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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation has long been identified as a method to abate such heat gains. We present test results from using the photovoltaic (PV) attic ventilator fans in a test home to assess impact on attic and cooling energy performance.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California (Fact Sheet), Building America...

3

Simulated Attic Radiant Barrier Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent EPRI evaluation determined that attic radiant barriers installed under roof decks are increasingly effective in reducing cooling energy use as insolation increases and ceiling insulation thickness decreases. A savings worksheet included in this report allows rapid estimation of these energy cost impacts.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Conditioned Attics Overview | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioned Attics Overview Conditioned Attics Overview Adequate attic ventilation is a long-standing requirement in building codes. However, conditioned, unvented attics have the potential to reduce residential energy needs and are allowed by code under certain conditions. Such assemblies are sometimes called cathedralized attics because, as with cathedral ceilings, the insulation is in the rafters and/or roof deck. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ta_conditioned_attics_overview.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Document Number: PNNL-SA-57260 Focus: Compliance Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies

5

Humidity in Attics -- Sources and Control Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for the control of moisture in attics are in a state of flux. The 1981 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals gives only ''Past Practice'', and notes that such practice might not be currently valid. Furthermore, in the past it was assumed that the attic was an inert structure on which moisture would either condense or pass through unaffected. Results are presented which show that the attic is in a constant state of flux, absorbing and releasing moisture. A mathematical model for predicting the moisture content of attic wood members is presented. The model is used to predict hour-by-hour attic air humidity ratio, and seasonal wood moisture content. Results are compared with measured data. The application of the model to the re-calculation of attic ventilation standards is discussed, both with respect to condensation and wood rot.

Cleary, Peter

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Attics Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems William (Bill) Miller, Ph.D. ORNL WML@ORNL.GOV____ (865) 574-2013 April 4, 2013 Goals: Develop New Roof and Attic Designs  Reduce Space Conditioning Due to Attic  Convince Industry to Adopt Designs Building Envelope Program  Dr. William Miller  Dr. Som Shrestha  Kaushik Biswas, Ken Childs, Jerald Atchley, Phil Childs Andre Desjarlais (Group Leader) 32% Primary Energy 28% Primary Energy 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives

7

Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple duct system was installed in an attic test module for a large scale climate simulator at a US national laboratory. The goal of the tests and subsequent modeling was to develop an accurate method of assessing duct system performance in the laboratory, enabling limiting conditions to be imposed at will and results to be applied to residential attics with attic duct systems. Steady-state tests were done at a severe summer and a mild winter condition. In all tests the roof surface was heated above ambient air temperatures by infrared lights. The attic test module first included then did not include the duct system. Attic ventilation from eave vents to a ridge vent was varied from none to values achievable by a high level of power ventilation. A radiant barrier was attached to the underside of the roof deck, both with and without the duct system in place. Tests were also done without the radiant barrier, both with and without the duct system. When installed, the insulated ducts ran along the floor of the attic, just above the attic insulation and along the edge of the attic near the eaves and one gable. These tests in a climate simulator achieved careful control and reproducibility of conditions. This elucidated dependencies that would otherwise be hidden by variations in uncontrolled variables. Based on the comparisons with the results of the tests at the mild winter condition and the severe summer condition, model predictions for attic air and insulation temperatures should be accurate within {+-} 10 F ({+-} 6 C). This is judged adequate for design purposes and could be better when exploring the effect of changes in attic and duct parameters at fixed climatic conditions.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.; Wilkes, K.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Next Generation Roofs and Attics for Homes  

SciTech Connect

Prototype residential roof and attic assemblies were constructed and field tested in a mixed-humid U.S. climate. Summer field data showed that at peak day irradiance the heat transfer penetrating the roof deck dropped almost 90% compared with heat transfer for a conventional roof and attic assembly. The prototype assemblies use a combination of strategies: infrared reflective cool roofs, radiant barriers, above-sheathing ventilation, low-emittance surfaces, insulation, and thermal mass to reduce the attic air temperature and thus the heat transfer into the home. The prototype assemblies exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor air temperature. Field results were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for the densely populated, hot and dry southeastern and central-basin regions of California. New construction in the central basin could realize a 12% drop in ceiling and air-conditioning annual load compared with a code-compliant roof and attic having solar reflectance of 0.25 and thermal emittance of 0.75. In the hot, dry southeastern region of California, the combined ceiling and duct annual load drops by 23% of that computed for a code-compliant roof and attic assembly. Eliminating air leakage from ducts placed in unconditioned attics yielded savings comparable to the best simulated roof and attic systems. Retrofitting an infrared reflective clay tile roof with 1 -in (0.032-m) of EPS foam above the sheathing and improving existing ductwork by reducing air leakage and wrapping ducts with insulation can yield annual savings of about $200 compared with energy costs for pre-1980 construction.

Miller, William A [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

K. Hovnanian Homes constructed a 2,253-ft single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

Not Available

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant barriers laid on top of the insulation, and for radiant barriers attached to the bottom of the top chords of the attic trusses. The models include features such as a radiation interchange analysis within the attic space, convective coupling with the ventilation air, and sorption/desorption of moisture at surfaces facing the attic enclosure. The paper gives details of the models and the engineering assumptions that were made in their development. The paper also reports on the status of efforts that are underway to verify the models by comparing their predictions with the results of laboratory and field tests on residential attics and test cells, both with and without radiant barriers. Comparisons are given for a number of selected sets of experimental data. Suggestions are given for needed model refinements and additional experimental data. Plans for utilization of the models for extrapolation to seasonal and annual performance in a variety of climatic conditions are also described.

Wilkes, K. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Numerical heat transfer attic model using a radiant barrier system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, steady-state finite-element model was developed to simulate the thermal effects of the application of an attic radiant barrier system (ARBS) inside a ventilated residential attic. The attic is ventilated using the exhaust air from an evaporative cooler. The study uses a {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulent model to describe the velocity and temperature distributions in the attic. The ambient temperature and solar isolation densities on the outside inclined attic surfaces are used as driving functions for the model. The model also included the appropriate heat exchange modes of convection and radiation on these outside surfaces. Several recirculation zones were visually observed in the attic flow pattern. Also, the use of the ARBS seems to lower the heat transfer through the ceiling by 25--30%, but this effect decreases significantly as the outside ventilation rates are increased through the attic space. The 2D model revealed some interesting temperature distributions along the attic surfaces that could not have been predicted by the one-dimensional models. The lower emissivity ARBS seems to raise the temperature of the inclined attic surfaces as well as the temperature of the exhausted ventilation air.

Moujaes, S.F.; Alsaiegh, N.T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Analysis of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using Mathematical Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past six years, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has conducted extensive experimental research on radiant barrier systems (RBS). This paper presents recent research on the development of mathematical attic models. Two levels of modeling capability have been developed. A very simplified model based on ASHRAE procedures in used to study the sensitivity of RBS performance parameters, and a very detailed finite element model is used to study highly complex phenomena, including moisture adsorption and desorption in attics. The speed of the simple model allows a large range of attic parameters to be studies quickly, and the finite element model provides a detailed understanding of combined heat and moisture transport in attics. This paper concentrates on a parametric analysis of attic RBS using the simplified model. The development of the model is described, and results of the parametric analyses are presented and discussed. Preliminary results from the finite element model are also compared with measurements from a test attic to illustrate the effects of moisture adsorption and desorption in common attics.

Fairey, P.; Swami, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Thermal Performance of Unvented Attics in Hot-Dry Climates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As unvented attics become a more common design feature implemented by Building America partners in hot-dry climates of the United States, more attention has been focused on how this approach affects heating and cooling energy consumption. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has conducted field testing and hourly building simulations for several Building America projects to evaluate energy use in vented and unvented attics in hot-dry climates. In summer, testing of the Las Vegas protoype house demonstrated that the thermal performance of an unvented attic is highly dependent on duct leakage.

Hendron, B.; Anderson, R.; Reeves, P.; Hancock, E.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effect of attic ventilation on the performance of radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the experiments was to quantify how attic ventilation would affect the performance of a radiant barrier. Ceiling heat flux and space cooling load were both measured. Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 13.38 m[sup 2] (nominal) test houses are presented in this paper. The test houses responded similarly to weather variations. Indoor temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.2 [degrees] C. Ceiling heat fluxes and space cooling load were within a 2.5 percent difference between both test houses. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate of 1.3 (1/sec)/m[sup 2] of the attic floor existed after which the percentage reduction in ceiling heat fluxes produced by the radiant barriers did not change with increasing attic airflow rates. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barriers were between 25 and 35 percent, with 28 percent being the percent reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. The space-cooling load reductions observed were between two to four percent. All results compiled in this paper were for attics with unfaced fiberglass insulation with a resistance level of 3.35 m[sup 2]K/W (nominal) and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities (less than 0.05) on both sides.

Medina, M.A.; O'Neal, D.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Turner, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft paper faced nominal R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicated that the most effective way of installing the foil was to lay it on top of the fiberglass batt insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to house by approximately 30-35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Moisture performance of sealed attics in the mixed-humid climate  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory studied 8 homes in the mixed-humid climate, 4 with vented attics and 4 with sealed attics. ORNL wanted to understand the moisture performance of the sealed attic and how it affected the interior environment. We found that the attic and interior of sealed attic homes were more humid than the attic and interior observed in vented attic homes. This is due to the lack of ventilation in the sealed attic. Historically attics have been vented to dehumidify the attic and interior of the home. A sealed attic design greatly reduces the venting potential and thus this drying pathway and can cause elevated interior moisture over a vented attic home. Despite the elevated attic and interior moisture in the sealed attic homes, so far no mold or material degradation has been found. The roof sheathing moisture content has stayed below 20%, indicating low potential for material degradation. Also the relative humidity at the roof sheathing has stayed within the ASHRAE 160 design criteria except for a short time during the 2011/2012 winter. This was due to a combination of the sealed attic design (minimal venting to the outside) and the duct work not being operated in the attic which usually provides a dehumidification pathway. It was also found that when the humidity was controlled using the HVAC system, it resulted in 7% more cooling energy consumption. In the mixed-humid climate this reduces the cost effectiveness of the sealed attic design as a solution for bringing ducts into a semi-conditioned space. Because of this we are recommending the other alternatives be used to bringing ducts into the conditioned space in both new construction and retrofit work in the mixed-humid climate.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Pallin, Simon B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cooling energy measurements of houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The radiant barrier has the potential to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. Working as a system in conjunction with an air space, the radiant barrier could theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption was 17% and 9%, respectively.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.; Knight, D.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study concerned with different modes of heal transfer in fibrous and cellulose insulating material is presented. A series of experiments were conducted using an attic simulator to determine the effects of ventilation on attic heat transfer, and the effect of infrared radiation on the thermal conductivity of the insulation system and on attic heat transfer. All the tests were performed at steady state conditions by controlling the roof deck temperature. Calculations are performed for insulation thicknesses between 1 inch (2.54cm) and 6.0 inches (15.24cm) and roof deck temperatures between 145F (62.78C) and 100F (36.78C). The temperature profiles within the insulation were measured by placing thermocouples at various levels within the insulation. The profiles for the cellulose insulation are linear. The profiles within the glass fiber insulation are non-linear due to the effect of infrared radiation. Also heat fluxes were measured through different insulation thicknesses and for different roof temperatures. It was found that a radiant barrier such as aluminum foil can reduce the heat flux significantly. Experimental results were compared to a Three-Region approximate solution developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The model was in good agreement with experimental results.

Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Thermal Performance of Unvented Attics in Hot-Dry Climates: Results from Building America; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unvented attics have become a more common design feature implemented by Building America partners in hot-dry climates of the United States. More attention is being focused on how this approach affects heating and cooling energy consumption. By eliminating the ridge and eave vents that circulate outside air through the attic and by moving the insulation from the attic floor to the underside of the roof, an unvented attic become a semi-conditioned space, creating a more benign environment for space conditioning ducts.

Hendron, R.; Farrar-Nagy, S.; Anderson, R.; Reeves, P.; Hancock, E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weight Room & Gym Weight Room & Gym Weight Room & Gym Hours Monday-Friday 7-9am Monday-Friday 11am-9pm Saturday 10am-2pm CLOSED Saturdays between Memorial Day & Labor Day. Note: the Weight Room is NOT open to the public. Please check the Gym Activity Schedule to get up-to-date information. The BERA Body Building Club weight room is located in the rear of the Gym in Bldg 461. Tours & information are always available. Contact Christine Carter at ext. 5090 to schedule a tour. How to Join the BERA Bodybuilding Club (BBC) New Members & Renewals 2014 NEW information where & when to sign up for gym weight room Weight Room use is open to employees, guest/contractors, spouse/partner and children over 18 only (NO other extended family). Retirees are FREE. Any guest/contractor or family member (this includes spouse/partner or adult children) wishing to use the Weight Room MUST present their medical insurance card and initial a receipt that states they have insurance in place in order to participate. The Recreation Office (Bldg 400) will keep this receipt on file. Proof of Medical Insurance.

22

Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages  

SciTech Connect

This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

Neuhauser, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy Savings: Attics by Kristine Solomon, Posted Aug 2nd 2010 1:00PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

even more by installing a ridge-and-soffit ventilation system. Page 1 of 2Energy Savings: Attics - DIY's Green Home Guide. Page 2 of 2Energy Savings: Attics - DIY Life 9/14/2010http://www.diylife.com/2010

24

Solar energy for a community recreation center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 58,000 ft/sup 2/ recreation center in Shenandoah, Georgia is described. Rooftop solar collectors and reflectors serve as a basis for the active solar heating and cooling systems. The recreation center clearly demonstrates the technical feasibility of solar application in a recreation setting; economically, however, results are shown to be mixed. Although effective in the heating mode, solar cooling is considered as questionable in terms of a reasonable payoff period. A computer model predicts a payoff period of 11 years based on 1977 energy prices. The design and construction costs of the solar heating and cooling system ($726,000) was 90% financed by ERDA. A hockey-size ice rink and a gymnasium plus locker rooms and meeting rooms comprised the major part of the floor space. Problems encountered and operation of the facility are described. (MJJ)

Libman, D.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Hygrothermal Risk Analysis Applied to Residential Unvented Attics  

SciTech Connect

Aresidential building, constructed with an unvented attic, is acommonroof assembly in the United States.The expected hygrothermal performance and service life of the roof are difficult to estimate due to a number of varying parameters.Typical parameters expected to vary are the climate, direction, and slope of the roof as well as the radiation properties of the surface material. Furthermore, influential parameters are indoor moisture excess, air leakages through the attic floor, and leakages from air-handling unit and ventilation ducts. In addition, the type of building materials such as the insulation material and closed or open cell spray polyurethane foam will influence the future performance of the roof. A development of a simulation model of the roof assembly will enable a risk and sensitivity analysis, in which the most important varying parameters on the hygrothermal performance can be determined. The model is designed to perform probabilistic simulations using mathematical and hygrothermal calculation tools. The varying input parameters can be chosen from existing measurements, simulations, or standards. An analysis is applied to determine the risk of consequences, such as mold growth, rot, or energy demand of the HVAC unit. Furthermore, the future performance of the roof can be simulated in different climates to facilitate the design of an efficient and reliable roof construction with the most suitable technical solution and to determine the most appropriate building materials for a given climate

Pallin, Simon B [ORNL] [ORNL; Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint  

SciTech Connect

As energy-efficiency efforts focus increasingly on existing homes, we scratch our heads about construction decisions made 30, 40, 50-years ago and ask: 'What were they thinking?' A logical follow-on question is: 'What will folks think in 2050 about the homes we're building today?' This question can lead to a lively discussion, but the current practice that we find most alarming is placing ducts in the attic. In this paper, we explore through literature and analysis the impact duct location has on cooling load, peak demand, and energy cost in hot climates. For a typical new home in these climates, we estimate that locating ducts in attics rather than inside conditioned space increases the cooling load 0.5 to 1 ton, increases cooling costs 15% and increases demand by 0.75 kW. The aggregate demand to service duct loss in homes built in Houston, Las Vegas, and Phoenix during the period 2000 through 2009 is estimated to be 700 MW. We present options for building homes with ducts in conditioned space and demonstrate that these options compare favorably with other common approaches to achieving electricity peak demand and consumption savings in homes.

Roberts, D.; Winkler, J.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Thermal Performance Evaluation of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS)  

SciTech Connect

Application of radiant barriers and low-emittance surface coatings in residential building attics can significantly reduce conditioning loads from heat flow through attic floors. The roofing industry has been developing and using various radiant barrier systems and low-emittance surface coatings to increase energy efficiency in buildings; however, minimal data are available that quantifies the effectiveness of these technologies. This study evaluates performance of various attic radiant barrier systems under simulated summer daytime conditions and nighttime or low solar gain daytime winter conditions using the large scale climate simulator (LSCS). The four attic configurations that were evaluated are 1) no radiant barrier (control), 2) perforated low-e foil laminated oriented strand board (OSB) deck, 3) low-e foil stapled on rafters, and 4) liquid applied low-emittance coating on roof deck and rafters. All test attics used nominal RUS 13 h-ft2- F/Btu (RSI 2.29 m2-K/W) fiberglass batt insulation on attic floor. Results indicate that the three systems with radiant barriers had heat flows through the attic floor during summer daytime condition that were 33%, 50%, and 19% lower than the control, respectively.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modeling attic humidity as a function of weather, building construction, and ventilation rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic model for predicting attic relative humidity (RH) and roof-sheathing moisture content (MC) was developed for microcomputer application. The model accepts standard hourly weather data and building-design parameters as input. Model predictions gave good agreement with measured data from a house located in Madison, Wisconsin. Solar radiation varies with roof orientation and plays an important role in determining moisture transfer to and from the roof sheathing. Opposing roof surfaces must be differentiated in attic humidity models to account for the effect of solar radiation. The model described in this paper is capable of such differentiation. Snow accumulation on a roof can significantly alter the temperature and moisture conditions in an attic, but further research is needed to understand the effect of a snow layer on attic temperatures. Various scenarios were simulated with this model to determine the effect of building practice and ventilation strategies on roof sheathing MC. Direct control of RH in the living space by ventilation is very effective in lowering attic moisture conditions. Where natural ventilation is not adequate, a timer-controlled attic fan shows great promise for ensuring efficient and economical attic ventilation.

Gorman, T.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Unvented, Conditioned Attics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

additional heat loss and gain of ducts additional heat loss and gain of ducts in unconditioned, vented attics increases energy use for heating and cooling 10%. Additionally, duct air leakage has been measured to commonly exceed 20% of conditioned air flow, which results in a significant energy loss when ducts are in unconditioned space. In addition to influencing builders across the country to adopt unvented, conditioned attics, Building America research has helped influence code acceptance of this innovation since 2006. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.1 Building Science Solutions Unvented, Conditioned Attics The preference for a large segment of the U.S. housing industry has been to locate HVAC systems in unconditioned attics, but this is highly inefficient.

30

Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient July 18, 2011 - 5:29pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL This year at my house, we have been on a quest to make our attic more energy efficient. I think we realized just how much this unseen area contributes to our overall comfort -not to mention what we pay to heat and cool the house. The first thing we did was install more insulation this winter. In addition to the tax credits we'll be able to claim, there were several incentives available from our state and utility that made it a great time for us to make this improvement. Following the installation, we noticed an immediate improvement in the overall comfort of our home and the furnace seemed to

31

Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient July 18, 2011 - 5:29pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL This year at my house, we have been on a quest to make our attic more energy efficient. I think we realized just how much this unseen area contributes to our overall comfort -not to mention what we pay to heat and cool the house. The first thing we did was install more insulation this winter. In addition to the tax credits we'll be able to claim, there were several incentives available from our state and utility that made it a great time for us to make this improvement. Following the installation, we noticed an immediate improvement in the overall comfort of our home and the furnace seemed to

32

Internal Microclimate Resulting From Ventilated Attics in Hot and Humid Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ventilated spaces in the built environment create unique and beneficial microclimates. While the current trends in building physics suggest sealing attics and crawlspaces, comprehensive research still supports the benefits of the ventilated microclimate. Data collected at the University of Florida Energy Park show the attic environment of asphalt shingled roofs to be typically hotter than the outdoor conditions, but when properly ventilated sustains a much lower relative humidity. The hot, humid regions of the United States can utilize this internally convective, exchanging air mass to provide stable moisture levels within attic spaces. Positioning the buildings primary boundary at the ceiling deck allows for utilization of this buffer climate to minimize moisture trapping in insulation and maximize the insulations thermal benefits. This investigation concludes the conditions in a ventilated attic are stable through seasonal changes and promotes cost effective, energy efficient climate control of unconditioned spaces in hot, humid regions.

Mooney, B. L.; Porter, W. A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radiant Barrier Insulation Performance in Full Scale Attics with Soffit and Ridge Venting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a limited data base on the full scale performance of radiant barrier insulation in attics. The performance of RBS have been shown to be dependent on attic ventilation characteristics. Tests have been conducted on a duplex located in Florida with soffit and ridge venting to measure attic performance. The unique features of these experiments are accurate and extensive instrumentation with heat flow meters, field verification of HFM calibration, extensive characterization of the installed ceiling insulation, ventilation rate measurements and extensive temperature instrumentation. The attics are designed to facilitate experimental changes without damaging the installed insulation. RBS performance has been measured for two natural ventilation levels for soffit and ridge venting. Previously, no full scale data have been developed for these test configurations. Test data for each of the test configurations was acquired for a minimum of two weeks with some acquired over a five week period. The Rl9 insulation performed as expected.

Ober, D. G.; Volckhausen, T. W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Passive preheating of water-heater feed water (using attic heat)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Baseboard convectors were installed in a house attic to preheat water prior to entering the home water heater. The system was monitored and not found to be cost effective. (LEW)

Knudsen, E.T. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy measurements of attic radiant barriers installed in single-family houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the energy savings attributable to radiant barriers installed in attics of unoccupied single-family houses. Three levels of fiberglass attic insulation (R-11 ,R-19, and R-30) were tested with two types of barrier installation (horizontal and truss). The results showed that horizontally installed radiant barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing heating and cooling loads. Measured cooling load reductions ranged form 0 to 22% (compared to same attic insulation insulation R-value with no radiant barrier) and heating load changes from /plus/4% to /minus/10% were measured (compared to same attic insulation R-value with no radiant barrier). Radiant barriers appeared to decrease the heating and cooling loads more when lesser amounts of insulation (R-11 and R-19) were present in an attic. Minimal changes were measured when R-30 was present in an attic. Long-term effects of dust on the performance of radiant barriers as well as the effects of moisture condensing on the surface of a radiant barrier during cold winter temperatures remain unanswered.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

BERA Recreational Facilities for FREE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RETIREES are welcome to use the BERA Recreational Facilities for FREE CONGRATULATIONS on your retirement Retirees are requested to use the recreational facilities during off...

37

Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates  

SciTech Connect

Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Residential Attic Ventilation In A Hot And Humid Climate: Effects Of Increased Ventilation On Thermal Performance And Moisture Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The reality of the effect of natural ventilation in a residential attic cavity has been the topic of many debates and scholarly reports since (more)

Atherton, Stanley Arthur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Influence of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems on Air Conditioning Demand in an Utility Pilot Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A utility monitoring project has evaluated radiant barrier systems (RBS) as a new potential demand site management (DSM) program. The study examined how the retrofit of attic radiant barriers can be expected to alter utility residential space conditioning loads. An RBS consists of a layer of aluminum foil fastened to roof decking or roof trusses to block radiant heat transfer between the hot roof surface and the attic below. The radiant barrier can significantly lower summer heat transfer to the attic insulation and to the cooling duct system. Both of these mechanisms have strong potential impacts on cooling energy use as illustrated in Figures 1 and 2. The pilot project involved installation of RBS in nine homes that had been extensively monitored over the preceding year. The houses varied in conditioned floor area from 939 to 2,440 square feet; attic insulation varied from R-9 to R-30. The homes had shingle roofs with varying degrees of attic ventilation. The radiant barriers were installed during the summer of 2000. Data analysis on the pre and post cooling and heating consumption was used to determine impacts on energy use and peak demand for the utility. The average cooling energy savings from the RBS retrofit was 3.6 kWh/day, or about 9%. The average reduction in summer afternoon peak demand was 420 watts (or about 16%).

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

An attic-interior infiltration and interzone transport model of ahouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed model is developed for predicting the ventilation rates of the indoor, conditioned zone of a house and the attic zone. The complete set of algorithms is presented in a form for direct incorporation in a two zone ventilation model. One of the important predictions from this model is the leakage flow rate between the indoor and attic zones. Ventilation rates are predicted from a steady state mass flow rate balance for each zone where all individual flow rates through leakage sites are based on a power law expression for flow rate versus pressure difference. The envelope leakage includes distributed leakage associated with background leakage, localized leakage associated with vents and flues, and active fan ventilation. The predicted ventilation rates agree quite well with field measurements of ventilation rates in houses and attics with different leakage configurations, without the use of any empirically adjusted parameters or constants.

Walker, Iain S.; Forest, Tom W.; Wilson, David J.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 144 ft2 (nominal) test houses are presented. The test houses responded very similarly to weather variations prior to the retrofit. The temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.3F. Ceiling heat fluxes were within 2 percent for each house. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate (0.25 CFM/ft2 ) existed after which the percentage reduction produced by the radiant barrier systems was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented in this paper were for attics with R-19 unfaced fiberglass insulation and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities on both sides.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiant barriers were tested in attics of three unoccupied research houses which are located near Knoxville, Tennessee. The prime purpose of the testing was to determine the interaction, if any, between two types of radiant barriers, horizontal (barrier laid on top of attic insulation) and truss (barrier attached to underside of roof trusses), and three levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation, R-11, R-19, and R-30. Testing of radiant barriers with R-19 fiberglass-batt attic insulation was done at the houses in the summer of 1985 and in the winter of 1985-86. The R-11 and R-30 testing was done in the summer of 1986. These results showed that horizontal barriers were more effective than truss barriers in reducing house cooling and heating loads. The summer of 1986 testing showed that increasing the attic insulation from R-11 to R-30 reduced the house cooling load (Btu) by approximately 16%. Adding a horizontal barrier to R-11 also reduced the cooling load compared to R-11 with no barrier by about 16%, while a truss barrier reduced it by 11%. A horizontal barrier with R-30 only reduced the cooling load by 2% compared to R-30 with no barrier, while an increase in the cooling load of 0.7% was measured with a truss barrier and R-30. Radiant barriers were not effective in reducing house cooling loads when R-30 attic insulation was present. The results from the summer of 1985 were integrated into the latest work through the use of a modeling effort using the building load simulation program, DOE-2.1B. This showed that R-19 insulation in conjunction with a horizontal barrier was (for Knoxville) the most effective barrier/insulation combination and could reduce the house cooling load by 25.1% compared to R-11 with no barrier.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cooling-energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test is a product with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The purpose of the radiant barrier is to reduce the radiant heat transfer component impinging on the fiberglass attic insulation. The radiant barrier works as a system in conjunction with an air space and can theoretically block up to 95% of far-infrared radiation heat transfer. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses that are operated by ORNL. Two variations on the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two different methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house the barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The results showed a savings in the cooling loads of 21% when the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass insulation and 13% with the radiant barrier attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The savings in electrical consumption were 17% and 9%, respectively. The electrical consumption data and the cooling load data indicate that the most effective way of installing the foil is to lay it on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barriers reduced the measured peak ceiling heat fluxes by 39% for the case where the barrier was laid on top of the fiberglass insulation. The radiant barrier reduced the integrated heat flows from the attic to the house by approximately 30 to 35% over a 7-day time period.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effect of Radiant Barrier Technology on Summer Attic Heat Load in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to experimentally evaluate the performance of radiant barriers in single-family occupied housing units in South Texas. Ceiling heat fluxes, attic air temperatures, indoor air temperatures, ambient air temperatures. roof temperatures, and solar radiation were measured. Results of the radiant barrier experiment using two side-by-side 600 ft2 units are presented. Attic fiberglass insulation of nominal R-11 was installed in the two apartments when the units were last remodeled in 1974. The test houses responded similarly to weather variations, that is, attic temperature and heat flux profiles were similar in magnitude prior to the retrofit. Residents of the housing units were asked to set the thermostats at 76F. Data were analyzed for periods of time which had the greatest attic temperatures (11 a.m. - 11 p.m.) and for which the indoor temperature differences were less than 1 percent. The results showed that radiant barriers reduced ceiling heat loads (on daily basis) by an average of 60 percent.

Ashley, R.; Garcia, O.; Medina, M. A.; Turner, W. D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

An Evaluation of the Placement of the Placement of Radiant Barriers on their Effectiveness in Reducing Heat Transfer in Attics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental tests were conducted to measure the influence of radiant barriers and the effect of the radiant barrier location on attic heat transfer. All the tests were conducted in an attic simulator at a steady state. The heat flux through the attic floor was measured at two different roof deck temperatures (120F and 140F). The temperature distribution within the base fibrous insulation was also measured. Three different solid kraft laminates with aluminum foil backing were tested. There was a 34 percent reduction (sample A) in heat flux through the ceiling for the case where the radiant barrier was placed 6 inches below the roof deck in addition to the base fibrous insulation (R-11), with the roof deck at 140 F. The reduction for the same sample with the radiant barrier placed on the studs of the attic floor was 46 percent. For all the three samples, the heat flux through the attic floor was reduced when the radiant barrier was placed on the attic floor studs.

Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Brookhaven Employees' Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to BERA Brookhaven Employees' Recreation Association The BERA Store will be CLOSED next Wednesday & Thursday, Oct 9 & 10. BNL Facilities are not open to the Public...

47

Solar-assisted electric clothes dryer using a home attic as a heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of using a southeastern home attic as a means of reducing the energy consumption of an electric clothes dryer. An inexpensive duct (duplicable for $25) was constructed to collect hot attic air from the peak of a south facing roof and introduce it into the dryer inlet. Instrumentation was added to measure inlet temperatures and operating time/energy consumption of the dryer. Standardized test loads, in addition to normal laundry, were observed over the period of one year. The heat-on time of the dryer tested was shown to be reduced .16 to .35 minutes per /sup 0/C rise in inlet temperature. Inlet temperatures produced by the attic duct peaked at 56/sup 0/C(133/sup 9/F) in May/June and 40/sup 0/C(104/sup 0/F) in February. Based on peak temperatures available between 2 and 4 pm each month, a potential 20% yearly average savings could be realized. Economic viability of the system, dependant primarily on dryer usage, can be computed using a formula derived from the test results and included in the report.

Stana, J.M.

48

Heating energy measurements of unoccupied single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the heating energy savings achieved by installing attic radiant barriers. The radiant barriers used for the test consist of a material with two reflective aluminum surfaces on a kraft paper base. The experiment was conducted in three unoccupied research houses operated by ORNL. Two variations in the installation of radiant barriers were studied. One house was used as the control house (no barrier was installed), while the other two were used to test the two methods for installing the radiant barriers. In one house, the radiant barrier was laid on top of the attic fiberglass batt insulation, and in the other house, the barrier was attached to the underside of the roof trusses. The attics of all three houses were insulated with a kraft-paper-faced R-19 fiberglass batt insulation. The winter test with the radiant barrier showed that the horizontal barrier was able to save space-heating electical energy in both the resistance and heat pump modes amounting to 10.1% and 8.5%, respectively. The roof truss radiant barrier increased consumption by 2.6% in the resistance mode and 4.0% in the heat pump mode. The horizontal orientation of the radiant barrier is the more energy-effective method of installation.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A transient heat and mass transfer model of residential attics used to simulate radiant barrier retrofits. Part 1: Development  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a transient heat and mass transfer model of residential attics. The model is used to predict hourly ceiling heat gain/loss in residences with the purpose of estimating reductions in cooling and heating loads produced by radiant barriers. The model accounts for transient conduction, convection, and radiation and incorporates moisture and air transport across the attic. Environmental variables, such as solar loads on outer attic surfaces and sky temperatures, are also estimated. The model is driven by hourly weather data which include: outdoor dry bulb air temperature, horizontal solar and sky radiation, wind speed and direction, relative humidity (or dew point), and cloud cover data. The output of the model includes ceiling heat fluxes, inner and outer heat fluxes from all surfaces, inner and outer surface temperatures, and attic dry bulb air temperatures. The calculated fluxes have been compared to experimental data of side-by-side testing of attics retrofit with radiant barriers. The model predicts ceiling heat flows with an error of less than 10% for most cases.

