National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for attic floor joists

  1. Innovative residential floor construction: Structural evaluation of steel joists with pre-formed web openings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elhajj, N.R.

    1999-03-01

    Since 1992, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development has sponsored numerous studies to identify, evaluate, and implement innovative structural materials, such as cold-formed steel (CFS), in the residential market. The use of CFS is still very limited, partly because steel is not being effectively integrated into conventional home construction. One of the major barriers to the use of CFS floor joists is the impact it has on placement of large waste drains and ductwork installed in floor systems. This report provides an overview of tests conducted by the NAHB to integrate these systems with CFS. A brief literature review of relevant work followed by a detailed overview of the experimental and analytical approach are also provided. The report recommends adoption of the research findings in residential and commercial applications.

  2. Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows an attic that is conditioned...

  3. Thermal Performance of Unvented Attics in Hot-Dry Climates: Results from Building America; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Farrar-Nagy, S.; Anderson, R.; Reeves, P.; Hancock, E.

    2003-01-01

    Unvented attics have become a more common design feature implemented by Building America partners in hot-dry climates of the United States. More attention is being focused on how this approach affects heating and cooling energy consumption. By eliminating the ridge and eave vents that circulate outside air through the attic and by moving the insulation from the attic floor to the underside of the roof, an unvented attic become a semi-conditioned space, creating a more benign environment for space conditioning ducts.

  4. Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

    2013-01-01

    Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

  5. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Application of radiant barriers and low-emittance surface coatings in residential building attics can significantly reduce conditioning loads from heat flow through attic floors. The roofing industry has been developing and using various radiant barrier systems and low-emittance surface coatings to increase energy efficiency in buildings; however, minimal data are available that quantifies the effectiveness of these technologies. This study evaluates performance of various attic radiant barrier systems under simulated summer daytime conditions and nighttime or low solar gain daytime winter conditions using the large scale climate simulator (LSCS). The four attic configurations that were evaluated are 1) no radiant barrier (control), 2) perforated low-e foil laminated oriented strand board (OSB) deck, 3) low-e foil stapled on rafters, and 4) liquid applied low-emittance coating on roof deck and rafters. All test attics used nominal RUS 13 h-ft2- F/Btu (RSI 2.29 m2-K/W) fiberglass batt insulation on attic floor. Results indicate that the three systems with radiant barriers had heat flows through the attic floor during summer daytime condition that were 33%, 50%, and 19% lower than the control, respectively.

  6. Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    attics, but this is highly inefficient. The additional heat loss and gain of ducts in unconditioned, vented attics increases energy use for heating and cooling by 10%....

  7. An Evaluation of the Placement of the Placement of Radiant Barriers on their Effectiveness in Reducing Heat Transfer in Attics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D.

    1986-01-01

    the attic floor was measured at two different roof deck temperatures (120°F and 140°F). The temperature distribution within the base fibrous insulation was also measured. Three different solid kraft laminates with aluminum foil backing were tested...

  8. Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A case study of photovoltaic attic ventilator fans was conducted on an occupied single family home in Central Florida. Two fans were installed at mid-summer in an instrumented home where attic air temperature, meteorological conditions and space cooling electric power were measured. The home already had an attic radiant barrier, but still experienced attic air temperatures in excess of 130oF.

  9. Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation...

  10. Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2012-06-01

    This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

  11. Next Generation Roofs and Attics for Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Prototype residential roof and attic assemblies were constructed and field tested in a mixed-humid U.S. climate. Summer field data showed that at peak day irradiance the heat transfer penetrating the roof deck dropped almost 90% compared with heat transfer for a conventional roof and attic assembly. The prototype assemblies use a combination of strategies: infrared reflective cool roofs, radiant barriers, above-sheathing ventilation, low-emittance surfaces, insulation, and thermal mass to reduce the attic air temperature and thus the heat transfer into the home. The prototype assemblies exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor air temperature. Field results were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for the densely populated, hot and dry southeastern and central-basin regions of California. New construction in the central basin could realize a 12% drop in ceiling and air-conditioning annual load compared with a code-compliant roof and attic having solar reflectance of 0.25 and thermal emittance of 0.75. In the hot, dry southeastern region of California, the combined ceiling and duct annual load drops by 23% of that computed for a code-compliant roof and attic assembly. Eliminating air leakage from ducts placed in unconditioned attics yielded savings comparable to the best simulated roof and attic systems. Retrofitting an infrared reflective clay tile roof with 1 -in (0.032-m) of EPS foam above the sheathing and improving existing ductwork by reducing air leakage and wrapping ducts with insulation can yield annual savings of about $200 compared with energy costs for pre-1980 construction.

  12. Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant...

  13. A Hygrothermal Risk Analysis Applied to Residential Unvented Attics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B; Kehrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Aresidential building, constructed with an unvented attic, is acommonroof assembly in the United States.The expected hygrothermal performance and service life of the roof are difficult to estimate due to a number of varying parameters.Typical parameters expected to vary are the climate, direction, and slope of the roof as well as the radiation properties of the surface material. Furthermore, influential parameters are indoor moisture excess, air leakages through the attic floor, and leakages from air-handling unit and ventilation ducts. In addition, the type of building materials such as the insulation material and closed or open cell spray polyurethane foam will influence the future performance of the roof. A development of a simulation model of the roof assembly will enable a risk and sensitivity analysis, in which the most important varying parameters on the hygrothermal performance can be determined. The model is designed to perform probabilistic simulations using mathematical and hygrothermal calculation tools. The varying input parameters can be chosen from existing measurements, simulations, or standards. An analysis is applied to determine the risk of consequences, such as mold growth, rot, or energy demand of the HVAC unit. Furthermore, the future performance of the roof can be simulated in different climates to facilitate the design of an efficient and reliable roof construction with the most suitable technical solution and to determine the most appropriate building materials for a given climate

  14. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Guide to Attic Air Sealing was completed in 2010 and although not in the standard Measure Guideline format, is intended to be a Measure Guideline on Attic Air Sealing. The guide was reviewed during two industry stakeholders meetings held on December 18th, 2009 and January 15th, 2010, and modified based on the comments received. Please do not make comments on the Building America format of this document. The purpose of the Guide to Attic Air Sealing is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy - health, safety and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  15. Influence of Infrared Radiation on Attic Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; Turner, W. D.; Murphy, W. E.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental study concerned with different modes of heal transfer in fibrous and cellulose insulating material is presented. A series of experiments were conducted using an attic simulator to determine the effects of ventilation on attic heat...

  16. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy, health, safety, and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  17. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fallahi, A.; Duraschlag, H.; Elliott, D.; Hartsough, J.; Shukla, N.; Kosny, J.

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  18. Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building America Top Innovation Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building America...

  19. Analysis of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using Mathematical Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairey, P.; Swami, M.

    1988-01-01

    During the past six years, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has conducted extensive experimental research on radiant barrier systems (RBS). This paper presents recent research on the development of mathematical attic models. Two levels...

  20. Moisture performance of sealed attics in the mixed-humid climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Pallin, Simon B; Jackson, Roderick K

    2013-12-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory studied 8 homes in the mixed-humid climate, 4 with vented attics and 4 with sealed attics. ORNL wanted to understand the moisture performance of the sealed attic and how it affected the interior environment. We found that the attic and interior of sealed attic homes were more humid than the attic and interior observed in vented attic homes. This is due to the lack of ventilation in the sealed attic. Historically attics have been vented to dehumidify the attic and interior of the home. A sealed attic design greatly reduces the venting potential and thus this drying pathway and can cause elevated interior moisture over a vented attic home. Despite the elevated attic and interior moisture in the sealed attic homes, so far no mold or material degradation has been found. The roof sheathing moisture content has stayed below 20%, indicating low potential for material degradation. Also the relative humidity at the roof sheathing has stayed within the ASHRAE 160 design criteria except for a short time during the 2011/2012 winter. This was due to a combination of the sealed attic design (minimal venting to the outside) and the duct work not being operated in the attic which usually provides a dehumidification pathway. It was also found that when the humidity was controlled using the HVAC system, it resulted in 7% more cooling energy consumption. In the mixed-humid climate this reduces the cost effectiveness of the sealed attic design as a solution for bringing ducts into a semi-conditioned space. Because of this we are recommending the other alternatives be used to bringing ducts into the conditioned space in both new construction and retrofit work in the mixed-humid climate.

  1. Cooling Energy Measurements of Houses with Attics Containing Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levins, W. P.; Karnitz, M. A.; Knight, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Tests were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the magnitude of the energy savings brought about by installing radiant barriers in the attics of single-family houses. The radiant barrier used for this test was a product...

  2. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Warme und Feuchte instationar Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  3. Moisture Risk in Unvented Attics Due to Air Leakage Paths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.; Shaffer, M.

    2014-11-01

    IBACOS completed an initial analysis of moisture damage potential in an unvented attic insulated with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam. To complete this analysis, the research team collected field data, used computational fluid dynamics to quantify the airflow rates through individual airflow (crack) paths, simulated hourly flow rates through the leakage paths with CONTAM software, correlated the CONTAM flow rates with indoor humidity ratios from Building Energy Optimization software, and used Wärme und Feuchte instationär Pro two-dimensional modeling to determine the moisture content of the building materials surrounding the cracks. Given the number of simplifying assumptions and numerical models associated with this analysis, the results indicate that localized damage due to high moisture content of the roof sheathing is possible under very low airflow rates. Reducing the number of assumptions and approximations through field studies and laboratory experiments would be valuable to understand the real-world moisture damage potential in unvented attics.

  4. Measure Guideline: Air Sealing Attics in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otis, C.; Maxwell, S.

    2012-06-01

    This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for owners, builders, contractors, homeowners, and other stakeholders in the multifamily building industry, and focuses on challenges found in existing buildings for a variety of housing types. It explains why air sealing is desirable, explores related health and safety issues, and identifies common air leakage points in multifamily building attics. In addition, it also gives an overview of materials and techniques typically used to perform air sealing work.

  5. Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSitesUMTRCA Site | Department of Energy toNewsAttics and

  6. Savings Project: Attic Stairs Cover Box | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA TokenCommercialSTEMSarah L. Gamage AboutEnergyAttic

  7. ORNL Roof and Attic System Shows Efficient Retrofit By Zaher Karp Reuters, July 27, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ORNL Roof and Attic System Shows Efficient Retrofit Option By Zaher Karp ­ Reuters, July 27, 2009 A new roof and attic system developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building Technology Center. Texas-based Billy Ellis Roofing funds the research through the Building Technology Center

  8. Radiant Barrier Insulation Performance in Full Scale Attics with Soffit and Ridge Venting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ober, D. G.; Volckhausen, T. W.

    1988-01-01

    There is a limited data base on the full scale performance of radiant barrier insulation in attics. The performance of RBS have been shown to be dependent on attic ventilation characteristics. Tests have been conducted on a duplex located in Florida...

  9. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    K. Hovnanian Homes constructed a 2,253-ft single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

  10. Ducts in the Attic? What Were They Thinking? Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D.; Winkler, J.

    2010-08-01

    As energy-efficiency efforts focus increasingly on existing homes, we scratch our heads about construction decisions made 30, 40, 50-years ago and ask: 'What were they thinking?' A logical follow-on question is: 'What will folks think in 2050 about the homes we're building today?' This question can lead to a lively discussion, but the current practice that we find most alarming is placing ducts in the attic. In this paper, we explore through literature and analysis the impact duct location has on cooling load, peak demand, and energy cost in hot climates. For a typical new home in these climates, we estimate that locating ducts in attics rather than inside conditioned space increases the cooling load 0.5 to 1 ton, increases cooling costs 15% and increases demand by 0.75 kW. The aggregate demand to service duct loss in homes built in Houston, Las Vegas, and Phoenix during the period 2000 through 2009 is estimated to be 700 MW. We present options for building homes with ducts in conditioned space and demonstrate that these options compare favorably with other common approaches to achieving electricity peak demand and consumption savings in homes.

  11. Indoor climate and moisture durability performances of houses with unvented attic roof constructions in a mixed-humid climate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boudreaux, Philip R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A sealed or unvented attic is an energy-efficient envelope component that can reduce the amount of energy a house consumes for space conditioning if the air handler and/or ducts are located in the attic. The attic is typically sealed by using spray foam on the underside of the roof deck and covering the soffit, ridge and gable vents to minimize air leakage from the attic to the outside. This approach can save up to 10% in space-conditioning energy when ducts are located in the attic (DOE 2013). Past research done by ORNL and Florida Solar Energy Center suggests that in more hot, humid climates, an unvented attic could potentially create a more humid, uncomfortable living environment than a vented attic (Colon 2011, Boudreaux, Pallin et al. 2013). Research showed that controlling the higher indoor humidity could reduce the energy savings from the sealed, unvented attic, which in turn would decrease the energy savings payback. Research also showed that the roof assembly (5.5 inches of open-cell foam, 1inch of closed-cell foam, OSB, felt paper, and asphalt shingles) stored moisture, thus acting as a moisture buffer. During the fall and winter, the roof assembly stored moisture and during the spring and summer it released moisture. This phenomenon is not seen in a vented attic, in which the air exchange rate to the outside is greater and, in the winter, helps to dehumidify the attic air. It was also seen that in a vented attic, the direction of water vapor diffusion is on average from the attic to the interior of the house. Air leakage from the attic to the interior also occurs during more of the year in a house with an unvented attic than in one with a vented attic. These discoveries show that the moisture dynamics in a house with an unvented attic are much different from those in a house with a vented attic. This study reports on a series of computer model investigations completed to determine the key variables impacting indoor comfort and the durability of roof assemblies against moisture. The key variables investigated were the leakage area from the attic to the outside, leakage area from the attic to the interior, leakage area from the interior to the outside, supply duct leakage in the attic, and interior moisture generation. These investigations are described in this report.

  12. Internal Microclimate Resulting From Ventilated Attics in Hot and Humid Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, B. L.; Porter, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilated spaces in the built environment create unique and beneficial microclimates. While the current trends in building physics suggest sealing attics and crawlspaces, comprehensive research still supports the benefits of the ventilated...

  13. Influence of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems on Air Conditioning Demand in an Utility Pilot Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    A utility monitoring project has evaluated radiant barrier systems (RBS) as a new potential demand site management (DSM) program. The study examined how the retrofit of attic radiant barriers can be expected to alter utility residential space...

  14. First Floor1 Second Floor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    Resource Center Financial Counseling & Infusion Center Scheduling Lactation Room Meditation Garden Infusion Center Clinical Lab Waiting Playground Registration Infusion Center Waiting Second Floor Research Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Conference Room 2250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Financial Counseling & Infusion

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes a low-cost, low-tech attic insulation technique developed by the ARIES Building America team with help from Southern Energy Homes and Johns Manville. Increasing attic insulation in manufactured housing has been a significant challenge due to cost, production and transportation constraints. The simplicity of this dense-pack solution to increasing attic insulation R-value promises real hope for widespread industry adoption.

  16. LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    LEVEL 01 FLOOR LEVEL 1 / GROUND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level 2 Lower building Rm.2350 1393 WESTERN ROAD N6G -1G9 UPDATE DRAWN #12;LEVEL 02 FLOOR LEVEL 2 / SECOND FLOOR / SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY

  17. Development of a Transient Heat and Mass Transfer Model of Residential Attics to Predict Energy Savings Produced by the Use of Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    : different attic insulation levels, various attic airflow rates, cooling and heating seasons, and different radiant barrier orientations. The model predicted ceiling heat flows within 10% for most cases. The model was used to run simulations and parametric...

  18. Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented...

  19. Effect of Radiant Barrier Technology on Summer Attic Heat Load in South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, R.; Garcia, O.; Medina, M. A.; Turner, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    . roof temperatures, and solar radiation were measured. Results of the radiant barrier experiment using two side-by-side 600 ft2 units are presented. Attic fiberglass insulation of nominal R-11 was installed in the two apartments when the units were last...

