98 59 1,222 1,214 648 69.5 81.0 91.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................. 56 90 56 1,131 1,733 828 49.8 51.9 67.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................... 103 141 57 2,392 2,909 1,752 42.9 48.4 32.3

366

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 137 254 189 261 202 11,300 18,549 12,374 17,064 10,894 12.1 13.7 15.3 15.3 18.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 19 27 14 32 23 1,210 1,631 923 1,811 903 15.7 16.4 15.0 17.8 25.8 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 12 18 15 27 14 1,175 1,639 1,062 1,855 914 10.2 10.9 14.3 14.3 15.5

367

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 172 234 452 185 13,899 17,725 26,017 12,541 12.4 13.2 17.4 14.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 14 30 52 19 1,031 1,742 2,410 1,296 13.5 17.4 21.5 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 37 21 1,128 1,558 2,640 1,319 9.8 10.8 14.0 15.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 22 33 59 28 2,094 3,317 4,746 2,338 10.4 10.0 12.5 12.1

368

c1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 13,391 9,500 1,737 272 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 10,347

369

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 448 728 511 350 10,162 14,144 15,260 8,907 44.1 51.5 33.5 39.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 50 92 68 40 547 1,086 912 629 90.6 84.6 74.5 63.7 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 63 69 46 661 1,064 1,439 806 59.2 59.4 48.1 57.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 58 133 81 70 1,293 2,656 2,332 1,542 45.2 50.1 34.7 45.7

370

Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor- space In Occupied Floor- space In Vacant Floor- space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 5 9 4 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 12 6 6 9 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 13 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 7 14 5 5 7 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 21 10 10 11 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 12 15 8 8 10 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 13 24 10 11 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 13 19 11 11 10 Over 500,000 26 18 18 34

371

Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities (1989 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Use in Multibuildings > Overview Use in Multibuildings > Overview Overview Percent of Buildings, Floorspace, and Consumption in Multibuilding Facilities, 1989 Figure on percent of buildings, floorspace, and consumption in multibuilding facilities, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar Executive Summary The purpose of this report is to address a known problem in the Energy Information AdministrationÆs (EIA) data systems regarding energy consumption in buildings. The problem is in measuring the consumption of energy in a particular building that is located within a multibuilding facility that utilizes district heating and/or cooling. When such a building is surveyed by EIA, total energy use for that particular building is normally not measured and can only be estimated from related information that is provided for the multibuilding facility as a whole. Since a facility usually includes a wide variety of building types with differing heating and/or cooling requirements, the estimation procedures are subject to error. This then adversely affects the quality of the energy consumption estimates that are made for the surveyed building.

372

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 168 185 165 5,453 3,263 5,644 30.9 56.6 29.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 29 18 Q 334 266 363 87.9 68.5 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 25 Q Q 545 291 514 45.6 62.7 54.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 20 45 26 626 699 844 32.1 63.9 30.6

373

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 66 254 57 5,523 13,837 3,546 12.0 18.3 16.2 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 28 7 821 1,233 481 12.4 22.4 15.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 20 5 681 1,389 386 10.8 14.4 13.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 9 31 12 1,204 2,411 842 7.8 12.8 14.1

374

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 C8. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q

375

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................... 147 216 375 152 12,809 16,701 22,766 11,030 11.5 12.9 16.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 13 30 50 19 997 1,729 2,324 1,295 13.4 17.5 21.7 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 10 15 33 19 1,083 1,447 2,454 1,214 9.0 10.7 13.4 15.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 19 29 49 22 1,944 3,098 4,266 2,063 9.6 9.3 11.6 10.9

376

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q

377

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ........................... 990 1,761 1,134 1,213 724 10,622 17,335 11,504 15,739 9,584 93.2 101.6 98.5 77.0 75.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

378

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

379

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Buildings RSEs for Total Floorspace RSEs for Mean Square Feet per Building RSEs Not Available for Medians All Buildings .................................... 3.8 3.1 4.0 _ Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 5.7 5.6 1.3 _ 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 5.6 5.5 0.8 _ 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 4.9 4.9 0.9 _ 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 5.5 5.8 1.2 _ 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 6.1 6.0 1.0 _ 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9.9 10.0 1.5 _ 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 9.8 10.2 1.8 _ Over 500,000 .................................... 12.6 12.8 4.2 _ Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 7.1