Medina, M.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; O`Neal, D.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Turner, W.D. [Texas Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

BERA Forms, Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Forms PDF Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view some files on this page. Get Reader | troubleshoot Request to serve Alcohol on-Site Form and Alcohol Policy (pdf) Guidelines to start a new BERA Club/Activity (pdf) Injury Report Form (pdf) Confirmation of Medical Insurance Receipt (pdf) BERA Club Activities - Insurance Information Weight Room or fitness activities: Any contractor or family member (this includes spouse/partner, adult children, guests/contractors) wishing to use the Weight Room MUST present a copy of their medical insurance card and initial a receipt that states they have insurance in place in order to participate in any fitness activities or the weight room. The Recreation Office (Bldg 400) will keep this receipt on file. BERA League Sports: BSA paid employees must fill out this BERA Sports Clearance Form* (pdf) and go through the clearance procedure with OMC @ 490 (not BERA Office). Once reviewed by OMC, the clearance form will be mailed to the player who must then furnish a copy to the captain in order to practice or play.

51

Outdoor Recreation Participation Trends in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outdoor recreation is a popular pastime in Texas. This publication reports on the participation and trends in outdoor recreation in the U.S. and Texas revealed in the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment conducted by the U.S. Forest Service.

Schuett, Michael A.; Shafer, Carl Scott; Lu, Jiaying

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

A transient heat and mass transfer model of residential attics used to simulate radiant barrier retrofits. Part 2: Validation and simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer program was developed and used to implement the model described on Part 1 of this paper. The program used an iterative process to predict temperatures and heat fluxes using linear algebra principles. The results from the program were compared to experimental data collected during a three-year period. The model simulated different conditions such as variations in attic ventilation, variations in attic ceiling insulation, and different radiant barrier orientations for summer and winter seasons. It was observed that the model predicted with an error of less than 10% for most cases. This paper presents model results for nonradiant barrier cases as well as cases for radiant barriers installed horizontally on top of the attic floor (HRB) and for radiant barriers stapled to the attic rafters (TRB). Savings produced by radiant barriers and sensitivity analyses are also presented. The model results supported the experimental trend that emissivity was the single most significant parameter that affected the performance of radiant barriers.

Medina, M.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Development of a Transient Heat and Mass Transfer Model of Residential Attics to Predict Energy Savings Produced by the Use of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transient heat and mass transfer model was developed to predict ceiling heat gain/loss through the attic space in residences and to accurately estimate savings in cooling and heating loads produced by the use of radiant barriers. The model accounted for transient conduction, convection and radiation and incorporated moisture and air transport across the attic. Environmental variables such as solar loads on outer attic surfaces and sky temperatures were also estimated. The model was driven by hourly weather data which included: time, outdoor air temperature, horizontal sun and sky radiation, wind speed and direction, relative humidity (dew point), and cloud cover data. The outputs of the model were ceiling heat fluxes, inner and outer heat fluxes from all surfaces, inner and outer surface temperatures and attic air temperatures. Transient conduction was modeled using response factors. Response factors were calculated for each attic component based on construction type. Convective heat transfer was modeled using flat plate correlations found in the literature and radiative heat transfer was modeled using radiation enclosure theory. Moisture was incorporated via a condensation/evaporation model. A new procedure was developed to account for attic air stratification. Both forced and natural attic ventilation patterns were added to the model for three types of louver combination arrangements. An iterative technique was used to solve a set of simultaneous heat balance equations. The model predictions were compared to experimental data gathered throughout a three year experimental effort of side-by-side testing of attics retrofit with radiant barriers. The model was compared to the experimental data for a variety of situations which included: different attic insulation levels, various attic airflow rates, cooling and heating seasons, and different radiant barrier orientations. The model predicted ceiling heat flows within 10% for most cases. The model was used to run simulations and parametric studies under a diversity of climates, insulation levels and attic airflow patterns. Model predictions and results were presented on the basis of savings produced by the use of radiant barriers. Hourly, daily, and seasonal predictions by the model were in excellent agreement with observed experimental data and with literature.

Medina, M. A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Marine Recreational Information Program | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recreational Information Program Recreational Information Program Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Marine Recreational Information Program Dataset Summary Description The Marine Recreational Information Program, or MRIP, is the new way NOAA Fisheries is counting and reporting marine recreational catch and effort. It is a customer-driven initiative that will not only produce better estimates, but will do so through a process grounded in the principles of transparency, accountability and engagement. MRIP replaces the Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey, or MRFSS, which has been in place since the 1970s. Tags {fish,fisheries," catch",angler,surveys,marinas,boats,pelagics,tunas,billfish,sharks,tournament," HMS",landings,tagging,logbooks,"US South Atlantic","Gulf of Mexico",Florida,"Puerto Rico",migratory,registry}

55

Fuel used for off-highway recreation  

SciTech Connect

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation by transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund of individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile.

Hu, P.S.; Trumble, D.; Lu, A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Recreation Information Database - RIDB | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recreation Information Database - RIDB Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities ...

57

AN EVALUATION OF A GRADUATE RECREATION CURRICULUM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the Recreation curriculum at Southern Illinois University, utilizing data collected from both alumni and students. The purpose of this study was to (more)

Gory, Ryan Patrick

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Heating energy measurements of single-family houses with attics containing radiant barriers in combustion with R-11 and R-30 ceiling insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the heating energy performance of two levels of fiberglass-batt attic insulation (R-11 and R-30) in combination with truss and horizontally installed radiant barriers. The tests, a continuation of work started in the summer of 1985, were conducted in three unoccupied ranch-style houses in Karns, Tennessee, during the winter of 1986-87. The measured results of the heating tests showed that a horizontal radiant barrier used with R-11 attic insulation reduced the house heating load by 9.3% compared with R-11 with no radiant barrier, while a truss barrier showed essentially no change in the heating load. Horizontal and truss barriers each reduced the heating load by 3.5% when added to R-30 attic insulation. Moisture condensed on the bottom of the horizontal barrier during cold early morning weather but usually dissipated in the warmer afternoon hours at Karns and left no accumulation in the insulation. Depending on the level of attic insulation, an annual heating and cooling HVAC savings ranging from $5 to $65 is estimated to be attainable when a radiant barrier is installed in the attic at Karns. 8 refs., 64 figs., 18 tabs.

Levins, W.P.; Karnitz, M.A.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training | National Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Old Y-12 utility poles put to use ... Old Y-12 utility poles put to use for recreation and training Posted By Office of Public Affairs Logs and trucks Maintenance Support and Utilities Management personnel at NNSA's Y-12

60

Recreation Information Database - RIDB | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recreation Information Database - RIDB Recreation Information Database - RIDB Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Recreation Information Database - RIDB Dataset Summary Description XML extractable listing of US Gov't Recreation sites Tags {recreation,camping,hiking,"visitor center","forest service","us army corps of engineers","national park service","bureau of reclamation","bureau of land management","fish and wildlife"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated Jun-09 Publisher US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fuel Used for Off-Highway Recreation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile. Two factors governed the development of this estimation procedure. First, individual state shares of the total Trust Funds need to be developed using a uniform approach. Second, data needed for the estimation procedure should be publicly available and easily obtainable so that estimates for all subsequent years can be generated easily. Estimates were developed based on existing data sources. Adjustment factors were developed to take into account different vehicular off-highway recreational usage among states.

Hu, P.S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inverted Attic Bulkhead for Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork Roseville, California PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Long-Term Monitoring of Occupied Test House Location: Roseville, CA Partners: K. Hovnanian® Homes®, www.khov.com IBACOS www.ibacos.com Building Component: Envelope, structural, HVAC ducts Construction: New Application: New; single and/or multifamily Year Tested: 2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Hot-dry climate PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index: 52 Projected Energy Savings: 11 million Btu/year heating and cooling savings Projected Energy Cost Savings: $116/year Modifying the truss system of a new home to accommodate ductwork within an inverted insulated bulkhead along the attic floor can save energy by placing

63

Services, Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recreational Facilities Recreational Facilities Please Note: BNL facilities are NOT open to the public. Please check the BERA Calendar of Events to get up to date information about BNL employee events. Swimming Pool (Bldg. 478) The pool is available to BNL employees and their families. There are open swim, lap swim and other programs offered Monday thru Saturday. You may purchase an individual or family pool pass at the pool. Friday evening is Family Swim from 5:00pm-8:00pm for $5.00 per family. Swimming lessons are available for children and are scheduled during the summer. Adult swim lessons are generally scheduled for March - April. For more information contact the Recreation Office at ext. 2873. Birthday parties and scout troops can occasionally be accommodated if it is the employee or retirees child who is participating. Call 344-5090 for more information.

64

Build A Recreation Center Using Geometry Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILD A RECREATION CENTER USING GEOMETRY BUILD A RECREATION CENTER USING GEOMETRY Project Description The city of West Chicago has recently acquired a small island on a nearby lake. The island is roughly circular with a radius of approximately two acres. Our geometry class is being asked to design a recreation center for the children of West Chicago. Our class has a very unique opportunity. Because of an anonymous donor, money is no object. The class will be divided into groups of approximately four students. The first task of each group is to decide which portion of the project your group will be responsible for designing. Below are your possible choices. Possible Topics Architecture Landscape Architecture Computer Games Bridges Art Other Finished Product Following is what your team is responsible for turning in at the end of the

65

SRO : single room occupancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During August of 1996, I stayed in a series of SRO hotels in New York City leaving a book and diary behind when I checked out of each room. The books that were left in the rooms differ from one room to the other but all ...

Shimada, Taketo

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recreation Department Name Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Address 725 Summer St., N.E. Suite C Place Salem, OR Zip 97301 Phone number 503-986-0707 Website http:...

67

Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Public Reading Room  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

has established a Public Reading Room at 955 has established a Public Reading Room at 955 Mound Road, Miamisburg, Ohio, which contains documents and information related to Mound as required under Section 117(d) of SARA. Copies of key Mound records, including the CERCLA Administrative Record and Information Repository, are kept in the Public Reading Room. The Administrative Record and Information Repository for Mound are updated as new documents are created and an index of documents in the complete collections accompanies each update. The Public Reading Room also contains reference items consisting of technical documents, news clippings, videotapes, journal articles, annual reports, and environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning decisional documents. Stakeholders are

69

Room Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Superefficient Room Air Conditioners year month keywords appliance energy efficiency energy efficiency incentives Market Transformation standards url https isswprod lbl gov...

70

CASE STUDY OF DUCT RETROFIT OF A 1985 HOME AND GUIDELINES FOR ATTIC AND CRAWL SPACE DUCT SEALING  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is fully committed to research for developing the information and capabilities necessary to provide cost-effective residential retrofits yielding 50% energy savings within the next several years. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the biggest energy end use in the residential sector, and a significant amount of energy can be wasted through leaky ductwork in unconditioned spaces such as attics and crawl spaces. A detailed duct sealing case study is presented for one house along with nine brief descriptions of other duct retrofits completed in the mixed-humid climate. Costs and estimated energy savings are reported for most of the ten houses. Costs for the retrofits ranged from $0.92/ft2 to $1.80/ft2 of living space and estimated yearly energy cost savings due to the duct retrofits range from 1.8% to 18.5%. Lessons learned and duct sealing guidelines based on these ten houses, as well as close work with the HVAC industry in the mixed-humid climate of East Tennessee, northern Georgia, and south-central Kentucky are presented. It is hoped that the lessons learned and guidelines will influence local HVAC contractors, energy auditors, and homeowners when diagnosing or repairing HVAC duct leakage and will be useful for steering DOE s future research in this area.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Demolishing Searle's Chinese Room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Searle's Chinese Room argument is refuted by showing that he has actually given two different versions of the room, which fail for different reasons. Hence, Searle does not achieve his stated goal of showing ``that a system could have input and output capabilities that duplicated those of a native Chinese speaker and still not understand Chinese''.

Wolfram Schmied

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

72

BERA Activities, Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Club Vinita Ghosh 197D 6226 Meets on Wednesday evenings in the North Room at the Brookhaven Center for ballroom dance lessons given by a professional instructor. Basketball...

73

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Development Projects in the "Press Room" at www.doe.gov for further details.) Expected funding for the SRNL project is estimated at approximately one-half million dollars a year...

74

Utah State Parks and Recreation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Utah State Parks and Recreation Jump to: navigation, search Name Utah State Parks and...

75

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) Recreational Lake and Water Quality Districts (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Territory contiguous to a recreational lake may be incorporated into a

76

Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

Making recreational space: citizen involvement in outdoor recreation and park establishment in British Columbia, 1900-2000.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies of outdoor recreation and the social construction of wilderness have shown how urban consumption of wilderness areas dispossessed rural residents from traditional land uses. (more)

Clayton, Jenny

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DOE Solar Decathlon: Press Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bios Press Releases Photos Videos Education Sponsors Volunteers History FAQs Contacts Solar Decathlon Press Room The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon press room provides...

79

Electronic Reading Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electronic Reading Room - making information about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act process accessible to the public electronically. Electronic Reading Room - making information about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act process accessible to the public electronically. Major Information Systems - Final Opinions - [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](A) final opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases within the Office of Hearings and Appeals Statements of Policy and Interpretation and Administrative Staff Manuals and Instructions - [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](B) those statements of policy and interpretation which have been adopted by the agency and are not published in the Federal Register - Directives, DOE Orders, Headquarters Orders, Secretarial Notices, Technical Standards, Forms, Delegations, Electronic Library Public Reading Facilities - making information available for public inspection and copying

80

Reading Room Locations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Offices and Reading Rooms FOIA Office Locations Our FOIA Officers are located at various sites throughout the DOE complex, each with responsibility for records located at or under the jurisdiction of the site. We recommend that you send your request directly to that specific site. This will shorten the processing time. However, if you do not know which location has responsive records, you may either call the Headquarters FOIA office at (202) 586-5955 to determine the appropriate office, or mail the request to the Headquarters FOIA office. Other records are publicly available in the facilities listed below: Headquarters U.S. Department of Energy FOIA/Privacy Act Group 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Phone: 202-586-5955 Fax: 202-586-0575

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) Protection of Public Parks and Recreational Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

82

County Planning, Zoning, and Recreation on Natural Streams and Waterways  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

County Planning, Zoning, and Recreation on Natural Streams and County Planning, Zoning, and Recreation on Natural Streams and Waterways (Missouri) County Planning, Zoning, and Recreation on Natural Streams and Waterways (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting

83

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources

84

Using Vulcan to Recreate Planetary Cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accurate equation of state (EOS) for planetary constituents at extreme conditions is the key to any credible model of planets or low mass stars. However, experimental validation has been carried out on at high pressure (>few Mbar), and then only on the principal Hugoniot. For planetary and stellar interiors, compression occurs from gravitational force so that material states follow a line of isentropic compression (ignoring phase separation) to ultra-high densities. An example of the predicted states for water along the isentrope for Neptune is shown in a figure. The cutaway figure on the left is from Hubbard, and the phase diagram on the right is from Cavazzoni et al. Clearly these states lie at quite a bit lower temperature and higher density than single shock Hugoniot states but they are at higher temperature than can be achieved with accurate diamond anvil experiments. At extreme densities, material states are predicted to have quite unearthly properties such as high temperature superconductivity and low temperature fusion. High density experiments on Earth are achieved with either static compression techniques (i.e.diamond anvil cells) or dynamic compression techniques using large laser facilities, gas guns, or explosives. A major thrust of this work is to develop techniques to create and characterize material states that exists primarily at the core of giant planets and brown dwarf stars. Typically, models used to construct planetary isentropes are constrained by only the planet radius, outer atmospheric spectroscopy, and space probe gravitational moment and magnetic field data. Thus any data, which provide rigid constraints for these models will have a significant impact on a broad community of planetary and condensed matter scientists. Recent laser shock wave experiments have made great strides in recreating material states that exist in the outer 25% (in radius) of the Jovian planets and at the exterior of low-mass stars. Large laser facilities have been used to compressed materials to ultra-high pressures and characterize their thermodynamic and transport properties (plastic Hugoniot to 40 Mbar, deuterium Hugoniot to 3 Mbar, metallization of ''atomic'' deuterium on the Hugoniot). To probe materials properties at these high pressures, several experimental techniques were developed high resolution radiography, optical reflectance, pyrometry, and velocity/displacement sensitive interferometry are some of the diagnostics currently used in laser-generated shock EOS experiments. During our experiments at Vulcan we developed and tested precompressed and multiple shock experimental techniques which allowed us to recreate the extreme core states of giant plants. These experiments compressed water to densities higher than accessible by single shock Hugoniot techniques and showed that the metal-insulator transition of shocked precompressed water is suppressed significantly as compared to uncompressed water. Further, as predicted the temperature of shocked precompressed water is lower than the temperature of uncompressed water enabling us to determine the metallization mechanism for water near the Hugoniot.

Collins, G.W.; Celliers, P.M.; Hicks, D.G.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Moon, S.J.; Cauble, R.; DaSilva, L.B.; Koening, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Jeanloz, R.; Lee, K.M.; Benedetti, L.R.; Henry, E.; Batani, D.; Willi, O.; Pasley, J.; Gessner, H.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.; Danson, C.

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Media Room | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Media Room Home > Media Room Media Room NNSA's Office of...

86

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources The South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for maintaining a state water plan, intended to implement state policies for water management. A portion of the plan is reserved for rivers

87

World class recreation complements cutting-edge science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

World class recreation complements cutting-edge science World class recreation complements cutting-edge science World class recreation complements cutting-edge science Los Alamos employees enjoy access to a network of 100+ miles of high-quality trails, much of it within walking distance from key Lab facilities or from residents' front doors. April 3, 2012 Bikers (and LANL Postdocs) Brent and Pam in Los Alamos canyon riding hard on the trail Bikers (and LANL Postdocs) Brent and Pam in Los Alamos canyon riding hard on the trail. Hikers, mountain bikers, joggers, and dog walkers can wind through thick forest, cross deep canyons or meander along picturesque mesas within city limits. All work and no play makes J. Robert Oppenheimer a dull boy Perhaps the importance of a good quality of life is why Oppie insisted that

88

Division of Recreational Sports Visit us at www.recsports.wisc.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-AIR-CONDITIONED RECREATIONAL INDOOR FACILITIES. ALL USERS ARE AT THEIR OWN RISK WHEN USING ANY INDOOR RECREATIONAL FACILITIES is essential to avoid progressive dehydration. Always consume more fluids than you think you need before

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

89

Evaluation of recreational health risk in coastal waters based on enterococcus densities and bathing patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marine water con- tact recreation guidelines remain based on the results of their studies because of the strength and power

Turbow, D J; Osgood, N D; Jiang, Sunny C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports Student Job Announcement Student Position Title: Rec Medic Job Description: We are a student-run Texas Department of Health recognized First environment by providing emergency medical services to a diverse Texas A&M Community. We encourage lifelong

91

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hypercomputation in the Chinese Room  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I rehearse a number of objections to John Searle's famous Chinese room argument. One is the 'hypercomputational objection' (Copeland 2002a). Hypercomputation is the computation of functions that cannot be computed in the sense of Turing (1936); the term ...

B. Jack Copeland

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Reading Room | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Freedom of Information Act » Reading Freedom of Information Act » Reading Room Reading Room Welcome to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Electronic Reading Room for the Department of Energy at Headquarters. The FOIA requires certain kinds of documents to be made available to the public for inspection and copying. This is a requirement for agencies of the executive branch of the federal government. The documents that are required to be made available by the FOIA are: Final Opinions [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](A) final opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases. Office of Hearings and Appeal - FOIA Appeals Initial agency determinations in response to FOIA and Privacy Act requests may be appealed to the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Decisions of

95

Reading Room | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Reading Room Reading Room Welcome to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Electronic Reading Room for the Department of Energy at Headquarters. The FOIA requires certain kinds of documents to be made available to the public for inspection and copying. This is a requirement for agencies of the executive branch of the federal government. The documents that are required to be made available by the FOIA are: Final Opinions [5 USC 552 (a)(2)](A) final opinions, including concurring and dissenting opinions, as well as orders, made in the adjudication of cases. Office of Hearings and Appeal - FOIA Appeals Initial agency determinations in response to FOIA and Privacy Act requests may be appealed to the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Decisions of the OHA constitute the agency's final determinations on requests made under

96

Room temperature terahertz polariton emitter  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz (THz) range electroluminescence from intersubband polariton states is observed in the ultra strong coupling regime, where the interaction energy between the collective excitation of a dense electron gas and a photonic mode is a significant portion of the uncoupled excitation energy. The polariton's increased emission efficiency along with a parabolic electron confinement potential allows operation up to room temperature in a nonresonant pumping scheme. This observation of room temperature electroluminescence of an intersubband device in the THz range is a promising proof of concept for more powerful THz sources.

Geiser, Markus; Scalari, Giacomo; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Meeting Rooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

41 144D 3117 30-C Blue Room (20) 41 207 2868 30-C Castle Craigs Conference Room 280B 241 2804 29-D Cedar Room (15) 48 101 3485 30-B CEF Conference Room 35 4A 3534 27-E Controls...

98

A three dimensional comparison of elite and recreational ice hockey slap shots.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to examine the three dimensional kinematic differences between elite and recreational ice hockey players while performing a stationary slap (more)

Woo, Timothy Keith

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

U.S. Government recreation sites and facilities | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JamesRolfes@ios.doi.gov Unique Identifier DOI-1517 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary NA Data Download URL http:ridb.recreation.gov?actiondatasharing Format na...

100

Classified Reading Room Instructions/Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Classified Reading Room Instructions/Guidelines Classified Reading Room Instructions/Guidelines * Reading Room Points of Contact: Milesha Grier, (202) 586-8210, milesha.gier@nnsa.doe.gov Reading Room Location: DOE Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Ave., Washington, D.C. Room 4A-045, 4 th Floor, "A" Corridor, Behind Glass Doors, dial 6-8210 Reading Room Availability: By Appointment - Reading Room will be available until RFP Closes except (12/5/11 thru 12/16/11, December 23, January 2, 2012 and January 16, 2012). Reading Room Hours: Morning, 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.; and Afternoon 1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Reading Room Will Accommodate: Up to 5-6 people * All personnel must: a. submit a formal Intent to Bid IAW Section L of the RFP, via email to: SEB1@doeal.gov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners July 1, 2012 - 5:35pm Addthis A window air conditioner is one solution to cooling part of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kschulze. A window air conditioner is one solution to cooling part of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/kschulze. What does this mean for me? Room air conditioners are less expensive and disruptive to install than central air conditioning systems. Room air conditioners can be a cost-effective alternative to central air conditioning systems. How does it work? Room air conditioners work by cooling one part of your home. Room or window air conditioners cool rooms rather than the entire home or business. If they provide cooling only where they're needed, room air conditioners are less expensive to operate than central units, even though

102

NETL: NewsRoom - Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsRoom NewsRoom Multimedia Now you can download videos to your computer by right clicking the "download" link and selecting the "Save target as" option. It is suggested that mac users use this link. Carbon Cycle Animation Carbon Cycle Animation - 2012 Animation that depicts the carbon cycle as it relates to nature, land use, and energy production. Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-5.7MB) [ view | download ] Earth Day Animation Earth Day Animation - 2011 A compilation of three Earth Day animations that demonstrate being green around your home, office, and community Movie Icon Windows Media Video (WMV-16MB) [ view | download ] Interview with Anthony Cugini Interview with Anthony Cugini - 2011 Interview at the International Pittsburgh Coal Conference with Dr. Cugini regarding Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage technologies.

103

DOE Solar Decathlon: Press Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Room Press Room The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon is an award-winning program that challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency. The first Solar Decathlon was held in 2002; the competition has since occurred every two years in 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2011. The last event was held at the National Mall's West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C., Sept. 23-Oct. 2, 2011. Solar Decathlon 2013 takes place Oct. 3-13, 2013, at Orange County Great Park in Irvine, California. Open to the public free of charge, the Solar Decathlon gives visitors the

104

News Room | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Room News Room In a 3D structure of the protein, the binding site is shown in pink, representing a potential drug target. The green molecule shows binding of an antibiotic to the protein. Click to enlarge. Image courtesy of Wladek Minor. Newly ID'd protein provides target for antibiotic-resistant hospital bacterium Full Story » Researchers have made inroads into tackling a bacterium that plagues hospitals and is highly resistant to most antibiotics. Andrey Elagin (left), postdoctoral scholar at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, and Matthew Wetstein, the Grainger Postdoctoral Fellow at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, adjust the optics in the Large Area Picosecond Photodetector testing facility. The facility uses extremely short laser pulses to precisely measure the time resolution of the photodetectors. Click to enlarge.

105

Forecasting Uncertain Hotel Room Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic systems are characterized by increasing uncertainty in their dynamics. This increasing uncertainty is likely to incur bad decisions that can be costly in financial terms. This makes forecasting of uncertain economic variables an instrumental activity in any organization. This paper takes the hotel industry as a practical application of forecasting using the Holt-Winters method. The problem here is to forecast the uncertain demand for rooms at a hotel for each arrival day. Forecasting is part of hotel revenue management system whose objective is to maximize the revenue by making decisions regarding when to make rooms available for customers and at what price. The forecast approach discussed in this paper is based on quantitative models and does not incorporate management expertise. Even though, forecast results are found to be satisfactory for certain days, this is not the case for other arrival days. It is believed that human judgment is important when dealing with ...

Mihir Rajopadhye Mounir; Mounir Ben Ghaliay; Paul P. Wang; Timothy Baker; Craig V. Eister

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modelling Recreation Demand using Choice Experiments: Climbing in Scotland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the use of the choice experiment method for modelling the demand for recreation, using the example of rock-climbing in Scotland. We begin by outlining the method itself, including its theoretical and econometric underpinnings. Data collection procedures are then outlined. We present results from both nested and non-nested models, and report some tests for the implications of choice complexity and rationality. Finally, we compare our results with a revealed preference data model based on the same sample of climbers.

Nick Hanley; Robert E. Wright; Gary Koop

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Media Room | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Media Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Media Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Media Room Home > Media Room Media Room NNSA's Office of Congressional, Intergovernmental, and Public Affairs regularly updates the web site with current press releases, newsletters,

108

Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

Gupta, Amita

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy Integration Visualization Room (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This two-page fact sheet describes the new Energy Integration Visualization Room in the ESIF and talks about some of the capabilities and unique visualization features of the the room.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The room noise criteria (RNC) metric.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent ANSI S12.2:2008 room noise criteria contains both a survey and an engineering method to specify room noise criteria. The methods use A?weighting and extended NC

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Room temperature nano- and microstructure photon detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of room temperature infrared (IR) detectors for wavelengths beyond NIR will open up many applications that are currently limited due to cooling requirements. Three approaches are discussed, which show promise for room temperature IR detection. ... Keywords: Infrared, PbS quantum dot, Room temperature detector, Split-off band, Tunneling quantum dot

A. G. U. Perera; P. V. V. Jayaweera; G. Ariyawansa; S. G. Matsik; K. Tennakone; M. Buchanan; H. C. Liu; X. H. Su; P. Bhattacharya

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model  

SciTech Connect

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA required that certain tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-road recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Funds to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual States equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1993 to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-road recreation in the State level by different vehicle types. A modification of the methodology developed by ORNL has been used to apportion funds to the States since that time.

Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.; Hu, P.S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

FOIA Reading Room - privacy act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reading Room - pricacy act Reading Room - pricacy act CH Frequently Requested Documents Under FOIA Administrative Electronic FOIA Form Privacy Act Advisory (Microsoft Word(tm) document) DOE-CH Government Purchase Card Cardholders: December 2012 CH Organizational Chart: Current Version Policies and Procedures - Office of Science (including Chicago Office) Office of Hearings and Appeals Decisions Department of Justice Cases and Legal Documents Department of Energy Directives DOE Office of Inspector General Reports Responses Under FOIA FY10 Management and Operating Contracts "FY2012 Laboratory Performance Report Cards" The following management and operating prime contracts under the jurisdiction of DOE-CH have been renewed and posted for your convenience. Modifications that change, delete, or add language to any portion of these contracts (referred to as "M" Mods) will be posted as expeditiously as possible after execution. It is at the discretion of the Contractors whether or not they include modifications that change the amount obligated by the Government. Ames Laboratory - Contract No. No.DE-AC02-07CH11358

114

Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Reading Room Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitations > Environmental Program Services Contract > Reading Room

115

Heating remote rooms in passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote rooms can be effectively heated by convection through a connecting doorway. A simple steady-state equation is developed for design purposes. Validation of a dynamic model is achieved using data obtained over a 13-day period. Dynamic effects are investigated using a simulation analysis for three different cases of driving temperature; the effect is to reduce the temperature difference between the driving room and the remote room compared to the steady-state model. For large temperature swings in the driving room a strategy which uses the intervening door in a diode mode is effective. The importance of heat-storing mass in the remote room is investigated.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor present a room-to-room thermal model used to accurately predict temperatures in residential buildings. We that our model can predict future indoor temperature trends with a 90th percentile aggregate error between

Hazas, Mike

117

Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Environmental documents and reports are available online. Hard copies are available at the Laboratory's Public Reading Room in Pojoaque, New Mexico. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports Online Annual Environmental Report Electronic Public Reading Room (EPRR) Plans, Procedures A listing of procedures available in the EPRR Hard copy Public Reading Room 94 Cities of Gold Road Pojoaque, NM Vie Screen reader users: click here for plain HTML Go to Google Maps Home 94 cities of gold Road, Pojoaque, NM Loading... Map Sat Ter Did you mean a different:

118

Showering with the Sun at Chickasaw National Recreation Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ark Golnar, a mechanical engineer with the National Park Service (NPS), describes solar water heating as the "perfect heat source" for the comfort stations at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. "The demand for hot water coincides with the availabil- ity of sunlight, which makes solar water heaters the obvious choice," he says. "As a bonus, the solar systems are an environmentally sound and cost- effective way to heat water." Located about 100 miles (161 km) south of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on Lake of the Arbuckles, the facility is used primarily in the summer, when solar energy is abundant. The solar water heating systems supply all the hot water for one large comfort station and two small ones at the Buckhorn Campground. (There are no

119

Showering with the Sun at Chickasaw National Recreation Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ark Golnar, a mechanical engineer with ark Golnar, a mechanical engineer with the National Park Service (NPS), describes solar water heating as the "perfect heat source" for the comfort stations at Chickasaw National Recreation Area. "The demand for hot water coincides with the availabil- ity of sunlight, which makes solar water heaters the obvious choice," he says. "As a bonus, the solar systems are an environmentally sound and cost- effective way to heat water." Located about 100 miles (161 km) south of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on Lake of the Arbuckles, the facility is used primarily in the summer, when solar energy is abundant. The solar water heating systems supply all the hot water for one large comfort station and two small ones at the Buckhorn Campground. (There are no

120

Economic effects of projected climate change on outdoor recreation in Tennessee.  

SciTech Connect

Climate change projections from three General Circulation Models were used to adjust the temperature and precipitation in 2030 and 2080 in each of five ecological provinces in Tennessee to estimate the direct economic effects of the projected changes on recreation using the Tourism Climatic Index. The indirect effects on recreation were evaluated qualitatively, based on current demand for the unique values associated with current conditions. The results of the direct impact evaluation reveal that climate change will have variable effects on recreational activities in Tennessee. The magnitude and direction of the effects vary by the recreational activity involved, patterns of precipitation and temperature regimes, and specific location in Tennessee. Recreational activities such as rock climbing, winter activities independent of snow, and whitewater boating are likely to benefit from projected climate changes due to increased temperatures in the winter months. Summer-based activities such as lake recreation and camping are likely to decline with increasing seasonal temperatures. The indirect effects of climate change on recreation are likely to have a larger effect than the direct impacts of climatic variables.

Hodges, Donald G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fogel, Jonah [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Lannom, Karen O. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Economic and environmental equity in the U.S. nonmetropolitan tourism and recreation dependent communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focused on economic and environmental equity in tourism and recreation dependent communities in the U. S. In the economic equity section, research was conducted to do an empirical analysis of the income distribution in nonmetropolitan tourism and recreation dependent communities. In the environmental equity section, this study evaluated conceptual and theoretical understanding dealing with tourism and the environment and addressed the importance of environmental equity issues. A key objective of this study is to examine economic equity across different income groups and race in nonmetropolitan tourism and recreation dependent communities. By comparing economic equity between nonmetropolitan tourism and recreation dependent communities and other industry dependent nonmetropolitan communities, the differences of income inequality between those communities were explored. This study also assesses how tourism and recreation development contributes to economic equity in nonmetropolitan tourism and recreation communities in the U. S. In particular, determinants of income inequality were investigated. Income distribution of nonmetropolitan tourism and recreation dependent communities is more unequal than that of nonmetropolitan manufacturing dependent communities in the U. S. Tourism and recreation development contributes to increase income inequality while manufacturing related development is likely to reduce income inequality. The positive effect comes from the inequality of earnings in tourism and recreation employment. Race dualism shows a positive relationship with income inequality. This result suggests that the racial difference in income distribution plays an important role in increasing income inequality. There is a positive relationship between the south region and income inequality irrespective of community type and suggest that the regional variable is still an essential component for understanding income inequality in the U.S. This study addresses the need of an environmental justice framework for improving environmental equity across stakeholders in the process of tourism and recreation planning and development. Equity within/between social groups and inter and intra-generational equity should be taken into account for sustainable tourism and recreation development. The analytical framework for assessing environmental equity that this study suggested will be a good foundation for further development of environmental equity framework in the context with tourism and recreation development.