  20. Attic Retrofits Using Nail-Base Insulated Panels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartment ofAtlantaLutron ex-parte meeting atAttic

  1. 1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic assemblies weighing up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Envelope 1. Large Scale Climate Simulator (Building 3144) The LSCS tests roof and/or attic accommodates specimens of up to 606020 cm 24248 in.). 5. Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (Apparatus 3138) #12;RTRA measures effects of long-term natural weather exposure on small, low-slope roof specimens

  2. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce (Beverly Hills, MI); Blessing, Leonard J. (Rochester, MI)

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  3. Impact of Thermally Insulated Floors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghimlas, F.; Omar, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    INSULATED FLOORS E. Al-Sayed Omar Associate Research Scientist Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat, Kuwait F. Alghimlas * Research Associate Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research P.O. Box 24885, 13109 Safat..., Kuwait * fghimlas@kisr.edu.kw ABSTRACT Presently in Kuwait the code of practice for energy conservation in the air conditioned buildings implemented by the Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW) which has been in effect since 1983 has...

  4. Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy-efficient solutions. Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    . Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls, foundation) is an obvious choice as heating needed to retrofit today's poor energy performing walls. · Partnering with the Single Ply Roofing Industry, ORNL helped in understanding the role cool roofing plays in moisture accumulation in these types

  5. Modeling thermal comfort with radiant floors and ceilings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    literatures related to floor heating environment in Japan.of performance of radiant floor-heating systems and a wallB.W. 2002. Radiant floor heating in theory and practice.

  6. Optimization Online - Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Goetschalckx

    2007-02-28

    Feb 28, 2007 ... ... of the facility layout problem with practical applications when the price ... provided the floor projections on the ground floor are nested starting ...

  7. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  8. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork

  9. Tsunami recorded on the open ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    On March 14, 1979 a sizeable earth-quake (Ms-7.6 Richter scale) occurred on the continential shelf adjacent to S.W. Mexico, near Petatlan in the state of Guerrero. This earthquake generated a small tsunami that was recorded in deep water, 1000 km away, thus providing for the first time a glance at a tsunami traveling in the open ocean. The same sea floor pressure record displays conspicuous signals associated with vertical sea floor motions generated at the passage of the first Rayleight seismic wave, R1. Seismic and tsunami travel velocities are in agreement with our present understanding of the phenomena, and tsunami detectability in deep water is demonstrated to be well within present day state of the art in the design of sea floor pressure transducers. As calculations anticipate, the E.M. signals associated with the passage of the tsunami were too faint to be detected.

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Inverted...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    along the attic floor, which saves energy by placing heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) ductwork within the home's thermal boundary. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for...

  11. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operating very inefficiently. In a retrofit house, insulation is removed from the attic floor. The roof and sides of the attic are sealed with insulating foam, and a...

  12. HRC floors are found in residence centers located

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robeson, Scott M.

    to sign up for housing. No matter the weather, living in an HRC means always having a warm, welcoming home friends on the HRC floors, and end up living with friends from their HRC floor when they move off campus are members of the Hutton Honors Col- lege and many live on HRC floors, but HRC res- idents know how to man

  13. U. S. Attic Grsrgy 'bmiss~o3 U. S. Atomic lb-al-w CamLf3sion December 27, S.957

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr a . - 3 U. S. Attic

  14. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  15. Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingle, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    other  wall  or  floor  heating  systems,  and  heating  other  wall  or  floor  heating  systems,  or  heating  attics,  or  floors,  air  sealing,  heating   system  

  16. Building Area Location Grant 3rd Floor Hallway Outside of S304

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Building Area Location Grant 3rd Floor Hallway Outside of S304 Grant 2nd Floor Room S274 Grant 2nd Floor Mailroom A246 (Next to S299) Alway 3rd Floor End of Hallway (By Recycling Bins) Lane Library 1st Beckman Center 3rd Floor Mail / Recycling Area Beckman Center 4th Floor Room B432 Hagey PSRL 1st Floor

  17. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Where to insulate. Adding insulation in the areas shown here may be...

  18. UCSF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EAP Floor Warden Duties Pamela Roskowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derisi, Joseph

    followed Retrieve emergency bag and put on Floor Warden ID vest and hard hat Observe any hazardous or Emergency Responders with status report of condition of assigned floor. Include the last known locations of any injuries, deaths, trapped or missing persons, fires, hazardous materials spills, utility failures

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using "L" clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and "picture framing" the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing.

  20. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Bauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor

  1. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    7] B. Borresen, Floor heating and cooling of an atrium, in:thermal performance of floor heating systems, Solar Energy,discussed this issue for floor heating, but not cooling.

  2. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Radiant Heating and Cooling Systems, in, 2012. [15] F.Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design. Proceedings ofof radiant floor cooling systems and their associated air

  3. The flow in an under-floor plenum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jun Myoung

    2009-01-01

    forced convection dominant flow. REFERENCES Bauman F. , HuiOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO The Flow in an Under-Floor Plenum A10 3 THE EFFECT OF FLOW RATE AND PLENUM DEPTH…………………15

  4. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  5. SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN Sea Floor Methane Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN 1 Sea Floor Methane are exposed at the sea floor. A methane-oxidizing bacterial consortium populates the exposures of hydrate; colonies of vent macro-fauna are abundant as well. Discharge of methane from destabilized hydrate

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,FloorAreaShops Jump

  7. Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,FloorAreaShops

  8. Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:FloorAreaTotal Jump to:

  9. Property:Building/FloorAreaWarehouses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:FloorAreaTotal

  10. INSTANTANEOUS FREQUENCY VERSUS TIME FOR 7 BUILDINGS B.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7) B.5108 Santa Susana, ETEC Bldg 462 (6th Floor, and 1st Floor (pp. 19) B.5450 Burbank, 3601 West Olive Ave., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 11) B.5451 Los Angeles, 6301 Owensmouth Ave., Roof (12th level) (pp. 7) B.5453 Los Angeles, 5805 Sepulveda Blvd., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 13) B

  11. Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORKSHOP Autonomous Industrial Vehicles: From the Laboratory to the Factory Floor 1 IEEE@astm.org 610-832-9720 www.astm.org May 30, 2015 #12;· To solicit researchers and industry input for the development of consensus standards within ASTM International Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Industrial

  12. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  13. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but ...

  14. Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-01-01

    As a comfortable and energy-efficient air conditioning system, the application of floor radiant heating system is used increasingly greatly in the north of China. As a result, the feasibility of floor radiant cooling has gained more attention...

  15. Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Floor and Ceiling Plenum Energy Model Parameters, American Society of Heating,heating and cooling systems were not modelled because the simulation aim was to investigate the influence of the raised floor

  16. Modeling, Simulation, and Practice of Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Floor control, Ubiquitous collaboration, Synchronous collaboration, Mobile devices, Human-computer dispersed virtual place. Mobile computing paradigm [34] made ubiquitous access possible with the integration1 Modeling, Simulation, and Practice of Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration

  17. BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH AND 6TH FLOOR) AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    1ST FLOOR ENTRANCE ELEVATOR WASHROOMS BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH MCINTYRE MEDICAL SCIENCES BUILDING 3655 SIR WILLIAM OSLER PINE AVENUE PROMENADESIRWILLIAMOSLER ACCESSIBLE BUILDING CONNECTION ACCESS VIA MAIN ENTRANCE ON PEEL (5TH AND 6TH FLOOR) AND SOUTH ENTRANCE (1ST FLOOR) ALL

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and an R-28 fiberglass blanket under the floor joists. One mini-split ductless heat pump heats and cools the home with thermostat-controlled in-wall fans to transfer heat...

  19. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  20. Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy TechnologyFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Jump

  1. Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy TechnologyFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime

  2. Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search

  3. Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices

  4. Do-It-Yourself Home Energy Audits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    not blocked by insulation. You also should seal any electrical boxes in the ceiling with flexible caulk (from the living room side or attic side) and cover the entire attic floor...

  5. Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    space in your house, putting the insulation on the inside of the roof rather than on the floor of the attic. Sealed attics are more feasible in new home construction, but can be...

  6. An intelligent floor field cellular automata model for pedestrian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekaterina Kirik; Tat'yana Yurgel'yan; Dmitriy Krouglov

    2009-06-15

    A stochastic cellular automata (CA) model for pedestrian dynamics is presented. Our goal is to simulate different types of pedestrian movement, from regular to panic. But here we emphasize regular situations which imply that pedestrians analyze environment and choose their route more carefully. And transition probabilities have to depict such effect. The potentials of floor fields and environment analysis are combined in the model obtained. People patience is included in the model. This makes simulation of pedestrians movement more realistic. Some simulation results are presented and comparison with basic FF-model is made.

  7. Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliamDRAFTAreaFloorAreaGroceryShops

  8. Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  9. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is

  10. Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This

  11. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, Anatasia; Baker, Richard; Prahl, Duncan

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using "L" clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and "picture framing" the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  12. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, A.; Baker, R.; Prahl, D.

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using 'L' clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and 'picture framing' the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  13. Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits, Syracuse, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using 'L' clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and 'picture framing' the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  14. Cactus, Pixies, 04 Sept 09 Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Cactus, Pixies, 04 Sept 09 Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had that dress when you di-yi-yi-yi-yine Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had it to me Em Sittin' here wishin' on a cement floor G Em just wishin' that I had something you wore #12;

  15. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO? emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  16. Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Goetschalckx and Takashi Irohara

    2007-02-22

    Feb 22, 2007 ... problem with practical applications when the price of land is high or when a ... may have different dimensions provided the floor projections on.

  17. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

  18. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  19. Houses for early weaned piglets : influence of rearing on the floor or in batteries,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Houses for early weaned piglets : influence of rearing on the floor or in batteries, temperature-deck batteries on wire floor divided into 2 compartments : one at I8.!0 y- i°C, relative humidity 61+ io p. roo and in batteries were the following : 148 and z36 (period I), !2S and 495 (period 11), i. e. differences in favour

  20. UCR Chemistry Program 1953-1966; 2nd floor, Geology Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    UCR Chemistry Program 1953-1970 1953-1966; 2nd floor, Geology Building 1966-2005; Pierce Hall of Physical Sciences ­ chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics ­ W. Conway Pierce, Chairman #12;Hart Schmidt of Geology bld; 1954-66 ­ Plus 2nd floor addition; 1959-66 ­ Pierce Hall; 1966-2005 · Instruments and support

  1. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    of the energy storage floor is designed,which places heat pipes in the enclosed phase change material (PCM) layer, without concrete in it. The PCM thermal storage time is studied in relation to the floor surface temperature under different low-temperature hot...

  2. Where to Insulate in a Home | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to improve your home's energy efficiency. Insulate either the attic floor or under the roof. Check with a contractor about crawl space or basement insulation. Tips: Insulation...

  3. Vitality and chemistry of roots of red spruce in forest floors of stands with a gradient of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Vitality and chemistry of roots of red spruce in forest floors of stands with a gradient of soil Al) dominated by red spruce and with a gradient of forest floor exchangeable Al/Ca ratios. Root vitality

  4. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO? emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore »feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  5. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    With this new home—which achieved the highest rating possible under the National Green Building Standard—Nexus EnergyHomes demonstrated that green and affordable can go hand in hand. The mixed-humid climate builder, along with the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Partnership for Home Innovation, embraced the challenge to create a new duplex home in downtown Frederick, Maryland, that successfully combines affordability with state-of-the-art efficiency and indoor environmental quality. To limit costs, the builder designed a simple rectangular shape and kept interesting architectural features such as porches outside the building’s structure. This strategy avoided the common pitfall of creating potential air leakage where architectural features are connected to the structure before the building is sealed against air infiltration. To speed construction and limit costs, the company chose factory-assembled components such as structural insulated panel walls and floor and roof trusses. Factory-built elements were key in achieving continuous insulation around the entire structure. Open-cell spray foam at the rim joist and attic roofline completed the insulation package, and kept the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system in conditioned space.

  6. Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, Maryland (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    With this new home - which achieved the highest rating possible under the National Green Building Standard - Nexus EnergyHomes demonstrated that green and affordable can go hand in hand. The mixed-humid climate builder, along with the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Partnership for Home Innovation, embraced the challenge to create a new duplex home in downtown Frederick, Maryland, that successfully combines affordability with state-of-the-art efficiency and indoor environmental quality. To limit costs, the builder designed a simple rectangular shape and kept interesting architectural features such as porches outside the building's structure. This strategy avoided the common pitfall of creating potential air leakage where architectural features are connected to the structure before the building is sealed against air infiltration. To speed construction and limit costs, the company chose factory-assembled components such as structural insulated panel walls and floor and roof trusses. Factory-built elements were key in achieving continuous insulation around the entire structure. Open-cell spray foam at the rim joist and attic roofline completed the insulation package, and kept the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system in conditioned space.

  7. Jane Gray Research Greenhouse and IB Sixth Floor Greenhouse Department of Integrative Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane Gray Research Greenhouse and IB Sixth Floor Greenhouse Department of Integrative Biology UC Berkeley - 200 Centennial Dr. Greenhouse Space Request Form Date of Request____________ Expected time frame_____________________E-mail______________________________________ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Greenhouse Environmental Specifications Watering instructions

  8. Modelling heated composite floor slabs with reference to the Cardington experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillie, Martin; Usmani, Asif; Rotter, J Michael

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a method of modelling composite floor slabs in fire conditions using a stress-resultant approach. The FEAST suite, which consists of two main computer programs is described. The first, SRAS, is designed ...

  9. The effectiveness of floor mats as an intervention for standing fatigue of light fabrication workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Michael Shannon

    1996-01-01

    A field study was conducted in a light fabrication plant to determine the effectiveness of floor mats on reducing the symptoms of standing fatigue. Specific physiological variables measured include skin temperature of the ...

  10. Development of an NC equipment level controller in a hierarchical shop floor control system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, William

    1993-01-01

    The methodology of developing an NC equipment controller in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) System, which is based on a philosophy of hierarchical shop floor control, is presented in this research. The underlying architecture consists...

  11. Ground Floor (Basement) B10 -B10A --IT Service Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    -- Living Room 130 -- Buskuhl Gallery B50 ­ Arch 1st Year Studio B60 ­ ID 1st Year Studio B60 East ­ ID 2nd;Second Floor 205 -- Arch 2nd Year Studio (Access by First or Third Floor) 230 -- CNS Classroom 240 -- CNS Year Studio B80 ­ ID 3rd Year Studio B90 ­ ID 4th Year 150, 155, 160 -- Shared Classrooms 165

  12. DOE ZERH Case Study: Charles Thomas Homes, Anna Model, Omaha, NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 48 without PV, with 2x6 24” on center walls with R-23 blown fiberglass, ocsf at rim joists, basement with plus 2x4 stud walls with R-23 blown fiberglass, with R-20 around slab, R-38 under slab; a vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; 95% AFUE furnace, 14 SEER AC, ERV; heat pump water heater.

  13. INTER-NOISE 2006 3-6 DECEMBER 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Colin

    Papa Tipi Innovation Park 49 Sala St, Private Bag 3020, Rotorua New Zealand Ken McGunnigle 34 Barrys at the Acoustics Research Centre succeeded in producing a cost- effective and buildable timber-framed inter weight timber floor/ceiling structures consist of horizontal joists supporting an upper floor and lower

  14. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan H. Davis

    2015-03-09

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

  15. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:FloorAreaTotal Jump

  17. CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof (13th floor) (pp. 7)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    APPENDIX A CATALOG OF PROCESSED DATA FOR 7 BUILDINGS A.0466 Los Angeles, 15250 Ventura Blvd., Roof Burbank, 3601 West Olive Ave., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 11) A.5451 Los Angeles, 6301 Owensmouth Ave., Roof (12th level) (pp. 8) A.5453 Los Angeles, 5805 Sepulveda Blvd., Roof (9th floor) (pp. 19) A.5455 Los

  18. Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder ...