380

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 575 381 530 7,837 3,675 7,635 73.4 103.8 69.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 464 871 110.9 94.7 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 60 36 76 879 418 820 68.2 86.7 92.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 53 76 73 1,329 831 1,256 40.2 91.7 58.4

382

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................... 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2

383

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ............................ 418 659 327 347 119 7,645 12,850 8,113 10,509 4,350 54.7 51.3 40.3 33.0 27.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 56 81 35 55 16 660 979 421 789 234 85.0 82.9 82.5 69.8 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 47 53 27 59 16 644 944 526 1,212 367 72.5 56.5 51.2 49.0 43.9

384

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Table C8A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 456 1,241 340 5,680 13,999 3,719 80.2 88.7 91.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 60 123 37 922 1,283 547 64.9 96.2 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 45 111 27 738 1,468 420 61.6 75.4 63.2

385

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................. 1,271 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8

386

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 684 446 617 9,022 4,207 8,613 75.8 106.1 71.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 87 44 64 788 466 871 110.9 94.8 73.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 67 39 84 957 465 878 69.7 84.8 95.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 77 91 89 1,555 933 1,429 49.4 97.2 62.4

387

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 345 1,052 1,343 3,452 10,543 12,424 99.8 99.7 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 37 86 147 383 676 986 95.9 127.9 148.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 39 68 83 369 800 939 106.0 85.4 88.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 121 187 674 1,448 2,113 Q 83.4 88.4

388

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 1,522 3,228 1,772 18,031 33,384 20,243 84.4 96.7 87.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 193 300 193 2,168 2,904 1,850 89.0 103.2 104.2 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 134 263 165 2,032 3,217 1,784 66.0 81.9 92.5 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 241 432 226 3,273 5,679 3,707 73.6 76.1 60.9

389

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings* ............................... 73 343 512 1,465 7,716 9,570 49.5 44.4 53.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q 41 68 Q 417 729 Q 99.5 93.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q 31 43 Q 482 654 Q 64.8 66.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 45 90 Q 931 1,681 Q 47.9 53.6

390

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/ square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings ............................ 1,086 1,929 1,243 1,386 879 11,529 18,808 12,503 17,630 11,189 94.2 102.6 99.4 78.6 78.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 143 187 90 170 95 1,313 1,709 1,010 1,915 975 108.7 109.6 88.8 89.0 97.9 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 110 137 91 156 69 1,248 1,725 1,077 2,024 959 88.1 79.3 84.6 77.1 71.7

391

 

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 ENERGY STAR Commercial and Institutional Buildings and Industrial Plants (1) 3 ENERGY STAR Commercial and Institutional Buildings and Industrial Plants (1) Qualified Floorspace Floorspace Buildings Million SF Building Type Million SF % of Total Buildings 1999 87 33 Office 1,550.2 57.8% 5,981 2000 452 73 K-12 School 531.3 19.8% 5,453 2001 298 73 Retail 179.1 6.7% 2,048 2002 486 127 Hospital (General and Surgical) 100.5 3.4% 144 2003 592 150 Supermarket/Grocery 90.2 3.7% 1,878 2004 892 172 Hotel 71.9 2.7% 448 2005 1,026 216 Bank/Financial Institution 51.9 1.9% 257 2006 1,156 239 Warehouse (Unrefrigerated) 47.9 1.2% 179 2007 1,797 458 Courthouse 31.3 1.8% 121 2008 3,697 847 Medical Office 12.0 0.4% 138 2009 4,722 1,035 Residence Hall/Dormitory 7.9 0.3% 99

392

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Annual Energy Expenditures per Gross Square Foot of Federal Floorspace Stock, by Year ($2010) FY 1985 2.13 FY 2000 1.36 FY 2001 1.58 FY 2002 1.49 FY 2003 1.45 FY 2004 1.54 FY 2005 1.59 FY 2006 2.01 (1) FY 2007 2.01 Note(s): Source(s): Total Federal buildings and facilities energy expenditures in FY 2006 were $5.79 billion (in $2010). 1) Increase due to change in FEMP categorization of Federal buildings. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-9, p. 97 and Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2008, Table A-9, p. 78 for energy costs, and Table 1, p. 12 for floorspace for 2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2006, Table A-12, p. 158 for energy costs for 1985-2005; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report on FEMP, Dec. 2002, Table 8-A, p. 61 for 2000; DOE/FEMP, Annual