Lee, Sang Kwon

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NEPA Reading Room Home > About Us > Our Operations > NNSA Office of General Counsel > National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) > NEPA Reading Room NEPA Reading Room Welcome to the National Nuclear Security Administration's NEPA Reading

123

Data for Room Fire Model Comparisons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the burn room; and, possibly, a load platform. ... by the use of the oxygen consumption principle ... be used to estimate the rate of energy production of ...

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing...

125

NEPA Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reading Room | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

126

Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Used for Off-Road Recreation: Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model Stacy C. Davis Lorena F. Truett Patricia S. Hu ORNL/TM-1999/100 Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model Stacy C. Davis Lorena F. Truett Patricia S. Hu July 1999 Prepared for the Office of Highway Information Management Federal Highway Administration U.S. Department of Transportation Washington, DC 20590 Prepared by the Statistics and Data Analysis Program Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6073 managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-96OR22464 Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model - iii - TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

127

The Live Room: transducing resonant architectures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Live Room was a temporary site-specific installation presented in building N51, room 117 on the MIT campus on 7 May 1998 and concluded on 10 June 1998. Using small acoustic-intensifying equipment which mounted directly to the structure of ...

Mark Bain

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE-ID FOIA Reading Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reading Room Reading Room READING ROOM Eectronic Freedom of Information Act, E-FOIA RECORDS UNDER THE E-FOIA The Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996 addresses the issues and procedural aspects of FOIA administration. The amendment: defines the term "record" as including "any information that would be an agency record subject to the requirements of the FOIA when maintained by an agency in any format, including an electronic format; addresses the form or format in which a requested record is disclosed providing the record is readily reproducible by the agency in the requestor's desired form or format; directs Federal agencies to maintain both conventional reading rooms and electronic reading rooms to meet FOIA responsibilities.

129

Los Alamos test-room results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fourteen Los Alamos test rooms have been operated for several years; this paper covers operation during the winters of 1980-81 and 1981-82. Extensive data have been taken and computer analyzed to determine performance parameters such as efficiency, solar savings fraction, and comfort index. The rooms are directly comparable because each has the same net coefficient and solar collection area and thus the same load collector ratio. Configurations include direct gain, unvented Trombe walls, water walls, phase change walls, and two sunspace geometries. Strategies for reducing heat loss include selective surfaces, two brands of superglazing windows, a heat pipe system, and convection-suppression baffles. Significant differences in both backup heat and comfort are observed among the various rooms. The results are useful, not only for direct room-to-room comparisons, but also to provide data for validation of computer simulation programs.

McFarland, R.D.; Balcomb, J.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

131

Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

you need to mount the air conditioner at the narrow end of a long room, then look for a fan control known as "Power Thrust" or "Super Thrust" that sends the cooled air farther...

132

Design of the CTX diagnostics screen room  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of a shielded enclosure (or screen room) to house data acquisition equipment in an area in which substantial, time varying magnetic fields are present and capable of producing significant interference is described.

Chandler, G.I. II

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

An exploration of perceived benefits of recreation in the Pine Valley District of the Dixie National Forest .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Public land agencies are mandated to incorporate Ecosystem Management practices into forest planning and management. The human dimensions of Ecosystem Management, including recreation and amenity (more)

Kaufman, Andrew Jay, 1963-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Software Support during a Control Room Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, after 14 years of accelerator operations and commissioning, Jefferson Lab renovated its main control room. Changes in technology and lessons learned during those 14 years drove the control room redesign in a new direction, one that optimizes workflow and makes critical information and controls available to everyone in the control room. Fundamental changes in a variety of software applications were required to facilitate the new operating paradigm. A critical component of the new control room design is a large-format video wall that is used to make a variety of operating information available to everyone in the room. Analog devices such as oscilloscopes and function generators are now displayed on the video wall through two crosspoint switchers: one for analog signals and another for video signals. A new software GUI replaces manual configuration of the oscilloscopes and function generators and helps automate setup. Monitoring screens, customized for the video wall, now make important operating information visible to everyone, not just a single operator. New alarm handler software gives any operator, on any workstation, access to all alarm handler functionality, and multiple users can now contribute to a single electronic logbook entry. To further support the shift to distributed access and control, many applications have been redesigned to run on servers instead of on individual workstations.

Michele Joyce; Michael Spata; Thomas Oren; Anthony Cuffe; Theo McGuckin; Isadoro Carlino; C. Higgins; Harry Fanning; Matthew Bickley; Brian Bevins

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Method of remotely constructing a room  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The testing of nuclear devices of high explosive yield has required that cavities of relatively large size be provided at considerable distances below the surface of the earth for the pre-detonation emplacement of the device. The construction of an essentially watertight chamber or room in the cavity is generally required for the actual emplacement of the device. A method is described of constructing such a room deep within the earth by personnel at the surface. A dual wall bladder of a watertight, pliable fabric material is lowered down a shaft into a selected position. The bladder is filled with a concrete grout while a heavy fluid having essentially the same density as the grout is maintained on both sides of the bladder, to facilitate complete deployment of the bladder by the grout to form a room of desired configuration. (10 claims)

Michie, J.D.; De Hart, R.C.

1971-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Carbon War Room | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

War Room War Room Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon War Room Place Washington, DC Number of employees 1-10 Website http://www.carbonwarroom.com/ Coordinates 38.8951118°, -77.0363658° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8951118,"lon":-77.0363658,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

137

A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Matchstick: a room-to-room thermal model for predicting indoor temperature from wireless sensor data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a room-to-room thermal model used to accurately predict temperatures in residential buildings. We evaluate the accuracy of this model with ground truth data from four occupied family homes (two in the UK and two in the US). The ... Keywords: forced air, home automation, prediction, radiators, thermal modelling, underfloor heating

Carl Ellis; Mike Hazas; James Scott

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Operating Room Pooling and Parallel Surgery Processing Under Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating room (OR) scheduling is an important operational problem for most hospitals. In this study, we present a novel two-stage stochastic mixed-integer programming model to minimize total expected operating cost given that scheduling decisions are ... Keywords: multiple operating rooms, operating room pooling, operating room scheduling, parallel surgery processing, two-stage stochastic mixed-integer programs

Sakine Batun; Brian T. Denton; Todd R. Huschka; Andrew J. Schaefer

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

commercial and recreational fisheries are com-posed of both populations of bluefin tuna (Fig.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial and recreational fisheries are com- posed of both populations of bluefin tuna (Fig. 2). A large fraction of the school (57.4%) and medium (44.3%) category bluefin tuna present in the U.S. waters bluefin tuna in the Mid Atlantic Bight decreased with increasing size (age) (Fig. 3). Our estimates

Shaham, Shai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Outdoor recreational use of the Salton Sea with reference to potential impacts of geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to describe the types, levels, and locations of outdoor recreation uses in the Salton Sea area, the number and principal activities of visitors, and to estimate the consequences upon outdoor recreation of geothermal development and other activities that might affect the Salton Sea. It is concluded that since the Salton Sea is considered legally to be a sump for agricultural, municipal, and presumably geothermal waste waters, recreational use of the Sea for fishing and boating (from present marinas) will undoubtedly continue to decline, unless there is a major policy change. Use of the shoreline for camping, the surrounding roads and lands for scenic viewing, ORV events, and retirement or recreation communities will not decline, and will probably increase, assuming control of hydrogen sulfide odors. Two ways in which the fishing and present boating facilities could be returned to a wholly usable steady state are discussed. One is by construction of a diked evaporation pond system at the south end of the Sea. This would allow a means of control over both water level and salinity. Another means, less costly but more difficult to effectively control, would be to budget geothermal plant use of, and disposal of wastes in, Salton Sea water. (JGB)

Twiss, R.; Sidener, J.; Bingham, G.; Burke, J.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Boiler Kids Camp Parent Manual Division of Recreational Sports Mission Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boiler Kids Camp Parent Manual Division of Recreational Sports Mission Statement The Division which fosters an appreciation for a healthy lifestyle and promotes lifelong learning. Boiler Kids Camp Mission Statement Boiler Kids Camp is an interactive, summer day camp designed for children ranging

Holland, Jeffrey

143

Thermostat response and room temperature control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the impact to thermal comfort of the operation of the room thermostat. The topics of the article include types of thermostat response, reset response, proportional response, digital systems, system response, verification of building temperatures, thermal comfort analysis, and productivity costs of implementing mandated setpoints.

Int-Hout, D. (Carrier Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Texas Union Pizza Order Form ROOM RESERVED ______________________________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Texas Union Pizza Order Form ROOM RESERVED: ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ Pick-up All orders are to be picked up at the Texas Union Hospitality Center desk in the south end West with the Texas Union Policies and Procedures. I understand that I will be held responsible for any debts incurred

Texas at Austin, University of

145

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Priority coding for control room alarms  

SciTech Connect

Indicating the priority of a spatially fixed, activated alarm tile on an alarm tile array by a shape coding at the tile, and preferably using the same shape coding wherever the same alarm condition is indicated elsewhere in the control room. The status of an alarm tile can change automatically or by operator acknowledgement, but tones and/or flashing cues continue to provide status information to the operator.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioners to someone by E-mail Room Air Conditioners to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories Product Designation Process

148

Release of DRAFT RFP Headquarters Reading Room Instructions/Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release of DRAFT RFP Release of DRAFT RFP Headquarters Reading Room Instructions/Guidelines 1. Reading Room Points of Contact: 7/21 - 8/8, Mike Baehre, (202) 586-6575 8/9 - Close of Draft RFP, John Bernier, (202) 586-6416 Reading Room Availability: By Appointment - Reading Room will be available until DRAFT RFP Closes. Reading Room Hours: Morning, 9:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.; and Afternoon 1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Reading Room Will Accommodate: Up to 5-6 people 2. All personnel must: a. Sign-in b. Identify their Company or Firm they work for or are affiliated c. Indicate if they have a "Q" clearance 3. Personnel must stay in the Reading Room to view documents. The "A" corridor is inside a classified area and all visitors to the Reading Room must be escorted at all times.

149

Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US Title Evaluation of Energy-Efficiency Standards for Room Air Conditioners in the US Publication Type Journal Article...

150

A review of the effectiveness of recreation prevention and intervention efforts with at-risk and juvenile delinquent populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A segment of youth in society are considered at risk, and the number is increasing. At-risk youth are a problem to the extent that many of them become delinquents with a resulting high social and economic cost to the individuals and society. The use of recreation is often left out of the variety of services that have been suggested or utilized to help either prevent delinquency or intervene once the problems occur. Thus, the overall goal of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of recreation prevention and intervention efforts with at-risk and juvenile delinquent populations through an examination of theoretical and empirical research in the leisure, criminology, sociology, psychology, and education fields. This goal was achieved through the accomplishment of five purposes: develop a better understanding of the role recreation can play in the prevention of juvenile delinquency and the use of recreation as an intervention mechanism; identify key variables that are impacted by recreation; conceptualize the recreation impact construct; identify instrumentation used to measure key variables; and, identify limitations/issues in evaluation instrumentation. Specific outcomes of the study included: the development of a continuum describing youth from a position of risk to juvenile delinquency; the development of a taxonomy of possible domains based on the identified key variables; development of a taxonomy of existing theories and concepts used to explain delinquency; conceptualization of a model explaining the impact of recretain in delinquency prevention and intervention; and, the compilation and critique of an inventory of instruments used to measure recreation-delinquency variables. The results of the study provide a framework from which research in the area of youth-at-risk and delinquency and the use of recreation as a medium of prevention and/or intervention can be investigated.

McKay, Stacey Lyn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

TVA Melton Hill Dam Sustainable Recreation Area: Analysis of Field Data from Renewable and Energy Efficiency Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the culmination of activities, analyses, and results from EPRI's evaluation of TVA's Sustainable Recreation Area at Melton Hill Dam in East Tennessee. The recreation area includes renewable energy generation, energy and water efficiency, and other environmentally-driven enhancements throughout the area's visitor and campground facilities.EPRI has collected time-series data from a specific subset of technologies to evaluate energy and related performance ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

Pre-validation of nuclear power plant control room design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the design of complex automation and control room systems is an essential phase in the design process in the nuclear field. For example, in order to meet the nuclear regulatory requirements, the new control room systems have to be evaluated ... Keywords: concept of operations, control room, pre-validation, verification & validation

Jari Laarni; Paula Savioja; Hannu Karvonen; Leena Norros

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Milestone Status 1 Test Plan approved by KB Home and Owens Corning Complete 2 Cold climate demonstration switched to hot climate. Instrument and commission data...

155

NETL: NewsRoom - LabNotes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LabNotes LabNotes NewsRoom LabNotes January 2014 Chemical Looping 101: The Basics NETL's Chemical Looping Research Facilities Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion Chemical Looping Modeling and Simulation Research at NETL December 2013 Foamed Cement Can Seal Tricky Oil and Gas Wells November 2013 High-Performance Rechargeable Batteries May Help Keep the Lights On Rocks Demystified in Geomechanical Properties Lab October 2013 NETL's Morgantown Supercomputer Sets a High Bar for Energy Efficiency September 2013 NETL's Energy Data Exchange (EDX): Providing Access to Quality Energy Data Sorbents Capturing CO2 Will Make Power Plants Cleaner August 2013 Collaborative Technology Demonstrates Potential in Diabetes Testing Quantifying Uncertainty in Computer Model Predictions

156

Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-pre The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP03533 between the Department of Energy and Rockwell International Corporation.

Balmer, David K. (Broomfield, CO); Tyree, William H. (Boulder, CO)

1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

158

Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-preamplifier combination. 2 figs.

Balmer, D.K.; Tyree, W.H.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Electrorecovery of actinides at room temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are a large number of purification and processing operations involving actinide species that rely on high-temperature molten salts as the solvent medium. One such application is the electrorefining of impure actinide metals to provide high purity material for subsequent applications. There are some drawbacks to the electrodeposition of actinides in molten salts including relatively low yields, lack of accurate potential control, maintaining efficiency in a highly corrosive environment, and failed runs. With these issues in mind we have been investigating the electrodeposition of actinide metals, mainly uranium, from room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and relatively high-boiling organic solvents. The RTILs we have focused on are comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and mainly the {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anion [bis(trif1uoromethylsulfonyl)imide {equivalent_to} {sup -}NTf{sub 2}]. These materials represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. In order to ascertain the feasibility of using RTILs for bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple coordination complexes of uranium dissolved in the RTIL solutions. More recently we have begun some fundamental electrochemical studies on the behavior of uranium and plutonium complexes in the organic solvents N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Our most recent results concerning electrodeposition will be presented in this account. The electrochemical behavior of U(IV) and U(III) species in RTILs and the relatively low vapor pressure solvents NMP and DMSO is described. These studies have been ongoing in our laboratory to uncover conditions that will lead to the successful bulk electrodeposition of actinide metals at a working electrode surface at room temperature or slightly elevated temperatures. The RTILs we have focused on thus far are based on 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and {sup -}N(SO{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} anions. Our results from XPS studies of e1ectrooxidized uranium metal surfaces indicate that uranium metal reacts with the anion from the RTIL, most likely through an initial f1uoride abstraction, forming decomposition products that inhibit the bulk electrodeposition of uranium metal. Similar results were found when the organic solvents were used with TBA[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] as the supporting electrolyte, although the voltammetric data of uranium ions in these solutions is more encouraging in relation to electrodeposition of uranium metal. Preliminary results on the voltammetric behavior and bulk electrodeposition of plutonium species are also presented.

Stoll, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A holistic investigation of complexity sources in nuclear power plant control rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear power community in the United States is moving to modernize aging power plant control rooms as well as develop control rooms for new reactors. New generation control rooms, along with modernized control rooms, ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cold Room Calc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

skills helpful but not required. Users More than 200 around the world. Audience Cold room design engineers, refrigeration equipment suppliers and contractors, owners of...

163

METRO Metropolitan Exposition Recreation Commission MERC Facilities Efficiently Maintained Maybe Too Efficiently  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To the Metro Council, Metropolitan Exposition Recreation Commission and Metro-area citizens: As part of the Metro Auditors risk assessment and audit plan, we studied facility care and capital improvement processes at the Metropolitan Exposition Recreation Commission (MERC), a unit of Metro. Facility care includes janitorial and repair and maintenance activities. Capital improvement processes include plans for determining necessary capital improvements and obtaining adequate, reliable funding for capital renewal and replacement projects. MERC owns public assembly facilities with a book value of over $200 million. It manages the Oregon Convention Center, the Portland Center for the Performing Arts and the Portland Metropolitan Exposition Center. The cost of maintaining and safeguarding these facilities consumes about 14 % of MERCs operating revenues each year. The cost of MERC facilities care activities benchmark below that of other facilities across the nation. While low cost is generally a positive, some improvements in facility care practices and capital improvement processes could be made. We recommend that MERC: Evaluate the adequacy of staffing for janitorial and maintenance activities and add electrical expertise where needed.

Alexis Dow Cpa; A Uditor; A Lexis; D Ow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Stakeholder behavior and legislative influence: A case study of recreational water rights in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado water law is based on 150 years of legal, constitutional, and administrative precedent. Much of this precedent encourages traditional consumptive uses of water and impedes non-consumptive uses. Throughout Colorados history, the water law system has evolved to include new codified uses of water. This paper analyzes the behavior of stakeholder groups that drove legislative changes in the Colorado General Assembly in the most recent example of this evolutionthe inclusion of non-consumptive recreational in-channel water rights as a codified use of water. Using a qualitative case study research method, this study finds that collaboration among formerly disenfranchised stakeholders explains their legislative success despite the lesser degree of influence these groups have over water rights in Colorado. 2008 Western Social Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Groups of policy actors influence the policy process significantly and can take the form of interrelated actors in policy communities (Kingdon, 2003), or coalitions of stakeholders within and outside government (Sabatier & Jenkins-Smith, 1993). These groups use internal coordinated action to promote their preferred versions of policy change. This paper analyzes the role that groups played in the process of policy change in the case of recreational water

Deserai Anderson Crow

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Opinions of fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers towards recreational fishing issues: an exploratory analysis for North America  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to better understand the perspectives of various recreational fishing stakeholder groups regarding key issues related to fisheries sustainability. To provide a first snapshot and to inform future human dimension studies in this area, we distributed a Web-based open-access survey to fisheries researchers, fisheries managers, and anglers in North America. Attitudes of these respondents towards issues such as overharvest, impacts of catch and release, recreational fisheries management, and research priorities for the future were assessed. We found similar opinions and perspectives by the responding recreational anglers, managers,and researchers on a number of issues, such as the perceived impact of commercial fishing contributing to fish stock declines, the perceived importance of using and promoting gear that minimizes stress and injury to individual fish when fish are to be released, and the belief that conflicts among stakeholders is growing as is the global anti-fishing movement based on animal rights thinking. Differences among responding groups included that researchers tended to be more concerned than anglers and managers with the potential of recreational angling contributing to fish stock declines. Responding anglers were also less content with their involvement in the fisheries management process than were responding managers and researchers, and these anglers also indicated a greater desire for more human dimensions research on understanding angler attitudes and behavior than was evident for responding managers and researchers. This preliminary survey revealed some variation in attitudes among recreational fisheries stakeholders. However, due to lack of random sampling, the study results cannot be extrapolated to the population level. We nevertheless conclude that improved communication and better understanding about the different perspectives among fisheries researchers, managers, and anglers and intrasectorally among different angling groups are needed, particularly when addressing contentious issues of relevance for the entire recreational fishing sector.

Hasler, Caleb T.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Rapp, Tobias; Jamieson, Elizabeth; Bellehumeur, Karyne; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ranking management strategies with complex outcomes: An AHP-fuzzy evaluation of recreational fishing using an integrated agent-based model of a coral reef ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of recreational fishing requires resolving conflicting interests and is thus among the most controversial natural resource related issues. Decision making is difficult because of two main factors: first, there is lack of prediction tools ... Keywords: AHP, Agent-based model, Area closure, Decision support system, Fuzzy evaluation, Multiple criteria decision making, Non-market valuation, Random utility model, Recreational fishing

Lei Gao; Atakelty Hailu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Simulation of a mannequin's thermal plume in a small room  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation results are presented for the buoyancy-driven flow in a small room containing a seated mannequin that is maintained at a constant temperature. The study was motivated, in part, by a published experimental study of the thermal plume around ... Keywords: Heated mannequin, Lattice Boltzmann method, Particle trajectories, Small room, Thermal plume

Xinli Jia; John B. Mclaughlin; Jos Derksen; Goodarz Ahmadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Physical Education Building Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical Education Building Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action Phys Ed Level Mechanical Insulation 250 LF 70.00 P6 Manage Phys Ed Level 1 East PE1H2 Pipe Fitting Mud 6 each 85.00 P5 #12;Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action Phys Ed Level 2 West PE200 Pipe Fitting

Seldin, Jonathan P.

169

Service Building 4 Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service Building 4 Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action Service Building 4 S160 65 sqft 15.00 P5 Manage S1J74 Friday, February 18, 2011 Page 1 of 2 #12;Building Room Material Amount Manage Mechanical Insulation 100 LF 55.00 P5 Manage Service Buliding 4 S16H6A Gypsum Wallboard Joint

Seldin, Jonathan P.

170

ENERGY STAR Qualified Room Air Conditioners | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data ENERGY STAR Qualified Room Air Conditioners Dataset Summary Description Room Air Conditioners that have earned the ENERGY STAR are more efficient than standard models. ENERGY STAR is the trusted symbol for energy efficiency helping consumers save money and protect the environment through energy-efficient products and practices. More information on ENERGY STAR is available at www.energystar.gov. Tags {"Room Air Conditioners","Energy Star",products,"energy efficiency",efficient,"greenhouse gas emissions",climate,utility,utilities,household,savings,labels,partners,certification}

171

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Room Air Conditioner Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Screen capture of Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator The cost estimator compares high-efficiency room air conditioners to standard equipment in terms of life cycle cost. It provides an alternative to complicated building simulation models, while offering more precision than simplified estimating tools that are commonly available. The cost estimator assists decision-making regarding the purchase or replacement of room air conditioning equipment, by estimating a product�s lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Screen Shots Keywords air conditioner, life-cycle cost, energy performance, residential buildings, energy savings Validation/Testing Internal reviews at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

172

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy Consumption Estimation for Room Air-conditioners Using Room Temperature Simulation with One-Minute Intervals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the purpose of developing optimized control algorithm for room air-conditioners to ensure their energy efficiency, a short time interval (i.e., one minute) simulation of building thermal performance is necessary because the sampling time interval for room air-conditioner control is one minute in general. This paper studies the short-time interval room air temperature simulation method using the response factor method. Using the simulated room air temperature, an air-conditioner's running time can be known so that its energy consumption can be estimated accurately. In order to verify the simulation accuracy, an actual room equipped with a gas-engine heat pump (GHP) air-conditioning system is studied by both simulation and measurement. The cooling amount produced by the GHP is calculated using measured refrigerant pressure and temperature at condenser and evaporator respectively. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between measured cooling amount and simulated cooling load is 18.9 percent of the average measured value. The profile of simulated room air temperature in both air-conditioned daytime and nighttime without air-conditioning can match the measured room air temperature. With respect to the estimated energy consumption, the profile of simulated energy consumption can match the measured data. The simulation accuracy of room air temperature and energy consumption during the air-conditioner start-up period is not good and needs to be improved in future research. But in general, the verification shows that this energy consumption simulation method is acceptable for evaluating the energy performance of a room air-conditioner, and can also be a useful tool for commissioning room air-conditioners.

Wang, F.; Yoshida, H.; Matsumoto, K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measuring angler attitudes toward the catch-related aspects of recreational fishing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary purposes of this dissertation were understanding the nature of an attitudinal scale designed to measure the consumptive orientation of recreational anglers and filling a gap in the published literature regarding measurement using the scale. Consumptive orientation was defined as the attitude anglers hold towards catching fish, including catching something, retaining fish (as opposed to releasing), catching large fish (size), and catching large amounts of fish (numbers). In order to confirm these four attitudes are measured by the scale, a model was hypothesized and tested using a confirmatory factor analysis on a sample of male anglers in Texas. It was reasoned that a different subculture may interpret the attitudinal statements differently; thus, the structure of the scale was explored using women as a separate sample. Finally, an example of how the scale could be used was provided by examining differences between tournament and nontournament anglers?? attitudes towards the four constructs measured by the scale. Overall, results were varied with the hypothesized model used to confirm the scale. While results indicated dropping four of the sixteen statements would not result in a significant change in the structure of the scale, results also confirmed there were four distinct attitudes measured by the consumptive orientation scale. The use of the scale with the larger angling population was confirmed by finding the same structure using a sample of women anglers. Finally, the scale was shown to be useful for examining activity-specific differences in angling social worlds. Differences were detected between tournament and nontournament anglers on three of the four consumptive attitudes: ??catching numbers,?? ??catching large/trophy fish,?? and ??retaining fish.?? Differences found were related to the commitment level of tournament and nontournament anglers. Further analysis examined how avidity may have affected differences among angler groups. These differences further current knowledge about tournament anglers and their expectations for fishing experiences. Overall, results support the usefulness of the consumptive orientation scale as a survey tool for understanding recreational fishing clientele.

Anderson, David K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

176

Monitoring radioactive xenon gas in room air using activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

A method for monitoring room air for radioactive xenon gas is described. It uses activated charcoal vials, a vacuum source and a well-type scintillation counter. The method may be adapted for detection and identification of any radioactive gas excluding those with ultra-short half-lives. Sampling room air during xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) ventilation lung studies was performed using this technique. The results show that low concentrations of {sup 133}Xe in room air can be reliably detected and that staff exposure to {sup 133}Xe at this institution was within ICRP recommendations.

Langford, J.; Thompson, G. (Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth (Australia) Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

How much sense do room occupancy sensor controls make  

SciTech Connect

Hotel operators are faced with a confusing array of both remote and local guest room energy control devices. A wide variety of decentralized electronic room controllers, each with its own control logic and vendor claims are in competition with remote front desk microprocessor controls which are essentially ''blind'' to actual occupancy. This paper is a review of the characteristics of various controllers, their behaviour with different in-room environmental equipment, and guest reactions to the potpourri of available devices.

Becker, H.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

How (and where) to book rooms This guide will tell you how and where to book rooms and spaces in the Students'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How (and where) to book rooms This guide will tell you how and where to book rooms and spaces are completely FREE to use for societies and committees. All you need is a current Room Booking Card to show per society/committee). If you want a valid room booking card for the academic year 12/13 you MUST

Dixon, Peter

179

WIPP Reaches Milestone „ First Disposal Room Filled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Reaches Milestone - First Disposal Room Filled CARLSBAD, N.M., September 4, 2001 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office today announced that Room 7 of Panel 1 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the first underground room used for disposal operations, has been filled to capacity with transuranic waste. The milestone was reached at about 3:30 p.m. on August 24, as Waste Handling personnel emplaced a shipment of waste from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. On August 25, Underground Operations personnel completed installation of a chain link mesh barrier and cloth drape across the entrance to the room to officially declare the area "closed." The first shipment of waste, which came

180

Dorm Room Idea Now Revolutionizing Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dorm Room Idea Now Revolutionizing Energy Dorm Room Idea Now Revolutionizing Energy Dorm Room Idea Now Revolutionizing Energy April 16, 2010 - 11:07am Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this project do? Princeton Power Systems is currently installing a 200-kW solar array and advanced battery system on company grounds to provide clean power to its building and to showcase advancements in renewable energy technology to businesses, municipalities and utilities that may be curious about renewable energy projects. While many college students might spend their time playing Ultimate Frisbee or enjoying the nightlife, Darren Hammell and several other Princeton University classmates transformed an idea fostered in a dorm room into one of the fastest-growing businesses in the energy industry, creating jobs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

prior to 2000 | National Nuclear Security prior to 2000 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 Home > About Us > Our Operations > NNSA Office of General Counsel > Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) > Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 Virtual Reading Room prior to 2000 Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

182

Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Virtual Reading Room after to 2000 | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

after to 2000 | National Nuclear Security after to 2000 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Virtual Reading Room after to 2000 Home > About Us > Our Operations > NNSA Office of General Counsel > Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) > Virtual Reading Room after to 2000 Virtual Reading Room after to 2000 Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

184

Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners October 7, 2013 - 10:40am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including room air conditioners, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

185

Demonstration of Intelligent Control and Fan Improvements in Computer Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Intelligent Control and Fan Improvements in Computer Room Demonstration of Intelligent Control and Fan Improvements in Computer Room Air Handlers Title Demonstration of Intelligent Control and Fan Improvements in Computer Room Air Handlers Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6007E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Coles, Henry C., Steve E. Greenberg, and Corrine Vita Document Number LBNL-6007E Date Published 12/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley, CA Keywords air distribution, building technology and urban systems department, computer room air handler, crah control, data center, data center crah, ec fan, ecm, ecm fan, fan speed control, high tech and industrial systems group, plug fan, variable frequency drive, vfd, wireless control Abstract

186

Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners October 7, 2013 - 10:40am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including room air conditioners, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

187

MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN ROOMS IN THE MODELICA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODELING MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN ROOMS IN THE MODELICA "BUILDINGS" LIBRARY Michael Wetter, Wangda Zuo, Thierry Stephane Nouidui Simulation Research Group, Building Technologies Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720, USA ABSTRACT This paper describes the implementation of the room heat transfer model in the free open-source Modelica "Buildings" library. The model can be used as a single room or to compose a multizone building model. We discuss how the model is de- composed into submodels for the individual heat transfer phenomena. We also discuss the main physical assumptions. The room model can be parameterized to use di↵erent modeling assump- tions, leading to linear or non-linear di↵erential algebraic systems of equations. We present nu- merical experiments that show

188

Press Room - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; A-Z Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ. Press Room. Glossary ...

189

Design of a multisystem remote maintenance control room  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Systems Development Section of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Japan's Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) recently collaborated in the development of a control room concept for remote operations. This report describes design methods and the resulting control room concept. The design project included five stages. The first was compilation of a complete function list; functions are tasks performed by operators in the control room while operating equipment located in the remote area. The second step was organization of the function list into ''function groups;'' function groups are sets of functions that operate one piece of equipment. The third stage was determination of crew size and requirements for supervision. The fourth stage was development of conceptual designs of displays and controls. The fifth stage was development of plans for placement of crew stations within the control room. 5 figs., 1 tab.

Draper, J.V.; Handel, S.J.; Kring, C.T.; Kawatsuma, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Jeremiah Holzbauer Michigan State University Bldg. 401, Room...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jeremiah Holzbauer Michigan State University Bldg. 401, Room B-4100 Wednesday February 8, 1:30 pm Host: Ali Nassiri The Beams and Applications Seminar Series For more information...

191

Grid Support for Collaborative Control Room in Fusion Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Fusion Collaboratory project seeks to enable fusion scientists to exploit Grid capabilities in support of experimental science. To this end we are exploring the concept of a collaborative control room that harnesses Grid and collaborative ...

K. Keahey; M. E. Papka; Q. Peng; D. Schissel; G. Abla; T. Araki; J. Burruss; E. Feibush; P. Lane; S. Klasky; T. Leggett; D. Mccune; L. Randerson

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NETL: NewsRoom - This Week at NETL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsRoom This Week at NETL 2013 October September August July October 15, 2013 October 7, 2013 September 30, 2013 September 23, 2013 September 16, 2013 September 9, 2013 September...

193

Second Panel of Disposal Rooms Completed in WIPP Underground  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isolation Pilot Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 DOENews -2- Underground waste disposal panels are arranged in parallel sets of seven rooms each. Each set of seven...

194

Variable Speed Fan Retrofits for Computer Room Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variable-Speed Fan Retrofits for Computer-Room Air Conditioners Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Technology Case Study Bulletin By...

195

Near room temperature lithographically processed metal-oxide transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fully lithographic process at near-room-temperature was developed for the purpose of fabricating transistors based on metal-oxide channel materials. The combination of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the source/drain electrodes, ...

Tang, Hui, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Five ENERGY STAR Room Air Conditioners Fail Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Enforcement announced today that DOE testing has identified five Friedrich room air conditioners that do not meet the ENERGY STAR Programs energy...