  19. COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 COOLING OF THE OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE AND OCEAN FLOOR TOPOGRAPHY (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell) Introduction This lecture is the development of the lithospheric cooling problem. For researchers in the areas important thermal boundary layer which is at the core-mantle boundary. As the lithosphere cools it becomes

  20. Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

  1. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON 1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor Office/or for the past 12 months. 4. Evidence you are a registered voter in North Carolina. 5. Evidence of motor vehicle ownership - registration card in North Carolina. 6. Copy of North Carolina Driver's License. 7. Evidence

  2. UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA WILMINGTON1 Office of the Registrar, James Hall--First Floor Office (Domiciliary) of North Carolina for Tuition Purposes. 1. Documents of residence for the past 12 months (i are a registered voter in North Carolina. 5. Evidence of motor vehicle ownership - registration card in North

  3. Carbon Dioxide Evolution from the Floor of Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Carbon Dioxide Evolution from the Floor of Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and extend access to Ecology. http://www.jstor.org #12;Late Spring 1968 CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION RATES 471. Germination behavior of some halc- phytes. Bull. Res. Council Israel (D) 6: 187-188. CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION

  4. Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Systemwide Risk Management and Public Safety 401 Golden Shore, 5th Floor Long Beach, CA 90802 in this self-insured program. The Office of Risk Management in the Chancellor's Office administers the general liability, workers' compensation, property, and professional liability programs. The State Office of Risk

  5. Influence of floor plenum on energy performance of buildings with1 UFAD systems2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    . Thermal29 buoyancy causes temperature stratification in the occupied zone, and the air temperature in the31 to use less energy for cooling [1,2]. In addition, the thermal stratification in a room the occupied zone and the floor plenum also be considered, so do the43 thermal stratification in the occupied

  6. Beyond Kanban: Creating and analyzing lean shop floor control policies 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gershwin, Stanley B.

    Beyond Kanban: Creating and analyzing lean shop floor control policies 1 Asbjoern M. Bonvik ffl Stanley B. Gershwin Operations Research Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 Laboratory for Manufacturing policies for repetitive manufacturing, including kanban, basestock, and CONWIP control. This view focuses

  7. The Floor Strategy: Wayfinding Cognition in a Multi-Level Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Floor Strategy: Wayfinding Cognition in a Multi-Level Building Christoph Hölscher1 , Georg and cognitive processes of wayfinding in public buildings. We conducted an empirical study in a complex multi-level building, comparing performance measures of experienced and inexperienced participants in different

  8. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

  9. Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and Reduce Carbon PollutionZealand JoinsJune 1,of EnergyNext

  10. Tender Notice for Renovation of Toilets (Gents & Ladies) on Ground and Second Floor in the Academic Block of ISI Bangalore Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Block of ISI Bangalore Centre Sealed tender applications are hereby invited from the contractors (Gents & Ladies) on ground floor and second floor in the Academic block building of ISI, Bangalore Centre

  11. Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University, Dept. Civ. & Env. Eng.;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hines, Eric

    Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University in the design of steel and concrete floor systems to control vibrations suggests that a floor system's vibration-term collaborative research program between Tufts University and LeMessurier Consultants to investigate the vibration

  12. Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and N. M. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners. http://www.jstor.org #12;497 ENERGY AND NUTRIENT DYNAMICS OF FOREST FLOORS IN THREE MINNESOTA FORESTS and subsequent utilization by heterotrophs is a major pathway of energy flow. Forest floors can also

  13. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  14. Second Floor N314 N313 N312 N311 N310 N309N308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST CORRIDOR N304 N307 N306 Centre for Doctoral Research N305 LIFT First Floor NORTHWEST CORRIDOR N203207 S207A S206S206A S205 S204 S203 S202 MAIN NORTH CORRIDOR M F LINKCORRIDOR LIFT 301 F M D Lift LIFT Lecture Theatre 1 (N111) Seminar Room 1 Tea & Cofee Station Seminar Room 2 Programme Office Office

  15. Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,

  16. Property:Building/FloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to:

  17. Wheelchair access to this building is not currently recommended without assistance and is limited to the ground floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Lift. Page 10. Stairs. Page 10. Toilets. Page 11. Room Directory. Page 12. Floor Plans, Page 13 at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city centre. The nearest bus stops

  18. Commissioning Tools for Heating/Cooling System in Residence - Verification of Floor Heating System and Room Air Conditioning System Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miura, H.; Hokoi, S.; Iwamae, A.; Umeno, T.; Kondo, S.

    2004-01-01

    Tools of evaluating the performance of floor heating and room air conditioner are examined as a commissioning tool. Simple method is needed to check these performance while in use by residents, because evaluation currently requires significant time...

  19. Fatigue analysis of stringer to floor beam connections in through plate girder and through truss railroad bridges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Leslie Virginia

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to determine fatigue stresses in the stringer to floor beam connections of through plate girder (TPG) and through truss (TT) bridges in order to predict failure. Field observations by the Association of American...

  20. Floor Polisher 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    When steam transfers its heat in a manufacturing process or heat exchanger, it may revert to a liquid phase called condensate. This paper presents a method to help certain manufacturing and petro-chemical companies to save energy costs by returning their...

  1. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more »in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  2. Verification of criticality accident alarm system detector locations for the X-326 process cell floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.; Lee, B.L. Jr.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) detectors on the cell floor of the X-326 process building at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) are located at a height of 5 m above the cell floor. It has been suggested that this height be lowered to I m to alleviate accelerated system failures caused by the elevated temperatures at 5 m and to reduce the frequency of injury to maintenance personnel lifting the approximately 90-lb units into position. Work has been performed which analyzed the effect of relocating the CAAS detectors on the process floors of the X-333 and X-330 buildings from their current height to a height of 1 m{sup 1}. This earlier work was based on criticality accidents occurring in low enriched material (5% {sup 235}U) and was limited to the X-333 and X-330 buildings and the low enriched areas of X-326. It did not consider the residual higher enriched material in the X-326 building. This report analyzes the effect on criticality alarm coverage of lowering the CAAS detectors. This analysis is based on criticality accidents resulting from higher enriched material which may be present as ``hold-up`` in the process equipment within the X-326 building. The criticality accident alarm detectors at the PORTS facility are set to alarm at a neutron absorbed dose rate of 5 mrad/hr. The calculated absorbed dose rates presented in this report show that the detectors examined that produce an alarm for the given criticality event at their current height will also produce an alarm if located at a height of 1 meter. Therefore, lowering the detectors will not result in a loss of coverage within the building.

  3. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Withers, C.; Kono, J.

    2015-04-01

    This report provides results from a second-phase research study of a phenomenon generally referred to as wind washing. Wind washing is the movement of unconditioned air around or through building thermal barriers in such a way as to diminish or nullify the intended thermal performance. In some cases, thermal and air barriers are installed very poorly or not at all, and air can readily move from unconditioned attic spaces into quasi-conditioned interstitial spaces. This study focused on the impact of poorly sealed and insulated floor cavities adjacent to attic spaces in Florida homes. In these cases, unconditioned attic air can be transferred into floor cavities through pathways driven by natural factors such as wind, or by thermal differences between the floor cavity and the attic. Air can also be driven into a floor cavity through mechanical forces imposed by return duct leakage in the floor cavity.

  4. Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

    2006-01-01

    accordin g to heat quantity compared charge according to area. 2.3 Government Encouraging Use of New and Re producible Energy In order to save energy in architecture field, government and MINISRY OF CONSTRUCTIO N P.R. CHINA issue a series of laws... has longer life and its life is up to fifty years. 6) Divided calculation heat is easily carried out i n floor radiant heating system. It is helpful to so lve charge question. According to statistic, it can save energy about 20~30% that charge...

  5. Method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate located on the ocean floor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Douglas E. (Aiken, SC)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for recovering a gas from a gas hydrate on the ocean floor includes a flexible cover, a plurality of steerable base members secured to the cover, and a steerable mining module. A suitable source for inflating the cover over the gas hydrate deposit is provided. The mining module, positioned on the gas hydrate deposit, is preferably connected to the cover by a control cable. A gas retrieval conduit or hose extends upwardly from the cover to be connected to a support ship on the ocean surface.

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy TechnologyFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Jump to:

  7. Crailo House, page 1 of 9 Dendrochronological dates for the Crailo House, Rensselaer, NY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    samples from floor support timbers in what is now the boiler room. Six cores were taken in the attic, from dormer windows, a beam against the east wall, and two rafters in the section two stories above the boiler). Pitch pine was used mainly in the boiler room beams and the roof rafters of the attic of the addition

  8. AN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 35 years old and ready for upgrades to heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, which make and the air sealing of the attic," he said. "Once you do that, you spend less on your heating and air was insulated with material packed under the attic floor, above which a cooling unit was located. In the second

  9. Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of False Floors for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Supply of False Floors for the Auxiliary Buildings of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Complete and Fully Aligned Air Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    This research project, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, focused on eliminating excessive humidity in the attic of a multi-floor, single-family home that was causing condensation and water damage along the roof and eaves.

  11. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Devoted Builders, LLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Devoted Builders meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the cold climate with R-25 ICF walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  12. Optical Spectrum Analyzer with Quantum-Limited Noise Floor M. Bishof, X. Zhang, M. J. Martin, and Jun Ye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical Spectrum Analyzer with Quantum-Limited Noise Floor M. Bishof, X. Zhang, M. J. Martin with state-of-the-art stability. We demonstrate a technique that precisely measures the noise spectrum determine the laser noise spectrum from near dc to 100 Hz via the measured fluctuations in atomic excitation

  13. PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite and smectite surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite carbon (DOC) concentrations (0­140 g C m 3 ) for reaction with goethite ( -FeOOH), birnessite ( -MnO2 different NOM adsorption, fractionation and transformation patterns. Goethite exhibited a steep initial

  14. A model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    ; improved thermal comfort; improved ventilation efficiency and indoor air quality; reduced energy useA model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb a Energy gains that occur above the occupied zone are isolated from the calculation of the required space supply

  15. Job Opportunity at NEUROMATTERS, LLC 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005 www.neuromatters.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Mark

    , Neuromatters is at the forefront of neurotechnologies, EEG signal processing and decoding. The successfulJob Opportunity at NEUROMATTERS, LLC 40 Wall Street, 28th Floor, New York, NY 10005 www.neuromatters.com Founded by recognized neuroengineering experts from Columbia University and the City College of New York

  16. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

  17. Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 363374 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2002-01-01

    Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand K variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content within a Douglas fir

  18. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  19. Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J.; Matika, D.; Kollar, R.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.

    2011-07-01

    Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

  20. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

  1. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  2. A Sea Floor Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Zumberge

    2005-12-31

    In the North Sea natural gas production field at Sleipner, CO{sub 2} is being separated from natural gas and injected into an underground saline aquifer, known as the Utsira formation, for environmental purposes. In this study, gravity measurements were made over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site in 2002 and again in 2005 on top of 30 concrete benchmarks on the seafloor to study the behavior and physical properties of the injected CO{sub 2}. As the gas is injected, pore space water is replaced by gas, altering the bulk density of the formation. This results in a change in gravitational acceleration observed on the overlying sea floor. Our gravity measurements show a repeatability of 4.3 {micro}Gal for 2003 and 3.5 {micro}Gal for 2005. Forward models of the gravity change are calculated based on both 3-D seismic data and reservoir simulation models from other studies. These forward models indicate that the magnitude of maximum gravity change is primarily related to CO{sub 2} density rather than flow geometry. The time-lapse gravity observations best fit a high temperature forward model based on the seismically determined CO{sub 2} geometry, suggesting that the 3-D reflection seismics are imaging the geometry of the injected CO{sub 2}, and that the in situ CO{sub 2} density is around 530 kg/m{sup 3}. Uncertainty in determining the average density using this technique is estimated to be {+-}65 kg/m{sup 3} (95% confidence), however, additional seismic surveys are needed before final conclusions can be drawn. Future gravity measurements will put better constraints on the CO{sub 2} density and continue to map out the CO{sub 2} flow.

  3. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

  6. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  7. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  8. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  9. Theses Come Out of the Attic & Become an Institutional Asset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    of information ­ 62 US institutions have projects I Required at (16): Cal Tech, Concordia, ETSU, LSU, NCSU, UNT

  10. Attic Air Sealing Guide - Building America Top Innovation | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to achieving effective energy savings while avoiding pitfalls that can lead to combustion safety and indoor air quality issues. The widely disseminated, DOE-sponsored Guide...

  11. Women in Relief. 'Double Consciousness' in Classical Attic Tombstones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    2002-01-01

    The classical Greek cemetery was a women's space. The tombstones were often decorated with idealized portraits of the women buried below; other women are also often depicted, and inscriptions give names and qualities. A living woman, tending...

  12. A Personification of Demos on a New Attic Document Relief 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowacki, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    , while on yet another (NM 1482; Fig. 11), a figure probably to be identi- fied as Demos stands near the center of the composition, directly interact- ing with the honorand, while Athena observes from behind.23 A slightly less secure identification....v. Demos (O. Tzachou-Alexandri); Meyer 1989, p. 304, no. A138, pl. 35:1; Tzachou- Alexandri 1994, p. 67; Lawton 1995a, p. 154, no. 172, pl. 89; Smith 1997, pp. 220–221, no. DR33. 23. Athens, National Museum 1482 (318/7 b.c.). Found in the Late Roman...

  13. Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork, Roseville, California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for HVAC Ductwork Roseville, California PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Long-Term Monitoring of Occupied Test House Location: Roseville, CA Partners: K. Hovnanian Homes,...

  14. Modeling the Energy Efficiency of Residential Attic Assemblies | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX F Wetlandsof Energy Model RepairCladdings:Tianzhenof

  15. Attic Air Sealing Guide - Building America Top Innovation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartment ofAtlantaLutron ex-parte meeting at

  16. Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobsFelixContracts | Departmentof Energy

  17. Stand: Mai 2014 Rent per month

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stand: Mai 2014 Number of Apartment Floor m² Rent per month (inc. operating costs, electricity and heating) Fixed amount for final cleaning Living area in m² 3 rooms (33 m² + 27 m² + 39 m²) 97,78 winter tenants (only on request). Attic floor, apartments 7 - 11: these apartments have a shared kitchen

  18. Placement of criticality alarms in the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.F.; Weems, L.D.; Cao, Z. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    The placement of criticality alarms at the Paducah plant has been studied. Four detectors placed in the halls of the first floor will provide double coverage of the first floor and single coverage of the basement, attic, and counting laboratory. Results from MCNP calculations also show that a detector placed in the hall adjacent to room 27 will cover the NDA laboratory.

  19. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  20. Underhill Parking Facility is the closest University Lot that is available to the public. Meter machines located on each floor take exact change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Parking: Underhill Parking Facility is the closest University Lot that is available to the public. Parking spots fill quickly. Comprehensive map of at UC Berkeley's public parking lots (http://pt.berkeley.edu/parking. Meter machines located on each floor take exact change or credit card. Parking along College Ave. Longer

  1. Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-30

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

  2. Psychology Student Affairs -1st Floor Mandler Hall -858.534.3001 -psycadvising@ucsd.edu h#p://psychology.ucsd.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squire, Larry R.