393

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010 1,826 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 13,083 10,547 2,227 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 10,443 8,199 1,830 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15,689 12,172 2,897 238 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 11,898 9,179 2,054 134 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 15,171 11,694 2,140 229 Q

394

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 114 56 96 7,449 3,633 7,397 15.3 15.4 13.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 437 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 5 14 787 404 810 13.4 12.0 16.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 11 10 13 1,267 831 1,232 8.9 11.7 10.3

395

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 141 68 117 8,634 4,165 8,376 16.3 16.3 14.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 439 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 12 5 15 865 451 868 13.8 12.1 17.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 16 12 16 1,493 933 1,405 11.0 13.0 11.5

396

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ................................ 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2

397

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................... 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001 to 10,000 ............................. 57 101 60 1,154 1,932 883 49.4 52.3 67.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................... 105 174 65 2,452 3,390 1,982 42.6 51.2 32.7

398

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 41 131 168 3,430 10,469 12,202 12.0 12.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 5 9 20 369 662 921 12.9 13.9 21.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 8 9 360 768 877 8.4 10.4 10.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 24 674 1,420 2,113 Q 11.6 11.2

399

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

400

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace2" "Fewer than 500",3.2,"Q",0.8,0.9,0.8,0.5 "500 to 999",23.8,1.5,5.4,5.5,6.1,5.3 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,1.4,4,5.2,5,5.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1.4,3.1,3.5,3.6,3.8

402

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.7,0.8,0.4,0.3,"Q" "500 to 999",23.8,10.2,6.4,3.4,2.3,1.5 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.5,6.3,3,3.3,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,3.8,4.7,2.9,2.2,1.9 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.6,4,2.5,2,1.3 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,1.9,4.1,1.7,1.3,1.3

403

"Table HC10.2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.9,1 "500 to 999",23.8,4.6,3.9,9,6.3 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,2.8,4.4,8.6,5 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1.9,3.5,6,4 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.3,3.2,4.1,2.6 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,2.2,2.7,3,2.4 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,1.6,2.1,2.1,0.9 "3,500 to 3,999",5.2,1.1,1.7,1.5,0.9

404

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

405

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

406

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Table B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 10,305 12.4 1,031 60 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 17,340 14.8 1,000 63 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 14,007 17.1 821 66 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276 15,739 17,178 12.3 916 57 2,000 CDD or More and -- Fewer than 4,000 HDD ...................

407

"Table HC14.2 Living Space Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1,0.2,0.8 "500 to 999",23.8,6.3,1.4,4.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5,1.6,3.4 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,4,1.4,2.6 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.6,0.9,1.7 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,2.4,0.9,1.4 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,0.9,0.3,0.6 "3,500 to 3,999",5.2,0.9,0.4,0.5

408

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

409

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings* ............................... 32 116 153 2,942 9,867 11,373 10.8 11.7 13.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 4 9 20 345 652 908 12.7 13.8 22.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 7 8 350 732 781 7.7 9.6 10.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 20 Q 1,390 1,934 Q 11.2 10.5

410

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings* ............................... 151 162 149 4,704 2,797 5,016 32.2 57.9 29.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 29 18 Q 334 265 363 87.9 68.4 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 23 Q Q 519 Q 496 44.2 Q 53.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 14 38 22 514 630 748 28.1 61.1 29.0

411

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6

412

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 5. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................... 415 683 460 311 9,181 13,163 13,311 7,813 45.2 51.9 34.6 39.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 46 91 65 40 513 1,074 869 628 90.4 84.9 74.9 63.7 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 38 57 64 44 621 959 1,349 763 61.3 59.0 47.5 57.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 51 119 70 60 1,173 2,436 2,066 1,378 43.9 48.7 33.8 43.6

413

1992 CBECS BC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary Table of Square Feet, Hours of Operation Summary Table of Square Feet, Hours of Operation and Age of Building, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Median Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week Median Hours per Week Median Age of Buildings (years) RSE Row Factor 1.1 1.2 1.5 1.0 -- 1.3 -- 0.4 -- -- All Buildings ................................... 4,806 67,876 71,236 14.1 4.5 953 1,013 58 50 28.5 4.0 Building Floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,681 7,327 9,701 2.7 2.5 755 850 56 48 28.5 3.3 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 975 7,199 7,644 7.4 7.2 942 1,267 57 49 30.5 2.8