197

Tertiary Containment in a Multi-Room Tritium Facility  

SciTech Connect

An experimental system to provide tertiary containment at Mound has been upgraded to support a new multi-room tritium handling facility. This system is used to remove tritium from room air in the event of primary (process) and secondary (glovebox) containment failure. The upgraded system includes a faster response time, piping and valves that are more leaktight, and a new control panel that better indicates the system status and operating conditions.

Kent, L. R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Using a Research Simulator for Validating Control Room Modernization Concepts  

SciTech Connect

The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is a research, development, and deployment program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The program is operated in close collaboration with industry research and development programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants that are currently in operation. Advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the continued safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear control rooms. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe life extension of current reactors. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Current analog control rooms are growing obsolete, and it is difficult for utilities to maintain them. Using its reconfigurable control room simulator adapted from a training simulator, INL serves as a neutral test bed for implementing new control room system technologies and assisting in control room modernization efforts across.

Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Julius J. Persensky; Jeffrey C. Joe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ARIEL: automatic wi-fi based room fingerprinting for indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People spend the majority of their time indoors, and human indoor activities are strongly correlated with the rooms they are in. Room localization, which identifies the room a person or mobile phone is in, provides a powerful tool for characterizing ...

Yifei Jiang; Xin Pan; Kun Li; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

When Emergency Rooms Close: Ambulance Diversion in the West San Fernando Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple critical patients APP: When Emergency Rooms Closeparamedics sit in a crowded emergency room. 16 These waitsS. Chan. The effect of emergency department crowding on

Natasha Mihal; Renee Moilanen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pilot Study: Measurement of Room Illuminance to Assess Automatic Brightness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study: Measurement of Room Illuminance to Assess Automatic Brightness Study: Measurement of Room Illuminance to Assess Automatic Brightness Control in Televisions Title Pilot Study: Measurement of Room Illuminance to Assess Automatic Brightness Control in Televisions Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Greenblatt, Jeffery B., Mia Forbes Pirie, Louis-Benoit Desroches, Sally M. Donovan, Clancy Donnelly, Craig Billingsley, and Chris Calwell Pagination 13 Date Published August 12 Conference Location Berkeley Abstract Automatic brightness control (ABC) is an increasingly common feature found in newtelevisions (TVs) and computer monitors. ABC is intended to adjust TV screen brightness(luminance) according to the ambient light level (room illuminance). When implementedcorrectly, this can both reduce energy consumption and improve viewing quality. The currentENERGY STAR test procedure provides for a more favorable energy use rating for TVs withABC, by measuring power consumption at two light levels (0 and 300 lux) and reporting aweighted-average energy use. However, this and other studies suggest that these levels are notrepresentative of actual TV viewing conditions.As there were currently only limited data available concerning room illuminance, weundertook a small pilot study in 2011 to begin to answer two key questions: 1. To what extent doroom illuminance levels vary depending on the location of measurement (e.g., center of theroom, on the couch, or at the TV)? 2. What room illuminance conditions are prevalent whenpeople watch TV?We measured room illuminance in the homes of nine volunteers in California andColorado to begin addressing the above two questions. Although the study had the usualdrawbacks of a pilot (limited sample size, time duration, etc.), it has, nonetheless, yielded usefulresults. The study shows definitively that there is large variability between measurements madeat different locations in the room and, therefore, that location of room illuminance measurementsis critical. Moreover, the majority (over 75%) of TV viewing occurred at illuminance levels ofless than 50 lux (though measurements of up to several hundred lux were also recorded), a resultthat was consistent with subsequent larger-scale studies. This type of information can helpdetermine how ABC-enabled TVs should be tested to best represent actual viewing conditions.

202

Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The solar energy system includes a 238 single glazed flat plate, 3650 sq ft area collector subsystem, a 6000 gallon hot water storage subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat subsystem, an absorption chiller subsystem with a 2000 gallon tank chilled water storage subsystem. The auxiliary back up system is a gas-fired boiler and a conventional 100 gallon natural gas water heater provides any additional energy to satisfy hot water load requirements. A summary of project information, project chronology, project costs, the five modes of system operation, description of the Site Data Acquisition System, system performance summary, experience recommendations, system operational verification, drawings and major component manufacturers information are provided.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Community Activity Room (CAR) Painter, Version 4.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CAR V4 software visualizes transmission congestion and grid reliability in both a two-dimensional painting and a three-dimension rendering of walls enclosing a Community Activity Room. EPRI developed the concept of the Community Activity Room in the spring of 2002. It was implemented in the CAR Painter software. A demonstration software was issued in September 2002. In April, 2004, version 2.0 was released with many features added to the CAR Painter, including a 3-D visualization module. Version 3.0 ...

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance evaluation of the Shenandoah Community Solar Recreational Center for the year 1980. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Shenandoah Solar Recreational Center, when completed in early 1977, was the largest building to have most of its heating, air conditioning, and hot water needs met by solar energy. Principal components of the building solar energy system are a 1121 sq-m array of modularized flat plate collectors with 2300 sq-m of aluminum foreground reflectors integrated into a sawtooth wood truss roof, a 15.1 cu-m collector loop buffer tank, a 56.8 cu-m hot water storage tank, two 113.6 cu-m chilled water storage tanks, and a nominal 100 ton single stage absorption chiller. The system is interconnected by means of primary-secondary loops and was designed for simultaneous operation of all subsystems in either the heating or cooling modes. Control is by means of conventional HVAC pneumatic and electric control equipment. Transient thermal simulation studies were used to design the solar energy system. The collector array size was fixed so as to provide a significant fraction of the building annual thermal load, and the hot and chilled water storage volumes and other system functions were sized to maximize economic benefit. On this basis the predicted solar fractions were 95% space heating, 64% space cooling and 50% hot water. The building operation was monitored for a period on one year (February 1980 through February 1981) using a calculator-based data acquisition system with 80 sensors located throughout the building. This report presents an analysis of this data and an evaluation of the building performance over the year. The annual collector efficiency was found to be 19% and the overall annual solar fraction (combined thermal loads met from solar) was determined to be 39%. It is felt that this level of performance for a demonstration system is quite acceptable.

Craig, J.I.; Jeter, S.M.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Patient/Family Waiting Room Analysis For Susquehanna Health's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for WRMC against others in the industry, the team found that the industry average cost was $1.57 per square objectives included measuring the square footage of the waiting rooms, researching utility costs, utilization foot. This value is less than the WRMC maintenance costs, so the team provided recommendations

Demirel, Melik C.

207

Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms  

SciTech Connect

nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

R.L. Boring

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Measurement of Absorption in Rooms with Sound Absorbing Ceilings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Serious difficulties have been encountered in attempts to measure the absorption coefficients of sound absorbing ceilings in large offices. An analysis of the sound field is made and it is concluded (1) that the reverberation time formula is usually invalid if the absorption is concentrated on one surface of the room

J. R. Power

1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Science Career & Cooperative Education Burke Science Building Room 127  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Career & Cooperative Education Burke Science Building Room 127 www.science event. Visit the SCCE website to find event dates and details: www.science.mcmaster.ca/scce Attend a Co visit: www.science.mcmaster.ca/scce Enroll in SCIENCE 2C00 to learn the skills for career success

Hitchcock, Adam P.

210

Press Room - Testimony - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ. Press Room. ... Subcommittee on Energy Committee on Science, Space and Technology U.S. House of Representatives ...

211

FUEL HANDLING FACILITY BACKUP CENTRAL COMMUNICATIONS ROOM SPACE REQUIREMENTS CALCULATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Fuel Handling Facility Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements Calculation is to determine a preliminary estimate of the space required to house the backup central communications room in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). This room provides backup communications capability to the primary communication systems located in the Central Control Center Facility. This calculation will help guide FHF designers in allocating adequate space for communications system equipment in the FHF. This is a preliminary calculation determining preliminary estimates based on the assumptions listed in Section 4. As such, there are currently no limitations on the use of this preliminary calculation. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Design and Engineering and are intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the FHF Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Design and Engineering should be consulted before the use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

B. SZALEWSKI

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

212

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Round Robin Testing Results and Analysis by China National Institute of Standardization..................................................................................................................... 1 I.1.1 China's Energy Constraint Problem and the Need to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy

213

Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airflow simulation in one ventilated room with radiant heating and natural ventilation has been carried out. Three cases are compared: the closed room, the room with full openings, and the room with small openings. The radiator heating room with small openings is recommended. The airflow and thermal comfort are discussed for the last case. It is suitable for two kinds of civil buildings, housing buildings and office buildings, which take up the largest part of all functional buildings.

Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Influence of Operating Modes, Room Temperature Set Point and Curtain Styles on Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field investigation was carried out in an office building of Changsha city in winter and summer, the influence of different running modes, curtain styles and room temperature set point on energy consumption of room air conditioner (RAC) was studied. The results show that: In summer automatic speed mode consumes the least refrigerating energy in different running modes, compared with low speed and high speed modes, it can conserve energy for 27.3% and 15.8%, respectively. In the same running mode, setting outer curtain can conserve energy for 40.9% and 20.4% compared with no curtain and inner curtain states, respectively. In winter high speed mode is the most efficient for saving energy which can decrease 40.3% and 30.9% compared with low speed and automatic speed modes. In the same running mode, setting inner curtain state makes the least heating energy consumption in cloudy day, about 10.8% and 2.7% less than no curtain and outer curtain states. However, it is not obvious when the day is fine. The heating energy consumption decreases as room temperature set point falls, compared with the energy consumption at 20.5 C and 19.5 C, it is decreases for 34.1% and17.0 % at 18.5 C, respectively. All the results will be the reference of environment design and control for air conditioning room.

Yu, J.; Yang, C.; Guo, R.; Wu, D.; Chen, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Press Room - Radio - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Press Room Press Room Glossary › FAQS › Overview Press Releases Testimony Presentations Radio Events Radio Spots Ready-to-broadcast news stories. Transcripts provided so radio spots can be re-recorded in whole or in part. Residential heating oil prices virtually unchanged mp3 Date: December 18, 2013 Description: The average retail price for home heating oil fell 4-tenths of a penny from a week ago to $3.95 per gallon. That's down 8-tenths of a penny from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Heating oil prices in the New England region rose 3.92 per gallon, up 3-tenths of a cent from last week, and up 3 cents from a year ago. Contact/Author: Amerine Woodyard, 202-586-1256 Transcript: http://www.eia.gov/radio/transcript/heating_oil_prices_12182013.pdf

216

Press Room - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Press Room Press Room Glossary › FAQS › Overview Press Releases Testimony Presentations Radio Events Press Releases State Energy Profiles enhanced and renewables sections added December 19, 2013 Growing oil and natural gas production continues to reshape the U.S. energy economy December 16, 2013 MEDIA ADVISORY: EIA to Release Updated Energy Forecasts to 2040 December 4, 2013 EIA initiates new monthly Drilling Productivity Report October 22, 2013 More press releases... Congressional Testimony U.S. petroleum supply system pdf Subject: EIA, Petroleum Presented by: Adam Sieminski, Administrator Presented to: Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate Washington, DC-July 16, 2013 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program pdf Subject: EIA, Renewable, Forecasts Presented by: Adam Sieminski, Administrator

217

List of Room Air Conditioners Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conditioners Incentives Conditioners Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 112 Room Air Conditioners Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 112) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools State Government Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Room Air Conditioners Yes Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota) Utility Rebate Program Minnesota Residential Central Air conditioners

218

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a furnished room a furnished room Title Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-53943 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Singer, Brett C., Kenneth L. Revzan, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 38 Start Page Chapter Issue 16 Pagination 2483-2494 Abstract We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m3 room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h-1 and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium

219

Room Air Conditioning Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room or window air conditioners are a common appliance in parts of the United States residential sector for providing summertime cooling. The technology is based on the same vapor compression cycle common in central air conditioning and refrigeration applications, but with all system components in one enclosure, which is generally small and comparatively inexpensive. The systems are simple and modular enough to be installed by the homeowner, and can be installed in windows without major modification, or ...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

Community Activity Room (CAR) Code, Demo Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examining a computer image akin to a weather map, transmission system operators are now able to visualize congestion on the high voltage power lines that make up our nation's massive regional electricity grids. The multi-dimensional image, which represents power market activities, is made possible by a new software tool called the Community Activity Room, or CAR (TM). The colorful graphic shows the current state of wholesale power transactions and their effect on the reliability of an interconnected powe...

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

OSU WEBVIEWER PROVIDING WEB BASED ACCESS TO ROOM SCHEDULING INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a specific room. You can also search for an event name. For example, entering ANTH will display all and the starting date of next term's CS 419 course. You'll notice there is no way to filter this search by date be ignored. If we want all 400 level CS courses, we just enter "cs 4". SPACE QUICK SEARCH OR LOOKUP You can

Escher, Christine

222

Plenary session Room F2 Chairman: Doc. J. Langer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. O Modeling of Bacterial Chemotaxis in Steady-state System 17:15 Poster Session Symposium Room M1., Glosik J. O State-selective Recombination of H3 + Ions with Electrons at Temperatures 50­300 K 14:55 f2 Referee: Prof. F. Marsik 13:30 f11 Netusil M. O Modeling of Arterial Wall ­ The Current State of Knowledge

223

Determination of the Acceptable Room Temperature Range for Local Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the acceptable room temperature range is a key problem in satisfactory design of local cooling for energy savings. At the room temperatures ranging from neutral to warm, three sensitive body parts-the face, chest and back-were each exposed to local cooling airflow, where temperatures were 22, 25 and 28C. Thirty randomly-selected male subjects, dressed in shorts, were exposed to each condition for 30 minutes. Data were collected on their local thermal sensations of each body part, overall thermal sensation, and overall thermal acceptability on voting scales at regular intervals during the exposure. Results show that the non-uniformity of thermal sensation is a key factor affecting thermal acceptability except for overall thermal sensation. A new assessment model for local cooling was proposed. The model shows that face cooling can improve thermal acceptability more than chest or back cooling, and the upper boundary of the acceptable range of room temperature can be shifted from 26C to 30.5C when face cooling is provided.

Zhang, Y.; Zhao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radiation dose and risk to recreational fishermen from ingestion of fish caught near eight oil platforms in the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Offshore production of oil and gas is accompanied by a saline wastewater, called produced water. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico often contain elevated concentrations of radionuclides that occur naturally in the geologic reservoir along with the oil and gas. These radionuclides may accumulate in organisms that live near offshore oil and gas structures. Because recreational fishing in the Gulf of Mexico is concentrated near oil and gas platforms, there is the potential for increased risks to recreational fishermen from the ingestion of radionuclides in fish caught near produced water discharges. This analysis investigated the potential risk to recreational fishermen from radium and lead-210 in offshore produced water discharged to the Gulf of Mexico.

Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Research on Thermal Properties in a Phase Change Wallboard Room Based on Air Conditioning Cold Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After comparing the thermal performance parameters of an ordinary wall room to a phase change wall (PCW) room, we learn that phase change wallboard affects the fluctuation of temperature in air-conditioning room in the summer. We built a PCW room and an ordinary wall room, which are cooled by an air-conditioner. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to test the temperature field and heat flow fluctuation in these rooms. Through analyzing the data tested, we found that the mean temperature of PCW is lower than that of ordinary wall room by 1 to 2?, and PCW can lower the heat flow by 4.6W/m2. Combining phase change material with the building envelope can lower the indoor temperature, make the room thermally comfortable, and cut down the turn-on-and-off frequency of the air-conditioner and the primary investment and operating costs. It alleviates the urgent need for electricity.

Feng, G.; Li, W.; Chen, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: a room-sized chamber...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: a room-sized chamber study Title Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: a room-sized chamber study Publication Type Journal...

227

Modeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica Buildings Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for convective and radiative heat transfer yielded a twofoldModeling of Heat Transfer in Rooms in the Modelica of California. MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER IN ROOMS IN THE

Wetter, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

How do operators monitor a complex, dynamic work domain? The impact of control room technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: cognitive engineering, control rooms, human-machine interface, monitoring, nuclear power plants, process control, supervisory control

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

INFORMATION INTEGRATION IN CONTROL ROOMS AND TECHNICAL OFFICES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants Report prepared within the framework of the

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fuzzy expert system design for operating room air-condition control systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a controlled fuzzy expert system (FES) was designed to provide the conditions necessary for operating rooms. For this purpose, existing operating rooms have been studied to see if there are more useful, reliable and comfortable ones. How ... Keywords: Adaptive fuzzy control, Expert systems, Fuzzy control systems, Operating room control

Nazmi Etik; Novruz Allahverdi; Ibrahim Unal Sert; Ismail Saritas

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Designing for man: advances in control room operation  

SciTech Connect

Considers the human factor in nuclear power plants in relation to improving control room and maintenance operations. Control room operators face thousands of dials, meters, and indicator lights dispersed over large control boards. Components may not be arranged in clearly identifiable panels of related elements; sometimes related controls may not be near each other. Extensive alarm systems may sometimes confuse rather than alert the operators; communications with other parts of the plant may be difficult. Maintenance personnel may have to squeeze past pipes and similar obstructions to make repairs while carrying equipment and tools, sometimes while wearing protective gear. EPRI has developed a cool suit consisting of 16 pounds of water-filled compartments built into a two-piece repair suit that can be frozen to keep body temperatures at acceptable levels for up to 2 hrs. in high-heat areas of the plant. An ergonomics guide, which examines alternative solutions to heat stress (such as rest cycles and worker screening) is also being developed. Because few new nuclear plants are currently being built, many of the improvements will be retrofits in existing plants. EPRI's human factors work emphasizes thorough validation of new techniques through simulators and mockups.

Lihach, N.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers, and lakes for recreation. When we  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we are using it offstream. When we use water for recreation or to produce hydroelectric power, we from rivers and reservoirs. The water consumed may produce livestock, crops, or manufactured goods during heating, water is evaporated off and condensed with cool water. The water produced provides

Dyer, Bill

233

Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRAb) stated: The "business" of water resources management in Texas, and throughout the nation, is in the midst of transition and transformation. The transition is largely the result of ever increasing demands and competition for renewable but limited water supplies and a growing awareness of the limits of "traditional" water supply management strategies. ... In response to new challenges and uncertainties, it is imperative that water management institutions, at all levels, adopt a balanced, flexible approach that gives due weight to all the conflicting demands on the water, including the heavy economic dependence of the rice farmers on historic uses of irrigation water, rapidly emerging public interest in recreation, and environmental values. (p. 1) The problem is that the total quantity demanded is increasing and peak demand for agricultural, municipal, industrial, and recreational uses occurs at the same time of year. Since the supply is limited in any given year, efficient water management requires knowledge of the benefits to the various user groups. The research described in this paper focuses on the user group whose benefits have received relatively little attention in the past. These are the recreational and aesthetic users who own property and live around reservoirs in the Lower Colorado River basin. This study employs a "hedonic" or "implicit" price approach to examine a component of the recreational (and aesthetic) value of two lakes in the "Highland Lakes" chain. The study addresses the implicit recreational and aesthetic (RA) price placed on Lakes Austin and Travis by homeowners living near the lakes. It also examines the relationship between lake management practices and the value of lake front properties.

Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microsoft Word - SmallServerRoomEfficiencyFactSheet.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5E 5E Fact Sheet: Improving Energy Efficiency for Server Rooms and Closets Hoi Ying (Iris) Cheung, Rod Mahdavi, Steve Greenberg, Rich Brown and William Tschudi, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Pierre Delforge, National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) Joyce Dickerson, Google Environmental Energy Technologies Division September 2012 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

235

Variable Speed Fan Retrofits for Computer Room Air Conditioners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Variable-Speed Fan Variable-Speed Fan Retrofits for Computer-Room Air Conditioners Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Technology Case Study Bulletin By Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Steve Greenberg September 2013 2 Contacts Steve Greenberg Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, 90R3111 Berkeley, California 94720 (510) 486-6971 segreenberg@lbl.gov For more information on FEMP, please contact: Will Lintner, P.E., CEM Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. S.W. Washington, D. C. 20585-0121 (202) 586-3120 william.lintner@ee.doe.gov 3 Acknowledgements EPRI: Dennis Symanski, Brian Fortenbery Synapsense: Garret Smith, Patricia Nealon Vigilent: Corinne Vita

236

Observation of visible luminescence from indium nitride at room temperature  

SciTech Connect

InN films were grown on sapphire substrates with AlN buffer layers by reactive sputtering. C-axis-oriented crystalline InN films with a wurtzite structure were confirmed by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. Strong photoluminescence (PL) at 1.87 eV, together with a clear absorption edge at 1.97 eV, was observed at room temperature, which clearly demonstrates that it is not accurate in the previous assignment of an {approx}0.7 eV fundamental band gap for intrinsic InN simply from PL and absorption data. The possible origin of the present large band gap was discussed in terms of the effects of oxygen and the Burstein-Moss shift.

Guo, Q.X.; Tanaka, T.; Nishio, M.; Ogawa, H.; Pu, X.D.; Shen, W.Z. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Laboratory of Condensed Matter Spectroscopy and Opto-Electronic Physics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Committee convened in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MEETING MEETING - - - Thursday, April 25, 1996 - - - The Committee convened in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Dr. Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chairman SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX JOHN D. GRACE CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG RICHARD A. LOCKHART DANIEL A. RELLES PRESENT (Continued): BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS ALSO PRESENT: RENEE MILLER YVONNE BISHOP MARY HUTZLER JAY HAKES DOUGLAS HALE ART HOLLAND ARTHUR RYPINSKI LOUISE GUEY-LEE JOHN CYMBALSKY ERIN BOEDECKER JERRY COFFEY INDER KUNDRA C O N T E N T S PAGE Presentation by Jay Hakes 6 Presentation by Yvonne Bishop 34 Presentation by Art Rypinski 43 Presentation by Richard A. Lockhart 61 Presentation by Douglas Hale 84

238

Generation of coherent terahertz pulses in ruby at room temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have shown that a coherently driven solid state medium can potentially produce strong controllable short pulses of THz radiation. The high efficiency of the technique is based on excitation of maximal THz coherence by applying resonant optical pulses to the medium. The excited coherence in the medium is connected to macroscopic polarization coupled to THz radiation. We have performed detailed simulations by solving the coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations. By using a simple V-type energy scheme for ruby, we have demonstrated that the energy of generated THz pulses ranges from hundreds of pico-Joules to nano-Joules at room temperature and micro-Joules at liquid helium temperature, with pulse durations from picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. We have also suggested a coherent ruby source that lases on two optical wavelengths and simultaneously generates THz radiation. We discussed also possibilities of extension of the technique to different solid-state materials.

Kuznetsova, Elena; Rostovtsev, Yuri; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kolesov, Roman; Kocharovskaya, Olga [Institute for Quantum Studies and Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Scully, Marlan O. [Institute for Quantum Studies and Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Princeton Institute for Material Science and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energys (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

200-GeV ISA with room temperature magnets  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design study of 200-GeV proton intersecting storage accclerators with room temperature magnets is presented. The key to this study was thc desire to keep the electric power consumptiom to an acceptable level (40 MW). The design has been optimized by choosing small-gap (4 cm) aluminum coil dipoles operating at about 15 kG. The luminosity of this machine is limited to about 10/sup 32/ cm-/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ by transverse space-charg e effects. An order of magnitude higher luminositics can be obtained by adding a booster of modest cost. A novel vacuum system using distributed Ti-sublimation pumps results in considerable savings. A cost comparison with a high-luminosity superconducting machine is given. (auth)

Willis, W.J.; Danby, G.T.; Hahn, H.; Halama, H.J.; Maschke, A.W.; Month, M.; Parzen, G.; Polk, I.

1974-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy impacts of attic duct retrofits in Sacramento houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inefficiencies in air distribution systems have been identified as a major source of energy loss in US sunbelt homes. Research indicates that approximately 30--40% of the thermal energy delivered to the ducts passing through unconditioned spaces is lost through air leakage and conduction through the duct walls. Field experiments over the past several years have well documented the expected levels of air leakage and the extent to which that leakage can be reduced by retrofit. Energy savings have been documented to a more limited extent, based upon a few field studies and simulation model results. Simulations have also indicated energy loss through ducts during the off cycle caused by thermosiphon-induced flows, however this effect had not been confirmed experimentally. A field study has been initiated to separately measure the impacts of combined duct leak sealing and insulation retrofits, and to optimize a retrofit protocol for utility DSM programs. This paper describes preliminary results from 6 winter and 5 summer season houses. These retrofits cut overall duct leakage area approximately 64%, which translated to a reduction in envelope ELA of approximately 14%. Wrapping ducts and plenums with R-6 insulation translated to a reduction in average flow-weighted conduction losses of 33%. These experiments also confirmed the appropriateness of using duct ELA and operating pressures to estimate leakage flows for the population, but indicated significant variations between these estimates and measured flows on a house by house basis. In addition, these experiments provided a confirmation of the predicted thermosiphon flows, both under winter and summer conditions. Finally, average material costs were approximately 20% of the total retrofit costs, and estimates of labor required for retrofits based upon these experiments were: 0.04 person-hrs/cm{sup 2} of duct sealed and 0.21 person-hrs/m{sup 2} of duct insulated.

Jump, D.; Modera, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Moisture Measurements in Residential Attics Containing Radiant Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal radiant barriers, rigorously tested during a typical Tennessee winter, allowed moisture to dissipate on a diurnal cycle and caused no structural, wet insulation, or stained-ceiling problems.

1989-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

243

BSA 07-22: Compact Room-Temperature Radiation Detector for Oil ...  

These small, solid-state radiation detectors can be used at room temperature, making them more practical, mobile, and cost-effective than existing devices.

244

Design of a ventilation system for carbon dioxide reduction in two gym rooms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project is mainly focused on the improving and design of the ventilation system of two rooms at different levels of a gym (Friskis (more)

Barroeta, Ander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Virtual Control Room for Fusion Energy Sciences (V3) (A24771)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of The Virtual Control Room For Fusion Energy Sciences (V3)US DOE National Collaboratories Program Meeting(2004) Champaign Illinois, US, 2004999610460

Schissel, D.P.

2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

10:20AM, P1 Room Temperature Lasing From Excited Stated of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum dots formed by highly strained epilayers undergoing a ... The quantum dots demonstrate room temperature photoluminescence at 1.32 um with a full...

247

Large Room Temperature Magnetoresistance in FeCo-SiN Granular ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Large magnetoresistance (MR) materials have broad applications in ... Giant Low-Field Magnetocaloric Effect with Small Hysteresis Near Room...

248

BSA 07-22: Compact Room-Temperature Radiation Detector for Oil ...  

BSA 07-22: Compact Room-Temperature Radiation Detector for Oil & Gas Exploration. BNL Reference Number: BSA 07-22. Patent Status: U.S. Patent ...

249

Road to room-temperature superconductivity: A universal model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a semiclassical view superconductivity is attributed exclusively to the advance of atoms' outer s electrons through the nuclei of neighbor atoms in a solid. The necessary progression of holes in the opposite direction has the electric and magnetic effect as if two electrons were advancing instead of each actual one. Superconductivity ceases when the associated lateral oscillation of the outer s electrons extends between neighbor atoms. If such overswing occurs already at T = 0, then the material is a normal conductor. Otherwise, lateral overswing can be caused by lattice vibrations at a critical temperature Tc or by a critical magnetic field Bc. Lateral electron oscillations are reduced - and Tc is increased - when the atoms of the outer s electrons are squeezed, be it in the bulk crystal, in a thin film, or under external pressure on the sample. The model is applied to alkali metals and alkali-doped fullerenes. Aluminum serves as an example of a simple metal with superconductivity. Application of the model to transition metals, intertransitional alloys and compounds of transition metals with other elements sheds light on the pattern of their critical temperature. More examples of the squeeze effect are provided by the superconductivity of PdH, MgB2, borocarbides, ferropnictides, and organic charge-transfer salts. The model also provides the superconduction mechanism in the oxide superconductors, exemplified by YBa2Cu3O7. Finally the model suggests which steps to take in order to reach superconductivity at room temperature and above.

Manfred Bucher

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Renewable energy has political support, room to grow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources enjoy growing political support and have plenty of room to grow in the worldwide energy mix. And grow they will, according to most projections. The US Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) International Energy Outlook 1997 says consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewables will increase by 56% during 1995--2015. The renewable share of the total energy mix will remain at about current levels, however. The EIA projection includes only renewable fuels used in the generation of electricity. It therefore excludes most biomass energy. Despite the importance of biomass energy, data on consumption of it are sparse. IEA estimates that in the industrialized world, the biomass share of primary energy consumption amounts to 3.5%. Also excluded from EIA`s projection because of insufficiency of data are dispersed renewables, a category that includes energy consumed at the site of production, such as solar panels used for water heating. This paper discusses regional trends, North American activity, Western Europe, Asian developments, and the rest of the world.

NONE

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

251

Interest group lifecycles and recreational fishing: an exploratory study in the evolution of two sport fishing groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is a comparative, exploratory case study of the evolution of the Sport Fishing Institute and the Coastal Conservation Association. The study details the life histories of these two recreational fishing interest groups in order that it may be seen how interest groups change and why they do so. Initial propositions suggest there are three developmental stages in the lifecycle of an interest group. Additionally, there are eight variables of change that are characteristic of each stage. These variables may be used to classify the interest group according to its developmental stage. Finally, it is suggested that these changes are part of a general and predictable pattern in the interest group's lifecycle. Data for the study was obtained over a two year period through document search and extensive interviews with key informants, both inside and outside the organizations. Findings of the study indicate that there are three stages of development in these interest group's lifecycles. The stages are; nascent, developing, and mature. Data indicates that the Sport Fishing Institute has evolved to the mature stage, while the Coastal Conservation Association is in the developing stage. Characteristics of each stage are defined, as are the circumstances necessary for movement from one stage to another and the common problems faced by most interest groups.

Faulkner, Kelly Patrice

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

RADIATION DOSE AND RISK TO RECREATIONAL FISHERMEN FROM INGESTION OF FISH CAUGHT NEAR EIGHT OIL PLATFORMS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Offshore production of oil and gas is accompanied by a saline wastewater, called produced water. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico often contain elevated concentrations of radionuclides that occur naturally in the geologic reservoir along with the oil and gas. These radionuclides may accumulate in organisms that live near offshore oil and gas structures. Because recreational fishing in the Gulf of Mexico is concentrated near oil and gas platforms, there is the potential for increased risks to recreational fishermen from the ingestion of radionuclides in fish caught near produced water discharges. This analysis investigated the potential risk to recreational fishermen from radium and lead-210 in offshore produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico. The assessment used data collected at eight discharging offshore platforms and two reference locations. These data were collected in a USDOE funded project titled ``Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations'', here called the USDOE Field Study. The risk assessments were done to support risk managers in developing regulations and permits for offshore discharges of produced water.

MEINHOLD,A.F.; HOLTZMAN,S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m{sup 3} room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C{sub 8}-C{sub 10} aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h{sup -1} and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium.

Singer, Brett C.; Revzan, Kenneth L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Brown, Nancy J.

2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

City of Danville Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Amount Lighting: 0.175watt reduced New Occupancy Sensors: 0.05watt controlled LED Exit Sign: 14unit Air ConditioningHeat Pump Units: 40 - 60 Room AC: 25 Attic...

255

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

256

Boiler Room Coal Drying Heat Exchanger Numerical Computational Simulation and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northeast area city district heating boiler room of coal with high moisture content, have caused a large number of waste of coal resources. Boiler coal drying heat exchanger is a long design cycle, testing workload and investment is more equipment. In ... Keywords: District heating boiler room, Dry heat exchanger, Numerical simulation, Heat transfer calculation

Zhao Xuefeng, Xiong Wen-zhuo

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Title Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5932E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Nouidui, Thierry Stephane, Kaustubh Phalak, Wangda Zuo, and Michael Wetter Conference Name Proc. of the 9th International Modelica Conference Date Published 09/2012 Conference Location Munich, Germany Abstract The Modelica Buildings library contains a package with a model for a thermal zone that computes heat transfer through the building envelope and within a room. It considers various heat transfer phenomena of a room, including conduction, convection, short-wave and long-wave radiation. The first part of this paper describes the physical phenomena considered in the room model. The second part validates the room model by using a standard test suite provided by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). The third part focuses on an application where the room model is used for simulation-based controls of a window shading device to reduce building energy consumption.

258

Managing Complexity in TeamRooms, a Tcl-Based Internet Groupware Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing Complexity in TeamRooms, a Tcl-Based Internet Groupware Application Mark Roseman Dept@cpsc.ucalgary.ca Abstract This paper describes TeamRooms, a Tcl-based real time groupware application that provides "network the use of several Tcl programming techniques -- meta-architectures, multiple interpreters, and embedded

Greenberg, Saul

259

UC Davis Medical Education Building | 4610 X Street | Room 1222 & 2222 ONLINE REGISTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UC Davis Medical Education Building | 4610 X Street | Room 1222 & 2222 ONLINE REGISTRATION/ TECHNOLOGIST SYMPOSIUM Advances In Cardiovascular Medical and Surgical Care SAVE THE DATE Saturday, May 5, 2012-734-5512, janine.neely@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu. LOCATION UC Davis Medical Education Building 4610 X Street, Room 1222

Hammock, Bruce D.