    Psychology Student Affairs - 1st Floor Mandler Hall - 858.534.3001 - psycadvising@ucsd.edu h#p://psychology.ucsd.edu · At least 4 of the Upper Division Psychology Courses MINOR REQUIREMENTS 5 Upper Division 2 Lower Division 6 Upper

  3. Center for Space Research, Conference Room 2.806, WPR Building, 2nd Floor, 3925 W. Braker Lane, Suite 200, Austin, Texas 78759

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    Center for Space Research, Conference Room 2.806, WPR Building, 2nd Floor, 3925 W. Braker Lane 10 -- 8:30 AM Thermospheric Density Variations, Solar EUV and Geomag. Storm Modeling Bruce R. Bowman, Senior Scientist with Space Environment Technologies Abstract: Discussion of density variations and how

  4. Rigid overlay of volume sonography and MR image data of the female pelvic floor using a fiducial based alignment--feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the authors [1], advances in 3D sonographical imaging as well as in data acquisition techniques allowRigid overlay of volume sonography and MR image data of the female pelvic floor using a fiducial with enhanced informative content. In this paper, we present an overlay technique of magnetic resonance (MR

  5. Scheme for generating and transporting THz radiation to the X-ray experimental floor at the LCLS baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel scheme for integrating a coherent THz source in the baseline of the LCLS facility. Any method relying on the spent electron beam downstream of the baseline undulator should provide a way of transporting the radiation up to the experimental floor. Here we propose to use the dump area access maze. In this way the THz output must propagate with limited size at least for one hundred meters in a maze, following many turns, to reach the near experimental hall. The use of a standard, discrete, open beam-waveguide formed by periodic reflectors, that is a mirror guide, would lead to unacceptable size of the system. To avoid these problems, in this paper we propose an alternative approach based on periodically spaced metallic screens with holes. This quasi-optical transmission line is referred to as an iris line. We present complete calculations for the iris line using both analytical and numerical methods, which we find in good agreement. We present a design of a THz edge radiation source ...

  6. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and laying of false floors in the rectifier buildings and the electricity sub-stations serving five LEP access points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and laying of false floors in the rectifier buildings and the electricity sub-stations serving five LEP access points

  7. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Withers, Charles R.; Kono, Jamie

    2015-04-13

    With U.S. Department of Energy goals of reducing existing home energy use by 30% and new home energy use by 50%, it is imperative to focus on several energy efficiency measures, including the quality of air and thermal barriers. This report provides results from a second-phase research study of a phenomenon generally referred to as wind washing. Wind washing is the movement of unconditioned air around or through building thermal barriers in such a way as to diminish or nullify the intended thermal performance. In some cases, thermal and air barriers are installed very poorly or not at all, and air can readily move from unconditioned attic spaces into quasi-conditioned interstitial spaces. This study focused on the impact of poorly sealed and insulated floor cavities adjacent to attic spaces in Florida homes. In these cases, unconditioned attic air can be transferred into floor cavities through pathways driven by natural factors such as wind, or by thermal differences between the floor cavity and the attic. Air can also be driven into a floor cavity through mechanical forces imposed by return duct leakage in the floor cavity.

  8. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project: Feasibility test of real-time radiation monitoring during removal of surface contamination from concrete floors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leino, R.; Corle, S.

    1995-10-01

    This feasibility test was conducted to determine if real-time radiation-monitoring instruments could be mounted on decontamination machines during remediation activities to provide useful and immediate feedback to equipment operators. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored this field test under the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project (GJPORAP) to identify a more efficient method to remove radiological contamination from concrete floor surfaces. This test demonstrated that project durations and costs may be reduced by combining radiation-monitoring equipment with decontamination machines. The test also demonstrated that a microprocessor-based instrument such as a radiation monitor can withstand the type of vibration that is characteristic of floor scabblers with no apparent damage. Combining radiation-monitoring equipment with a decontamination machine reduces the time and costs required to decontaminate concrete surfaces. These time and cost savings result from the reduction in the number of interim radiological surveys that must be conducted to complete remediation. Real-time radiation monitoring allows equipment operators to accurately monitor contamination during the decontamination process without support from radiological technicians, which also reduces the project duration and costs. The DOE Grand Junction Projects Office recommends more extensive and rigorous testing of this real-time radiation monitoring to include a variety of surfaces and decontamination machines. As opportunities arise, additional testing will be conducted under GJPORAP.

  9. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi; Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi

    2013-07-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  10. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    This builder worked with Building Science Corporation to build moisture- and flood-resistant HERS- 65 affordable homes on pier foundations, with borate pressure-treated lumber, wind-resistant OSB sheathing, hurricane strapping, roofing membrane, and closed-cell spray foam in attic, walls, and under floor.

  11. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tom Walsh & Co.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Tom Walsh & Company’s homes in an urban infill project in Portland achieved meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the marine climate with R-21 fiberglass batt walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  12. Garden Variety Coffee Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wismath, Stephen

    Garden Variety Coffee Company Hiroba Nippon Got Fries? Icy's Subway Pitas, Wraps, Fruit Smoothies legend. The Attic Grill Boston Pizza Brewsters Brewing Company The Cheesecake Café Coco Pazzo Italian Café Dionysios Earl's New to downtown Lethbridge. Fine dining menu. 2 Floor 411-3rd. Ave. South Family

  13. Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott R.B.

    2008-11-13

    The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

  14. Published June 1, 2003. Distribution restricted to Sponsors until September 1, 2003. auto-id center massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139-4307, usa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Program in Logistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is currently working on MIT Auto corporate logistics and operations management positions. He has a Bachelors of Science in food technology massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139

  15. Published June 1, 2003. Distribution restricted to Sponsors until September 1, 2003. auto-id center massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139-4307, usa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    management for the last six years. He was Product Manager at Optimum Logistics, Director of Global Logistics a Master of Engineering in Logistics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a PhD in Solid massachusetts institute of technology, 400 technology sq, building ne46, 6th floor, cambridge, ma 02139

  16. Student Accounting Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor P.O. Box 843036 Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 Fax (804) 828-5463 www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Student Accounting · Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center · 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor · P.O. Box 843036 · Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 · Fax (804) 828-5463 · www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting excess financial aid (not in excess of $200) to any prior academic year charges on my account. 3. I

  17. Student Accounting Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor P.O. Box 843036 Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 Fax (804) 828-5463 www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Student Accounting · Grace E. Harris Hall Student Service Center · 1015 Floyd Ave., 1st Floor · P.O. Box 843036 · Richmond, VA 23284-3036 (804) 828-2228 · Fax (804) 828-5463 · www.enrollment.vcu.edu/accounting-digit routing transit number and your account number. I hereby authorize and request Virginia Commonwealth

  18. Office +27 (0) 21 424 5351 Fax +27 (0) 21 423 4819 Email attorneys@fidfund.co.za Website www.fidfund.co.za Physical 5th Floor, Waalburg Building, 28 Wale Street, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    .fidfund.co.za Physical 5th Floor, Waalburg Building, 28 Wale Street, Cape Town, 8001, South Africa Postal P O Box 3062, Cape Town, 8000, South Africa Docex Docex 154, Cape Town B M Molefe (Chief Executive Officer), A M oorr ee--mmaaiilleedd aapppplliiccaattiioonn ffoorrmmss.. Yours faithfully MR S. AFRICA BURSARY CO

  19. A Study of the Energy-Saving Potential of Metal Roofs Incorporating Dynamic Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Manlove, Gary [Metanna, Monument, CO

    2013-01-01

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space-conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase-change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface, and above-sheathing ventilation with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a three-year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year three of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic-temperature fluctuations.

  20. Measure Guideline: Implementing a Plenum Truss for a Compact Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01

    This Measure Guideline presents the steps to implement a compact duct system inside an attic bulkhead (plenum truss) of a one-story, slab-on-grade (SOG) home. In a compact duct design, ductwork runs are reduced in length to yield a smaller and more compact duct system. Less energy will be lost through ductwork if the ducts are contained within the thermal enclosure of the house. These measures are intended for the production builder working to meet the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) requirements and keep the ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house. This measure of bringing the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment and ductwork within the thermal enclosure of the house is appropriate for the builder wishing to avoid cathedralizing the insulation in the attic space (i.e., locating it at the underside of the roof deck rather than along the attic floor) or adding dropped soffits.

  1. First Floor Records Office, Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Post O ce Bureau of Internal Revenue FTC Archives Building Federal Bureau of Investigation US Court of Transport. Post O ce Government Printing O ce Lafayette Square Renwick Gallery L'Enfant Plaza FAA NASA

  2. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    California, consuming an average of 5 billion kWhyr, more than 25 percent of the total electricity consumption for the entire state of New Mexico. 6 It's not just surface water...

  3. Floor San Francisco, CA 94104

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping into Funding forFY'17 Projects forgray vanGuidelines

  4. A Comparison of Simulation Capabilities for Ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A.; Smith, Matt K.; Gu, Lixing; New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Typically, the cheapest way to install a central air conditioning system in residential buildings is to place the ductwork in the attic. Energy losses due to duct-attic interactions can be great, but current whole-house models are unable to capture the dynamic multi-mode physics of the interactions. The building industry is notoriously fragmented and unable to devote adequate research resources to solve this problem. Builders are going to continue to put ducts in the attic because floor space is too expensive to closet them within living space, and there are both construction and aesthetic issues with other approaches such as dropped ceilings. Thus, there is a substantial need to publicly document duct losses and the cost of energy used by ducts in attics so that practitioners, builders, homeowners and state and federal code officials can make informed decisions leading to changes in new construction and additional retrofit actions. Thus, the goal of this study is to conduct a comparison of AtticSim and EnergyPlus simulation algorithms to identify specific features for potential inclusion in EnergyPlus that would allow higher-fidelity modeling of HVAC operation and duct transport of conditioned air. It is anticipated that the resulting analysis from these simulation tools will inform energy decisions relating to the role of ducts in future building energy codes and standards.

  5. How the Library is Organized Floor 1 Floor 2 Floor 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    AND to combine terms; use " " around phrases For information on classroom management in middle school "classroom management" and (elementary or middle) For information on inclusive teaching in Grade 4: inclusi

  6. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  7. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… Unvented, Conditioned Attics

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat: Airtightness3.fieldRobust costadditional

  8. Ghosts in the Attic - Horror Stories from the Field (What to Do When

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMat 4" |a,-Department of EnergyThings Go

  9. Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeepDecemberCornstalksAmerica Top

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Inverted Attic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, IncBioPredictingMissed Energy Saving OpportunityInc.

  11. Look Up to See Your Bills Go Down: Making Your Attic More Efficient |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S

  12. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit, Stockton, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) team conducted a deep retrofit project within Stockton’s Large-Scale Retrofit Program that expanded on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Post-retrofit site energy savings were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case.

  13. Technology Solutions Case Study: Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase 2, Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    In many two-story homes, there are attic spaces above the first-floor of the home that border portions of the second-story conditioned space. These spaces have breaches of the air and thermal boundaries, creating a phenomenon known as wind washing. This can cause attic air above the first-floor space to be driven into the cavity between the first and second floors by wind, thermal buoyancy forces, or mechanical driving forces as well as circulation of hot attic air against the wallboard because of gaps between insulation batts installed on knee walls and the gypsum wallboard. In this project, the U.S. Department of Energy team Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) investigated wind washing in 56 homes. The goals were to identify the failure mechanisms that lead to wind washing, characterize the pathways for air and heat to enter the house, and evaluate the seasonal energy savings and peak demand reduction that can result from repairing these wind washing problems. Based on this research, the team developed recommendations for cost-effective retrofit solutions and information that can help avoid these problems in new construction.

  14. Plancher solaire direct mixte \\`a double r\\'eseau en habitat bioclimatique - Conception et bilan thermique r\\'eel. Double direct solar floor heating in boclimatic habitation - Design and real energetical balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Larochelambert, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a new direct solar floor heating technique with double heating network wich allows simultaneous use of solar and supply energy. Its main purpose is to store and to diffuse the whole available solar energy while regulating supply energy by physical means without using computer controlled technology. This solar system has been tested in real user conditions inside a bioclimatic house to study the interaction of non-inertial and passive walls on the solar productivity. Daily, monthly and annual energy balances were drawn up over three years and completed by real-time measurements of several physical on-site parameters. As a result the expected properties of this technique were improved. The use of per-hour solar productivity, saved primary energy and corrected solar covering ratio is recommended to analyze the performances of this plant and to allow more refined comparisons with other solar systems

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat: Airtightness3. EffectiveBUILDING

  16. Elev. Elev. 1st Floor, Building 51

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    undergrad, 1st year master's and 1st ~ 2nd year doctroal students University Clinic Nishi-Waseda Office 4th year undergrad, 2nd year master's and 3rd year doctoral students Automatic Certificate-Issuing Macine Next to the Stairs Mon.~Sat.: 9:00~21:00 Locations Issuing Medical Certificates 1st ~ 3rd year

  17. PITTSBURGH AIRPORT MARRIOTT HOTEL FLOOR PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10:45 - 12:00 p.m Intermediate Temperature Electrogenerative Cells for Flexible Cogeneration of Power and Liquid Fuel Greg Tao, Materials & Systems Research, Inc. Liquid Fuels...

  18. Johannesburg First Floor, 17 Baker Street,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    and Installation of Rotary UPS, MV Indoor Switchgear and Power Transformers at the MeerKAT site near Carnarvon

  19. Berit Floor Lund Rigorous simulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    ingeniør Norwegian University of Science and Technology Faculty of Information Technology, Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering Department of Engineering Cybernetics #12;Norwegian University of Science and Technology Faculty of Information Technology, Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering Department

  20. Floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

    2001-01-01

    Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

  1. Formaldehyde Laminate Flooring Clinician Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the eyes, nose, and throat Skin rashes Cough Shortness of breath Bronchospasm and wheezing, especially

  2. CXD 4600, 9103 Second Floor Refurbishment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods POCTBT |CUD-55 /Allen

  3. COMET TA Floor Plan 100225.vc6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1, 2013, 4:15pmEnergyNovember 12, 2015,and Night |

  4. Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First ObservationFast(ER1) TargetRLFloor

  5. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrigan, P.

    2014-03-01

    BSC worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to redesign three floor plans in order to locate the HVAC system in conditioned space. The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses. This is in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. The builder wishes to develop an upgrade package that will allow for a seamless transition to the new code mandate. The following research questions were addressed by this research project: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost? BSC and the builder developed a duct design strategy that employs a system of dropped ceilings and attic coffers for moving the ductwork from the vented attic to conditioned space. The furnace has been moved to either a mechanical closet in the conditioned living space or a coffered space in the attic.

  6. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House - Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian® Homes®), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft² slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols, while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic to conditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing of individual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.

  7. HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder, Houston, Texas (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    BSC worked directly with the David Weekley Homes - Houston division to redesign three floor plans in order to locate the HVAC system in conditioned space. The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space. In addition, BSC conducted energy analysis to calculate the most economical strategy for increasing the energy performance of future production houses. This is in preparation for the upcoming code changes in 2015. The builder wishes to develop an upgrade package that will allow for a seamless transition to the new code mandate. The following research questions were addressed by this research project: 1. What is the most cost effective, best performing and most easily replicable method of locating ducts inside conditioned space for a hot-humid production home builder that constructs one and two story single family detached residences? 2. What is a cost effective and practical method of achieving 50% source energy savings vs. the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for a hot-humid production builder? 3. How accurate are the pre-construction whole house cost estimates compared to confirmed post construction actual cost? BSC and the builder developed a duct design strategy that employs a system of dropped ceilings and attic coffers for moving the ductwork from the vented attic to conditioned space. The furnace has been moved to either a mechanical closet in the conditioned living space or a coffered space in the attic.