414

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 672 1,164 386 250 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 516 790 262 209 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 776 1,229 407 309 27 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 673 1,058 350 258 16 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 759 1,223 405 244 26 Q

415

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings* ............................ 120 224 166 219 161 10,393 17,076 11,375 15,172 9,290 11.5 13.1 14.6 14.5 17.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 19 26 14 31 23 1,204 1,595 918 1,759 871 15.7 16.5 14.9 17.8 26.3 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 11 17 12 24 13 1,124 1,547 950 1,738 839 9.9 10.9 12.8 13.7 15.3

416

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings* ............................... 62 210 50 5,328 12,097 3,220 11.7 17.4 15.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 10 26 7 821 1,157 472 12.4 22.9 15.5 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 7 18 4 666 1,308 359 10.7 13.9 12.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 8 27 11 1,164 2,207 791 7.3 12.2 14.2

417

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

418

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 2.4 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 7.2 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 35.0 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 70.2 67.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 74 10,217 138.6 130.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................ 26 7,494 287.6 260.0

419

b28.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,258 1,999 282 63 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 699 955 171 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 233 409 58 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 211 372 32 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 63 140 8 9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 32 73 6 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 15 33 Q 9 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 5 13 Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 3 Q 2 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 141 172 14 24 Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 94 68 Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 282

420

Any Refrig-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Any Refrig- eration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Commercial Refrigeration",,,,"Other Refrigeration " ,,,"Any","Walk-In Units","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets","Resid- ential- Type Units","Vending Machines" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3176,1007,666,308,696,2370,996 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1591,486,332,142,353,1159,268 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,642,188,124,65,117,494,181

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

422

b4.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

........... ........... 4,657 208 479 782 406 748 396 618 315 705 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 99 206 390 230 368 189 360 155 351 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 41 128 200 72 194 80 139 80 175 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 38 92 122 66 105 87 69 39 91 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 14 25 32 17 43 25 25 25 52 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 10 16 22 13 24 9 16 12 23 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 3 7 11 5 11 4 6 4 8 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 1 4 5 2 4 1 2 Q 3 Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 Q 2 1 1 1 Q 1 Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................................

423

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 5. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Number of Workers Fewer than 5 Workers 5 to 9 Workers 10 to 19 Workers 20 to 49 Workers 50 to 99 Workers 100 to 249 Workers 250 or More Workers All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 2,653 778 563 398 147 77 30 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 1,879 422 202 43 Q Q N 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 452 192 146 87 Q Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 268 134 154 131 42 Q N 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 36 24 38 82 44 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 10 4 16 41 31 21 5

424

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" 2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,492,1460,894,96,581,1347,185 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,240,783,397,"Q",146,589,98 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,100,387,183,"Q",144,302,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,81,206,191,19,128,253,22

425

Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" 5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings ................",4657,3239,1546,1520,110,62,130 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1456,795,574,"Q","Q","Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,778,317,429,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,574,265,274,14,9,31

426

b16.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings ............................................... 4,657 1,362 142 67,338 26,049 7,101 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 604 Q 6,774 1,706 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 297 Q 8,238 2,211 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 253 26 11,153 3,965 464 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 104 26 9,311 3,728 901 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 63 17 10,112 4,498 1,274 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 27 8 8,271 3,799 1,159 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 10 5 6,851 3,107

427

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

428

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

429

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Three of the four activities that dominated commercial floorspace-office, warehouse and storage, and mercantile-dominated the distribution of buildings (Figure 1). Each of these three activity categories included more than 600,000 buildings, while no other building activity had more than a half-million buildings and only service buildings exceeded 350,000 buildings. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

430

All Office Administrative/ Professional Government All Other  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 824 442 84 298 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) Small (1,001 to 5,000)........................ 2,552 503 273 Q 189 Medium (5,001 to 50,000).................. 1,868 285 147 38 100 Large (Over 50,000)........................... 225 35 21 5 9 Year Constructed Before 1960 ...................................... 1,419 230 158 21 51 1960 to 1989...................................... 2,016 414 204 47 163 1990 to 2003...................................... 1,210 180 80 17 83 Census Region and Division Northeast........................................... 726 155 87 19 49 New England................................... 233 47 26 Q Q Middle Atlantic................................. 493 108 61 11 36 Midwest............................................. 1,266 231 120 28 83 East North Central...........................