260

Joan Stevens Hall 1st-year students. 242 242 single rooms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

single rooms, 38 twin-share places. $170­$213 Yes Yes # Gym area Music room 15 free off-street car parks fee* Electricity included in fee Internet included in fee Facilities available #12;uStay McKenzies = 1

Frean, Marcus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Room ventilation and its influence on the performance of fume cupboards: A parametric numerical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-dimensional turbulent flow in a typical chemical laboratory containing two fume cupboards and furniture is investigated numerically in order to obtain detailed information needed for the improved design of ventilating systems for such rooms. The flow inside the two fume cupboards is simulated simultaneously with the room flow, and its dependence on the flow structure in the room is shown. The flow inside the cupboards and in the vicinity of their sash openings has been found to be essentially three-dimensional. Several room parameters are varied, and a quantitative evaluation of their influence on the flow, the comfort characteristics, and the ventilation efficiency is given. Additional ceiling-mounted openings, which extract room air outside the fume cupboards, can affect the capture efficiency of the cupboards, as well as the quality of the air in the room. It has been found also that small changes in the position of the radial inlet ceiling-mounted diffuser can influence the air quality of the room and at the same time the draught risk. These effects are shown for a given room arrangement. To accommodate the complex geometry, the elliptical nature of the mathematical problem, and the use of a turbulence model, a multigrid acceleration method with 245,000 control volumes is used, allowing CPU times on a workstation to become acceptable.

Denev, J.A.; Durst, F.; Mohr, B. [Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)] [Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators of nuclear power plants face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms that will be produced at various stages of instrumentation and control (I&C) modernization. This report provides guidance on planning, specifying, designing, implementing, operating, maintaining, and training for modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

Ronald L. Boring

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Apparatus for conserving energy in a building. [Patent equipment for controlling energy use in unoccupied hotel rooms and other buildings  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus for turning off power-consuming appliances in rooms of a building having a private automatic branch exchange telephone system includes computer-controlled means at the exchange central periodically to apply short bursts of audio-frequency oscillations to telephone lines going to rooms in which power can be conserved. Detecting means in each room connected to the room telephone line provide an output on receipt of a burst which operates a line relay in the room, disconnecting power from the appliance in the room, for a predetermined time period greater than the time period between the periodic application of bursts at the exchange central.

James, E.C.; Fairfax, G.H.

1977-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

265

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electrochemical Windows of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids from Molecular Dynamics and Density Functional Theory Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated the cathodic and anodic limits of six room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) formed from a combination of two common cations, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM) and N,N-propylmethylpyrrolidinium (P13), and ...

Ong, Shyue Ping

267

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Title Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for Room Air Conditioners Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-63204 Year of Publication 2007 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 03/2007 Keywords India Air Conditioner Efficiency Standards Abstract The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency.

268

HQFMSP Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas HQFMSP Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas October 2013 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 2, Limited Areas, Valut-Type Rooms and Temporary Limited Areas This chapter covers the establishment, maintenance, and termination of areas within HQ buildings where classified activities take place. It covers the requirements applicable to each type of security area, including physical protection measures, controls on the use of electronic devices, restrictions on what security activities can take place, and what security equipment must be present. The procedures in this chapter were developed and are maintained jointly by HS-91 and the Office of Information Security

269

Human-factors engineering-control-room design review: Shoreham Nuclear Power Station. Draft audit report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A human factors engineering preliminary design review of the Shoreham control room was performed at the site on March 30 through April 3, 1981. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. This report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Design Assessment and the human factors engineering design review/audit performed at the site. The presented sections are numbered to conform to the guidelines of the draft version of NUREG-0700. They summarize the teams's observations of the control room design and layout, and of the control room operators' interface with the control room environment.

Peterson, L.R.; Preston-Smith, J.; Savage, J.W.; Rousseau, W.F.

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Route to Room-Temperature Superconductivity from a Practical Point of View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To synthesize a new superconductor which has a critical temperature, Tc, exceeding the room temperature, one needs to know what chemical components to start with. This chapter presents analysis of experimental data which allow one to draw a conclusion about components and the structure of a potential room-temperature superconductor. The two essential components of a roomtemperature superconductor are large organic molecules (polymers, tissues) and atoms/molecules which are magnetic in the intercalated state. This conclusion is fully based on experimental facts known today, and does not require any assumptions about the mechanism of room-temperature superconductivity. This, however, does not mean that to synthesize a room-temperature superconductor is an easy task. Never let them persuade you that things are too difficult or impossible.

A. Mourachkine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Numerical method for computing nonlinear, time dependent, buoyant circulation of air in rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described which solves the dynamic equations for air circulation at Grashof numbers that are in the range of environmental temperatures of rooms. Previous two-dimensional computation techniques were limited to G ? 105 ...

J. E. Fromm

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

NSLS ESH&Q | NSLS Laboratory Rooms and Experimental Safety Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS Laboratory Rooms and Experimental Safety Reviews Some beamlines have dedicated lab space. Fill out the form below and e-mail it to the Lab Steward for that beamline first. If...

273

Optical gain and lasing from band-engineered Ge-on-Si at room temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present theoretical modeling and experimental results of optical gain and lasing from tensile-strained, n[superscript +] Ge-on-Si at room temperature. Compatible with silicon CMOS, these devices are ideal for large-scale ...

Liu, Jifeng

274

Room-temperature direct bandgap electroluminesence from Ge-on-Si light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of direct bandgap electroluminescence (EL) from Ge/Si heterojunction light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at room temperature. In-plane biaxial tensile strain is used to ...

Sun, Xiaochen

275

ICTs and the limits of integration: Converging professional routines and ICT support in colocated emergency response control rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we have tried to establish how the nature of professional routines affects the ICT supported standardization and scripting of work performed by operators in Dutch colocated emergency response control rooms. In this type of multidisciplinary ... Keywords: Emergency response control room, ICTs, colocated control room, emergency response services, inter-organizational collaboration, professional routines

Stefan Soeparman; Hein van Duivenboden; Pieter Wagenaar; Peter Groenewegen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Room coolers prior to 1930 and the technical impediments to their development  

SciTech Connect

Numerous attempts at room cooling can be found beginning in the mid 1800's. These attempts became more common as the refrigeration industry developed; however, it was not until the 1900's that the many technical problems were solved, primarily by the fledgling household refrigeration industry. Isolated installations of room cooling for residential and commercial use gave way to mass production of engineered products by the late 1920's, setting the stage for widespread manufacture and use in the 1930's and beyond.

Nagengast, B.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

TRANSIENT ACCIDENT ANALYSIS OF THE GLOVEBOX SYSTEM IN A LARGE PROCESS ROOM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Local transient hydrogen concentrations were evaluated inside a large process room when the hydrogen gas was released by three postulated accident scenarios associated with the process tank leakage and fire leading to a loss of gas confinement. The three cases considered in this work were fire in a room, loss of confinement from a process tank, and loss of confinement coupled with fire event. Based on these accident scenarios in a large and unventilated process room, the modeling calculations of the hydrogen migration were performed to estimate local transient concentrations of hydrogen due to the sudden leakage and release from a glovebox system associated with the process tank. The modeling domain represented the major features of the process room including the principal release or leakage source of gas storage system. The model was benchmarked against the literature results for key phenomena such as natural convection, turbulent behavior, gas mixing due to jet entrainment, and radiation cooling because these phenomena are closely related to the gas driving mechanisms within a large air space of the process room. The modeling results showed that at the corner of the process room, the gas concentrations migrated by the Case 2 and Case 3 scenarios reached the set-point value of high activity alarm in about 13 seconds, while the Case 1 scenario takes about 90 seconds to reach the concentration. The modeling results were used to estimate transient radioactive gas migrations in an enclosed process room installed with high activity alarm monitor when the postulated leakage scenarios are initiated without room ventilation.

Lee, S

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

North Campus Recreation Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Handling Franklin AmbulatoryCareCenter Bowles Thurston Research Granville Towers West Cancer Ops- NC Northside Hospital Campus NC Neuro- Plant #1 Hospital Chiller Hospital Chiller Hill Whitehead KouryNatatorium Pinetum UNC Hospital Alumni Parker HenryStadium Union SRC Graham Arena Plant Love House

Lieb, Jason

279

Jamail Texas Recreational  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lot 40 Lot 31 Lot 16 Lot 11 Lot 70 Lot 99 Lot 80 Lot 118 Lot 108 Trinity Garage Jamail Texas Swimming Blanton Museum of Art Brazos Garage Conference Center Garage Main Building San Jacinto Garage DKR Texas Memorial Stadium Bellmont Hall North End Zone North End Zone Bellmont Hall DKR Texas Memorial Stadium San

Texas at Austin, University of

280

Campus Recreation PROGRAM GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hockey pucks Hockey goals Towel Service *Failure to return equipment, including towels will result Jessica Solana jsolana27@gatech.edu Fencing Joseph Conn josephconn@gatech.edu Field Hockey Mukund Kumar.edu Ice Hockey Jeremy Spafard j.spafard@gatech.edu Inline Hockey Kevin Brenner kevin

Löffler, Frank E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recreation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook...

282

MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>Conference Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Physics Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links Conference Rooms The PSFC is using google apps for education to support calendars for shared resources. There are currently two calendars implemented. One for the Alcator C-Mod Run Schedule, and one to schedule the NW17-132 conference room. These links will display read only views of the calendars. In order to schedule the conference room visit your personal psfc calendar as described below. In order to view these calendars you must be signed in to the g-apps.psfc.mit.edu domain. When prompted by https://sso.psfc.mit.edu/ for a username and password, enter your PSFC login credentials. After you authenticate for the first time, you get a screen which asks you to accept new account. Note that: THIS IS DIFFERENT AND SEPARATE FROM YOUR OTHER GOOGLE

283

State of Washington officials join department of energy to dedicate WIPP disposal room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State of Washington Officials Join Department of Energy State of Washington Officials Join Department of Energy To Dedicate WIPP Disposal Room CARLSBAD, N.M., June 2, 2000 - U.S. Congressman Doc Hastings of Washington state joined U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) officials today in dedicating the "Washington Room" at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Disposal Room 2 of Panel 1 in the WIPP underground will be filled with transuranic radioactive waste from the Hanford Site near Richland, Wash., as well as other DOE facilities. "The state of Washington is pleased that WIPP is open and will soon accept transuranic waste from Hanford," said Congressman Hastings. "This event recognizes the years of cooperation and dedication among all parties in making WIPP a reality. It also shows continuing progress on the cleanup of the Hanford Site."

284

HYBRID ALARM SYSTEMS: COMBINING SPATIAL ALARMS AND ALARM LISTS FOR OPTIMIZED CONTROL ROOM OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current nuclear power plants. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Within control room modernization, alarm system upgrades present opportunities to meet the broader goals of the LWRS project in demonstrating the use and safety of the advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies and the short-term and longer term objectives of the plant. In this paper, we review approaches for and human factors issues behind upgrading alarms in the main control room of nuclear power plants.

Ronald L. Boring; J.J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the actual magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite.

Ohldag, Hendrik

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Laser sheet light flow visualization for evaluating room air flowsfrom Registers  

SciTech Connect

Forced air heating and cooling systems and whole house ventilation systems deliver air to individual rooms in a house via supply registers located on walls ceilings or floors; and occasionally less straightforward locations like toe-kicks below cabinets. Ideally, the air velocity out of the registers combined with the turbulence of the flow, vectoring of air by register vanes and geometry of register placement combine to mix the supply air within the room. A particular issue that has been raised recently is the performance of multiple capacity and air flow HVAC systems. These systems vary the air flow rate through the distribution system depending on the system load, or if operating in a ventilation rather than a space conditioning mode. These systems have been developed to maximize equipment efficiency, however, the high efficiency ratings do not include any room mixing effects. At lower air flow rates, there is the possibility that room air will be poorly mixed, leading to thermal stratification and reduced comfort for occupants. This can lead to increased energy use as the occupants adjust the thermostat settings to compensate and parts of the conditioned space have higher envelope temperature differences than for the well mixed case. In addition, lack of comfort can be a barrier to market acceptance of these higher efficiency systems To investigate the effect on room mixing of reduced air flow rates requires the measurement of mixing of supply air with room air throughout the space to be conditioned. This is a particularly difficult exercise if we want to determine the transient performance of the space conditioning system. Full scale experiments can be done in special test chambers, but the spatial resolution required to fully examine the mixing problem is usually limited by the sheer number of thermal sensors required. Current full-scale laboratory testing is therefore severely limited in its resolution. As an alternative, we used a water-filled scale model of a room in which whole-field supply air mixing maps of two vertical planes were measured using a Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurement technique. Water marked with fluorescent dye was used to simulate the supply airflow; and the resulting concentrations within the water filled model show how the supply air mixes with the room air and are an analog for temperature (for thermal loads) or fresh air (for ventilation). In addition to performing experiments over a range of flow rates, we also changed register locations and examined the effects for both heating and cooling operation by changing the water density (simulating air density changes due to temperature changes) using dissolved salt.

Walker, Iain S.; Claret, Valerie; Smith, Brian

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Valance heating/cooling system attains largest application in 1,000-room hotel  

SciTech Connect

Room temperatures in the 1,000 guest rooms of Chicago's Hyatt Regency Hotel are controlled by a valance heating and cooling system that functions by means of radiation and convection. The valances are mounted below the ceiling and consists of finned tubes and a drain tube contained within a wall-mounted enclosure. The finned tubes and drain are connected to a riser system, that is connected to a hot and cold water supply. The economics of the system is discussed and with no fans, motors, or blowers to run, energy is conserved. (MCW)

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Room-temperature electric-field controlled spin dynamics in ,,110... InAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Room-temperature electric-field controlled spin dynamics in ,,110... InAs quantum wells K. C. Halla pseudomagnetic fields exceeding 1 T when only 140 mV is applied across a single quantum well. Using this large­11 and the influence of the Rashba pseudomagnetic fields on the electron spin relaxation time in GaAs quantum wells

Flatte, Michael E.

289

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

290

THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF EXPERIMENTAL ROOMS FOR THE STUDY OF AIR-BORNE INFECTION*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to carry out adequately controlled studies on the effects of temperature and humidity on the behavior of bacteria and viruses suspended in the air under various experimental conditions, it became necessary to have available enclosed spaces in which any desired atmospheric state could be produced and maintained. The use of conventional methods of air conditioning is unsuitable for this purpose because all of these depend upon exchange of the air inside the experimental space with conditioned air. Hence, two identical air-tight, glass-walled rooms 8 feet X 10 feet and 8 feet high were built each within a separate air-conditioned shell which can be kept constantly at any temperature and relative humidity likely to be encountered in spaces occupied by human beings. Rapid circulation of the conditioned air over all surfaces of the inner room provides a sufficiently high rate of heat transfer to insure constant temperature conditions within that space. The relative humidity of the inner room can be maintained at the same level as the air of the outer shell or can be increased by the introduction of steam. Two rooms provide much greater

O. H. Robertson; Theodore T. Puck, Ph.D.; Henry Wise

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Study on Energy Saving of the Interlayer Ventilation Walla Used in Clean Operation Rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery energy of the exhaust in air conditioning is very important to clean operating rooms. In disinfected operating rooms, we often use completely fresh air conditioning system in order to maintain cleanliness. All the return air of the air conditioning must be discharged. For recovering the exhaust energy, whole heat exchangers are used, and they may bring cross-infection in clean operating rooms. Cross-infection would negatively affect cleanness. This paper puts forward an air layer inside of a building's external wall that acts as a passageway for air conditioning exhaust, and also providing a place for the thermal exchange of the air conditioning exhaust. This kind of envelope is named an interlayer ventilation wall. There are two advantages. First, it will recover and reutilize the energy that the air conditioning exhaust takes, avoid cross-infection between the fresh air and the exhaust. Second, it will lower the energy loss of the heat exchange through the envelope. The energy saving effect will be very significant in clean operating rooms.

Feng, J.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fabrication of a Miniaturized Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gas Sensor for Human Health and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of a Miniaturized Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gas Sensor for Human Health and Safety temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) gas sensors utilizing electrochemical instrumentation demonstrate promising that enables miniaturized, rapid response, gas sensors to be realized using RTIL interfaces on a permeable

Mason, Andrew

293

Current methods to handle wall conduction and room internal heat transfer  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews methods of handling wall conduction and room internal heat exchange adopted by ASHRAE (1993 Handbook of Fundamentals and later developments), CIBSE (1986 Guide and current proposals), and the CEN/TC89/WG6 proposals to calculate heating and cooling loads and related topics.

Davies, M.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ECE 461 FUNDAMENTALS OF SOLAR ENERGY Time/Day: TBA Room: TBA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ECE 461 FUNDAMENTALS OF SOLAR ENERGY Time/Day: TBA Room: TBA Instructor: Rajendra Singh Topics Covered Topic Hours Course Overview 1 Solar Energy: Introduction 2 Importance of Solar Energy as Clean & Sustainable Energy 3 Fundamentals & Technology of Solar Thermal Systems 3 Fundamentals

Bolding, M. Chad

296

Room-temperature oxygen sensitization in highly textured, nanocrystalline PbTe films: A mechanistic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we report large mid-wave infrared photoconductivity in highly textured, nanocrystalline PbTe films thermally evaporated on Si at room temperature. Responsivity as high as 25 V/W is measured at the 3.5 ?m ...

Wang, Jianfei

297

Electrical properties of room temperature sputtered Y2O3and MOSFET characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We closely evaluated the properties of Y2O3 deposited by RF sputter system at room temperature for the application to a transparent thin film transistor. Although the leakage current density hardly depends on the deposition conditions, ... Keywords: IGZO, TTFT(transparent thin film transistor), Y2O3, electrical characterization, gate oxide, leakage current

Young-Je Cho; Ji-Hoon Shin; Jae-Kyu Lee; Young-Bae Kim; Duck-Kyun Choi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A study towards applying thermal inertia for energy conservation in rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are in an age where people are paying increasing attention to energy conservation around the world. The heating and air-conditioning systems of buildings introduce one of the largest chunks of energy expenses. In this article, we make a key observation ... Keywords: Thermal inertia, energy conservation, room management, wireless sensor networks

Yi Yuan; Dawei Pan; Dan Wang; Xiaohua Xu; Yu Peng; Xiyuan Peng; Peng-Jun Wan

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Trends in the living room and beyond: results from ethnographic studies using creative and playful probing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we present the findings of two ethnographic studies embedded into two broader projects on interactive television in the home environment. Based on previous research on the home context and inspired by ongoing trends around interactive ... Keywords: cultural probes, ethnography, home context, interactive TV, living room

Regina Bernhaupt; Marianna Obrist; Astrid Weiss; Elke Beck; Manfred Tscheligi

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design and performance of a rule-based controller in a naturally ventilated room  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to design and implement a fuzzy controller for naturally ventilated buildings. The controller is implemented in a test room using MATLABTM. Initially the controller was validated using simulated data. Simulations ... Keywords: fuzzy logic control, naturally ventilated buildings, thermal comfort

M. Eftekhari; L. Marjanovic; P. Angelov

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The KidsRoom: A Perceptually-Based Interactive and Immersive Story Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The KidsRoom is a perceptually-based, interactive, narrative playspace for children. Images, music, narration, light, and sound effects are used to transform a normal child's bedroom into a fantasy land where children are guided through a reactive adventure ...

Aaron F. Bobick; Stephen S. Intille; James W. Davis; Freedom Baird; Claudio S. Pinhanez; Lee W. Campbell; Yuri A. Ivanov; Arjan Schtte; Andrew Wilson

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A room temperature CuO nanowire sensor for organic volatile gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CuO nanowires have been synthesised by the thermal method in 100% oxygen ambient at 600C. Gas sensing property has been examined by measuring the resistance change of the materials to 1% of butane gas and 1% of ethanol vapour separately under the ... Keywords: copper oxide (CuO) nanowires, room temperature gas sensor and organic volatile gas

C. F. Dee; T. Y. Tiong; M. M. Salleh; M. M. Yahya; B. Y. Majlis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature-principles anharmonic calculations are carried out for the IR and Raman spectra of the CAH stretch- ing bands in butane.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction n-Butane is of great importance in several disciplines

Potma, Eric Olaf

304

Room temperature 1.6 m electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Room temperature 1.6 µm electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si substrate Szu n+/p light emitting diode on a Si substrate. Unlike normal electrically pumped devices, this device.4670) Optical materials; (230.3670) Light-emitting diodes. References and links 1. L. C. Kimerling, "Silicon

Vuckovic, Jelena

305

Room-temperature mid-infrared laser sensor for trace gas detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and pipeline leak detection. Applications such as landfill emissions monitoring require measurements of gasRoom-temperature mid-infrared laser sensor for trace gas detection Thomas To¨ pfer, Konstantin P. Petrov, Yasuharu Mine, Dieter Jundt, Robert F. Curl, and Frank K. Tittel Design and operation

306

Dye-doped cholesteric-liquid-crystal room-temperature single-photon source*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dye-doped cholesteric-liquid-crystal room-temperature single-photon source* SVETLANA G. LUKISHOVAy, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA (Received 30 June 2003) Abstract. Fluorescence antibunching from single terrylene molecules embedded in a cholesteric-liquid-crystal host is used

Stroud, Carlos R.

307

MULTI - TRACER CONTROL ROOM AIR INLEAKAGE PROTOCOL AND SIMULATED PRIMARY AND EXTENDED MULTI - ZONE RESULTS.  

SciTech Connect

The perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be applied simultaneously to the wide range in zonal flowrates (from tens of cfms in some Control Rooms to almost 1,000,000 cfm in Turbine Buildings), to achieve the necessary uniform tagging for subsequent determination of the desired air inleakage and outleakage from all zones surrounding a plant's Control Room (CR). New types of PFT sources (Mega sources) were devised and tested to handle the unusually large flowrates in a number of HVAC zones in power stations. A review of the plans of a particular nuclear power plant and subsequent simulations of the tagging and sampling results confirm that the technology can provide the necessary concentration measurement data to allow the important ventilation pathways involving the Control Room and its air flow communications with all adjacent zones to be quantitatively determined with minimal uncertainty. Depending on need, a simple single or 3-zone scheme (involving the Control Room alone or along with the Aux. Bldg. and Turbine Bldg.) or a more complex test involving up to 7 zones simultaneously can be accommodated with the current revisions to the technology; to test all the possible flow pathways, several different combinations of up to 7 zones would need to be run. The potential exists that for an appropriate investment, in about 2 years, it would be possible to completely evaluate an entire power plant in a single extended multizone test with up to 12 to 13 separate HVAC zones. With multiple samplers in the Control Room near each of the contiguous zones, not only will the prevalent inleakage or outleakage zones be documented, but the particular location of the pathway's room of ingress can be identified. The suggested protocol is to perform a 3-zone test involving the Control Room, Aux. Bldg., and Turbine Bldg. to (1) verify CR total inleakage and (2) proportion that inleakage to distinguish that from the other 2 major buildings and any remaining untagged locations. These results would then direct the next subsequent tests. Final results would point to where mitigation steps should be initiated. Protocols for repeat testing as well as long term continual testing are suggested.

DIETZ,R.N.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Press Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

photos and graphics from Fermilab's online, up-to-the-minute archive. Video Archive Animations and videos based on streaming video technology, ready for watching without long...

309

LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis. #12;LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break,812 Maintenance Cost $620 $0 $97 $0 Life Cycle Cost $1,787 $1,693 $2,980 $2,980 #12;LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC

Hofmann, Hans A.

310

BEYOND INTEGRATED SYSTEM VALIDATION: USE OF A CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATOR FOR PROOF-OF-CONCEPT INTERFACE DEVELOPMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plants in the US. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

Ronald Boring; Vivek Agarwal

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CFN Operations and Safety Awareness (COSA) Checklist Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility Nanofabrication (Clean Room) Facility Building 735 This COSA form must be completed for all experimenters working in the CFN and must be submitted to the CFN User Office for badge access. CFN Safety Awareness Policy: Each user must be instructed in the safe procedures in CFN related activities. CFN Facility Laboratory personnel shall keep readily available all relevant instructions and safety literature. Employee/Guest Name Life/Guest Number Department/Division ES&H Coordinator/Ext. Facility Manager COSA Trainer Guest User Staff USER ADMINISTRATION Checked in at User Administration and has valid BNL ID badge Safety Approval Form (SAF) approved. Training requirements completed (Indicate additional training specified in SAF or ESR in lines provided below):

312

Section_201_Establishing_Maintaining_and_Deactivating_Limited_and_Vault-Type_Rooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

201 201 Establishing, Maintaining, and Deactivating Limited Areas and Vault-Type Rooms Description Classified matter must be processed, discussed, handled, or stored in designated Limited Areas (LAs) or Vault-Type Rooms (VTRs). LAs and VTRs must have security measures in place to detect and deter unauthorized persons from gaining access to the classified matter. This includes measures to prevent unauthorized persons from seeing or hearing classified information. All LAs and VTRs at Headquarters (HQ) must be approved by the Office of HQ Security Operations (HS-90) prior to the initiation of classified activities or the introduction of classified material or equipment. Definitions of a LA and VTR: 1. Limited Area (LA)--An LA is a security area designated for the protection of classified

313

Impact of the Energy Efficiency Labeling and Standards Program on Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of the Energy Efficiency Labeling and Standards Program on Room Impact of the Energy Efficiency Labeling and Standards Program on Room Air-conditioner in Korea Speaker(s): Jun-Young Choi Date: January 31, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 There is a significant amount of trade in energy-using equipment all over the world. A study of trade in air conditioners, refrigerators, electric motors and lighting products found that air-conditioner trade all among all economies was worth about US$35 billion in 2003. Window/wall air conditioners represented about 40% of the value of trade, and other types (split system and ducted types) about 60%. Air conditioner is the one of most energy-consuming equipments in residential sector, which reaches to include air conditioner in MEPS and energy labeling program in many economies. Much of this trade is affected in some way by minimum energy

314

The role of hydrogen in room-temperature ferromagnetism at graphite surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a x-ray dichroism study of graphite surfaces that addresses the origin and magnitude of ferromagnetism in metal-free carbon. We find that, in addition to carbon {pi} states, also hydrogen-mediated electronic states exhibit a net spin polarization with significant magnetic remanence at room temperature. The observed magnetism is restricted to the top {approx}10 nm of the irradiated sample where the average magnetization reaches {approx_equal} 15 emu/g at room temperature. We prove that the ferromagnetism found in metal-free untreated graphite is intrinsic and has a similar origin as the one found in proton bombarded graphite. Also, our findings show that the magnetic properties of graphite surfaces, thin films or two dimensional graphene samples can be reliably studied using soft x-ray dichroism. Fundamental new insight into the magnetic properties of carbon based systems can thus be obtained.

Ohldag, H.; Esquinazi, P.; Arenholz, E.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a functional model patient room. This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mirror thermal noise in laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors operating at room and cryogenic temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mirror thermal noise is and will remain one of the main limitations to the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors based on laser interferometers. We report about projected mirror thermal noise due to losses in the mirror coatings and substrates. The evaluation includes all kind of thermal noises presently known. Several of the envisaged substrate and coating materials are considered. The results for mirrors operated at room temperature and at cryogenic temperature are reported.

Janyce Franc; Nazario Morgado; Raffaele Flaminio; Ronny Nawrodt; Iain Martin; Liam Cunningham; Alan Cumming; Sheila Rowan; James Hough

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pushover, Response Spectrum and Time History Analyses of Safe Rooms in a Poor Performance Masonry Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of safe room has been developed for decreasing the earthquake casualties in masonry buildings. The information obtained from the previous ground motions occurring in seismic zones expresses the lack of enough safety of these buildings against earthquakes. For this reason, an attempt has been made to create some safe areas inside the existing masonry buildings, which are called safe rooms. The practical method for making these safe areas is to install some prefabricated steel frames in some parts of the existing structure. These frames do not carry any service loads before an earthquake. However, if a devastating earthquake happens and the load bearing walls of the building are destroyed, some parts of the floors, which are in the safe areas, will fall on the roof of the installed frames and the occupants who have sheltered there will survive. This paper presents the performance of these frames located in a destroying three storey masonry building with favorable conclusions. In fact, the experimental pushover diagram of the safe room located at the ground-floor level of this building is compared with the analytical results and it is concluded that pushover analysis is a good method for seismic performance evaluation of safe rooms. For time history analysis the 1940 El Centro, the 2003 Bam, and the 1990 Manjil earthquake records with the maximum peak accelerations of 0.35g were utilized. Also the design spectrum of Iranian Standard No. 2800-05 for the ground kind 2 is used for response spectrum analysis. The results of time history, response spectrum and pushover analyses show that the strength and displacement capacity of the steel frames are adequate to accommodate the distortions generated by seismic loads and aftershocks properly.

Mazloom, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Shahid Rajaee University, P.O. Box 16785-163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

318

Design and Validation of Control Room Upgrades Using a Research Simulator Facility  

SciTech Connect

Since 1981, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) [1] requires a plant- specific simulator facility for use in training at U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These training simulators are in near constant use for training and qualification of licensed NPP operators. In the early 1980s, the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLab) at the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Norway first built perhaps the most well known set of research simulators. The HRP offered a high- fidelity simulator facility in which the simulator is functionally linked to a specific plant but in which the human-machine interface (HMI) may differ from that found in the plant. As such, HAMMLab incorporated more advanced digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) than the plant, thereby giving it considerable interface flexibility that researchers took full advantage of when designing and validating different ways to upgrade NPP control rooms. Several U.S. partnersthe U.S. NRC, the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as well as international members of the HRP, have been working with HRP to run control room simulator studies. These studies, which use crews from Scandinavian plants, are used to determine crew behavior in a variety of normal and off-normal plant operations. The findings have ultimately been used to guide safety considerations at plants and to inform advanced HMI designboth for the regulator and in industry. Given the desire to use U.S. crews of licensed operators on a simulator of a U.S. NPP, there is a clear need for a research simulator facility in the U.S. There is no general-purpose reconfigurable research oriented control room simulator facility in the U.S. that can be used for a variety of studies, including the design and validation of control room upgrades.

Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julius J. Persensky

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn, Ni and Co ions doped Cu{sub 2}O nanorods  

SciTech Connect

Here we report the synthesis and characterization of Cu{sub 2}O nanorods doped with Mn, Ni and Co transition metal ions and the study of their magnetic properties. Synthesis of the nanorods was carried out by the modified polyol method. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed them to be polycrystalline single phase material. They exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature, however no such behavior was observed for the reference undoped sample, which indicated that unintentionally introduced magnetic impurities were not responsible for the observed phenomenon. Ferromagnetic behavior was found to be dependent on the dopant concentration and increased consistently with its increment in the material. The total magnetic moments contribution was calculated for the dopant concentration and was found to be insignificant to account for the observed ferromagnetism, therefore it was suggested that ferromagnetism could have conjured up from the induced magnetic moment in the defects created as cation vacancies in the material. The presence of the defects was supported by the room temperature photoluminescence study which showed that intensity of the peaks was dependent on the dopant concentration and increased consistently with it. There was strong correlation between the magnitude of the photoluminescence peak and the observed ferromagnetic property in the doped samples. -- Graphical Abstract: Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in the Cu{sub 2}O nanorods doped with Mn, Ni and Co ions. The origin seems to be the defects of cation vacancies created by the dopant ions. Display Omitted

Ahmed, Asar [Department of Chemistry, SL-214, Southern Lab, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India); Gajbhiye, Namdeo S., E-mail: nsg@iitk.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, SL-214, Southern Lab, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Risk associated with hospital rooms contaminated with 131I by patients being treated for thyroid carcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iodine-131 contamination is known to be present in hospital rooms that are used to confine patients being treated with quantities of 1311 in excess of 1. 1 GBq. These activities of 13 'I are used as a post-surgical follow-up procedure to a thyroidectomy as a means of treating thyroid cancer. Previous studies have indicated the extent of contamination in hospital rooms being used during these procedures. However, contamination has not been related to risk. This paper quantifies the risk in terms of effective dose equivalent to members of the public and personnel from 1311 contamination when only minimal precautions are taken to contain the contamination during the 1311 thyroid cancer treatment procedure. Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) calculations using the NRC published dose models for surface contamination results in public exposures of less than 2.7 uSv per patient and personnel exposures of less than 2.1 uSv yr-1. Maximum TEDE to the public considering the detectable limits of portable area survey equipment indicated a worst case exposure of 340 uSv per patient. As a result, conservative protective measures utilized by many institutions, such a lining the room with plastic, appear not to be warranted.