  8. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits theSunShot Prize: Race to 7-DayEnergyofWork ||

  9. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex FuelsEnergyInc| Open Energy Information

  10. Opportunities exist to name an entire floor in the Natural History Building. 1st Floor: $3 million | 2nd Floor: $5 million | 3rd Floor: $4 million | 4th Floor: $2 million

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    and film showings. (7,000 students per year) $500,000 · Sedimentology Research Lab: This will be a large laboratory complex that will be the central focus of research and student training in sedimentology. The area

  11. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    finished or conditioned (heated or cooled) areas of attics, and conditioned garage space that is attached to the home. Unconditioned and unfinished areas in attics and...

  12. Preliminary Release: April 19, 2012

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    finished or conditioned (heated or cooled) areas of attics, and conditioned garage space that is attached to the home. Unconditioned and unfinished areas in attics and...

  13. Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy-efficient solutions. Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy- efficient solutions penetration rates; validate models; and assist industry to develop new and more energy-efficient materials systems) resulting in affordable, moisture-durable products to increase energy efficiency. · ORNL

  14. Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy-efficient solutions. Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy- efficient solutions rates; validate models; and assist industry to develop new and more energy-efficient materials-durable products to increase energy efficiency. · ORNL established test facilities to measure essential property

  15. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-24

    A new generation of full variable-capacity air-conditioning (A/C) and heat pump units has come on the market that promises to deliver very high cooling and heating efficiency. The units are controlled differently than standard single-capacity (fixed-capacity) systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, the new units can vary their capacity over a wide range (approximately 40%–118% of nominal full capacity) and stay on for 60%–100% more hours per day than the fixed-capacity systems depending on load-to-capacity ratios. Two-stage systems were not evaluated in this research effort.

  16. Cooling and Heating Season Impacts of Right-Sizing of Fixed- and Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps With Attic and Indoor Ductwork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Kono, Jamie

    2015-06-01

    ?A new generation of central, ducted variable-capacity heat pump systems has come on the market, promising very high cooling and heating efficiency. They are controlled differently than standard fixed-capacity systems. Instead of cycling on at full capacity and then cycling off when the thermostat is satisfied, they vary their cooling and heating output over a wide range (approximately 40% - 118% of nominal full capacity), thus staying 'on' for 60% - 100% more hours per day compared to fixed -capacity systems. Experiments in this research examined the performance of 2-ton and 3-ton fixed- and variable-capacity systems and the impacts of system oversizing.

  17. Preliminary Study of a Vented Attic Radiant Barrier System in Hot, Humid Climates Using Side-by-Side, Full-Scale Test Houses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lear, W. E.; Barrup, T. E.; Davis, K. E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of side-by-side tests was performed using two full scale test houses to determine the effectiveness of a Vented Radiant Barrier System (VRBS) in reducing the ceiling heat flux during the summer cooling season in North Florida. Another...

  18. The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

    2006-01-01

    Energy Materials & Solar Cells (in press). Miller, W. A. 2006. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs. ORNL/TM-2006/9. Oak Ridge, TN: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miller W. A., K. T... that has a solar reflectance of 0.06. To improve its solar reflectance, several granular-coated products of a given color were evaluated for the importance of the size of the aggregate, the type of cool paint pigment, and the effect of applying...

  19. Reinnovating the African-American Shotgun House [Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Sheryl G

    1995-01-01

    houses' spare, identical elements — factory- made, double-hung windows, standard- sized wooden attic grills, prefabricated

  20. Human Resources Office Dalia Bldg. 2nd Floor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of soil conservation and water harvesting interventions. Design and evaluate soil and water conservation.icarda.org Post-doctoral Fellow Soil and Water Conservation Position specification Post-doctoral Fellow Reports to: Director, Integrated Water and Land Management Program (IWLMP) Location: Amman, Jordan. Closing date: 12

  1. 1752 Columbia Rd. NW, Fourth Floor Washington, DC 20009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    money and builders could benefit by increasing their profits according to Power Shift, a non the $8,000-10,000 that installing solar on existing homes costs in part because homebuilders purchase's Buydown and the California Tax Credit the total cost to purchase a two kW system is $5

  2. The Behaviour and Design of Composite Floor Systems in Fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Neil

    Modern composite steel frame structures possess a high degree of redundancy. This allows them to survive extreme fires without collapse as there are many alternative loadpaths which can be used to transfer load away from the fire affected part...

  3. Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

    1958-01-01

    This dissertation examines the performance of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) implemented in a mesoscale model in increasingly realistic contexts from under a perfect model assumption and in the presence of significant ...

  4. First Floor Interim Plan: January,2008 Draft: 28 February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Visitor 1207 Bio Off Hinsa 1208 Bio Lab Freezer 1209 Bio Lab Radio- isotopes 1004 Bio Lab Animal Bio Phy Fac Res Case 1035 Phy Lab Optic Laser 1133 Phy Lab Waves 1231 Phy Lab Nuclear 1236 Phy Adv Lab 1133A Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1133B Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1231A Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1321 Phy Study 1233 Phy

  5. First Floor Interim Plan: Fall,2007 Draft: 13 August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Bio Off Hinsa 1208 Bio Lab Freezer 1209 Bio Lab Radio- isotopes 1004 Bio Lab Animal Bio / Phys Develop 1039 Phy Off Case 1038 Phy Fac Res Case 1035 Phy Lab Optic Laser 1133 Phy Lab Waves 1231 Phy Lab Nuclear 1236 Phy Adv Lab 1133A Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1133B Phy Lab Mod / Waves 1231A Phy Lab Mod / Waves

  6. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    insulation Wire fasteners Tape measure Sharp utility knife Caulk and foam sealant Caulk gun Stepladder Straightedge Respirator or dust mask Eye protection Protective clothing,...

  7. Characterizing the muscle architecture in cadaveric female pelvic floor muscles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Olivia Thuy-Minh

    2012-01-01

    A. Ashton-Miller. "Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced byComparison of Levator Ani Muscle Defects and Function inMRI Comparison of Levator Ani Structure, Volume, and

  8. Working Towards 100% Electronic Transactions on the Shop Floor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, M.

    1985-01-01

    ~ will have to deal with to succeed. The three companies are General Motors, General Electric, and IBM, and the three major issues are: 1. Building a comprehensive manufucturing!strat egy, not a piece-meal, approach. 2. Building a corporate manufacturing... to strategy planning technique and not to reality. As a result, we will witness one of the largest re-positioning periods in corporate manufacturing history. PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE IBM, like GM and GE, has moved through a consider able period...

  9. International Flooring Conference 26 March 2009, Changzhou, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , China Main sources of information W W W W W W W W W W W W · UNECE/FAO Forest Products Annual Market by European Forest Institute · US Foreign Agricultural Statistics · Chinese Customs · State Forestry Agency, China · International Wood Markets Group · European Federation of the Parquet Industry Main sources

  10. Indentation and Recovery Tests of Common Resilient Floor Coverings. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price

    1960-01-01

    Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive ...

  11. Indentation and recovery characteristics of common resilient floor coverings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Billy Ray

    1959-01-01

    ?ate'ties At tbe ' Tesperstnres of 50 p an4 11 p. . . . . . ' hf l . Xg, Typical indentation ebd aeooverp corrie af Robber Tile, Vinyl Tile ead Viayl?' Asbestos Tile ~ ' ~ ' ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ' ~ "a' ~ ~ ~ ', ~ do" ' l la;: Tppioe1 xsdestotios . end... . . . Rmhagasnsl ~ "r C . I prefect Qhs pi the genes Agricultural ggperiaent gtstion '-entitled &%'ho Desirability of Wetiridle end Methods of is- ' a?-' stslletioa for tloir Coverings, , Drainboard surfaces, yleor snd gall Piaiehes', ead gall. Co...

  12. ECE Graduate Student Affairs Engineering Building I, 2nd Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    , Applied Additional Courses Electromagnetic Theory - Electromagnetics and Computational Methods Coursework (twenty units) SIO 214 A Introduction to Fluid Mechanics Core Courses SIO 202 A-B Fundamentals for Electromagnetics, Advanced Antenna Design ECE 250 Random Processes Total: 12 Units ECE 251 A-B-C-D1 Digital Signal

  13. ECE Graduate Student Affairs Engineering Building I, 2nd Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    -B-C3 Antennas and Their System Applications, Applied Electromagnetic Theory - Electromagnetics and Computational Methods for Electromagnetics ECE 230 A-B-C Solid State Electronics I, II and III ECE 236 A IIIPhotonics, BioElectronics, BioNanotechnology ECE 251 A-B Digital Signal Processing I and II ECE 253 Fundamentals

  14. Entropy "floor" and effervescent heating of intracluster gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roychowdhury, S; Nath, B B; Begelman, M C; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2004-01-01

    Recent X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies have shown that the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM), even at radii as large as half the virial radius, is higher than that expected from gravitational processes alone. This is thought to be the result of nongravitational processes influencing the physical state of the ICM. In this paper, we investigate whether heating by a central AGN can explain the distribution of excess entropy as a function of radius. The AGN is assumed to inject buoyant bubbles into the ICM, which heat the ambient medium by doing pdV work as they rise and expand. Several authors have suggested that this "effervescent heating" mechanism could allow the central regions of clusters to avoid the ``cooling catastrophe''. Here we study the effect of effervescent heating at large radii. Our calculations show that such a heating mechanism is able to solve the entropy problem. The only free parameters of the model are the time-averaged luminosity and the AGN lifetime. The results are main...

  15. Entropy "floor" and effervescent heating of intracluster gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Roychowdhury; M. Ruszkowski; B. B. Nath; Mitchell C. Begelman

    2004-07-08

    Recent X-ray observations of clusters of galaxies have shown that the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM), even at radii as large as half the virial radius, is higher than that expected from gravitational processes alone. This is thought to be the result of nongravitational processes influencing the physical state of the ICM. In this paper, we investigate whether heating by a central AGN can explain the distribution of excess entropy as a function of radius. The AGN is assumed to inject buoyant bubbles into the ICM, which heat the ambient medium by doing pdV work as they rise and expand. Several authors have suggested that this "effervescent heating" mechanism could allow the central regions of clusters to avoid the ``cooling catastrophe''. Here we study the effect of effervescent heating at large radii. Our calculations show that such a heating mechanism is able to solve the entropy problem. The only free parameters of the model are the time-averaged luminosity and the AGN lifetime. The results are mainly sensitive to the total energy injected into the cluster. Our model predicts that the total energy injected by AGN should be roughly proportional to the cluster mass. The expected correlation is consistent with a linear relation between the mass of the central black hole(s) and the mass of the cluster, which is reminiscent of the Magorrian relation between the black hole and bulge mass.

  16. Second Floor Interim Plan: January,2008 Draft: 28 February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Gas Storage 2214 Gas Storage 2114 Chem Fac Res Marzluff 2113 Chem Fac Res Mobley 2605 Chem Fac Res Off Sharpe 2024 Chem Classroom 2023 Chem Prep 2022 Chem Classroom 2021 Bio Classroom 2234 Chem Storage

  17. Second Floor Interim Plan: Fall,2007 Draft: 10 August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    .Chem Lab 2331 Chem Intro/Org Lab Instrumentation 2331A Telecom 2213 Gas Storage 2214 Gas Storage 2114 Chem Chem Prep 2022 Chem Classroom 2021 Bio Classroom 2234 Chem Storage 2133 Organic Chem Lab 2134 Intro

  18. Second Floor Interim Plan: Summer,2007 Draft: 6 April 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Henry MacKay

    Intro.Chem Lab 2331 Chem Intro/Org Lab Instrumentation 2331A Telecom 2213 Gas Storage 2214 Gas Storage 2008 Chem Fac Res Lyons 2806 StckrmOff Campbell then Math Off Visitor 2807 Chem Glassware Storage 2809 Classroom 2023 Chem Prep 2022 Chem Classroom 2021 Bio Classroom 2234 Chem Storage 2133 Organic Chem Lab 2134

  19. Production system improvement : floor area reduction and visual management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhuling, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    This thesis suggests on the development process of a new layout design and visual management tools to improve the efficiency of a production line in a medical device company. Lean production philosophy and common lean ...

  20. New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Efficient waste-recovery methods for rare-earth metals are one way to reduce demand for these limited mined resources. The process,...

  1. New CMI process recycles magnets from factory floor | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the rare-earth metals for reuse. But CMI scientist Ikenna Nlebedim said he and co-inventor Bill McCallum wanted to push further. "We decided to see if there is a possibility of...

  2. Exploring abundance under the sea floor By Alvin Powell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    instruments designed to take measurements there. Girguis and research associate Scott Wankel, who describe

  3. Accessibility Building Name Grid to the ground floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, Catherine L.

    Cogeneration Plant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F3 J Busch Dining Hall

  4. Financial Services and Operations 2nd Floor Lakeshore Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or type The number below is: Individual Taxpayer ID No. (ITIN) Social Security No. Federal Employer ID No

  5. Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology JumpWilliamDRAFTArea

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy

  7. Recycling Magnets from the Factory Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation |Publications The NRELRequirementsRecycling

  8. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA TokenCommercialSTEMSarah L.Department of Energy

  9. Evaluation of Crawlspace Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    In 2011 and early 2012, Building Science Corporation (BSC) collaborated with Innova Services Corporation on a multifamily community unvented crawlspace retrofit project at Oakwood Gardens in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. BSC provided design consulting services and pre- and post-retrofit evaluation, testing, and data monitoring. The existing condition was a vented crawlspace with an uninsulated floor between the crawlspace and the dwelling units above. The crawlspace was therefore a critically weak link in the building enclosure and was ripe for improvement. Saving energy was the primary interest and goal, but the greatest challenge in this unvented crawlspace retrofit project was working through a crawlspace bulk water intrusion problem caused by inadequate site drainage, window well drainage, foundation wall drainage, and a rising water table during rainy periods. While the unvented crawlspace retrofit was effective in reducing heat loss, and the majority of the bulk water drainage problems had been resolved, the important finding was that some of the wood joists embedded in masonry pockets behind the brick veneer were showing signs of moisture damage.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2014: Boulder ZED Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    value of R-38. The entire home has vaulted ceilings composed of 14-in. engineered roof joists that were sheathed with a coated OSB sheathing product which uses a proprietary...

  11. Second Floor N314 N313 N312 N311 N310 N309N308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecture Theatre 1 (N111) Seminar Room 1 Tea & Cofee Station Seminar Room 2 Programme Office Office Clonskeagh Donnyrook Ballsbridge Ranelagh St Stephens Green Sandymount Dundrum Herbert Park Location Map

  12. Directions to U-M Occupational Health Services (3rd floor, Med Inn Building)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    at the Cardiovascular Center underground7. parking. East Hospital Drive ends at the Med Inn parking lot.8. Choose at the Cardiovascular Center underground6. parking. East Hospital Drive ends at the Med Inn parking lot.7. Choose parking lot.11. Choose a space designated for Occupational Health parking. MED INN PARKING FROM NORTH

  13. Long-term Neurological Outcomes in Adults with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Admitted to ICU versus Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    low-risk patients as age less than 65 years, isolated headLow-risk defined as admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, isolated head

  14. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    longer-run management of greenhouse gas emis- sions; thatthe California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Severinthe California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Severin

  15. Low-floor Bus Design Preferences of Walking Aid Users during Simulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . Applied Ergonomics, 10.1016/j.apergo.2012.07.011. A Visual Haptic System for Children with Learning- fessor this August. She is the director of the Ergonomics and Bio- mechanics Lab. Dr. Cavuoto's work and muscle fatigue. The results of this work were recently published in Applied Ergonomics. The outcomes

  16. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  17. NON-DESTRUCTIVE DETERMINATION OF SERVICEABILITY AND LOAD BEARING CAPACITY OF FLOOR SLABS USING DYNAMIC METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , output-only modal analysis, Frequency Domain Decomposition, system identification, model updating in this case is the verification of the serviceability and the load bearing capacity towards the certification particularly powerful. The big advantage is that the exciting forces need not to be measured. As a consequence

  18. Geometric, topological & semantic analysis of multi-building floor plan data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Emily J

    2006-01-01

    Generating a comprehensive model of a university campus or other large urban space is a challenging undertaking due to the size, geometric complexity, and levels of rich semantic information contained in inhabited environments. ...