431

"Table HC15.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,7.1,6.8,7.9,11.9 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,7.1,6.6,7.9,11.4 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"N","Q","N",0.5 "Space Heating Usage During 2005" "Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)"

432

Professional","Government ","All Other Office"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Types of Office Building, Number of Buildings, 2003" 2. Types of Office Building, Number of Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Office Buildings" ,,"All Office","Administrative/ Professional","Government ","All Other Office" "All Buildings",4645,824,442,84,298 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "Small (1,001 to 5,000)",2552,503,273,"Q",189 "Medium (5,001 to 50,000)",1868,285,147,38,100 "Large (Over 50,000)",225,35,21,5,9 "Year Constructed" "Before 1960 ..................",1419,230,158,21,51 "1960 to 1989",2016,414,204,47,163 "1990 to 2003",1210,180,80,17,83 "Census Region and Division"

433

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 2 Table 2. Photocopiers in Commercial Buildings, 1999 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Photocopiers (thousand) Photocopiers per Million Square Feet Photocopiers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657 67,338 81,852 4,934 73 60 Principal Building Activity Education 327 8,651 8,927 433 50 48 Food Sales 174 994 980 41 42 42 Food Service 349 1,851 4,031 Q Q 26 Health Care 127 2,918 6,219 401 138 65 Inpatient 11 1,865 3,350 187 100 56 Outpatient 116 1,053 2,869 214 204 75 Lodging 153 4,521 2,356 78 17 33 Mercantile 667 10,398 11,384 526 51 46

434

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 A7. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Number of Establishments in Building One Two to Five Six to Ten Eleven to Twenty More than Twenty Currently Unoccupied All Buildings ................................ 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q

435

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,476,1864,819,65,579,953,205 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,258,1039,415,"Q",162,423,121 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,63,391,170,"Q",105,214,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,86,307,142,18,138,170,28

436

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,824,277,71,370,622,597 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,503,119,37,152,434,294 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,127,67,"Q",104,100,110 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,116,69,"Q",83,66,130 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,43,9,"Q",27,17,27

437

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. This report introduces several innovations in energy data reporting that complement the previously published triennial reports of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). (1) Both residential and commercial sector buildings data are presented together in the report. Common units of analysis, the residential or commercial building and floorspace, are used to facilitate comparison.17 (2) Unlike the triennial RECS and CBECS that

438

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

439

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

440

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

442

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

443

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

444

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

445

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

446

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Profile Lighting Equipment - Type and Characteristics of Equipment Emits Found In Incandescent Incandescent Light Bulb Produces light by electrically heating a tungsten filament Includes energy-efficient incandescent bulbs, such as Reflector or R-Lamps (accent and task lighting), Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR) lamps (flood and spot lighting), and Ellipsoidal Reflector (ER) lamps (recessed lighting) Highly inefficient because much of the energy is lost as heat 14-18 Lumens Per Watt (LPW) 14% of Lit Commercial Floorspace Standard Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballast Standard Fluorescent with Magnetic Ballast Produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce

447

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Principal Building Activity Office Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Religious Worship Service Warehouse and Storage All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 824 277 71 370 622 597 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 503 119 37 152 434 294 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 127 67 Q 104 100 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 116 69 Q 83 66 130 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 43 9 Q 27 17 27 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 17 7 Q Q Q 21 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 65 11 6 Q Q Q 8

448

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Lit Buildings Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply) Incand- escent Standard Fluor- escent Compact Fluor- escent High-Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 4,248 2,184 3,943 941 455 565 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 2,261 1,070 2,068 382 101 205 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 821 416 772 148 88 107 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 716 412 665 189 105 123 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 231 145 223 102 60 55 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 126 75 123 60 51 37

449

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 8. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Heated Buildings Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,982 476 1,864 819 65 579 953 205 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 2,100 258 1,039 415 Q 162 423 121 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 782 63 391 170 Q 105 214 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 659 86 307 142 18 138 170 28 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 225 33 76 49 9 78 69 13

450

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Energy Used For (more than one may apply) Space Heating Cooling Water Heating Cooking Manu- facturing All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,982 3,625 3,472 801 119 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 2,100 1,841 1,715 354 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 782 732 725 155 29 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 659 629 607 127 28 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 225 216 217 69 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 123 118 119 50 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 65 62 60 60 28 3

451

a7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 43 13 6 5 4 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 15 5 Q 1 3 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 8 3 1 Q Q 3 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service .....................................