Jones, David Maurice

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Commissioning Tools for Heating/Cooling System in Residence - Verification of Floor Heating System and Room Air Conditioning System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tools of evaluating the performance of floor heating and room air conditioner are examined as a commissioning tool. Simple method is needed to check these performance while in use by residents, because evaluation currently requires significant time and effort. Therefore, this paper proposes a) two methods of evaluating the floor heating efficiency from the room / crawl space temperature and the energy consumption and b) method of evaluating COP of the room air conditioner from the data measured at the external unit. Case studies in which these tools were applied to actual residences are presented to demonstrate their effectiveness.

Miura, H.; Hokoi, S.; Iwamae, A.; Umeno, T.; Kondo, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

IID Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program IID Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Central AC/Heat Pumps (Early Retirement/Replacement): $2,500 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation (in pre-1978 houses): $0.60/sq ft Attic Insulation (in post-1978 houses): $0.15/sq ft Electric Attic Fan: $50 Solar Attic Fan: $125 Refrigerator: $50/unit Room Air Conditioner: $50/unit Dual Pane Windows: $2.00/sq ft Variable Speed Pool Pumps: $200 - $350/unit Central AC/Heat Pumps: $100 - $145/unit

323

Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O'Hara

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

WIPP supplementary roof support system Room 1, Panel 1: Geotechnical field data analysis report  

SciTech Connect

The design of the Room 1, Panel 1, supplementary roof support system was finalized in September 1991, and the system successfully installed in the test bin area between the bulkheads by December 1991. Simultaneously with the support system installation, existing monitoring system was upgraded to meet the needs of the installed roof support. This included extensometers, closure stations, rockbolt load cells as well as survey measurements of roof sag and floor lift. A Project Control Group (PCG) was established in order to monitor room and support system performance. Weekly meetings of the PCG were held to review all monitored data against criteria set in the initial design, and to modify these where necessary. Records of these meetings have been kept, with copies of all data summaries and action notes. These data records are maintained in the Engineering data files. After more than ten months of monitoring and reviewing experience, several modifications have been made both to the way data has been reported as well as to the load adjustment criteria. The support system has performed as expected in the design, with no signs of instability developing considering the rates of roof deformation, the rock bolt loads and the observed fracture behavior in the roof. This is particularly true of the horizon in which the rockbolt anchors are located, the most critical part of the design. The distribution of load build-up, throughout the 286 rockbolt load cells installed, in the Room 1 has been found satisfactory, and the load increases as evaluated by the PCG on a weekly basis have been within the acceptable range. The minimum life of the installed support system is estimated at 15 years based on the highest roof expansion rate experienced to date. This report provides analysis of geotechnical field data collected up to December 1992.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Minimizing lighting power density in office rooms equipped with Anidolic Daylighting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lighting is responsible for up to one third of an office building's electricity needs. Making daylight more available in office buildings can not only contribute to significant energy savings but also enhance the occupants' performance and wellbeing. Anidolic Daylighting Systems (ADS) are one type of very effective facade-integrated daylighting systems. All south-facing office rooms within the LESO solar experimental building in Lausanne (Switzerland) are equipped with a given type of ADS. A recent study has shown that these offices' occupants are highly satisfied with their lighting environment. The most energy-efficient south-facing offices have a lighting power density of less than 5W/m{sup 2}. The lighting situation within these ''best practice''-offices has been assessed using the lighting simulation software RELUX Vision. Because this lighting situation is very much appreciated by the occupants, it was used as a starting point for developing even more energy-efficient office lighting designs. Two new lighting designs, leading to lighting power densities of 3.9W/m{sup 2} and 3W/m{sup 2}, respectively, have been suggested and simulated with RELUX Vision. Simulation results have shown that the expected performances of these new systems are comparable to that of the current lighting installation within the ''best practice''-offices or even better. These simulation results have been confirmed during experiments on 20 human subjects in a test office room recently set up within the LESO building. This article gives engineers, architects and light planers valuable information and ideas on how to design energy-efficient and comfortable electric lighting systems in office rooms with abundant access to daylight. (author)

Linhart, Friedrich; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Avoiding 100 new power plants by increasing efficiency of room air conditioners in India: opportunities and challenges  

SciTech Connect

Electricity demand for room ACs is growing very rapidly in emerging economies such as India. We estimate the electricity demand from room ACs in 2030 in India considering factors such as weather and income growth using market data on penetration of ACs in different income classes and climatic regions. We discuss the status of the current standards, labels, and incentive programs to improve the efficiency of room ACs in these markets and assess the potential for further large improvements in efficiency and find that efficiency can be improved by over 40% cost effectively. The total potential energy savings from Room AC efficiency improvement in India using the best available technology will reach over 118 TWh in 2030; potential peak demand saving is found to be 60 GW by 2030. This is equivalent to avoiding 120 new coal fired power plants of 500 MW each. We discuss policy options to complement, expand and improve the ongoing programs to capture this large potential.

Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, Nikit; Shah, Nihar; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FRIDAY FRIDAY APRIL 24, 1998 - - - The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Daniel Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL RELLES Chair CHARLES BISCHOFF Member CAROL CRAWFORD Member CALVIN KENT Member GRETA M. LJUNG Member POLLY PHIPPS Member SEYMOUR SUDMAN Member ROY WHITMORE Member JAMES HAMMITT Guest I N D E X Page Opening Comments from the Chair 3 Recognizing Previous Judges of the EIA Graphics 4 Contest and Announcing Winners, Jay Hakes EIA Survey Issues: Addressing Declining Budgets 12 Dwight French (EIA) Discussion: Seymour Sudman (ASA) 36 Questions from the Committee 45

329

Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO?(110) Rutile  

SciTech Connect

Interest in diluted magnetic semiconductros (DMS) is growing rapidly within the emerging field of spintronics. For example, the ability to efficiently inject spin-polarized carriers into nonmagnetic semiconductor heterostructures creates new and exciting possibilities for utilizing DMS materials in spin-based devices. Several III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials doped with magnetic transition metal elements have been explored. Although these materials show promising behavior in some cases, most exhibit Curie temperatures of ~170 K or less. It has recently been shown that certain oxide semiconductors doped with magnetic transition elements show room-temperature ferromagnetism.

Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heald, Steve M.; Droubay, Timothy; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; McCready, David E.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Chambers, Scott A.; Mun, B. S.; Hamdan, N. M.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Taylor, B.; Sears, R.; Sinkovic, Boris

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Analysis of Energy Saving in a Clean Room Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To address the issue of the substantial energy cost and operating cost of an all-return air system for a clean room, we changed the former system to a 2nd return air system. With the newest building energy simulation program, Energy Plus, we simulated and compared the summer energy consuming conditions of the two systems. Results prove the superiority of the 2nd return air system, and the validity of the simulation. Also, the air system energy performance in summer was illustrated with typical meteorological hour-to-hour data.

Liu, S.; Liu, J.; Pei, J.; Wang, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Floatabilities of treated coal in water at room temperature. Annual topical report, September 1992--August 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a research paper entitled ``Floatability of Treated Coal in Water at Room Temperature.`` Experimental data on equilibrium adsorption loadings of probe compounds on coal, and flotation of raw coals as well as treated coal were obtained, using Illinois No. 6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville No. 1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal (PSOC-1549). The raw data of this Annual Topical Report are also available in the Quarterly Progress Report for the period April--June 1993 and the Quarterly Progress Report July--September 1993.

Kwon, K.C. [Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rohrer, R.L.; Lai, R.W.; Finseth, D.H. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Oxygen Reordering Near Room temperature in YBa2Cu3O6+x: A Thermodynamic Model  

SciTech Connect

We propose a thermodynamic model to explain an unusual phase transformation occurring near room temperature in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} that greatly affects properties of the superconductor. Based on our model, the material's thermodynamic response functions, specific heat, thermal-expansion coefficient, and elastic compliances are deduced at the critical temperature of the phase transformation. We discuss the change of critical temperature with stress, and analyze the anomaly of specific heat in critical temperature of the phase transformation.

Meng, Q.; Welch, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

Enhanced room temperature electronic and thermoelectric properties of the dilute bismuthide InGaBiAs  

SciTech Connect

We report room temperature electronic and thermoelectric properties of Si-doped In{sub 0.52}Ga{sub 0.48}Bi{sub y}As{sub 1-y} with varying Bi concentrations. These films were grown epitaxially on a semi-insulating InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. We show that low Bi concentrations are optimal in improving the conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermoelectric power factor, possibly due to the surfactant effects of bismuth. We observed a reduction in thermal conductivity with increasing Bi concentration, which is expected because of alloy scattering. We report a peak ZT of 0.23 at 300 K.

Dongmo, Pernell; Zhong Yujun; Bomberger, Cory; Zide, Joshua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Attia, Peter [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Cheaito, Ramez; Hopkins, Patrick E. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 2294 (United States); Ihlefeld, Jon F. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, M.S. 1069, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Initial Study of Solar Control Film in a Hotel Guest Room in Winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, energy-efficient facilities have prevailed in the Hong Kong and China markets. Many of these facilities claim to generate considerable energy and money savings. Hoteliers, however, find that there is a lack of independent and local studies about energy performance and its related financial savings and environmental improvement brought by those facilities, such as heat pumps, solar-control film on the window, sensor and dimmer for lighting control, etc. Nevertheless, there is a lack of reliable and independent data about the energy performance and economic viability of the solar-control film applied in a real environment. In many situations, consumers are only given the laboratory's result of this energy saving facility. Research was carried out in summer to estimate its positive effect on energy saving. There is also a paucity of experiments conducted in winter to show its negative effect in cold weather. This study carries out an experiment in hotel guest rooms in winter in order to estimate the energy and lighting performance of solar-control film in winter. This experiment was conducted when the illuminance under 1000lux, the average visible light transmittance for the film was 49.8%, and with very low solar radiation being transmitted into indoor environment. Under these situations, the study found that the effect of solar energy passing through the film coating in the guest room can be neglected. Instead, the film can act as a layer to prevent heat to transmit to the outdoors, just like the greenhouse effect.

Chan, W. C.; Chen, Y.; Mak, B.; Li, D.; Huang, Y.; Xie, H.; Hou, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supported Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Membranes for CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} Separation  

SciTech Connect

Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are organic salts which are liquid at or around room temperature. These compounds exhibit many outstanding physical properties such as great thermal stability and no measurable vapor pressure. In this work supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were prepared by impregnating pores of ?-alumina inorganic supports with various ionic liquids. In addition to membranes prepared with pure RTILs we were able to synthesize membranes with RTIL mixtures using 1-aminopyridinium iodide dissolved in 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate or methyltrioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. This combination of an RTIL with an organic salt containing an amine group dramatically improved the membrane separation properties. The SILMs displayed CO{sub 2} permeance on the order of 5 10{sup ?10} to 5 10{sup ?9} mol m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} Pa{sup ?1} combined with CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity of 530. Although these values are comparable with the current systems for CO{sub 2} purification, CO{sub 2} permeance is still rather low for these compounds.

Iarikov, D. D.; Hacarlioglu, P.; Oyama, S. T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Room temperature all-silicon photonic crystal nanocavity light emitting diode at sub-bandgap wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon is now firmly established as a high performance photonic material. Its only weakness is the lack of a native electrically driven light emitter that operates CW at room temperature, exhibits a narrow linewidth in the technologically important 1300- 1600 nm wavelength window, is small and operates with low power consumption. Here, an electrically pumped all-silicon nano light source around 1300-1600 nm range is demonstrated at room temperature. Using hydrogen plasma treatment, nano-scale optically active defects are introduced into silicon, which then feed the photonic crystal nanocavity to enahnce the electrically driven emission in a device via Purcell effect. A narrow ({\\Delta}{\\lambda} = 0.5 nm) emission line at 1515 nm wavelength with a power density of 0.4 mW/cm2 is observed, which represents the highest spectral power density ever reported from any silicon emitter. A number of possible improvements are also discussed, that make this scheme a very promising light source for optical interconnects a...

Shakoor, A; Cardile, P; Portalupi, S L; Gerace, D; Welna, K; Boninelli, S; Franzo, G; Priolo, F; Krauss, T F; Galli, M; Faolain, L O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflective window coating Radiant barrier in attic Plantedwindow coating (10) Radiant barrier in attic (11) Planted

Peters, Jane S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Friday, April 21, 1995 - - - The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSWER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS A-G-E-N-D-A Page No. Introductory Remarks, TIMOTHY MOUNT, Chairman 3 Announcement of Winners on Contest On 3 Statistical Graphs, LARRY PETTIS Review of Survey Design for Residential Energy Consumption Survey BRENDA COX, Discussant 7 DAVID BELLHOUSE, Discussant 29 Dates for Future Meetings, TIMOTHY MOUNT 42

340

The Committee met at 8:30 a.m., in Room 8E-089, Forrestal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

+ + + + + + + + + + FALL MEETING + + + + + Friday, November 3, 2000 + + + + + The Committee met at 8:30 a.m., in Room 8E-089, Forrestal Building, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., Dr. Carol Gotway Crawford, Chairperson, presiding. PRESENT: CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD, Ph.D., Chairperson F. JAY BREIDT, Ph.D., Vice Chairperson THOMAS G. COWING, Ph.D. JAMES K. HAMMITT, Ph.D. CALVIN A. KENT, Ph.D. W. DAVID MONTGOMERY, Ph.D. WILLIAM G. MOSS, Ph.D. PRESENT (Continued): POLLY A. PHIPPS, Ph.D. RANDY R. SITTER, Ph.D. ROY W. WHITMORE, Ph.D. GUESTS PRESENT: JOHNNY BLAIR NICOLAS HENGARTNER ALSO PRESENT: STAN FREEDMAN, Designated Federal Official MARK MAZUR, Acting Administrator, EIA LARRY PETTIS, Deputy Administrator, EIA C-O-N-T-E-N-T-S

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341

The meeting was held at 8:30 in Room 8E-089 of the Department  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

THURSDAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2002 The meeting was held at 8:30 in Room 8E-089 of the Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., Carol A. Gotway Crawford, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD, Ph.D. Chair F. JAY BREIDT, Ph.D. Vice Chair MARK BERNSTEIN, Ph.D. JOHNNY BLAIR MARK BURTON, Ph.D. JAY EDMONDS, Ph.D. JAMES K. HAMMITT, Ph.D. NICHOLAS W. HENGARTNER WILLIAM G. MOSS, Ph.D. POLLY A. PHIPPS, Ph.D. RANDY R. SITTER, Ph.D. ROY WHITMORE, Ph.D. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION REPRESENTATIVES: GUY F. CARUSO Administrator MARY J. HUTZLER Acting Deputy Administrator NANCY J. KIRKENDALL Director, Statistics and Methods Group RICHARD BONSKOWSKI ELIZABETH CAMPBELL

342

The Committee met in Room 1E-246 of the Forrestal Building at  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MEETING MEETING + + + + + THURSDAY NOVEMBER 19, 1998 The Committee met in Room 1E-246 of the Forrestal Building at the Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 8:30 a.m., Daniel A. Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL A. RELLES Chair CAROL GOTWAY CRAWFORD Vice Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF JAY BREIDT R. SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE JAMES HAMMITT GRETA M. LJUNG POLLY A. PHIPPS SEYMOUR SUDMAN ALSO PRESENT: ERIN BOEDECKER STEPHEN CALOPEDIS LYNDA CARLSON SAM COHEN JOHN COLLIGAN CATHY DIPPO STAN FREEDMAN DWIGHT FRENCH JAY HAKES MARY HUTZLER W. CALVIN KILGORE PERRY LINDSTROM HERB MILLER RENEE MILLER BETSY O'BRIEN LARRY PETTIS ARTHUR RYPINSKI HANK SATTLETHIGHT JOHN SHERWELL BILL WEINIG C O N T E N T S PAGE Welcome 5

343

The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

THURSDAY, THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1995 The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS AGENDA Introductions by Committee Chair . . . . . . . . . 3 Opening Remarks by Administrator . . . . . . . . . 6 Summary of EIA Follow-up on Comments From Previous Meetings, Yvonne Bishop . . . . . . . . 28 Effects of Structural Changes in Industry 1. Electricity Issues Impact on EIA's Data Collection Activities . . 31 Noel Balthasar, Presenter Phil Hanser, Discussant

344

Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect

Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor  

SciTech Connect

We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M. [COBRA Inter-University Research Institute, Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P. O. Box 513, NL-5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marti, X. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Holy, V. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Cukr, M.; Novak, V. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jungwirth, T. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Room-temperature diluted magnetic semiconductors p-(Ga,Ni)N  

SciTech Connect

High concentration (5 at. %) Ni was incorporated into a chemical vapor deposition-grown GaN film by using a thin protecting Ni layer on top of the GaN film during ion implantation. After etching off the protecting layer, subsequent annealing up to 800 deg. C under flowing N{sub 2} resulted in a p-type GaN with apparent ferromagnetic behavior up to {approx}320 K. In addition, the ferromagnetic behavior became more manifest with increasing annealing temperature that increases hole concentration. No presence of any other second phases nor clusters in the Ni-implanted region was identifiable, at least to the 0.2 nm point-to-point resolution of high resolution transmission electron microscopy. This novel indirect implantation process that being easy to implement appears promising for attaining room-temperature diluted magnetic semiconductors which are applicable to magnetotransport, magneto-optical and spintronics devices, among others.

Huang, R.-T.; Hsu, C.-F.; Kai, J.-J.; Chen, F.-R.; Chin, T.-S. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2005-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Chemically Synthesized Sn?-xCox O? Powders  

SciTech Connect

Room temperature ferromagnetism is observed in chemically synthesized powder samples of Sn??xCox O? with x = 0.005 and 0.01. Magnetic hysteresis loops are ovserved at 300K with coercivity Hc ~ 630 Oe, saturation magnetization Ms ~0.133?? and about 31% remenance. Analyses of the magnetization data of paramagnetic samples with x = 0.01 and 0.03, measured as a function of temperature (3-330K) and magnetic field (up to 50kOe), indicated the presence of Co? ions with spin S = 3/2. Magnetic data obtained from samples prepared at different temperatures indicate that the observed ferromagnetism for x ? 0.01 might have been triggered by changes in the oxygen stiochiometry.

Punnoose, Alex; Hays, Jason S.; Gopal, Vidyut; Shutthanandan, V.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

Wagh, Arun S. (Joliet, IL); Singh, Dileep (Westmont, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Committee convened in the Clark Room of the Holiday Inn  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- - - - - - - - - - COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS - - - - - MEETING - - - - - FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1996 The Committee convened in the Clark Room of the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., DR. TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX JOHN D. GRACE CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG RICHARD A. LOCKHART DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS ALSO PRESENT: RENEE MILLER YVONNE M. BISHOP DIANE LIQUE L.A. PETTIS JAY HAKES JOHN WOOD GORDON M. KAUFMAN ROY KASS NANCY LEACH I-N-D-E-X Introductory Remarks: Announcement of Winners of the Contest on Graphs and Visuals Displays 3 Restructuring the Oil and Gas Crude Reserves Program (Agenda Item 5) Presenter: John Wood, Office of Oil and Gas 8

351

The Committee met in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol at 550  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PUBLIC MEETING + + + THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1997 + + + The Committee met in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol at 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS, Chairman DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS PRESENT (Continued): ROY WHITMORE C O N T E N T S PAGE Opening Remarks, Lynda Carlson 10 Update on 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Mike Laurence 16 The Use of a Variant of Poisson Sampling: Paula Weir 58, 85 David Bellhouse 72 Roy Whitmore 79 Presentation by Administrator Jay Hakes 112 Results of Customer Satisfaction Survey, Colleen Blessing 138 Annual Energy Outlook/Short-term Energy

352

The Committee met in Room 8E089 in the Forrestal Building, 1800  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

APRIL 4, 2003 APRIL 4, 2003 + + + + + The Committee met in Room 8E089 in the Forrestal Building, 1800 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 8:30 a.m., Jay Breidt, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: F. JAY BREIDT, Chair MARK BERNSTEIN, Committee Member JOHNNY BLAIR, Committee Member JAE EDMONDS, Committee Member MOSHE FEDER, Committee Member JAMES K. HAMMITT, Committee Member NEHA KHANNA, Committee Member WILLIAM G. MOSS, Committee Member NAGARAJ K. NEERCHAL, Committee Member POLLY A. PHIPPS, Committee Member RANDY R. SITTER, Committee Member ALSO PRESENT: GUY CARUSO, Administrator, Energy Information Administration HOWARD GRUENSPECHT, Deputy Administrator, EIA NANCY J. KIRKENDALL, Designated Federal Official BILL WEINIG, EIA CALVIN KENT, Invited Guest CRYSTAL LINKLETTER, Invited Guest

353

The Committee met in Room 1E-245 of the Forrestal Building,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS MEETING FRIDAY NOVEMBER 20, 1998 The Committee met in Room 1E-245 of the Forrestal Building, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. at 8:30 a.m., Daniel A. Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: Daniel A. Relles, Chair Carol Gotway Crawford, Vice Chair David R. Bellhouse Charles W. Bischoff Jay Breidt R. Samprit Chatterjee Greta M. Ljung Polly A. Phipps Seymour Sudman ALSO PRESENT: Lynda CarlsonBob Jewett Mary CarlsonRoy Kass Jay CasselberryInderjit Kundra Dave CostelloM.T. Lawrence Ramesh DandekarNancy Leach Stan FreedmanRei-Pyng Lu Dwight FrenchRenee Miller Joan HeinkelLarry Pettis Bill Weinig I-N-D-E-X Page No. Opening Comments from the Chair Dan Relles 3 A New Natural Gas Imports Model for STIFS Presenter, David Costello, (EIA) 4

354

The Committee met in Conference Room 8E-089 in the Forrestal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

THURSDAY THURSDAY APRIL 13, 2000 + + + + + The Committee met in Conference Room 8E-089 in the Forrestal Building at 10th Street and Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 8:30 a.m., Carol Gotway Crawford, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD, PhD Chair JAY BREIDT, PhD Member THOMAS G. COWING, PhD Member CALVIN A. KENT, PhD Member W. DAVID MONTGOMERY, PhD Member WILLIAM G. MOSS, PhD Member POLLY A. PHIPPS, PhD Member RANDY R. SITTER, PhD Member ROY WHITMORE, PhD Member JOHNNY BLAIR, PhD Member I-N-D-E-X Page Welcome and Introduction 3 Chairman Crawford Opening Remarks 9 Jay Hakes, Administrator, EIA

355

Unusual Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Bulk Sintered GaP Doped with Copper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust room temperature ferromagnetism is obtained in single phase Gallium Phosphide doped with Cu{sup 2+} prepared by simple solid state reaction route. The saturation magnetization at 300 K is 1.5 times 10{sup -2} emu/g and the coercivity was found to be 125 Oe. A strong ferromagnetic resonance signal confirms the long range magnetic order which persists to temperatures as high as 739 K. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicate that Cu is in a +2 state. Ab initio calculations also show that the ferromagnetic ordering is energetically favorable in Cu doped GaP. When the spin-orbit coupling is included we get an enhanced total magnetic moment of 0.31 muB with a local moment on Cu 0.082 and on P 0.204 mu{sub B}. per atom.

Owens, F. J.; Gupta, A.; Rao, K. V.; Iqbal, Z.; Osorio Guillen, J. M.; Ahuja, R.; Guo, J.-H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Energy Savings in Buildings Using Air Movement and Allowing Floating Temperature in Rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the research study was to determine if building loads could be reduced by using an intelligent controller rather than a thermostatic controller to operate heating and air conditioning equipment. In order to switch the equipment on and off at the proper times, the intelligent controller calculated temperature limits using a mathematical procedure that determined the percentage of people who would be comfortable in rooms of the building. Simulations showed the annual cost savings from intelligent controllers ranged from 6 to 37 percent for residences and from 6 to 29 percent for the offices. An ancillary study showed that a ceiling fan provided comfort in a 112 square foot floor area to 85 F and in a 200 to 250 square foot area to 82 F.

Spain, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Conjectured explanation for room-temperature superconductivity in narrow channels in oxidized polypropylene  

SciTech Connect

Two groups of scientists have observed conductivity at least five orders of magnitude higher than that of copper at room temperature in narrow channels perpendicular to surfaces of films in oxidized polypropylene. For pulsed currents, this conductivity starts at a minimum value of applied current, and is destroyed at a current of about 30-60 times this value. Because of the existence of an upper critical current and of the observation that electronic thermal conductivity is negligible in the channels, it is thought that the channels are superconducting. A study is made of the hypothesis that these results are due to enhanced pairing, as first suggested by Parameter, when the drift velocity of current carriers becomes close to the velocity of sound or, in work by Hone and by the present author, to an appropriate phase velocity of optical phonons. Such enhancements can be expected to be larger in quasi-one-dimensional systems. 10 refs.

Eagles, D.M. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Experimental Observation of the Inverse Spin Hall Effect at Room Temperature  

SciTech Connect

We observe the inverse spin Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas confined in Al-GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells. Specifically, they find that an inhomogeneous spin density induced by the optical injection gives rise to an electric current transverse to both the spin polarization and its gradient. The spin Hall conductivity can be inferred from such a measurement through the Einstein relation and the onsager relation, and is found to have the order of magnitude of 0.5(e{sup 2}/h). The observation is made at the room temperature and in samples with macroscopic sizes, suggesting that the inverse spin Hall effects is a robust macroscopic transport phenomenon.

Liu, Baoli; Shi, Junren; Wang, Wenxin; Zhao, Hongming; Li, Dafang; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shoucheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Dongmin; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

From molten salts to room temperature ionic liquids: Simulation studies on chloroaluminate systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An interaction potential including chloride anion polarization effects, constructed from first-principles calculations, is used to examine the structure and transport properties of a series of chloroaluminate melts. A particular emphasis was given to the study of the equimolar mixture of aluminium chloride with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, which forms a room temperature ionic liquid EMI-AlCl 4. The structure yielded by the classical simulations performed within the framework of the polarizable ion model is compared to the results obtained from entirely electronic structure-based simulations: An excellent agreement between the two flavors of molecular dynamics is observed. When changing the organic cation EMI+ by an inorganic cation with a smaller ionic radius (Li+, Na+, K+), the chloroaluminate speciation becomes more complex, with the formation of Al2Cl 7- in small amounts. The calculated transport properties (diffusion coefficients, electrical conductivity and viscosity) of EMI-AlCl4 are in good ag...

Salanne, Mathieu; Seitsonen, Ari P; Madden, Paul A; Kirchner, Barbara; 10.1039/C1FD00053E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; KOHMAN, K.T.; JAMES, R.B.

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Assessing Morphometric and Otolith Measurements of Red Snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, to Characterize a Recreational Headboat Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a highly targeted species, red snapper have been overfished since the 1970s. Inadequate monitoring and reporting of discard rates impedes regulatory measures which are in place to allow red snapper populations to reach a healthy, sustainable level. This study documented the relationship between morphometric measurements and otolith analysis of red snapper caught from a recreational headboat fishing exclusively in the GOMs EEZ of the upper Texas coast. The collected data of this research show that of the 594 red snapper caught within the sample group, 76% of the fish were discarded; analysis of the lengths of these discarded fish show that 15.5% were of regulation size (16 inches) or larger, clear evidence that high-grading is occurring. The effort for the total amount of red snapper caught by each individual angler within the sample group was measured to determine on average, approximately two red snapper were caught per person, per hour. The size distribution ranged from 16 to 32 inches with a mean total length of 21.32 inches for retained fish while discarded fish ranged from 5.5 to 22.5 inches with a mean of 14.23. Weight distribution ranged from 1.5 to 18.5 pounds with a mean of 5.81 pounds for retained fish and 0.20 to 6 pounds with a mean of 1.57 pounds for discarded fish. Age distribution ranged from 3 to 14 years of age; red snapper can live over 50 years, however relatively none (2.42%) older than 10 years were present in the sample, demonstrating a highly truncated population. Because fecundancy increases with age in females, longevity extends reproduction potential for red snapper. Management of reef fishes, and red snapper in particular, are difficult due to variances in growth rates and habitat use, complex population structure, and increasing reproduction levels with maturity. Recommendations for management include implementing an educational outreach program, reducing effort and discard rates, lowing rates of exploitation, and creating a marine reserve. Future research should address the entire Texas coast population of for-hire vessels (charter and headboats) to obtain data on discard rates and age distribution of red snapper.

Carrillo, Nicole Amber

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effects of 28 Days of Beta-Alanine and Creatine Monohydrate Supplementation on Muscle Carnosine, Body Composition and Exercise Performance in Recreationally Active Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early research with beta-alanine (beta-ALA) supplementation has shown increases in muscle carnosine as well as improvements in body composition, exercise performance and blood lactate levels. Creatine monohydrate supplementation has been extensively researched for its effects on anaerobic exercise performance. Recently, a new line of studies have examined the combined effects beta-ALA and creatine supplementation on anaerobic exercise performance and lactate threshold. The purpose of the present study is to examine the acute and chronic effects of beta-ALA supplementation with and without creatine monohydrate on body composition, aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance, and muscle carnosine and phosphagen levels in college-aged recreationally active females. Thirty-two females were randomized in a double-blind placebo controlled manner into one of four supplementation groups including beta-ALA only, creatine only, beta-ALA and creatine combined and placebo. Participants supplemented for four weeks and reported for testing at baseline, day 7 and day 28. Testing sessions consisted of a resting muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis, body composition measurements, a graded exercise test on the cycle ergometer for VO2max and lactate threshold, and multiple Wingate tests for anaerobic exercise performance. Results showed all supplementation strategies increasing muscle carnosine levels over placebo after four weeks, but not between groups. Muscle creatine increased for all groups after four weeks, but not between groups. There were improvements for all groups with body composition after four weeks, despite the present study not including a specific training protocol. There were no group differences observed for aerobic exercise, blood lactate levels, lactate threshold, ventilatory threshold, peak power, mean power, total work or rate of fatigue. There were some trends for anaerobic exercise indicating groups supplementing with creatine may have greater improvements, however, these findings were not statistically significant. The present study failed to show any additive effects of beta-ALA and creatine supplementation for body composition, aerobic exercise, lactate threshold or anaerobic exercise measures. This could be due to the small sample size resulting in low power and effect sizes. Previous research has demonstrated that four weeks of beta-ALA and creatine supplementation was enough time to increase muscle carnosine and phosphagen levels. However, perhaps more time is needed for performance adaptations to occur, especially without the addition of an exercise training component.

Kresta, Julie Yong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sports and Safety Rules Sports and Safety Rules Let's all appreciate & value what BNL and BERA offers us by playing safely & following the rules. If there is an injury it must be reported to the clinic immediately AND an injury report form (pdf) sent to C. Carter, Bldg 400, within 24 hours. An alcohol permission form (pdf) must be filled out for each event where there will be alcohol served. Bicycle Safety information provided by Safety & Health Services. BERA League Sports: BSA paid employees must fill out this BERA Sports Clearance Form * and go through the clearance procedure with OMC @ 490 (not this office). Once reviewed by OMC, the clearance form will be mailed to the player who must then furnish a copy to the captain in order to practice or play. Injury Report Form

364

Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Store Store Andrea at the BERA store Staff: Andrea Dehler Hours: Monday through Friday, 9:00am - 3:00pm Phone: 631-344-3347 Location: Building 488, Berkner Hall List of merchandise for sale at the store (pdf) The BERA Store carries many items with the BNL/BSA Logo which can be used as gifts, souvenirs, etc. Items such as pads, pens (fancy and plain), pencils, canvas totes, mugs (china or travel), sweatshirts, golf and tee shirts, lanyards, hats, and general merchandise. We offer many other services, listed here are a few of them. Please stop in and check them out!! We accept cash, check, credit card or charge your BSA Account, with approval. Gift Certificates for BERA Store, available in $10.00 increments. Sign-up and pay for all BERA sponsored trips and events.

365

Brookhaven Employees' Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fitness Activities & Facility Information Fitness Activities & Facility Information Please Note: BNL facilities are NOT open to the public. Please check with your physician before starting any fitness program. Jan-Feb Fitness Registration Form ~ Pool Hours for Jan-Feb 2014 Proof of Medical Insurance-New Policy for Guest/Contractors & Family Members Registration and payment is required for most classes listed below, with a few noted exceptions: **Pay fee as you go **Class is FREE Class Name Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Adult Swim Lessons 5:30-6:30 p.m. @ 478 Pool Aqua Aerobics 5:30-6:30 p.m. @ 478 Pool 5:30-6:30 p.m. @ 478 Pool Kardio Kickboxing** 12:15-1:15p.m. @ 461 Gym 12:15-1:15p.m. @ 461 Gym Pilates 5:30-6:30 p.m. @ 317 Rec Hall Reiki Healing Circle** Noon

366

Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

information LI Ducks official website Click here for information regarding METS and Yankee games Sunday, Sept 29, 2013 The Bronx Zoo is a wonderful family day trip The coach...