  19. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    economic slowdown cuts oil demand. At the intersection ofoil price, the expected retail gasoline price and consumption quantities are shown using a short-run demand

  20. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Ola Eiken

    2004-11-29

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 3/18/04 to 9/19/04. During this time, we participated in several CO{sub 2} sequestration-related meetings and conferences. On March 29, 2004, we participated in the 2004 Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting for the Department of Energy in Pittsburgh, PA. During the week of May 2, 2004, we attended and presented at the Third Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in Alexandria, VA. Finally, during the week of August 8, 2004, we took part in the U.S.-Norway, CO{sub 2} Summer School in Santa Fe, NM. Additional modeling was also completed, examining the seismic velocity pushdown estimates from the gravity models and the expected deformation of the seafloor due to the injected CO{sub 2}.

  1. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2004-05-19

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/03 to 3/18/04. During this time, significant advancement in the 3-D gravity forward modeling code was made. Testing of the numerical accuracy of the code was undertaken using both a sheet of mass and a frustum of a cone for test cases. These were chosen because of our ability to do an analytic calculation of gravity for comparison. Tests were also done to determine the feasibility of using point mass approximations rather than cuboids for the forward modeling code. After determining that the point mass approximation is sufficient (and over six times faster computationally), several CO{sub 2} models were constructed and the time-lapse gravity signal was calculated from each. From these models, we expect to see a gravity change ranging from 3-16 {micro}Gal/year, depending on reservoir conditions and CO{sub 2} geometry. While more detailed modeling needs to be completed, these initial results show that we may be able to learn a great deal about the state of the CO{sub 2} from the time-lapse gravity results. Also, in December of 2003, we presented at the annual AGU meeting in San Francisco.

  2. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zuberge; Scott Nooner; Glenn Sasagawa

    2003-11-17

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A three-week trip to Statoil Research Centre in Trondheim, Norway, was made in the summer of 2003. This visit consisted of gathering data and collaborating with scientists working on the Sleipner project. The trip ended with a presentation of the seafloor gravity results to date at a SACS2 (Saline Aquifer CO{sub 2} Storage 2) meeting. This meeting provided the perfect opportunity to meet and gather information from the world's experts on the Sleipner project.

  3. A SEA FLOOR GRAVITY SURVEY OF THE SLEIPNER FIELD TO MONITOR CO2 MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Zumberge; Scott Nooner

    2005-07-11

    Since 1996, excess CO{sub 2} from the Sleipner natural gas field has been sequestered and injected underground into a porous saline aquifer 1000 m below the seafloor. In 2002, we carried out a high precision micro-gravity survey on the seafloor in order to monitor the injected CO{sub 2}. A repeatability of 5 {micro}Gal in the station averages was observed. This is considerably better than pre-survey expectations. These data will serve as the baseline for time-lapse gravity monitoring of the Sleipner CO{sub 2} injection site. A repeat survey has been scheduled for the summer of 2005. This report covers 9/19/04 to 3/18/05. During this time, gravity and pressure modeling were completed and work graduate student Scott Nooner began writing his Ph.D. dissertation, of which this work is a the major part. Improvements to the gravimeters are also underway that will hopefully increase the measurement precision.

  4. Improved Global Bathymetry, Global Sea Floor Roughness, and Deep Ocean Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001), Estimates of M-2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean

  5. Improved global bathymetry, global sea floor roughness, and deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Joseph Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001), Estimates of M-2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean

  6. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    May 2004. Espey, M. “Gasoline Demand Revisited: AnRun Price Elasticity of Gasoline Demand,” Energy Journal,114. Poterba, J. “Is the Gasoline Tax Regressive? ,” in D.

  7. Monitored Performance of an Office Building with an Under-floor Air Distribution System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, C.; Norford, L.

    2005-01-01

    of the building. The mechanical room is located on the roof above the atrium. The façade is nearly 100% glazing, with fixed shading devices installed to reduce solar heat and glare. On the south and west façades, photovoltaics are integrated into the shading... of the photovoltaics, integrated with the exterior shading devices on the southern and the western façades, to the energy consumption of the building could be determined from the detailed sub- metering data. The monthly contribution of the photovoltaics ranged from...

  8. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    diesel and jet fuels. It would target a certain oil pricediesel and jet fuel. That quantity would vary, of course, both with the price

  9. Swing: From Time to Torque (Dance Floor Democracy at the Hollywood Canteen)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Sherrie

    2013-10-08

    childhood growing up in a small segregated Texas town, a career as an actor spent moving through predomi- nantly white crowds in a racially marked body, basic training with other black recruits under white of½cers at Montford Point, a furlough spent trying... of segregated and unequal condi- tions for black Marines. Montford Point also had a pool, he tells me, but black Marines couldn’t use it, only the white of½cers.28 The proximity and restrictions from swimming pools and movie stars at Mont- ford Point mirror his...

  10. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    load and capacity; solar heat gain; Radiant design standardssignificance of solar radiation in the design process andthe magnitude of solar impacts under various design/control

  11. Innovative accessible sunken floor systems for multi-story steel buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Henry K

    1987-01-01

    With the demands of telecommunications and computer equipment, building owners and designers are facing an increasingly difficult problem for wire management in today's electronic workplace. This thesis is to investigate ...

  12. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and viscoelastic behavior as functions of pH; shear rate; polymer concentration; salinity, including divalent ion effects; polymer molecular weight; and degree of hydrolysis. A comprehensive rheological model was developed for HPAM solution rheology in terms of: shear rate; pH; polymer concentration; and salinity, so that the spatial and temporal changes in viscosity during the polymer flow in the reservoir can be accurately modeled. A series of acid coreflood experiments were conducted to understand the geochemical reactions relevant for both the near-wellbore injection profile control and for conformance control applications. These experiments showed that the use hydrochloric acid as a pre-flush is not viable because of the high reaction rate with the rock. The use of citric acid as a pre-flush was found to be quite effective. This weak acid has a slow rate of reaction with the rock and can buffer the pH to below 3.5 for extended periods of time. With the citric acid pre-flush the polymer could be efficiently propagated through the core in a low pH environment i.e. at a low viscosity. The transport of various HPAM solutions was studied in sandstones, in terms of permeability reduction, mobility reduction, adsorption and inaccessible pore volume with different process variables: injection pH, polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degree of hydrolysis, and flow rate. Measurements of polymer effluent profiles and tracer tests show that the polymer retention increases at the lower pH. A new simulation capability to model the deep-penetrating mobility control or conformance control using pH-sensitive polymer was developed. The core flood acid injection experiments were history matched to estimate geochemical reaction rates. Preliminary scale-up simulations employing linear and radial geometry floods in 2-layer reservoir models were conducted. It is clearly shown that the injection rate of pH-sensitive polymer solutions can be significantly increased by injecting it at a pH below 3.5 (at a fixed bottom-hole pressure). This improvement in injectivity by a fa

  13. An evaluation of floor surfaces on the basis of skin temperature during constrained standing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monford, Leo Gabriel

    1995-01-01

    Determining compound levels in fruits and vegetables is necessary in the food industry for appropriate management and processing of these products. A fast, nondestructive and reliable method of measuring compounds is ...

  14. Dance Floor Reverberations: Affect and Experience in Contemporary Electronic Dance Music 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher

    2015-08-10

    In recent years, electronic dance music (EDM) and dance music culture have gained immense popularity. This thesis looks at EDM’s contemporary cultural landscape and what changes this popularity has brought about. While ...

  15. RYCKMAN LECTURE SERIES AND EARTH DAY CELEBRATION Lunch reception to follow, Second Floor, Brauer Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    used to counter the threat posed by Naegleria fowleri in water distribu- tion systems. The Chlorine Revolution: The Importance of Chlorination, 1908 (Typhoid Fever) to 2014 (Naegleria fowleri) EECE Department

  16. Chemistry of burning the forest floor during the FROSTFIRE experimental burn, interior Alaska, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    in interior Alaska, and were analyzed for bulk density, major and trace elements, and organic compounds. Concentrations of carbon, nutrients, and several major and trace elements were significantly altered by the burn: Biogeochemical processes (4805); 1030 Geochemistry: Geochemical cycles (0330); KEYWORDS: combustion, experimental

  17. Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    for Standardization, Brussels, Belgium, 2006. EnergyPlus.2009. EnergyPlus Input Output Reference.The Encyclopedic Reference to EnergyPlus Input and output.

  18. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    a direct comparison of EnergyPlus simulated radiation heatStandards, 1983. [19] DOE, EnergyPlus Engineering Reference,as the ratio of the EnergyPlus simulated radiant cooling

  19. Detecting Floor Anomalies Michael R. M. Jenkin1 and Allan Jepson2;z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jepson, Allan D.

    is to determine where an robot can go by identifying oor regions for which the planar oor assumption can be veri and forklifts moving about; oil and water spills on the oor; oor drains which can be uncovered; hoses, tools regions of the oor can be expected to contain structure which violates the planarity assumption

  20. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    oil price, the expected retail gasoline price and consumption quantities are shown using a short-run demand elasticity assumption

  1. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    and jet fuels. It would target a certain oil price andjet fuel. That quantity would vary, of course, both with the price

  2. Spring 2009 Assistant professor Laura Valdiviezo takes to the floor during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to support new tenure- track faculty in the School of Education to become successful scholars and teachers faculty on the "nuts and bolts" of academic life. It grew in 2008, when a meeting assessing the needs groups to support each other in their scholarly work. "I appreciated the supportive atmosphere

  3. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Menguc, Thermal radiation heat transfer, CRC Press, 2011.convection and radiation heat transfer are compared to theused for this study. Radiation Heat Transfer In the ASHRAE

  4. Support Vector Networks for Prediction of Floor Pressures in Shallow Cavity Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    known fact that skin friction on air vehicles reduces the maneuverability and agility while increasing development side of the above mentioned ultimate goal. Feedback control performance on aerodynamic flow sys author, and he is with TOBB Economics and Technology University, Department of Electrical and Electronics

  5. An evaluation of standing-induced lower leg edema as a function of floor surace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiSalvi, Lawrence Roberts

    1995-01-01

    of the surfaces. The surfaces used included: two brands of anti-fatigue mat, three types of industrial grating, and concrete. Using water volume displacement, edema of three segments of the right leg (ankle-and-below, calf-and-below, and knee...

  6. THE ROLE OF DEAD WOOD IN MAINTAINING ARTHROPOD DIVERSITY ON THE FOREST FLOOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Wade, Dale D.

    2006-08-01

    Abstract—Dead wood is a major component of forests and contributes to overall diversity, primarily by supporting insects that feed directly on or in it. Further, a variety of organisms benefit by feeding on those insects. What is not well known is how or whether dead wood influences the composition of the arthropod community that is not solely dependent on it as a food resource, or whether woody debris influences prey available to generalist predators. One group likely to be affected by dead wood is ground-dwelling arthropods. We studied the effect of adding large dead wood to unburned and frequently burned pine stands to determine if dead wood was used more when the litter and understory plant community are removed. We also studied the effect of annual removal of dead wood from large (10-ha) plots over a 5-year period on ground-dwelling arthropods. In related studies, we examined the relationships among an endangered woodpecker that forages for prey on live trees, its prey, and dead wood in the forest. The results of these and other studies show that dead wood can influence the abundance and diversity of the ground-dwelling arthropod community and of prey available to generalist predators not foraging directly on dead trees.

  7. Converted wave imaging in anisotropic media using sea-floor seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Fabio

    velocity ratio is derived conventionally by event matching in the P-wave and converted wave stacks. I present an attempt to use well-log derived velocity ratios to avoid this interpretative step. The velocity ratio derived from 4C seismic data is about 30...

  8. The Implications of a Gasoline Price Floor for the California Budget and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin

    2008-01-01

    as a function of crude oil prices with and without the FPSP.NYMEX front-month crude oil price that is generally referrederence between the price of crude oil and the target price.

  9. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave energy, wave energy converter, WEC, electrical energy, alternative energy, hydrokinetic energy on the coasts of the United States the harvesting ocean wave energy is ideal. It is projected that wave energy

  10. 970 East 58th Street 3rd floor Chicago, IL 60637 773-702-8000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    with the University; and to ensure the University's compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards merchant standards and/or industry standards for the processing of credit cards or automated clearing house of a proposed application with PCIDSS and industry best practices for conducting electronic payment transactions

  11. Valley floor climate observations from the McMurdo dry valleys, Antarctica, 19862000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    : Pressure, density, and temperature; 1610 Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325); 1650 Global Change: Solar with proximity to the polar plateau. Site- to-site variation in mean annual solar flux and PAR is due to exposure.992) of increasing potential temperature with distance from the coast (0.09°C kmÀ1 ). In contrast to mean annual

  12. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    M. Filippi, B.W. Olesen, Solar radiation and cooling loadY. Chen, The effect of solar radiation on dynamic thermaldependant upon solar radiation, ASHRAE Transactions, (2006)

  13. Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2010-01-01

    the exposure to direct solar radiation, and the presence ofthe influence of direct solar radiation, and the presence ofdue to the incident solar radiation. Figure 3 Box-plot for

  14. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology

  15. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 IdleReportReport

  16. Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate; Southwestern Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    This document provides content for three areas of the Building America Solution Center. First, "Insulating Closed Crawlspace Walls and Band Joist Area" describes how to install rigid foam insulation on the interior perimeter walls and band joist area in closed crawlspace foundations of homes. Second, "Removing Construction Debris from Flexible Ducts" describes how to clean flexible ducts after construction or major renovation of a home to remove debris resulting from building materials, particularly airborne dust and particulates. Third, images, CAD drawings, and a case study illustrate right and wrong ways to apply polyethylene sheeting over aggregate. Similarly, a CAD drawing is included that illustrates the use of a concrete slab over polyethylene.

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc.,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    production home has advance framed walls, a spray foamed attic, an air source heat pump, and an HRV. Palo Duro Homes, Inc.- Albuquerque, NM More Documents & Publications...

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2014: Durable Energy Builders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Together they researched all of the sub-systems of the house (walls, windows, attic, roof, HVAC, electrical, etc.) and considered over 300 different products and technologies,...

  19. Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingle, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    heat  pump   Appliance  replacement   Attic  insulation   Buy  more  appliances   Changes  to  the  heating  system   Changing  the  furnace   Changing  to  a  hybrid  

  20. Collecting helps to preserve objects for the future. By studying objects from the past, we can learn about the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    , not in a basement, attic, or garage. Air pollution: Keep dust off your objects. Don't exhibit your objects near

  1. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus. Also included

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes Inc.,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    production home has advance framed walls, a spray foamed attic, an air source heat pump, and an HRV. Palo Duro Homes, Inc.- Albuquerque, NM More Documents &...

  3. Insulation Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    House Where and How Much How Much Insulation Do I Already Have? Air Sealing Moisture Control and Ventilation Insulation Installation, the Retrofit Challenge Precautions Attics...

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: CDC Realty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Corporation to design HERS-54 homes with ducts in insulated attics, solar water heating, tight air sealing, and rigid foam exterior sheathing. CDC Realty Inc.:...

  5. DOE Tour of Zero: The Vista Palm Drive by Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The plywood roof sheathing incorporates sun barrier technology with a reflecting foil coating on the underside that blocks radiant heat from the attic. 15 of 15 Specially designed...

  6. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: CDC Realty, Tucson, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with Building Science Corporation to design HERS-54 homes with ducts in insulated attics, solar water heating, tight air sealing, and rigid foam exterior sheathing.

  7. DOE ZERH Case Study: Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    uninsulated salb on grade foundation; vented attic with R-44 blown fiberglass; air to water heat pumps. PNNL USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE),...