452

Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 Q Q Q 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 1.3 0.9 0.4 500 to 999......................................................... 27.7 5.6 4.2 1.4 1,000 to 1,499................................................... 26.0 4.3 3.3 1.1 1,500 to 1,999................................................... 17.6 3.0 2.3 0.7 2,000 to 2,499...................................................

453

EI Summary of SIC 35  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Machinery (35) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Machinery (35) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in manufacturing industrial and commercial machinery and equipment, and computers. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 35 Source: Table 12 of this report.

454

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

455

EI Summary of SIC 26  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper (26) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Paper (26) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of pulps from wood and other cellulose fibers, and from rags; the manufacture of paper and paperboard; and the manufacture of paper and paperboard into converted products, such as paper coated off the paper machine, paper bags, paper boxes, and envelopes. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace

456

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

457

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

458

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for 0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................ 1,602 1,397 125 Q 69 0.11 0.09 0.01 Q (*) Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ......................... 249 228 Q (*) Q 0.41 0.38 Q (*) Q 5,001 to 10,000 ....................... 261 237 Q 1 Q 0.37 0.33 Q (*) Q 10,001 to 25,000 ..................... 196 177 10 (*) Q 0.20 0.18 0.01 (*) Q 25,001 to 50,000 ..................... 117 112 Q (*) 4 0.14 0.14 Q (*) (*)

459

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

460

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attrition floorspace attrition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

462

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2011 to 2040 figure data Population growth affects energy use through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and economic activity. The effects can be mitigated, however, as the structure and efficiency of the U.S. economy change. In the AEO2013 Reference case, U.S. population increases by 0.9 percent per year from 2011 to 2040; the economy, as measured by GDP, increases at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent; and total energy consumption increases by 0.3 percent per year. As a result, energy intensity, measured both as energy use per person and as energy use per dollar of GDP, declines through the projection period (Figure 52). The decline in energy use per capita is brought about largely by gains in

463

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

464

c38a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings .................................... 9,470 113.98 108.4 1.31 11.45 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 34,658 121.16 Q Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 77,419 93.60 834.8 1.01 10.78 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 5,223 116.63 Q Q Q Food Sales .......................................

465

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

466

Microsoft Word - appa.docx  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Total floorspace (billion square feet) Surviving ............................................................. 79.3 80.2 87.0 91.9 96.2 100.7 106.4 1.0% New additions ..................................................... 1.8 1.5 2.1 2.0 2.0 2.3 2.4 1.6% Total ................................................................. 81.1 81.7 89.1 93.9 98.1 103.0 108.8 1.0% Energy consumption intensity (thousand Btu per square foot) Delivered energy consumption ........................... 105.6 105.2 100.4 98.1 97.2 95.8 93.8 -0.4%

467

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2010 to 2035 figure data Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use but also the mix of fuels consumed. Changes in the structure of the economy and in the efficiency of the equipment deployed throughout the economy also have an impact on energy use per capita. The shift in the industrial sector away from energy-intensive manufacturing toward services is one reason for the projected decline in industrial energy intensity (energy use per dollar of GDP), but its impact on energy consumption per capita is less direct (Figure 71). From 1990 to

468

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

469

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Energy Demand Commercial Sector Energy Demand On This Page End-use efficiency... Growth in electricity use... Core technologies... Improved interconnection... End-use efficiency improvements could lower energy consumption per capita The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. figure data

470

b20.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,657 4,657 4,016 1,880 2,380 377 96 307 94 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 1,982 926 1,082 214 Q 162 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 946 379 624 73 Q 88 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 629 324 389 52 19 42 Q 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 237 129 143 20 17 7 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 137 74 89 9 13 5 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 57 34 35 6 7 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 22 11 13 3 3 Q Q Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 7 4 4 1 2 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education ....................................................