367

Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Court Jesters during a Mixed 2 League volleyball match. 77th Regional Readiness Command (RRC) takes the field for the Casing of the Colors Ceremony - 7 September 2008 - Brookhaven...

368

Recreating the Strength of Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

momentum, inductance L "Low torque" state LL "Lower than low" torque state lb. Pounds LED Light emitting diode m Meters m Azimuthal wavenumber, spherical harmonic order xv #12;MHz Megahertz MOSFET Metal oxide

369

SRNL PHASE II SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SERIES 1 ROOM TEMPERATURE AND HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Phase II, Series 1 shelf-life corrosion testing for the Department of Energy Standard 3013 container is presented and discussed in terms of the localized corrosion behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures and the potential impact to the 3013 inner container. This testing was designed to address the influence of temperature, salt composition, initial salt moisture, residual stress and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and the initiation and propagation of localized corrosion, especially stress corrosion cracking. The integrated plan is being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and SRNL. SRNL is responsible for conducting a corrosion study in small scale vessels containing plutonium oxide and chloride salts under conditions of humidity, temperature and oxide/salt compositions both within the limits of 3013 storage conditions as well as beyond the 3013 storage requirements to identify margins for minimizing the initiation of stress corrosion cracking. These worst case conditions provide data that bound the material packaged in 3013 containers. Phase I of this testing was completed in 2010. The Phase II, Series 1 testing was performed to verify previous results from Phase I testing and extend our understanding about the initiation of stress corrosion cracking and pitting that occur in 304L under conditions of room temperature, high humidity, and a specific plutonium oxide/salt chemistry. These results will aid in bounding the safe storage conditions of plutonium oxides in 3013 containers. A substantial change in the testing was the addition of the capability to monitor relative humidity during test exposure. The results show that under conditions of high initial moisture ({approx}0.5 wt%) and room temperature stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304L teardrop coupons in contact with the oxide/salt mixture at times as short as 85 days. In all cases, the cracking appeared to be associated with pitting or localized general corrosion. Crack initiation at other sites, such as surface imperfections or inclusions, cannot be excluded. Cracks appear in most cases to initiate through an intergranular mode and transition to a transgranular mode.

Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification: Guidelines for Planning, Specifi cation, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation, and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators of nuclear power plants face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms that will be produced at various stages of instrumentation and control modernization. This report provides guidance on planning, specifying, designing, implementing, operating, maintaining, and training for modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces. Much of the guidance also will support new plant control rooms. This report also presents detailed information and guidelines on specific t...

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

THURSDAY MORNING, 3 JULY 2008 ROOM 242B, 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 NOON Session 4aAAa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Presentations: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 Time: 3:00-4:00 p.m. Room: 214 EERC Title: Stirling Engine

372

Room temperature green light emission from nonpolar cubic InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Room temperature green light emission from nonpolar cubic InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-wells Shunfeng Li Cubic InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-wells MQWs with high structural and optical quality are achieved by utilizing freestanding 3C-SiC 001 substrates and optimizing InGaN quantum well growth. Superlattice peaks up

As, Donat Josef

373

How the Number and Placement of Sensors Controlling Room Air Distribution Systems Affect Energy Use and Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of sensor number and placement on the energy needed to condition a typical office using several likely variants of an underfloor air distribution system (UFAD). The study uses an empirical-based room stratification model developed from full-scale tests of UFAD systems. Annual energy consumption is calculated for an interior zone using outside air temperature bin data. The comfort criteria are taken from ASHRAE standard 55-92. The simulations indicate that there are benefits derived from using more than one temperature sensor to control conditions in the occupied zone of a room. Among these are: 1. By adjusting both supply air temperature and volume to maintain the maximum allowable thermal gradient in the occupied (lower) part of the room, an optimal supply air condition can reduce energy use (relative to the best arrangement of a single sensor) while maintaining comfort; 2. Discomfort caused by stratification can be detected by having one of the sensors located at foot level; 3. For the simulated UFAD interior zone of a typical office building in Sacramento, an overall energy saving of 8%/24% (VAV/CAV respectively) can be achieved when two sensors as opposed to one are used to control room conditions.

Wang, D.; Arens, E.; Webster, T.; Shi, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Room-temperature electroluminescence from germanium in an Al0.3Ga0.7As/Ge heterojunction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7As/Ge heterojunction light-emitting diode without any complicated manipulation for alternating. ©2012 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (230.3670) Light-emitting diodes; (230.3990) Micro. Vuckovi, and Y. Nishi, "Room temperature 1.6 microm electroluminescence from Ge light emitting diode on Si

Kolner, Brian H.

375

Estimation of Thermal Resistance from Room Temperature Electrical Resistance Measurements for Different LHC Beam Screen Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note the thermal resistance between the LHC beam screen and cold bore is estimated from room temperature electrical resistance measurements. The results indicate that the beam screen without supports should have a comparable, if not better, thermal performance than the one with the existing spring supports. This prediction from electrical resistance measurements is confirmed by recent preliminary thermal measurements.

Jenninger, B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Absence of molecular deuterium dissociation during room-temperature permeation into polystyrene ICF target shells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polystyrene microshells filled with deuterium and tritium gas are important target shells for inertially confined fusion (ICF) and are particularly promising for target containing spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. A currently active approach to the latter uses polarized D in HD, in a method which requires preservation of the high purity of the initially prepared HD (very low specified H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} concentrations). This would not be possible if dissociation should occur during permeation into the target shells. We have thus tested polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure ortho-D{sub 2} as the test gas. An upper limit of 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} was deduced for the dissociation of D{sub 2} upon room temperature permeation through an approximately 8 um wall of polystyrene, clearing the way for use of polystyrene target shells for ICF fusion experiments with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. 19 refs., 1 fig.

Honig, A.; Alexander, N.; Fan, Q. (Syracuse Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics); Gram, R.; Kim, H. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Lab. for Laser Energetics)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Benzyl-Functionalized Room Temperature Ionic Liquids for CO2/N2 Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, three classes of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), including imidazolium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids with a benzyl group appended to the cation, were synthesized and tested for their performance in separating CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}. All RTILs contained the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion, permitting us to distinguish the impact of the benzyl moiety attached to the cation on gas separation performance. In general, the attachment of the benzyl group increased the viscosity of the ionic liquid compared with the unfunctionalized analogs and decreased the CO{sub 2} permeability. However, all of the benzyl-modified ionic liquids exhibited enhanced CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivities compared with alkyl-based ionic liquids, with values ranging from 22.0 to 33.1. In addition, CO{sub 2} solubilities in the form of Henry's constants were also measured and compared with unfunctionalized analogs. Results of the membrane performance tests and CO{sub 2} solubility measurements demonstrate that the benzyl-functionalized RTILs have significant potential for use in the separation of carbon dioxide from combustion products.

Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Dai, Thomas N [ORNL; Yeary, Joshua S [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS  

SciTech Connect

Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Room Temperature Control During Season Switchover with Single Duct Variable Air Volume System Without Reheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Langford A building houses the College of Architecture on TAMU campus. There are ten singleduct variable air volume (VAV) air-handling units (AHUs) without reheat serving the building. The local pneumatic thermostats modulate the dampers of VAV boxes to maintain room temperature at their setpoints. The thermostat action is switched from direct acting (DA) to reverse acting (RA) when the season changes from fall to winter and vice versa from winter to spring, based on the out side air temperature, when season changes. This results in various parts of the building ether too cold or too hot during the season change. This paper presents that the thermostat action will be switched according to cooling loads or discharge air temperature, instead of outside air temperature. For the interior zone, thermostat action does not need to be switched at all. The comfort is improved and savings is achieved by the new control scheme. Because some air-handling units (AHUs) serve both interior and exterior zones, this system never worked as intended. The system must be modified to have zone reheat and the AHUs discharge air temperature is set below dew point for humidity control.

Liu, C.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Room and Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, three previous papers [1, 2, 3] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens that began the investigation of these characteristics. The goal of the work presented herein is to add the results of additional tensile impact testing for 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, additional tests achieved target strain rates of 5, 10, and 22 per second at room temperature, 300, and 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at each designated strain rate and temperature are presented herein.

Dana K. Morton; Spencer D. Snow; Tom E. Rahl; Robert K. Blandford

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A room with a viewpoint: Using social norms to motivate environmental conservation in hotels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two field experiments examined the effectiveness of signs requesting hotel guests participation in an environmental conservation program. Appeals employing descriptive norms (e.g., the majority of guests reuse their towels) proved superior to a traditional appeal widely used by hotels that focused solely on environmental protection. Moreover, normative appeals were most effective when describing group behavior that occurred in the setting that most closely matched individuals immediate situational circumstances (e.g., the majority of guests in this room reuse their towels), which we refer to as provincial norms. Theoretical and practical implications for managing proenvironmental efforts are discussed. Until recently, the greatest towel-related dilemma travelers faced was reflected in the old joke told by the nightclub comic, Henny Youngman, about the hotel where he had stayed the previous night: What a hotel: the towels were so big and fluffy that I could hardly close my suitcase. In recent years, however, the question of whether or not to remove hotel towels has been supplanted by the question of whether or not to reuse hotel towels during the course of ones stay. With the adoption of environmental programs by hotels, more and more travelers are finding themselves urged to reuse their towels to help conserve environmental resources by saving energy and reducing the amount of detergent-related pollutants released into the environment. *Noah J. Goldstein is assistant professor of behavioral sciences at the

Noah J. Goldstein; Robert B. Cialdini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Roof-and-attic system delivers year-round efficiency | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center OLCFOak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility SNSSpallation Neutron Source Science & Discovery Advanced Materials Clean Energy National Security Neutron Science Nuclear...

383

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Attic Air Sealing Guidelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Terminology Terminology Air Barrier Material (ABM) --- A does not allow air to pass throu plywood/OSB, foam board, duc lumber. Backing --- Any material that s be sprayed so as to provide an glass batts. Baffle (B) --- Manufactured chu direct ventilation air flow up an foam board or cardboard. Thermal Blocking --- Any rigid heat sources like chimneys or metal and gypsum board. Fasteners --- Staples, screws o

384

Unvented Attic Increases Energy Efficiency and Reduces Duct Losses - Sun Lake at Banning, California  

SciTech Connect

New houses in the Sun Lakes at Banning subdivision are designed by Pulte Homes with technical support from the Building Science Consortium as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program. These homes save their homeowners money by applying the principles of ''whole-building'' design, which considers the house as a complete system instead of separate components.

Anderson, R.; Wells, N.

2001-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Roof-and-attic system delivers year-round efficiency | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at ORNL improves efficiency using controls for radiation, convection, and insulation, including a passive ventilation system that pulls air from the underbelly of the...

387

Ionic liquid pretreatment of poplar wood at room temperature: swelling and incorporation of nanoparticles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic biomass represents a potentially sustainable source of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. It could satisfy the energy needs for transportation and electricity generation, while contributing substantially to carbon sequestration and limiting the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Potential feedstocks are abundant and include crops, agricultural wastes, forest products, grasses, and algae. Among those feedstocks, wood is mainly constituted of three components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The conversion process of lignocellulosic biomass typically consists of three steps: (1) pretreatment; (2) hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars; and (3) fermentation of the sugars into liquid fuels (ethanol) and other commodity chemicals. The pretreatment step is necessary due to the complex structure of the plant cell wall and the chemical resistance of lignin. Most current pretreatments are energy-intensive and/or polluting. So it is imperative to develop new pretreatments that are economically viable and environmentally friendly. Recently, ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest, due to their ability to dissolve biopolymers, such as cellulose, lignin, native switchgrass, and others. Ionic liquids are also considered green solvents, since they have been successfully recycled at high yields for further use with limited efficiency loss. Also, a few microbial cellulases remain active at high ionic liquid concentration. However, all studies on the dissolution of wood in ionic liquids have been conducted so far at high temperatures, typically above 90 C. Development of alternative pretreatments at room temperature is desirable to eliminate the additional energy cost. In this study, thin sections of poplar wood were swollen at room temperature by a 3 h ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate or EMIMAc) pretreatment. The pretreated sample was then exposed to an aqueous suspension of nanoparticles that resulted in the sample contraction and the deposition of nanoparticles onto the surface and embedded into the cell wall. To date, both silver and gold particles ranging in size from 40-100 nm have been incorporated into wood. Penetration of gold nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter in the cell walls was best confirmed by near-infrared confocal Raman microscopy, since the deposition of gold nanoparticles induces a significant enhancement of the Raman signal from the wood in their close proximity, an enhancement attributed to the surface-enhanced Raman effect (SERS). After rinsing with water, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman images of the same areas show that most nanoparticles remained on the pretreated sample. Raman images at different depths reveal that a significant number of nanoparticles were incorporated into the wood sample, at depths up to 4 {micro}m, or 40 times the diameter of the nanoparticles. Control experiments on an untreated wood sample resulted in the deposition of nanoparticles only at the surface and most nanoparticles were removed upon rinsing. This particle incorporation process enables the development of new pretreatments, since the nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio and could be chemically functionalized. Other potential applications for the incorporated nanoparticles include isotope tracing, catalysis, imaging agents, drug-delivery systems, energy-storage devices, and chemical sensors.

Lucas, Marcel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Gregory L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rector, Kirk D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room  

SciTech Connect

We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S., E-mail: rotemshlomo@yahoo.de; Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Radiology (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Advanced Biofuels Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 August 1, 2012 Presenter Bios (Arranged in presentation order) Anthony Radich Tony Radich is an economist with the Energy Information Administration. He is currently a member of the Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Team in the Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels Analysis group of the Office of Energy Analysis. Dr. Radich has worked on biofuels issues since he joined EIA in 2001. He developed the cost models for the production of ethanol and biodiesel, the National Energy Modeling System, which is used to produce the EIA Annual Energy Outlook. He has served as a contributing author to numerous EIA publications, including the Annual Energy Outlook and the Short-Term

390

PHYSICAL FIDELITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR NRC ADVANCED REACTOR CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATORS USED FOR INSPECTOR/EXAMINER TRAINING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes research into the physical fidelity requirements of control room simulators to train U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff for their duties as inspectors and license examiners for next-generation nuclear power plants. The control rooms of these power plants are expected to utilize digital instrumentation and controls to a much greater extent than do current plants. The NRC is assessing training facility needs, particularly for control room simulators, which play a central role in NRC training. Simulator fidelity affects both training effectiveness and cost. Research has shown high simulation fidelity sometimes positively affects transfer to the operational environment but sometimes makes no significant difference or actually impedes learning. The conditions in which these different effects occur are often unclear, especially for regulators (as opposed to operators) about whom research is particularly sparse. This project developed an inventory of the tasks and knowledges, skills, and abilities that NRC regulators need to fulfill job duties and used expert panels to characterize the inventory items by type and level of cognitive/behavioral capability needed, difficulty to perform, importance to safety, frequency of performance, and the importance of simulator training for learning these capabilities. A survey of current NRC staff provides information about the physical fidelity of the simulator on which the student trained to the control room to which the student was assigned and the effect lack of fidelity had on learning and job performance. The study concludes that a high level of physical fidelity is not required for effective training of NRC staff.

Branch, Kristi M.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Miller, Mark; Cochrum, Steven

2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facing windows Radiant barrier in attic, low absorptivityfacing windows Radiant barrier in attic, low absorptivityfacing windows Radiant barrier in attic, low absorptivity

Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Techno-Economic Analysis of Indian Draft Standard Levels for RoomAir Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

The Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) finalized its first set of efficiency standards and labels for room air conditioners in July of 2006. These regulations followed soon after the publication of levels for frost-free refrigerators in the same year. As in the case of refrigerators, the air conditioner program introduces Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) and comparative labels simultaneously, with levels for one to five stars. Also like the refrigerator program, BEE defined several successive program phases of increasing stringency. In support of BEE's refrigerator program, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produced an analysis of national impacts of standards in collaboration with the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP). That analysis drew on LBNL's experience with standards programs in the United States, as well as many other countries. Subsequently, as part of the process for setting optimal levels for air conditioner regulations, CLASP commissioned LBNL to provide support to BEE in the form of a techno-economic evaluation of air conditioner efficiency technologies. This report describes the methodology and results of this techno-economic evaluation. The analysis consists of three components: (1) Cost effectiveness to consumers of efficiency technologies relative to current baseline. (2) Impacts on the current market from efficiency regulations. (3) National energy and financial impacts. The analysis relied on detailed and up-to-date technical data made available by BEE and industry representatives. Technical parameters were used in conjunction with knowledge about air conditioner use patterns in the residential and commercial sectors, and prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give an estimate of per-unit financial impacts. In addition, the overall impact of the program was evaluated by combining unit savings with market forecasts in order to yield national impacts. LBNL presented preliminary results of these analyses in May 2006, at a meeting of BEEs Technical Committee for Air Conditioners. This meeting was attended by a wide array of stakeholder, including industry representatives, engineers and consumer advocates. Comments made by stakeholders at this meeting are incorporated into the final analysis presented in this report. The current analysis begins with the Rating Plan drafted by BEE in 2006, along with an evaluation of the market baseline according to test data submitted by manufacturers. MEPS, label rating levels, and baseline efficiencies are presented in Section 2. First, we compare Indian MEPS with current standards in other countries, and assess their relative stringency. Baseline efficiencies are then used to estimate the fraction of models likely to remain on the market at each phase of the program, and the impact on market-weighted efficiency levels. Section 3 deals with cost-effectiveness of higher efficiency design options. The cost-benefit analysis is grounded in technical parameters provided by industry representatives in India. This data allows for an assessment of financial costs and benefits to consumers as a result of the standards and labeling program. A Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) calculation is used to evaluate the impacts of the program at the unit level, thus providing some insight into the appropriateness of the levels chosen, and additional opportunities for further ratcheting. In addition to LCC, we also calculate payback periods, cost of conserved energy (CCE), and return on investment (ROI). Finally, Section 4 covers national impacts. This is an extension of unit level estimates in the two previous sections. Extrapolation to the national level depends on a forecast of air conditioner purchases (shipments), which we describe here. Following the cost-benefit analysis, we construct several efficiency scenarios including the BEE plan, but also considering further potential for efficiency improvement. These are combined with shipments through a stock accounting model in order to forecast air conditioner energy consumption

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films  

SciTech Connect

Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu){sub 8}) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl{sub 2} gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01{<=}k{<=}0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman [Material Science Laboratory, Department of PhysicsGuru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CAR Demo 3.0: Community Activity Room Visualization of Probabilistic Reliability Contours for Operator Guidance, Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Activity Room (CAR) Version 3.0 software visualizes the probabilistic reliability index by means of color bands in the two-dimensional operating space of a power system. EPRI developed the concept of the CAR software in the spring of 2002. It was implemented in the CAR Painter software. A demonstration software (version 1.0) was issued in September 2002. Version 2.0 was issued in March 2004. The CAR Painter includes a 2D and a 3D visualization mode. CAR 3.0 can visualize the probabilistic r...

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Deployment of a Full-Scope Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulator at the Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The INL operates the HSSL to conduct research in the design and evaluation of advanced reactor control rooms, integration of intelligent support systems to assist operators, development and assessment of advanced human performance models, and visualizations to assess advanced operational concepts across various infrastructures. This advanced facility consists of a reconfigurable simulator and a virtual reality capability (known as the Computer-Aided Virtual Environment (CAVE)) (Figure 2). It supports human factors research, including human-in-the-loop performance, HSI, and analog and digital hybrid control displays. It can be applied to the development and evaluation of control systems and displays for complex systems such as existing and advanced NPP control rooms, command and control systems, and advance emergency operations centers. The HSSL incorporates a reconfigurable control room simulator, which is currently housed in the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a joint venture of the DOE and the Idaho University System. The simulator is a platform- and plant-neutral environment intended for full-scope and part-task testing of operator performance in various control room configurations. The simulator is not limited to a particular plant or even simulator architecture. It can support engineering simulator platforms from multiple vendors using digital interfaces. Due to its ability to be reconfigured, it is possible to switch the HSI - not just to digital panels but also to different control modalities such as those using greater plant automation or intelligent alarm filtering. The simulator currently includes three operator workstations, each capable of driving up to eight 30-inch monitors. The size and number of monitors varies depending on the particular front-end simulator deployed for a simulator study. These operator workstations would typically be used for the shift supervisor or senior reactor operator, reactor operator, and assistant reactor operator in current US NPPs. In addition to the three workstations, information can be shared between the workstations and further displayed on a large-screen overview display or a panel mimic. An 82-inch high-definition display is commonly used for the overview display.

Ronald Boring; Julius Persensky; Kenneth Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Draft audit report, human factors engineering control room design review: Saint Lucie Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 2  

SciTech Connect

A human factors engineering preliminary design review of the Saint Lucie Unit 2 control room was performed at the site on August 3 through August 7, 1981. This design review was carried out by a team from the Human Factors Engineering Branch, Division of Human Factors Safety. This report was prepared on the basis of the HFEB's review of the applicant's Preliminary Design Assessment and the human factors engineering design review/audit performed at the site. The review team included human factors consultants from BioTechnology, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia, and from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (University of California), Livermore, California.

Peterson, L.R.; Lappa, D.A.; Moore, J.W.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

CPS Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CPS Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program CPS Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program CPS Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Other Heat Pumps Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audits: Varies Central AC/Heat Pump: $110 - $225/ton, varies by efficiency rating Refrigerator Recycling: $65 Refrigerator Replacement: $35 Room A/C (window unit): $50 - $100, varies by capacity Attic/Foam Attic Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft. installed DIY-Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq.ft. installed

399

Where to Insulate in a Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home November 26, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis Examples of where to insulate. 1. In unfinished attic spaces, insulate between and over the floor joists to seal off living spaces below. (1A) attic access door 2. In finished attic rooms with or without dormer, insulate (2A) between the studs of "knee" walls, (2B) between the studs and rafters of exterior walls and roof, (2C) and ceilings with cold spaces above. (2D) Extend insulation into joist space to reduce air flows. 3. All exterior walls, including (3A) walls between living spaces and unheated garages, shed roofs, or storage areas; (3B) foundation walls above ground level; (3C) foundation walls in heated basements, full wall either interior or exterior.

400

Where to Insulate in a Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home November 26, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis Examples of where to insulate. 1. In unfinished attic spaces, insulate between and over the floor joists to seal off living spaces below. (1A) attic access door 2. In finished attic rooms with or without dormer, insulate (2A) between the studs of "knee" walls, (2B) between the studs and rafters of exterior walls and roof, (2C) and ceilings with cold spaces above. (2D) Extend insulation into joist space to reduce air flows. 3. All exterior walls, including (3A) walls between living spaces and unheated garages, shed roofs, or storage areas; (3B) foundation walls above ground level; (3C) foundation walls in heated basements, full wall either interior or exterior.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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401

EXTENDED DISCHARGE TESTING WITH FE-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the overall length of the boat, as shown ... engine room compartments on recreational boats/pleasure craft ... was equipped with twin CAT diesel engines ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Committee met at 8:30 a.m. in Room 8E-089 of the Forrestal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FALL MEETING FALL MEETING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2000 + + + + + The Committee met at 8:30 a.m. in Room 8E-089 of the Forrestal Building, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., Dr. Carol A. Gotway Crawford, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: CAROL A. GOTTWAY CRAWFORD, PhD Chair JOHNNY BLAIR Guest F. JAY BREIDT, PhD Member THOMAS C. COWING, PhD Member JAMES K. HAMMITT, PhD Member NICOLAS HENGARTNER Guest CALVIN A. KENT, PhD Member W. DAVID MONTGOMERY, PhD Member WILLIAM G. MOSS, PhD Member POLLY A. PHIPPS, PhD Member RANDY R. SITTER, PhD Member ROY W. WHITMORE, PhD Member

403

Hydrogen incorporation induced metal-semiconductor transition in ZnO:H thin films sputtered at room temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The room temperature deposited ZnO:H thin films having high conductivity of 500 Ohm-Sign {sup -1} cm{sup -1} and carrier concentration reaching 1.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} were reactively sputter deposited on glass substrates in the presence of O{sub 2} and 5% H{sub 2} in Ar. A metal-semiconductor transition at 165 K is induced by the increasing hydrogen incorporation in the films. Hydrogen forms shallow donor complex with activation energy of {approx}10-20 meV at oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) leading to increase in carrier concentration. Hydrogen also passivates V{sub O} and V{sub Zn} causing {approx}4 times enhancement of mobility to 25.4 cm{sup 2}/V s. These films have potential for use in transparent flexible electronics.

Singh, Anil; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, D. K. [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO?(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

Ferromagnetic Cr-doped rutile TiO? single crystals were synthesized by high-temperature ion implantation. The associated structural, compositional and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, proton induced x-ray emission, x-ray diffraction, Cr K- and L-shell near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Cr was distributed uniformly to the depth of about 300 nm with an average concentration of ~1 at. %. The samples are semiconducting and ferromagnetic as implanted, with a saturation magnetization of 0.29???B/Cr atom at room temperature. Cr is in a formal oxidation state of +3 throughout the implanted region, and no CrO? is detected.

Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy; Heald, Steve M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; McCready, David E.; Chambers, Scott A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Mun, B. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Committee met at 8:55 a.m., in Conference Room 8E-089 in  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

APRIL 14, 2000 + + + + + The Committee met at 8:55 a.m., in Conference Room 8E-089 in the Forrestal Building at 10th Street and Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C., Carol Gotway Crawford, Chair, presiding. MEMBERS PRESENT: CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD, Ph.D., Chair JAY BREIDT, Ph.D., Member THOMAS G. COWING, Ph.D., Member CALVIN A. KENT, Ph.D., Member W. DAVID MONTGOMERY, Ph.D., Member WILLIAM G. MOSS, Ph.D., Member POLLY A. PHIPPS, Ph.D., Member RANDY R. SITTER, Ph.D., Member ROY WHITMORE, ASA, Ph.D., Member PERRY M. LINDSTROM, EIA, Member GUESTS PRESENT: JOHNNY BLAIR, Ph.D. JOAN HEINKEL, Natural Gas Division MARY CARLSON, Natural Gas Division ANGIE KENT, Natural Gas Division KAREN FREEDMAN, National Energy Information Center GUESTS PRESENT: ANN DUCCA

406

Advanced Biofuels Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Advanced Biofuels Workshop Advanced Biofuels Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 August 1, 2012 Contact Information Hosts: Mindi Farber-DeAnda Team Lead, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Mindi.Farber-DeAnda@eia.gov 202-586-6419 Vishakh Mantri, Ph.D, P.E. Chemical Engineer, Energy Information Administration, Biofuels and Emerging Technologies Team Vishakh.Mantri@eia.gov 202-586-4815 Presenters Biofuels Year in Review Anthony Radich Analyst, Energy Information Administration Anthony.Radich@eia.gov 202-586-0504 Biofuels Outlook Terrence Higgins Hart Downstream Energy Services thiggins@hartenergy.com 703-891-4815 703-891-4815 Sustainability of Biofuels

407

Dynamic polarization of single nuclear spins by optical pumping of NV color centers in diamond at room temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a versatile method to efficiently polarize single nuclear spins in diamond, which is based on optical pumping of a single NV color center and mediated by a level-anti crossing in its excited state. A nuclear spin polarization higher than 98% is achieved at room temperature for the 15N nuclear spin associated to the NV center, corresponding to $\\mu$K effective nuclear spin temperature. We then show simultaneous deterministic initialization of two nuclear spins (13C and 15N) in close vicinity to a NV defect. Such robust control of nuclear spin states is a key ingredient for further scaling up of nuclear-spin based quantum registers in diamond.

V. Jacques; P. Neumann; J. Beck; M. Markham; D. Twitchen; J. Meijer; F. Kaiser; G. Balasubramanian; F. Jelezko; J. Wrachtrup

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Upgrading of the Air-conditioning of the Computer Room in the Computer Centre for the LHC era  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Built in the beginning of 1970's, the Computer Centre air-conditioning and cooling systems were designed to be modular and easily adaptable to the unpredictable future needs of computing. The infrastructure of LHC-computing that will be housed in the existing Computer Room with its five Computing farms and over 11000 PC's increases the requirements of cooling and air-conditioning power to a new level. The nominal thermal loads from the equipment rise from the current design maximum of 1MW to estimated maximum of 2MW in the future. This paper presents calculations and proposes solutions to meet the new nominal requirements. The air-conditioning system must also be able to cope with a situation of power cut in the main supply. A calculation of the temperature evolution during the power cut and a justified operation strategy for this scenario is also presented.

Lindroos, J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Photoluminescence in the Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}WO{sub 4} system at room temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a study was undertaken about the structural and photoluminescent properties, at room temperature, of powder samples from the Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}WO{sub 4} (x=0-1.0) system, synthesized by a soft chemical method and heat treated between 400 and 700 deg. C. The material was characterized using Infrared, UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy and XRD. The most intense PL emission was obtained for the sample calcined at 600 deg. C, which is neither highly disordered (400-500 deg. C), nor completely ordered (700 deg. C). Corroborating the role of disorder in the PL phenomenon, the most intense PL response was not observed for pure CaWO{sub 4} or SrWO{sub 4}, but for Ca{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}WO{sub 4}. The PL emission spectra could be separated into two Gaussian curves. The lower wavelength peak is placed around 530 nm, and the higher wavelength peak at about 690 nm. Similar results were reported in the literature for both CaWO{sub 4} and SrWO{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: The structural and room temperature photoluminescence of Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}WO4 synthesized by a soft chemical method was studied. The most intense PL emission was obtained for the sample calcined at 600 deg. C, that is neither highly disordered (400-500 deg. C), nor completely ordered (700 deg. C). Corroborating the role of disorder in the PL phenomenon, the most intense PL response was not observed for pure CaWO{sub 4} or SrWO{sub 4}, but for Ca{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}WO{sub 4}.

Porto, S.L. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); Longo, E. [CMDMC/LIEC, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP-Araraquara, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni s/n, Araraquara, SP, CEP 14800-900 (Brazil); Pizani, P.S.; Boschi, T.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luiz km 235, SP, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Simoes, L.G.P. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Desenvolvimento de Materiais Ceramicos (LIEC/DQ), Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luiz km 235, Sao Carlos, SP, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Lima, S.J.G. [Laboratorio de Solidificacao Rapida, Departamento de Tecnologia Mecanica (LSR/DTM/CT), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); Ferreira, J.M. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); COAMA, Area de Meio Ambiente, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba, Av. 1o de Maio 720, Jaguaribe, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58015-430 (Brazil); Soledade, L.E.B.; Espinoza, J.W.M.; Cassia-Santos, M.R.; Maurera, M.A.M.A. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil); Paskocimas, C.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, CEP 59072-970 (Brazil); Santos, I.M.G. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil)], E-mail: ieda@quimica.ufpb.br; Souza, A.G. [Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais (LACOM/DQ/CCEN), Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Cidade Universitaria, Joao Pessoa, PB, CEP 58059-900 (Brazil)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Home Energy Article: A Systems Approach to Retrofitting Residential HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facing windows Radiant barrier in attic, low absorbtivityto reduce solar loads Add radiant barrier in attic, or low

McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A systems approach to retrofitting residential HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facing windows Radiant barrier in attic, low absorbtivityto reduce solar loads Add radiant barrier in attic, or low

McWilliams, J.A.; Walker, I.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism of high-quality lightly Mn-doped ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism is demonstrated in single crystalline Mn-doped ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy. With a low Mn concentration of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, Mn-doped ZnO films exhibited room-temperature ferromagnetism with a coercivity field larger than 200 Oe, a large saturation moment of 6 {mu}{sub B}/ion, and a large residue moment that is {approx}70% of the saturation magnetization. Isolated ions with long range carrier mediated spin-spin coupling may be responsible for the intrinsic ferromagnetism.