  8. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    walls uninsulated salb on grade foundation vented attic with R blown fiberglass air to water heat pumps PNNL USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Building...

  9. Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; German, A.; Porse, E.

    2014-06-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story Tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  10. Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; German, A.; Porse, E.

    2014-06-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  11. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Gehl, Anthony C; Christian, Jeffrey E

    2012-01-01

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  12. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARBI

    2014-09-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  13. AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, D.T.

    2011-01-01

    frame construction. floor furnace heating. m floor windows,Gas forced air heating system. 100 m floor area, 230 msolar heating Sealed combustion wood stove. 174 m floor

  14. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    NMBE Floor Cooling Floor Heating AHU Fan Energy Conclusions.consumption (for floor cooling and heating models) Tablesimulated energy consumption (for floor cooling and heating

  15. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce its peak day heat transfer by almost 85 percent of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibits attic air temperatures that do not exceed the maximum daily outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the roof deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to gauge the cost of energy savings and potential payback.

  16. A Prototype Roof Deck Designed to Self-Regulate Deck Temperature and Reduce Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A prototype roof and attic assembly exploits the use of radiation, convection and insulation controls to reduce the heat transfer penetrating its roof deck by almost 85% of the heat transfer crossing a conventional roof and attic assembly. The assembly exhibited attic air temperatures that did not exceed the peak day outdoor ambient temperature. The design includes a passive ventilation scheme that pulls air from the soffit and attic into an inclined air space above the deck. The design complies with fire protection codes because the air intake is internal and closed to the elements. Field data were benchmarked against an attic computer tool and simulations made for new and retrofit home constructions in hot, moderate and cold climates to access economics for the assembly.

  17. The real consequences of an ocean floor collapse A collapse of the ocean floor in the Gulf of Mexico is in our near future but all depends on how such

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    on European and Asian trade for 50% of their annual revenue. The environmental impact is hard to measure of Mexico is in our near future but all depends on how such will occur. Two possible scenarios have been and will be far less destructive. Nevertheless, the impact on the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama

  18. From an armada of ocean buoys moored to the sea floor, to orbiting satellites, to advance computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the most infrequent, but they pose a major threat to coastal populations, particularly in the seismically tsunami forecasts and warnings 4 The DART (Deep- ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) buoy tsunami in decisions about the need for evacuations and other safety measures 4 The National Weather Service's Tsunami

  19. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    J.M, 1977, Seismic stratigraphic interpretation of clasticvia integrated interpretation of seismic, magnetic andand Interpretations .. 2.4.1 Seismic

  20. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    facies, pp.165-184 of Seismic Stratigraphy - applications toon sediment delivery, seismic stratigraphy, and changes inSeismic Stratigraphy ..

  1. Wheelchair access to and within this building is not currently recommended without assistance and is limited to the ground floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    6. Parking. Page 7. Outside Access. Page 8. Internal Access, Page 10. Reception. Page 10. Lift. Page of a mile of the main student residences at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station

  2. Wheelchair access to and within this building is unsuitable without assistance and is limited to part of the second floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Parking. Page 7. Outside Access. Page 8. Internal Access. Page 11. Reception. Page 12. Lift. Page 12 student residences at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city centre

  3. Wheelchair access to and within this building is not currently recommended without assistance and is limited to the ground floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    6. Parking, Page 7. Outside Access, Page 8. Internal Access, Page 10. Reception, Page 10. Lift, Page at Pollock Halls. The nearest railway line is at Waverley Station in the city centre. The nearest bus stops

  4. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    A study based on exploration 3D seismic data. Marine andSeismic Stratigraphy - applications to hydrocarbon exploration,In: 3D Seismic Technology: Application to the Exploration of

  5. Predictions of VRF on a Langmuir Probe under the RF Heating Spiral on the Divertor Floor on NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosea, J C [PPPL; Perkins, R J [PPPL; Jaworski, M A [PPPL; Kramer, G J [PPPL; Ahn, J-W [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    RF heating deposition spirals are observed on the divertor plates on NSTX as shown in for a NB plus RF heating case. It has been shown that the RF spiral is tracked quite well by the spiral mapping of the strike points on the divertor plate of magnetic field lines passing in front of the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) antenna on NSTX. Indeed, both current instrumented tiles and Langmuir probes respond to the spiral when it is positioned over them. In particular, a positive increment in tile current (collection of electrons) is obtained when the spiral is over the tile. This current can be due to RF rectification and/or RF heating of the scrape off layer (SOL) plasma along the magnetic field lines passing in front of the the HHFW antenna. It is important to determine quantitatively the relative contributions of these processes. Here we explore the properties of the characteristics of probes on the lower divertor plate to determine the likelyhood that the primary cause of the RF heat deposition is RF rectification.

  6. Reduction of forest floor respiration by fertilization on both carbon dioxide-enriched and reference 17-year-old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    be best applied to aggrading forest systems where soil resources have not been fully exploited (Mikan et affect the available C pool and impact microbial activity. When N amendments are added to peat soils, Canada. Amador JA, Jones RD (1993) Nutrient limitations on microbial respiration in peat soils

  7. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    via integrated interpretation of seismic, magnetic andInterpretations .. 2.4.1 Seismic2.4 RESULTS AND INTERPRETATIONS 2.4.1 Seismic Stratigraphy

  8. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W.

    2013-07-01

    Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as ± 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provid

  9. he chain of calamity now known as Japan's Triple Disaster began with a massive rupture in the ocean floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Donald M.

    . At the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, commissioned in 1971 on the coast 140 miles north of Tokyo, reaching heights up to 49 feet. minuTes LaTer In Fukushima, the Dai-ichi nuclear plant withstood shaking nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986. Without their cooling systems, three of the plant's six re

  10. Submit complete applications to the Administrative Assistant of the Department of Psychology, Room 10-Floor East, UNBC Teaching & Learning Building.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Submit complete applications to the Administrative Assistant of the Department of Psychology, Room program is competitive. The following conditions must be met: a) you must have completed 60 credit hours completed at the time of application. c) a faculty member in psychology must be willing to supervise your

  11. USC Career Center 6 floor, H. William Close (BA) Bldg. (P) 803.777.7280 (F) 803.777.7556

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    .777.1946 Email: career@sc.edu Website: www.sc.edu/career JobMate Full Access Form Resume Approval (Please print Search Integrity Statement The initial tenet of the Carolinian Creed, referencing students' obligation integrity." When conducting a job search and interviewing with employers, your display of ethical behavior

  12. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    Bouma, A.H. , 1962, Sedimentology of some flysch deposits: aGulf of California: sedimentology, mass physical properties

  13. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    drilling results found extensive evidence of sill-driven fluid-Drilling results confirmed (Kastner, 1982) that vertical discharge hydrothermal fluids

  14. A digital accelerometer array utilizing suprathreshold stochastic resonance for detection of sub-Brownian noise floor accelerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Olsson, Roy H.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this LDRD project was to evaluate the possibilities of utilizing Stochastic resonance in micromechanical sensor systems as a means for increasing signal to noise for physical sensors. A careful study of this field reveals that in the case of a single sensing element, stochastic resonance offers no real advantage. We have, however, identified a system that can utilize very similar concepts to stochastic resonance in order to achieve an arrayed sensor system that could be superior to existing technologies in the field of inertial sensors, and could offer a very low power technique for achieving navigation grade inertial measurement units.

  15. UHS Health Promotion Office, UHS Building, 2nd floor, 273-5775 The Monthly InSTALLSTALLSTALLSTALLment AAAAuuuugggguuuusssstttt 2222000000009999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    . 2. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing and sneezing. Throw your tissue away. 3 is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick! Wash your hands after you cough, sneeze or use District Health Unit Please... Whenever you cough or

  16. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    seismic reflection profiles as seismically blank or chaotic near-verticalProfile shows three pockmarks and acoustic blanking below that linkup with near vertical zones of seismicvertical zones of seismic disturbance interpreted as pipe-like fluid-flow conduits. Above: Analog 3.5 kHz profile

  17. Severe soil frost reduces losses of carbon and nitrogen from the forest floor during simulated snowmelt: A laboratory experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    Greenhouse gas Snowmelt Leachate Winter climate change a b s t r a c t Considerable progress has been made and DON in leachate were up to 19 and 18 mg N kgÀ1 soil greater in the no soil frost and mild soil frost of this study show that total fluxes of N in leachate, as well as total cumulative C and N fluxes (gases þ

  18. TopoPlan: a topological path planner for real time human navigation under floor and ceiling constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of virtual humans. 1 Introduction One of the goal of behavioral animation is to automate the process of populating a virtual environment with au- tonomous virtual humans. Models used to describe hu- manoid meshes modeled by designers (architects, graphics de- signers...). In order to endow a virtual human

  19. Floor-Plan Priors for Monocular Layout Estimation Chenxi Liu1, Alexander Schwing2, Kaustav Kundu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    collections or video Cabral & Furukawa, 2014 Brualla et al., 2014 Indoor localization (video, depth sensors) Project Tango SLAM work Lee et al., 2010 Xiao & Furukawa, 2012 Cabral & Furukawa, 2014 Liu, Schwing, Kundu & Furukawa, 2012 3D indoor reconstruction from large photo collections or video Cabral & Furukawa, 2014

  20. Remediation of Occupied Commercial Property Subject to Widespread Radium-226 Contamination - Confidential Client in the South-West of England - 12570

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, Philip [AMEC, UK (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    AMEC was contacted by a company that managed commercial office space in 2010. High Rn- 222 measurements had been observed throughout the facility and the landlord had been advised to commission a radiological survey of the site. The site had been purchased by the client in the 1990's. Initial desk studies found that the building had operated for around 50 years as a compass factory. Non-intrusive investigation identified widespread Ra-226 contamination. Ra-226 was found in the fabric of the building, in attic spaces, buried under floor boards and underlying car parks. Intrusive investigation was undertaken to estimate volume(s) of waste, waste categories, activity concentrations and the total inventory of radioactive materials on site. This work identified the presence of 180 GBq of Ra-226 on site. A programme of work is currently underway to remediate the site tackling areas posing the greatest risk to site occupants as a priority. We have worked closely with Regulators, our client, and tenants, to decontaminate the fabric of the building whilst areas of the building remain occupied. The radiological risk, from irradiation, ingestion and inhalation (of Ra-226 and Rn- 222) has been assessed before, during and after intervention to minimise the risks to site occupants. Tenants were moved from areas of unacceptable radiological risk to areas unaffected by the presence of radioactive materials. Rn-222 mitigation measures were installed during the remedial operations to minimise the hazard from Rn-222 that was liberated as a result of decontamination activities. Decontamination techniques were required to be sympathetic to the building as the ageing structure was in danger of collapse during several phases of work. The first phase of remediation is now complete and the decontaminated building is being returned for use as office space. The radiological risks have been significantly reduced and, in areas where decontamination was not possible (e.g. due to concerns over the structural integrity of the building), mitigation measures have been installed. (authors)

  1. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01

    They utilized under-floor heating, where hot air from a woodhot water for radiator or floor heating. Central heating andtemperature and floor temperature (because some heating may

  2. Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blum, Helcio

    2010-01-01

    the building (heating or cooling) served floor space, 11 andtotal floor space of all buildings with space heating andheating it applies only to buildings with a small floor

  3. Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2010-01-01

    cooling, heating systems - Total floor area of hospitalcooling, heating systems - Total floor area of hospitalthe entire floor space served. For example, heating may be

  4. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA; Delmas, MA

    2015-01-01

    Floor Ideology Member Environmental Organization Weather Controls HeatingFloor Ideology Member Environmental Organization Hourly Weather Controls HeatingFloor Ideology Member Environmental Organization Hourly Weather Controls Heating

  5. Radiant cooling research scoping study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy; Bauman, Fred; Huizenga, Charlie

    2006-01-01

    B W. 2002. Radiant Floor Heating in Theory and Practice.the inverse of the radiant floor heating systems that haveresidential radiant floor slab heating systems are often

  6. Advanced Design and Commissioning Tools for Energy-Efficient Building Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Ed

    2012-01-01

    with radiant floor cooling and heating, displacementwith radiant floor cooling and heating, displacementbuilding uses a radiant floor for heating and cooling. This

  7. Policy Strategies and Paths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamic Invert Simulation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael; Kranzl, Lukas; Huber, Claus; Haas, Reinhard; Tsioliaridou, Elena

    2006-01-01

    heating connection of one floor heating system; ss singlecovering one floor respectively central heating; additionalsystems and heating systems covering one floor. • Subsidy

  8. Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01

    ranges, dishwasher water heating Floor Space Services spacespace heating. In warmer climates, however, floor space mayheating and cooling energy use are analyzed per square meter of floor

  9. Call Numbers** A, B, C 3rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Call Numbers** A, B, C 3rd Floor Southeast . D, E, F, G, H, J, K, L 3rd Floor West . . . . . P 3rd Floor West . Q, R

  10. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Treasure Homes, Sacramento, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    The builder worked with SMUD, DOE, NREL, and ConSol to build HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC, ducts buried in attic insulation, SmartVent cooling, and rooftop PV..

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    attic with R-50 blown fiberglass; an insulated, conditioned basement; a high-efficiency heat pump with 97.3 AFUE gas backup furnace; a tankless water heater; 100% CFL lighting; and...

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Buried and Encapsulated Ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    In this innovation profile, CARB research shows HVAC ducts that are encapsulated in closed-cell spray foam and buried in blown insulation in a vented attic meet the code requirements for ducts in conditioned space.

  13. Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: e2 Homes, Winter Park...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home in Winter Park, FL, that scored HERS 57 without PV or HERS -7 with PV. This 4,305-square-foot custom home has autoclaved aerated concrete walls, a sealed attic with R-20 spray...

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Herriman, UT, that scored HERS 40 without PV, -1 with PV. This 4,111-square-foot production home has R-23 advanced framed walls, and a vented attic with R-60 blown fiberglass....

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformations Inc.,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home in Devens, MA, that scored HERS 34 without PV or HERS -21 with PV. This 3,168-square-foot custom home has R-46 double-stud walls, a vented attic with R-67 blown cellulose,...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ithaca, NY, that scored HERS 50 without PV. These 1,160-square-foot affordable town houses have R-20 advance framed walls, R-52 blown cellulose in attic, radiant heat with 92.5...

  18. Minnesota Member Lists the Twin Cities' First Energy Fit Certified...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Minnesota Multiple Listing Service for residential real estate. CEE upgraded the 1,774-square-foot house, built in 1952, with a high-efficiency furnace and water heater, attic...

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ready Home in Denver, CO, that scored HERS 41 without PV, HERS 3 with PV. This 3,560-square-foot production home has R-36 double-stud walls, a vented attic with R-50 blown...

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Forest, IL, that scored HERS 17 without PV. This 4,763-square-foot custom passive house has R-54 ICF walls, a vented attic with R-100 blown fiberglass, plus R-40 rigid EPS under...

  1. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2014: Clifton View Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    corrugated house wrap and fiber cement siding. Clifton used 10.25-inch SIPs for the roof. These provided for an R-40 insulated attic or cathedral ceiling. They also provided a...

  3. Castle Rock folio, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, G. B. (George Burr), 1872-1949.

    1915-01-01

    the underside of the roof decking. The test results were used to determine relative thermal performance of various roofing systems under typical Florida summer conditions. Measured impacts included changes to ceiling heat flux and attic air temperature which...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    foam, R-49 open-cell spray-foam sealed attic, an HRV, and a tankless water heater for hydro coil furnace with high-velocity, small-diameter ducts. BAZeroEnergyReadyStreetScape...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    open-cell spray-foam sealed attic, an HRV, and a tankless water heater for hydro coil furnace with high-velocity, small-diameter ducts. BAZeroEnergyReadyStreetScape062414.pdf...