471

b12.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,657 4,657 4,135 2,801 1,099 236 521 63 83 375 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 2,348 2,131 1,433 548 151 216 Q Q 175 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 1,110 1,006 693 250 Q 104 Q Q 70 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 708 618 431 172 15 91 Q 14 64 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 257 202 129 68 Q 55 Q 19 33 50,001 to 100,000 ........................................ 145 109 69 39 Q 36 Q 11 21 100,001 to 200,000 ...................................... 59 47 29 17 Q 13 2 3 8 200,001 to 500,000 ...................................... 23 18 13 4 Q 5 Q 2 3 Over 500,000 ............................................... 7 5 5 1 Q 2 1 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education ....................................................

472

b13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 824 277 71 370 622 597 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 503 119 37 152 434 294 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 127 67 Q 104 100 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 116 69 Q 83 66 130 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 43 9 Q 27 17 27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 17 7 Q Q Q 21 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 11 6 Q Q Q 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 5 Q Q Q Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 2 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 330 70 31 Q 65 Q 20 1920 to 1945 ..................................... 527 85 36 Q 52 90 39 1946 to 1959 ..................................... 562 75 45 Q 58 59 44 1960 to 1969 .....................................

473

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Buildings with Space Heating Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,982 1,258 1,999 282 63 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 2,100 699 955 171 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 782 233 409 58 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 659 211 372 32 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 225 63 140 8 9 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 123 32 73 6 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 65 62 15 33 Q 9

474

b19.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,754 643 55 23 14 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,131 311 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 720 136 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 590 104 22 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 163 50 11 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 87 25 4 5 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 43 11 4 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 15 5 Q 1 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 3 1 Q Q 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 270 26 Q N N N Health Care .......................................

475

AtAGlance2.vp:CorelVentura 7.0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration Administration A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures EN AT A GLANCE: Commercial Buildings in Perspective In-depth information about how energy is used by commercial buildings is provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in this analysis of its 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey results. Energy use and costs are analyzed by using the buildings' energy-related characteristics, such as size, age, location, and activity (for example, retail sales). Energy uses and sources are also covered. Commercial buildings typically are small, They average 13 thousand square feet, with fewer than 5 percent of buildings being larger than 50 thousand square feet, the size of a large supermarket. However, total commercial floorspace in the United States exceeds the area of the State of Delaware

476

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Buildings with Water Heating Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Propane All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,472 1,910 1,445 94 27 128 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 1,715 1,020 617 41 N 66 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 725 386 307 Q Q 27 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 607 301 285 16 Q 27 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 217 110 114 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 119 53 70 Q 5 Q

477

More Workers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 5. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,2653,778,563,398,147,77,30 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1879,422,202,43,"Q","Q","N" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,452,192,146,87,"Q","Q","N" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,268,134,154,131,42,"Q","N"

478

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Education","Food Sales","Food Service","Health Care",,"Lodging","Retail (Other Than Mall)" ,,,,,"Inpatient","Outpatient" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,386,226,297,8,121,142,443 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,162,164,202,"N",56,38,241 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,56,44,65,"N",38,21,97 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,60,"Q",23,"Q",19,38,83

479

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Cooling Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 0. Cooling Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Build- ings* Cooled Build- ings Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply) Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners Heat Pumps Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners District Chilled Water Central Chillers Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units Swamp Coolers Other All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 1,841 581 260 383 Q Q 678 58 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 732 207 78 134 Q Q 367 26 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 629 140 87 114 Q 26 332 26 Q

480

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3754,643,55,23,14,157 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2131,311,"Q","Q","N",100 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,720,136,"Q","N","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,590,104,22,"Q","Q","Q"

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

1999 CBECS Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Building Characteristics | Consumption & Expenditures Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. A table of Relative Standard Errors (RSEs) is included as a worksheet tab in each Excel tables. Complete sets of RSE tables are also available in .pdf format. (What is an RSE?) Preliminary End-Use Consumption Estimates for 1999 | Description of 1999 Detailed Tables and Categories of Data

482

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

483

Buildings*","Energy Used For  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,3625,3472,801,119 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,1841,1715,354,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,732,725,155,29 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,629,607,127,28 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,216,217,69,"Q" "50,001 to 100,000 ............",129,123,118,119,50,8

484

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

485

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

486

Description of CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Description of Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are as