Zuo Zheng; Zhou Huimei; Olmedo, Mario J.; Kong Jieying; Liu Jianlin [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Beyermann, Ward P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California - Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng Jianguo [Laboratory for Electron and X-ray Instrumentation, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, University of California - Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Xin Yan [NHMFL, Florida State University, 1800 E. Paul Dirac Dr., Tallahassee, Florida 32310-3706 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ADDITIONAL STAFFORD LOAN REQUEST 2011-12 Financial Aid and Scholarships, 201 South 1460 East, Room 105, Salt Lake City, UT 84112  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADDITIONAL STAFFORD LOAN REQUEST 2011-12 Financial Aid and Scholarships, 201 South 1460 East, Room be requested): Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Write originally asked for a reduced amount, and am now applying for an increased amount of Federal Direct Stafford

Utah, University of

414

ADDITIONAL STAFFORD LOAN REQUEST 2012-13 Financial Aid and Scholarships, 201 South 1460 East, Room 105, Salt Lake City, UT 84112  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADDITIONAL STAFFORD LOAN REQUEST 2012-13 Financial Aid and Scholarships, 201 South 1460 East, Room be requested): Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan (undergraduate students only) Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan Write the additional amount requested, not to exceed a combined total for both loan

van den Berg, Jur

415

Enhancing children's activity in browsing/reading together by the installation of the BrowsReader in the children's room of a library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reading together draws much attention as a societal concern for children not only to yield emotional reaction but also to gradually advance intellectual thinking. We here aim to build a new environment, in which children's browsing and reading of picture ... Keywords: BrowsReader, Browsing/reading together, Children's room, Digital library, Picture books, Public library

Jia Liu; Tetsuro Ito; Nana Toyokuni; Keizo Sato; Makoto Nakashima

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The 3rd International Conference of IIR on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature, Des Moines, Iowa, U.S.A, 11-15 May 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS USING DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS J. ROUDAUT1,2,* , H. BOUCHEKARA1 , A. KEDOUS-LEBOUC1 , J of Design of Experiments (DOE) method in magnetic refrigeration (MR) understanding and optimizationThe 3rd International Conference of IIR on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature, Des Moines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

Optically pumped InxGa???xN/InyGa???yN multiple quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting laser operating at room temperature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Room temperature vertical cavity lasing at the wavelength of 433nm has been successfully realized in InxGa???xN/InyGa???yN multiple quantum well without Bragg mirrors under photo-excitation. At high excitation intensity, ...

Chen, Zhen

418

Gluten Free Guide Fall 2010 Use this guide to find gluten-free selections in the dining rooms. Keep in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gluten Free Guide ­Fall 2010 Use this guide to find gluten-free selections in the dining rooms at eatsmart@umich.edu or 647-2614. Students can request additional gluten-free products at eatsmart@umich.edu. Remember to request gluten-free pizza crusts, breads, bagels, pastas, or waffles at any unit. A variety

Shyy, Wei

419

Interaction of Plutonium with Diverse Materials in Moist Air and Nitrogen-Argon Atmospheres at Room Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical and radiolytic interactions of weapons-grade plutonium with metallic, inorganic, and hydrogenous materials in atmospheres containing moist air-argon mixtures have been characterized at room temperature from pressure-volume-temperature and mass spectrometric measurements of the gas phase. A reaction sequence controlled by kinetics and gas-phase composition is defined by correlating observed and known reaction rates. In all cases, O{sub 2} is eliminated first by the water-catalyzed Pu + O{sub 2} reaction and H{sub 2}O is then consumed by the Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction, producing a gas mixture of N{sub 2}, argon, and H{sub 2}. Hydrogen formed by the reaction of water and concurrent radiolysis of hydrogenous materials either reacts to form PuH{sub 2} or accumulates in the system. Accumulation of H{sub 2} is correlated with the presence of hydrogenous materials in liquid and volatile forms that are readily distributed over the plutonium surface. Areal rates of radiolytic H{sub 2} generation are determined and applied in showing that modest extents of H{sub 2} production are expected for hydrogenous solids if the contact area with plutonium is limited. The unpredictable nature of complex chemical systems is demonstrated by occurrence of the chloride-catalyzed Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction in some tests and hydride-catalyzed nitriding in another.

John M. Haschke; Raymond J. Martinez; Robert E. Pruner II; Barbara Martinez; Thomas H. Allen

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyperion Power Sign Strategic Agreement Hyperion Power Sign Strategic Agreement ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, SC (Sept. 9, 2010) - Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Hyperion Power Generation Inc., today announced an agreement that could lead to deployment of a small modular nuclear reactor at the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The agreement was signed by John R. (Grizz) Deal, Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of Hyperion Power, and Garry Flowers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS). SRNS operates SRNL under contract to DOE. "This is one of the first in a series of steps that can put this region in an active role toward transforming America's energy future," said Flowers. "Small and modular reactors can become the primary base of new, clean power for the world. SRS is an ideal place to develop and demonstrate this exciting technology."

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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National Management Association Names Executive, Manager of the Year National Management Association Names Executive, Manager of the Year ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRS National Management Association Names Executive, Manager of the Year AIKEN, S.C. (June 11, 2001) - Two Westinghouse Savannah River Company managers have been recognized by the Savannah River Site Chapter of the National Management Association for their leadership abilities. Dr. Susan Wood, Vice President and Director of the Savannah River Technology Center, the site's applied research and development laboratory, received NMA's 2001 Executive of the Year award. Mike Logan, manager of engineering programs with the site's Nuclear Materials Management Division, is the 2001 Manager of the Year. Each year the local chapter selects a manager and executive of the year from dozens of nominations submitted by the nominees' employees and co-workers. The selection criteria include demonstrated performance in teamwork, leadership, communications, business results, employee development, self-management and community support.

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Fingerprint Detection Device Receives Patent Fingerprint Detection Device Receives Patent ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Fingerprint Detection Device Receives Patent AIKEN, S.C. (May 18, 2005) - An innovative tool developed by a researcher at the Savannah River National Laboratory to give law enforcement personnel a method for on-the-scene fingerprint detection has been issued a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The research and development of the device was funded by the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation Research and Funding. The BritePrint(tm) device, invented by SRNL's Eliel Villa-Aleman is a small, lightweight, battery-powered, high intensity light source that saves investigators valuable time in the investigation process. When used in conjunction with traditional dust detection methods, BritePrint reveals otherwise invisible fingerprints, footprints and other latent markings at crime scenes.

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Hosts Actinide Chemistry Short Course Hosts Actinide Chemistry Short Course ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Actinide Chemistry Short Course AIKEN, S.C. (July 28, 2010) - To help expand the pool of talent interested in nuclear sciences, SRNL this week hosted an "Actinide Chemistry Short Course" at the Center for Hydrogen Research near New Ellenton, which about 50 nuclear scientists from the U.S. and abroad attended. The actinides are a group of chemical elements that includes uranium and plutonium. The course was sponsored by the Materials Science of Actinides Energy Frontier Research Center, which is led by the University of Notre Dame and comprises five universities and four national laboratories. This Center is one of 46 founded by the Department of Energy to address energy and science "grand challenges" in a broad range of research areas. Of the 46, 16 (including this one) were fully funded for five years, at an average per Center of $17 million, by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through DOE's Office of Science.

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Secretary Abraham Certifies Savannah River Technology Center as New Department of Energy National Laboratory Secretary Abraham Certifies Savannah River Technology Center as New Department of Energy National Laboratory ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Energy Secretary Abraham Certifies Savannah River Technology Center as New Department of Energy National Laboratory AIKEN, S.C. (May 7, 2004) - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today certified the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), located at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site, as the Savannah River National Laboratory. Secretary Abraham was joined by Governor Mark Sanford, Senator Lindsey Graham and Congressmen Gresham Barrett (S.C.) and Max Burns (Ga.) at the certification event at the Savannah River Site. "President Bush and I are proud of the scientific and technical work ongoing at the Department of Energy's national laboratories," Secretary Abraham said. "And today, we are even more proud to designate this new laboratory and make it a full partner in the critical missions performed by DOE facilities."

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Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition Two Savannah River Site Projects Gain National Recognition ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (June 21, 2011) - The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has received Environmental Sustainability (EStar) awards from DOE for two projects growing out of technology research, development and application at the Savannah River National Laboratory. EStar awards recognize excellence in pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship. They are awarded for projects and programs that reduce environmental impacts, enhance site operations, and reduce costs. One award, for Renewable Technology Development, Deployment and Education in South Carolina, is a collaboration between SRNL and the Economic Development Partnership of South Carolina. Through collaboration, SRNL has shared expertise and knowledge of renewable energy technologies with EDP, which in turn has leveraged existing relationships with industry to identify and evaluate specific opportunities. The results have ranged from emissions reductions (through deployment and staging of hydrogen and wind energy technology) to community education programs.

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Patented SRNL Device Enhances Glass Melter Operations Patented SRNL Device Enhances Glass Melter Operations ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (July 24, 2007) - A newly patented invention from the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory has already proven itself highly valuable for enhancing operation of the Savannah River Site's facility for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. The Recirculation Bubbler for Glass Melter Apparatus was invented by Hector Guerrero of SRNL and Dennis Bickford, formerly of SRNL, in consultation with personnel at SRS' Defense Waste Processing Facility. At the DWPF, radioactive waste is mixed with a special glass formula in a melter, encapsulating the waste in glass at the molecular level, resulting in a stable glass form that isolates the radioactive contaminants from the environment. The Recirculation Bubbler, which enables more efficient melting of the waste and mixing with the glass, was installed in the DWPF in 2004 and has allowed the facility to increase by as much as 10 percent the rate at which it converts radioactive waste to a stable glass form for permanent disposal. SRNL personnel conducted an extensive computer modeling and experimental program in developing the bubbler.

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DHS Grants Fund Information Sharing Network in Georgia and South Carolina DHS Grants Fund Information Sharing Network in Georgia and South Carolina ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Congressman John Barrow of Georgia (center) participated in the news conference announcing the formation of CSRA IntelliNET, along with SRNL Laboratory Director Dr. Todd Wright (right) and the heads of the seven participating law enforcement agencies. AIKEN, S.C. (April 12, 2007) - When two California men recently pulled off a series of robberies in the San Fernando Valley, detectives used new technology to tap into the databases of several police departments, and came up with the clues they needed to make the arrests. A group of seven law enforcement agencies from Aiken, Burke, Columbia, Edgefield and Richmond counties today announces the formation of a similar informationsharing network, CSRA IntelliNET.

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Software Detects Piping Flaws Software Detects Piping Flaws ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (December 16, 2010) - New software developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding (NGSB) may lead to a less expensive and less time consuming method to detect corrosion or other defects in a ship's pipes. The copyrighted software, which is used to analyze digitized x-ray images to determine loss of wall thickness in pipes, was developed as the result of a six-month cooperative research and development agreement between SRNL and NGSB. SRNL has granted NGSB a license to commercialize and continue maturing the software for shipboard pipe analysis. Ships contain vast quantities of piping that is subject to corrosion and other types of failure issues. The current method of inspecting for these issues is to strip insulation from portions of piping, then test the piping to see if there is corrosion or other issues. Because the new approach uses digital x-rays, it does not require the removal of the insulation. When the new software is matured, it will save significant time, resulting in more piping being evaluated in a shorter period of time.

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Support International Energy Project Support International Energy Project ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL to Support International Energy Project AIKEN, S.C. (Jan. 12, 2007) - The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) announces an agreement to add its technological expertise in support of the ITER program, an international project to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of a full-scale fusion power reactor. The U.S. ITER Program Office, located at the DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tenn., selected SRNL along with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as a partner laboratory for the U.S. ITER project. U.S. ITER Project Manager Ned Sauthoff and Deputy Project Manager Carl Strawbridge met with SRNL personnel today to commemorate SRNL's participation in the program.

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Nuclear Production of Hydrogen Holds Promise for Energy Future ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (Sept. 16, 2004) - Using hydrogen produced in a...

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DuPont de Nemours Corporation, for leading DuPont's efforts to build and startup the Hanford Project. Dr. Rhodes lives in Aiken, S.C., and works for Washington Savannah River...

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Laboratory has been selected to serve as the Tritium Plant Responsible Officer for the ITER project, in Cadarache, France. ITER is a major international research project with the...

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them how their natural problem-solving abilities form the basis for many engineering skills. "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day" is an offshoot of National Engineers Week,...

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Automakers to Develop High-Performance Wireless Sensor Networks Automakers to Develop High-Performance Wireless Sensor Networks ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (Aug. 25, 2009) - Several industries use wireless sensors, which can monitor chemical processes or equipment activity and then transmit the data over a wireless network. Still, many facilities that could benefit from the use of wireless sensors must continue to use a wired network instead, because the reliability, speed and security of the current generation of wireless sensors do not meet their needs. The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory and U.S. automakers now have teamed up to develop a new high-performance platform for these sensors that not only serves the industry's needs, but also meets the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration's requirements for security and reliability for use in its facilities.

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Federal Research Facilities in South Carolina Join Forces to Advance Ocean Health and Homeland Security Federal Research Facilities in South Carolina Join Forces to Advance Ocean Health and Homeland Security ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (Feb. 20, 2007) - A collaborative agreement between U.S. Department of Energy and the Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research facilities in South Carolina will strengthen advances in homeland security, marine health, and ocean observation technologies through sensors to detect biological toxins and chemical hazards while maintaining ocean health and water quality. Toxins from harmful algae and marine bacteria or viruses can affect ecosystem health and homeland security, two vitally important issues to lawmakers in South Carolina and across the nation. The Port of Charleston is the busiest container port along the U.S. Southeast and Gulf coasts and the focus of intense maritimesecurity efforts. Moreover, ocean health and water quality are inextricably linked to South Carolina's quality of life and economic development, especially its tourism industry, which generates nearly $15 billion annually.

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Researcher Honored for Lifetime Achievement in Solving Nuclear Waste Challenges Researcher Honored for Lifetime Achievement in Solving Nuclear Waste Challenges ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY RESEARCHER HONORED FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN SOLVING NUCLEAR WASTE CHALLENGES AIKEN, S.C. (February 27, 2008) - Dr. Carol Jantzen, internationally recognized ceramics expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory, was honored this week at the international Waste Management '08 Conference in Phoenix, Arizona, for more than three decades of outstanding contributions to nuclear waste management. Dr. Jantzen is this year's recipient of the Wendell D. Weart Lifetime Achievement Award, which is sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories to recognize long-term commitment to solving significant nuclear waste management issues.

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Recognizes High Achievers in Technology Transfer Recognizes High Achievers in Technology Transfer ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (Feb. 10, 2010) - Savannah River National Laboratory held its inaugural SRNL Technology Transfer Recognition Reception last week at Newberry Hall in Aiken. The recognition event was established to honor those who have helped make SRNL technologies available for the marketplace and for research collaborations with industry partners and universities. This is the first formal recognition event for intellectual property activities and accomplishments since SRNL became a National Laboratory in May 2004. SRNL Technology Transfer Recognition Reception Honorees The honorees were recognized for significant accomplishments related to patents that have been granted, license agreements for the commercialization of technologies, cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) for on-going research and development, and special awards completed in Fiscal Year 2009. Altogether, the accomplishments being recognized included seven patents awarded, five CRADAs, three technology licenses and one special award of national stature.

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Earns Doctoral Student Invitation to International Nobel Laureates Meeting Earns Doctoral Student Invitation to International Nobel Laureates Meeting ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Steven Jung presents a certificate of appreciation to Helmut Sies of the University of Düsseldorf, one of the two scientific chairs of the Lindau Meeting, for his contributions to the 57th Meeting. AIKEN, S.C. (August 27, 2007) - A doctoral student who conducted research at the Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory was among the 49 young rising stars in American research selected to join their peers from around the globe this summer for discussions with Nobel laureates as part of the 57th annual Meeting of Nobel Laureates and Students in Lindau, Germany. SRNL nominated Steven B. Jung, a doctoral candidate from the University of Missouri-Rolla, for his work on an SRNL research project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to design and optimize new materials to remove certain radioactive elements from high-level radioactive waste. Jung, who is working toward a PhD in materials science and engineering, has also developed innovative new methods for testing how well different glass formulas can tolerate impurities, as part of an SRNL program to develop strategies for converting excess plutonium to a glass form. Utilizing his background in ceramic engineering, Jung is pursuing a variety of research interests from the use of glass for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste to glass and ceramic materials for medical applications, such as bone scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

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Named Among "World's Best" Named Among "World's Best" ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL Technology Named Among "World's Best" AIKEN, S.C. (May 15, 2007) - For the third year in a row, a technology developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory has been named among the top 25 of the World's Best Technologies for the year. The Smart Latch(tm) acoustic door latch detector, invented by SRNL's Bob Eakle and built with the help of Charlie Fulghum and Larry Feutral, is one of the featured inventions at the World's Best Technologies for 2007 (WBT07) Showcase in Arlington, Texas, May 15-16. This is the second time in three years that one of Eakle's inventions has been selected as one of the top 25 technologies in the WBT Showcase. In 2005, the Floating Plasma Screen Mount, which he coinvented with SRNL's Don Pak, was featured.

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Site Projects Receive Pollution Prevention Honors Site Projects Receive Pollution Prevention Honors ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) A Area constructed wetlands AIKEN, S.C. (February 24, 2010) - Two Savannah River Site (SRS) projects led by the Savannah River National Laboratory have been honored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOEEM) for achievements in pollution prevention. "SRS Constructed Wetlands Reduce Environmental Impacts" won DOE-EM's Best In Class in the category of Sustainable Design/Green Buildings. As a Best In Class winner in the DOE-EM Pollution Prevention (P2) honors program, it will be submitted for consideration for DOE's P2 Star honors, which recognizes achievements from across all of DOE's program offices, as well as the White House Closing the Circle award, which recognizes achievements throughout the federal government.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attic rooms recreation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

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Invention Named One of 25 Best Invention Named One of 25 Best ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL Invention Named One of 25 Best AIKEN, S.C. (March 30, 2005) - For the second year in a row, an invention from the Savannah River National Laboratory has been named one of the World's Best Technologies. The Plasma Screen Floating Mount, invented by Don Pak and Bob Eakle of SRNL, is one of the featured inventions at the World's Best Technologies for 2005 (WBT05) Showcase in Arlington, Texas, March 29-31. The mount allows large flat-panel display screens to be used in moving vehicles. The WBT05 is an international showcase for new technologies developed at the nation's top universities, federal labs, federally supported research and development institutions, and private companies. Each year, a seasoned screening panel of investors and commercialization experts selects up to 75 exhibitors that have the greatest potential for high growth commercial enterprises. From that group, the top 25 exhibitors are chosen for special attention. The Plasma Screen Floating Mount was chosen as one of that top 25. World's Best Technologies, produced in cooperation with the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer and the National Association of Seed and Venture Funds, provides an opportunity for investors to gather information on a variety of technologies with global commercialization potential.

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Oct. 2, 2002) - A team led by the Savannah River Technology Center is embarking on a study that could ultimately lead to the extensive use of hydrogen-based energy sources as an alternative to expensive and polluting fossil energy. The research will examine the technical and economic issues associated with a new and innovative approach that could be used to produce hydrogen: using the heat from a nuclear power reactor to break water down into hydrogen and oxygen. Oct. 2, 2002) - A team led by the Savannah River Technology Center is embarking on a study that could ultimately lead to the extensive use of hydrogen-based energy sources as an alternative to expensive and polluting fossil energy. The research will examine the technical and economic issues associated with a new and innovative approach that could be used to produce hydrogen: using the heat from a nuclear power reactor to break water down into hydrogen and oxygen. SRTC (the Savannah River Site's applied research and development laboratory) is working with its university partner, the University of South Carolina Department of Chemical Engineering, along with industrial partners General Atomics and Entergy Nuclear, and various consultants, on the three-year study. The U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative has provided $440,000 of funding for the first year of the study, and is expected to provide $1.35M over three years to support this research.

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SRR and SRNL: Partners in Technology Development for Waste Tank Cleanup Acceleration at SRS SRR and SRNL: Partners in Technology Development for Waste Tank Cleanup Acceleration at SRS ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (December 27, 2010) - Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have a long standing partnership in developing new technologies for waste processing, which is helping accelerate tank waste removal at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Technology development and effective and timely deployment is a shared common goal in meeting the objectives of SRR's Enhanced Tank Waste (ETW) strategy. SRNL, the U.S. Department of Energy-Environmental Management national laboratory, is a key component and vital resource for the multiple facets of the ETW strategy, including base operations technical support and technology deployment support. SRNL conducts research activities that make use of the Laboratory's expertise in high-level waste processing, including waste glassification, salt waste material processing, and support for base operations across multiple DOE sites.

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Specially Invented Grout Aids SRS Reactor Closure Specially Invented Grout Aids SRS Reactor Closure ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Aerial photograph shows P Reactor at SRS undergoing roof modifications as part of its in-place decommissioning AIKEN, S.C. - A combination of teamwork and cutting-edge science is responsible for the unique flowable and selfleveling cement slurry that on November 22 completely filled the P Reactor vessel at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project utilized the technical expertise of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to invent the slurry. "The aggressive deactivation and decommissioning schedule of this project required a multidisciplinary approach involving our national laboratory's worldclass expertise and innovation," said Dr. David Moody, DOE's Savannah River Operations Office Manager. "This important Recovery Act closure project is providing a final end state for this Cold War production reactor that served the Nation. The in-situ, or in-place deactivation and decommissioning of the SRS P and R Reactors is precedent-setting in the nuclear industry."

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Bioenergy Collaborative Paves Way for Freedom from Fossil Fuels Bioenergy Collaborative Paves Way for Freedom from Fossil Fuels ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) New fermenters for bioenergy research at SRNL NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (July 7, 2008) - Reducing the nation's dependence on fossil fuels will require the development of new energy sources, with the greatest interest in those that are clean, domestically produced, and economically advantageous. A collaboration of South Carolina research institutions and industry is paving the way to meet those requirements by advancing the development and commercial production of the next generation of biofuels: fuels made of cellulosic material (stems, wood, leaves, etc.) from non-food crops. The South Carolina Bioenergy Research Collaborative has reached a new milestone toward that goal, completing key plans for a pilot plant to test and demonstrate methods to convert regional crops into clean, locally produced biofuels.

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Filter Design Reduces Waste Treatment Costs Filter Design Reduces Waste Treatment Costs ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL Rotary Microfilter AIKEN, S.C. (January 25, 2011) - The redesign of a filtration system by the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is expected to help the DOE Office of Environmental Management drastically reduce cost and infrastructure for the treatment and permanent disposal of its inventory of high level radioactive waste. The U.S. Patent Office has recently allowed a patent on the reconfiguration of a commercial rotary filter, which has also been licensed by the company that produced the original system - two important steps in putting this technology into the marketplace for use by other potential customers.

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Reducing Ion Exchange Particles to Nano-Size Shows Big Potential Reducing Ion Exchange Particles to Nano-Size Shows Big Potential ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (January 30, 2012) - Sometimes bigger isn't better. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory have successfully shown that they can replace useful little particles of monosodium titanate (MST) with even tinier nano-sized particles, making them even more useful for a variety of applications. MST is an ion exchange material used to decontaminate radioactive and industrial wastewater solutions, and has been shown to be an effective way to deliver metals into living cells for some types of medical treatment. Typically, MST, and a modified form known as mMST developed by SRNL and Sandia National Laboratories, are in the form of fine powders, spherically-shaped particles about 1 to 10 microns in diameter (a micron is one-millionth of a meter).

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March 7, 2002) - Approximately 75 experts in fields related to hydrogen storage gathered in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina last week to assess the current status and potential of the various storage technologies and to begin planning a path forward toward a hydrogen economy. March 7, 2002) - Approximately 75 experts in fields related to hydrogen storage gathered in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina last week to assess the current status and potential of the various storage technologies and to begin planning a path forward toward a hydrogen economy. The Savannah River Technology Center (the applied research and development laboratory at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site) organized the workshop, entitled "Hydrogen Storage: Gateway to Energy Security," to contribute to a national dialogue on strategic direction for hydrogen energy. President Bush has identified hydrogen as a key component of his National Energy Plan. "This is the first time that the people working across the spectrum of direct hydrogen storage technologies have come together in a focused effort to evaluate and define the state of the art of each technology," said Bill Summers of SRTC. Their analysis showed that considerable progress is being made, but that continued aggressive research and development is needed.

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Melanin's "Trick" for Maintaining Radioprotection Studied Melanin's "Trick" for Maintaining Radioprotection Studied ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (August 23, 2011) - Sunbathers have long known that melanin in their skin cells provides protection from the damage caused by visible and ultraviolet light. More recent studies have shown that melanin, which is produced by multitudes of the planet's life forms, also gives some species protection from ionizing radiation. In certain microbes, in particular some organisms from near the former nuclear reactor facilities in Chernobyl, melanin has even been linked to increased growth in the presence of ionizing radiation. Research at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory, in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, has provided insights into the electrochemical mechanism that gives the complex polymer known as melanin its long-term radioprotective properties, with a goal of using that knowledge to develop materials that mimic those natural properties.

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Device for Sampling Storage Drums LIcensed by Florida Company Device for Sampling Storage Drums LIcensed by Florida Company ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (May 10, 2007) - A device invented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory for sampling drums of stored material has been licensed to a maker of waste storage and related equipment, for manufacture and sale to customers in the environmental and other industries. UltraTech International, Inc., of Jacksonville, Fla., entered into an agreement with Washington Savannah River Company, the company that operates SRNL for the DOE, for a device that safely and efficiently vents or samples storage drums remotely. Like many SRNL inventions, this device was created to meet a specific need at the Savannah River Site, but has applications well beyond the Site and its specialized operations. The Site had stored drums of heavy water, which had been used to cool the Site's reactors during the years that they operated. A method was needed to sample the headspace in the drums - the area between the surface of the stored liquid and the top of the drum - to determine what gases were present. In particular, they needed a way to perform this sampling while protecting employee safety and the environment, and without damaging the expensive stainless steel drums.

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Study Applicability of Solar Cell Coatings Study Applicability of Solar Cell Coatings ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (June 25, 2009) - A project under way at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory will study how special coatings that mimic structures found in nature can increase the usefulness of solar energy as a vital part of the nation's future energy strategy. Working with Peng Jiang of the University of Florida, SRNL's Dr. Marie Kane is evaluating nanostructured coatings to determine the readiness of this new approach for increasing the productivity of solar cells by reducing reflection. They are studying application of the new coatings for a variety of long-term uses, including commercial and home-based solar cells, as well as harsh environments, such as those encountered by satellites in space. This work is sponsored by the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Nanomanufacturing Program, and funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

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Designing, Building and Testing Seaport Radiation Detector System Designing, Building and Testing Seaport Radiation Detector System ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (August 3, 2010) - This month, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will begin testing a prototype radiation detector system at the Savannah River Site (SRS) that may be deployed to U.S. container seaports. SRNL's On Dock Rail Radiation Detector System rendering Container operations use large (40 feet high) straddle carriers to move cargo containers from the dock to railroad cars or trucks. SRNL has developed radiation detector systems that straddle carriers can drive through. Depending on the system in use, the detectors will either alarm at any radiation above background, or alarm and identify the isotopes responsible for the excess radiation.

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Laboratory, Universities, Discuss Collaboration on Vital Research Laboratory, Universities, Discuss Collaboration on Vital Research ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (Oct. 15, 2004) - At the invitation of U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and South Carolina's research universities came together for the first time today to identify and enhance collaboration opportunities for addressing some of the nation's most important technology needs. The South Carolina Strategic Research Exchange was held at the Savannah River Site's SRNL and provided a first-ever structured forum in which the research institutions shared their respective expertise and unique capabilities and explored the best ways to work together. Senator Graham and Congressmen Gresham Barrett and James Clyburn were all on hand to see and hear about some of the work that the five institutions are currently doing in four areas of strategic importance to the state:

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9 Archives 9 Archives Archives: Pre-2006 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 Mo-Sci Corporation to Manufacture, Market SRNL's Unique Glass Microspheres AIKEN, S.C. (December 17, 2009) - A licensing agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and specialty glass provider Mo-Sci Corporation will make SRNL's unique Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres available for use in targeted drug delivery, hydrogen storage and other uses, including applications still being developed. MORE » SRNL Establishes Presence at Charleston's SeaHawk AIKEN, S.C. (Nov. 17, 2009) - To support homeland security initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory has established a permanent presence at the SeaHawk interagency operations center (IOC). SeaHawk was established by Congress in 2003 and located at the Port of Charleston (S.C.) as a collaborative initiative designed to bring multiple agencies together to enhance port security operations and coordination among federal, state and local agencies. MORE »

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DOE's SRNL and DWPF Honored by the White House for Environmental Achievement DOE's SRNL and DWPF Honored by the White House for Environmental Achievement ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (June 17, 2009) - The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and its Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site were honored by the White House for an innovative environmental initiative that reduces contaminated waste requiring disposal and eliminates the need for people to enter a high-radiation area of the waste processing facility. The initiative - the development and deployment of a new remote gasket removal and replacement tool - earned the team an honorable mention in the annual White House Closing the Circle Awards, which recognize outstanding environmental stewardship at federal civilian and military facilities. This year, 15 winners and 13 honorable mentions were selected from nearly 200 nominations in the areas of environmental management systems, pollution prevention, recycling, green product purchasing, alternative fuels, electronics stewardship and sustainable buildings. SRS is one of only two DOE facilities to be recognized in this year's awards.

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USC, Westinghouse Savannah River Company Sign Hydrogen Technology Agreement USC, Westinghouse Savannah River Company Sign Hydrogen Technology Agreement ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) COLUMBIA, S.C. (Jan. 23, 2002) - The Westinghouse Savannah River Company and the University of South Carolina have signed an agreement to make South Carolina the nation's leader in hydrogen and fuel-cell technology. The agreement, signed Wednesday, Jan. 23, by USC President John M. Palms and Dr. Susan Wood, WSRC vice president for the Savannah River Technology Center, calls for collaborative research and development in the area of hydrogen technology, including energy applications and development of hydrogen fuel-cell technology for transportation, electric power and portable power applications. The Savannah River Technology Center is the applied research and development laboratory for the Savannah River Site.

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Biofuels Pilot Plant Set for Clemson University Restoration Institute in Charleston Biofuels Pilot Plant Set for Clemson University Restoration Institute in Charleston ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) Biofuels Pilot Plant Set for Clemson University Restoration Institute in Charleston FLORENCE, S.C. (Nov. 15, 2007) - A collaboration of research institutions and industry based in South Carolina today announced plans to build a biofuels research pilot plant at the Clemson University Restoration Institute in North Charleston, S.C. The goal is to use South Carolina's agricultural resources to help the state and nation reduce dependence on fossil fuels and enhance South Carolina's alternative-fuel industry. The announcement was made Nov.15 by Nick Rigas, Director of Renewable Energy at the Clemson University Restoration Institute and the S.C. Institute on Energy Studies, during the Switchgrass: Energy for the Future Conference at the university's Pee Dee Research and Education Center in Florence, S.C. The conference, geared toward researchers, state business leaders and legislators, focused on the fuel potential of switchgrass along with a tour of research studies conducted by the South Carolina Switchgrass Research and Education Team.

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FBI, Savannah River National Laboratory, Put Science to Work to Protect the Nation FBI, Savannah River National Laboratory, Put Science to Work to Protect the Nation ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (June 3, 2010) - The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) today announced the opening of a major expansion of the FBI's facilities for the forensic examination of radiological material and associated evidence. The FBI's newly expanded Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), located at the Savannah River National Laboratory near Aiken, South Carolina, provides a major enhancement in the FBI's ability to protect the nation from crimes involving radiological material and bring to justice those who would use these materials to harm the nation's citizens.

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Paves Way for Portable Power Systems Paves Way for Portable Power Systems ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRNL Portable Power Research AIKEN, S.C. (January 9, 2012) - Developments by hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are paving the way for the successful development of portable power systems with capacities that far exceed the best batteries available today. SRNL's advances in the use of alane, a lightweight material for storing hydrogen, may be the key that unlocks the development of portable fuel cell systems that meet the needs for both military and commercial portable power applications. SRNL has demonstrated a practical path to portable power systems based on alane and similar high capacity hydrogen storage materials that provide the sought-after high specific energy, which means the amount of energy per weight. Their accomplishments to date include developing a lower-cost method of producing alane, developing a method to dramatically increase the amount of hydrogen it releases, and demonstrating a working system powering a 150 W fuel cell. Portable power equipment manufacturers are looking for systems that can provide specific energies greater than 1000 watt-hours per kilogram (Wh/kg); that's more than 2 to 3 times the capacity of the best primary lithium batteries today. "Higher specific energy means more energy per weight," said SRNL's Dr. Ted Motyka. "The goal is to provide sufficient energy to a system that is light enough to be carried by a soldier or used in unmanned aircraft and other applications where weight is a factor."

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Device Searches for Signs of Life Device Searches for Signs of Life ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) SRTC Device Searches for Signs of Life AIKEN, S.C. (Apr. 13, 2004) - The quest for signs of life on Mars is taking place in a remote desert in northern Chile. Searching for life on Mars -- or even extinct life - is a daunting task. That's why researchers, with the help of an instrument developed at the Savannah River Technology Center, are investigating some of the most desolate spots on Earth. In this search for life, NASA scientists are exploring the interior of the Chilean Atacama Desert, the most arid region on Earth. This desolate desert appears to be void of nearly any signs of life - not just a lack of mammals, birds, reptiles or insects, but barely evidence of any spores or bacteria.

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