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a sealed attic with open-cell spray foam, a pier foundation, and 95% efficient gas furnace. BAZeroEnergyReadyWeissCustom062414.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Zero...

  7. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Tindall Homes, Columbus, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-01

    The builder worked with IBACOS to build 20 HERS-58 homes with R-49 mixed attic insulation, poly-iso foam in advanced framed walls, precast concrete basement walls with rigid foam, tight airsealing, and HRV

  8. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Pine Mountain...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1.0-1.8 ACH50 construction, spray-foamed walls and attics, and high-efficiency heat pumps with fresh-air intake. Pine Mountain Builders - Georgia More Documents & Publications...

  9. Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noris, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory, Home energy saver, in, Lawrence Berkeley consumption, we used Home Energy Saver Pro [9], a  web?available in Home Energy Saver Pro.   A high level of attic 

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Imagine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Homes, who worked with the Building America research partner IBACOS to build HERS-52 homes with spray foam-insulated attics and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Imagine...

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tindall...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tindall Homes who worked with Building America research team IBACOS to build 20 HERS-58 homes with R-49 mixed attic insulation, poly-iso foam in advanced framed walls, precast...

  12. Lakeland Electric- Residential Conservation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeland Electric offers a conservation program for residential customers to save energy in homes. Rebates are available for Heat Pumps, HVAC tune-ups, attic insulation upgrades, and Energy Star...

  13. Southern Power District- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Power District (SPD) offers rebates for the purchase and installation of efficient air source heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, attic insulation, and HVAC tune-ups.  Contractors who...

  14. Aerogel Insulation: The Materials Science of Empty Space

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empty space can be good, like a blank canvas for an artist, or it can be bad, like an attic without insulation for a homeowner.  But when a technological breakthrough provides just the right amount...

  15. Metamorphic style and development of the blueschist-to eclogite-facies rocks, Cyclades, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, John B.

    Metamorphic style and development of the blueschist- to eclogite-facies rocks, Cyclades, Greece.c.schumacher@bristol.ac.uk Abstract. The island of Syros, Greece is part of the Attic-Cycladic blueschist belt, formed during Mesozoic

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Via del...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and R-5rigid foam at slab edge; vented attic with R-75 blown fiberglass; ducted minisplit heat pump 16.5 SEER, 9.5 HSPF. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes,...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; wo air-to-air heat pumps SEER 14.1; HSPF 9.6; heat pump water heater. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Evolutionary Home Builders,...

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home, San Marcos, CA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    home has R-20 advanced framed walls with batts plus rigid foam sheathing, an air-source heat pump for central air in sealed attic, solar water heating and 100% LED lighting....

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes, Phoenix...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    home has R-21 framed walls, a sealed closed-cell spray foamed attic, an air-source heat pump with forced air, and a solar combo system that provides PV, hot water, and space...

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an R-20 insulated slab, R-70 cellulose in the attic, extensive air sealing, a mini-split heat pump, an heat recovery ventilator, solar water heating, LED lighting, 3.9 kWh PV, and...

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. BAZeroEnergyReadyManateeHabitatForHumanity062414.pdf More Documents &...

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Charles Thomas Homes,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    under slab; a vented attic with R-100 blown cellulose; 95% AFUE furnace, 14 SEER AC, ERV; heat pump water heater. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Charles Thomas Homes,...

  3. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Humanity of Palm Beach County to upgrade an empty 1996 home with a 14.5 SEER AC, heat pump water heater, CFLs, more attic insulation, and air sealing to cut utility bills...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    attic with R-50 blown fiberglass; an insulated, conditioned basement; a high-efficiency heat pump with 97.3 AFUE gas backup furnace; a tankless water heater; 100% CFL lighting;...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: High Performance Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    R-15 unfaced batt on walls, sealed attic with R-49 ocsf under roof deck; ground source heat pump COP 4.4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: High Performance Homes,...

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Hammer and Hand, Pumpkin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with R-29 rigid EPS foam under slab; vented attic with R-86 blown cellulose; minisplit heat pump; ducted with HRV; 15.5 SEER; 10 HSPF. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study:...

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Homes, Fishers...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and around slab, a vented attic with with 2" ccsf plus R-15 blown cellulose, a central heat pump and HRV. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Homes, Vadnais Heights,...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vented attic, R-10 rigid foam under the first 4 feet of slab, a high efficiency central heat pump, ENERGY STAR appliances, and 90% LED lighting. DOEZEHPaloDuro09-20-14.pdf...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sealed attic insulated under the roof deck with open-cell spray foam, a high-performance heat pump, heat pump water heater, and ENERGY STAR appliances, lighting, and ceiling fans....

  10. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and new drywall. The attic was sealed and insulated with spray foam to house a new heat pump. Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County - Venice, Florida More...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home, Double ZeroHouse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    edge; unvented attic with R-38 blown fiberglass netted to underside of roof deck; 19 SEER heat pump; heat pump water heater; 100% LED. BAZEHKBHomeSG10-5-15.pdf More Documents &...

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on interior walls; R-20 ocsf in roof of sealed attic, uninsulated slab, 15 SEER 8.0 HSPF heat pump walls for heating and cooling, heat pump water heater. DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Glastonbury Housesmith...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    unvented attic with 5" ccsf and 6.5" blown fiberglass under the roof deck; ground source heat pump COP 4.4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Glastonbury Housesmith, South...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Atlanta, GA More...

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Addison Homes, Cobbler...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on inside with 2 inches poly iso, a vented attic with R-38 blown fiberglass, a central heat pump with fresh air intake. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Addison Homes,...

  16. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Treasure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homes, Sacramento, California Case study of Treasure Homes, who worked with SMUD, DOE, NREL, and ConSol to build HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC, ducts buried in attic...

  17. How to align field guides and standards to the Standard Work...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    P rogram Q uality W ork P lan Training a nd T echnical A ssistance Aligning E xis,ng F ield G uides --- S tep 1 : I den,fy T opics Air Sealing and Insulating Attic Access 56...

  18. Determining Energy Use Volatility for Commercial Mortgage Valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, Paul

    2014-01-01

    constant year-round. Kick on the second boiler based on OAT.and always running two boilers. L L * L- Large officezone VAV Heating Type Gas boiler Mass wall Attic Packaged

  19. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family lab homes at the University of Texas at Tyler. The only difference was that House 1 had a vented attic and House 2 had an...

  20. AEP Public Service Company of Oklahoma - Residential Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air ConditionerHeat Pump Replacement: 900 Existing Homes: 5,000 Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount AtticCeling Insulation (0-7 inches...

  1. Energy and Transportation Science Division (ETSD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roof and attic design proves efficient in summer and winter ORNL debuts energy-saving heat pump Roofing energy efficiency: more than a simple black and white issue ORNL home to...

  2. Winter Weather Preparedness Have a Plan -Make a Kit -Stay Informed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Winter Weather Preparedness Have a Plan - Make a Kit - Stay Informed during winter weather. Move livestock to sheltered areas with non-frozen drinking. If necessary insulate walls and attic. Caulk and weather-strip doors and windowsills

  3. Psycho? Logical? Bulletin! Department Kick Ball (pg 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    are like feathers on a snake. The passive voice is to be ignored. Eliminate commas, that are, not necessary in the Kotovsky attic. They are planning an open house next weekend. You can enter through the hole off the gutter

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Reclaimed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    marine climate that got a HERS 55 without PV, or HERS 25 with PV, with 2x8 24" on center walls with R-27 dense-packed cellulose; R-20 rigid foam under slab; vented attic with R-70...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Caldwell and Johnson,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Exeter, Rhode Island, that scored HERS 43 without PV. This 2,000 ft2 custom home has a spray- foamed attic and walls, plus rigid foam...

  6. Pressure Losses in 12”, 15” and 16” Non-Metallic Flexible Ducts with Compression and Sag (RP-1333) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culp, C.H.; Cantrill, D.

    2009-01-01

    is based on findings resulting from ASHRAE Research Project RP-1333. ABSTRACT A study was conducted to measure air pressure loss in non- metallic flexible ducts and included 12” (305 mm), 14” (356 mm) and 16” (406 mm) diameter ducts on a flat surface... and also positioned over joists on 24” (610 mm) centers. For this study, flexible duct compression configurations were fully stretched and 4%, 15%, 30% and 45% compressed. Measure- ments were performed at each compression. All tests were performed...

  7. ,/ t"tSlifornla Energy Building Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating Equipment · Maintenance Information ··········· Responsibility of Equipment Suppliers Exceptional. "Conditioned floor area" means the floor area of conditioned space on all floors. including basements. intermediate floor tiers. and penthouses. measured from the exterior faces of exterior walls and the exterior

  8. University of Cambridge SPORTS CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    .........................................................................................................7 Floor usage summary...............................................................................................................................9 Heating and cooling ................................................................................................................10 Heating

  9. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    floors of BEB, the completed cards should be left in the rooms. On the third floor BEB, the completed

  10. A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01

    coal, heat, others) consumption Building floor space and typecoal, heat, others) consumption Building floor space and type

  11. A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01

    coal, heat, others) consumption Building floor space and typecoal, heat, others) consumption Building floor space and type

  12. A review of the corrective power of personal comfort systems in non-neutral ambient environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01

    heating panel (UD RHP), heating Floor radiant heating panel)heating panel (UD RHP) Floor radiant heating panel (FL RHP)

  13. Tilting at Modern: Elizabeth Gordon's "The Threat to the Next America"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbett, Kathleen LaMoine

    2010-01-01

    solar design and radiant floor heating. 33 The magazine‘sWright had used radiant floor heating earlier, but Keck

  14. New Methods of Energy Efficient Radon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    air beneath the floor may increase heating and cooling loadsbeneath the floors. The resultant increases in heating and

  15. Construction News Report January 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Continued heating hot water piping on the 1st floor. · Completed sanitary and domestic on the 1st floor metal on the 3rd and 4th floors. · Started interior caulk at break metal on the 4th floor · Completed installation of frames and glass on the 2nd floor. · Completed installing backer rod at 1st and 2nd floor

  16. RA After Hours On Call (971) 246-1388 Your Guide to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latiolais, M. Paul

    on the first floor, and in the first floor lobby of the Ondine Building. Heat Broadway uses baseboard heating floor and retail space on the ground floor. Each studio features loft-like cement floors and a modern (503) 725-4404 RA After Hours On Call FYE (floors 3-7) (971) 246-1386 RA After Hours On Call Upper

  17. 61 Wilder Street, O'Leary Library 3rd Floor | Lowell, MA 01854 Tel: 978.934.2797 | Fax: 978.934.2065 | Email: honors@uml.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    with a Commonwealth Honors designation the honors student must satisfy four CHP requirements. They are: CHP 1: Earn a 3.25 grade point average. CHP 2: Understand courses, just different courses. (see below). CHP 3: For each semester you

  18. Comparison of the effects of floor and cage housing on the performance of five strains and crosses of egg production stocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Bernice Boyce

    1957-01-01

    ) concluded that neither sexual maturity, annual egg production nor lag fng house mortality vere aff'ected by the rearing method used. Winter snd Schlswb (1948) compared range reaxed birds to conf'inement reared birds snd found that, ovex a 45 week laying... period the range resxed. birds laid at the x'ate of 41. 5 percent compared to 56. 6 percent for the conf'inement reared bixds. They also found that egg siss vss slightly lax'gex' for the xsnge xesxed gx'oup. The benefits of' selective strain crossing...

  19. STUDY CARREL APPLICATION Study carrels on the third and fourth floors of the Ned R. McWherter Library are available for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    Wherter Library are available for individual assignment to support study and research by graduate students, but library material left in the carrel must be properly checked out. Reference books and other non____________________________ Semester(s) for which you request a carrel: _______ Fall ______ Spring ______ Summer Classification

  20. Investigation of the huge tsunami from the 2011 T?hoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake using ocean floor boreholes to the fault zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, J; Chester, F; Brodsky, EE; Kodaira, S

    2014-01-01

    logging-while-drilling (LWD) operations, install temperatureproblems were overcome, and LWD data and cores from the

  1. 35841Federal Register/Vol. 74, No. B8/Tuesday. July 21, 2009/Notices which is located on the 13th floor of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be Connie Veillette. Senior Professional Staff Member. House Foreign Relation Committee and Peter Frosch an agro ecological perspective. This will be highlighted in a special panel presentation. "Climate

  2. Return this completed form to the Office of MPA, inside the ARC, located on the 2nd floor of the Culp Center.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    -439-4840 ~ mpamentoring@etsu.edu Name: ___________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ____________________ Local Phone: (_______) _____________________________ ETSU did you enter ETSU? (Ex. Fall 2008) ________________ When do you anticipate graduating from ETSU

  3. The goal of this paper is to review current impacts of human activities on the deep-sea floor ecosystem, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Craig

    fishing pressure. Oil and gas exploitation has begun, and will continue, in deep water, creating, and future human threats are difficult to predict. Low productivity, low physical energy, low biological (structures, radioactive wastes, munitions and carbon dioxide), deep-sea fishing, oil and gas extraction

  4. Fall Engineering Career Fair Employer List -October 3rd, 2013 1:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. College of Engineering; First Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Electromechanical Engineering Technology Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering #12;Mechanical Engineering Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Technology Manufacturing Engineering-ops Chemical Engineering Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Industrial Engineering Mechanical

  5. Fall Engineering Career & Networking Fair Employer List -Oct 10th 1:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m. College of Engineering; First Floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Technology Electrical Engineering Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology Industrial Engineering Technology Electromechanical Engineering Technology #12;Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering Electrical/Electronic Engineering Technology Electromechanical Engineering Technology Industrial Engineering

  6. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Preston, Caroline M; Schmidt, Michael W. I; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-01-01

    Ecological effects of forest fires, Bot. Rev. , 26, 483 –1 ] In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance andal. , 1999]. Risk of forest fires was high during the entire

  7. Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels Research Division "Dynamics of the Ocean Floor," IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Static and flowing regions in granular collapses down channels Gert Lube Research Division of an internal interface separating static and flowing regions. We present data for the time-dependent geometry approaches. First, by integrating under the entire internal interface we obtained data for the static area

  8. Please complete this form and return it to the Honors College Office on South Campus in O'Leary 3rd Floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Please complete this form and return it to the Honors College Office at 978.934.2797 or email us at Honors@uml.edu. Honors Thesis Completion Form Name, ________________________, certify that this student has satisfactorily completed his/her honors project and has given a public

  9. UHS Health Promotion Office, UHS Building, 2nd Floor, 585-273-5772, www.rochester.edu/uhs/healthpromotion Taking Care of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    through coughs, sneezes, and mucous on a person's hands. You can pick up the virus from books, towels for self-care for four of the most common cold symptoms ­ fever, cough, sore throat, and nasal congestion as directed. Cough Drink plenty of fluids (water, fruit juice, soup, etc.) and use a vaporizer or hot shower

  10. UHS Health Promotion Office, UHS Building, 2nd Floor, 585-273-5772, www.rochester.edu/uhs How Much is Too Much?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    through a fabric, UV rays can get through, too. Use Sunscreen Use a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher and use a broad spectrum sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Regardless of the SPF, sunscreen should be reapplied about every 2 hours. Wear a hat A hat with at least a 2

  11. April 2009The Monthly InSTALLmentBrought to you by the UHS Health Promotion Office. 2nd floor, UHS Building. 273-5775 UVA Vs. UVB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    during the peak intensity hours of 10 am to 4 pm. Wear sunscreen with at least SPF 15. Wear sunglasses-shirt in the summer usually protects you less than sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. Sunlight can be reflected. Save Your Skin · When buying sunscreen, make sure it has at least an SPF of 15. · Sunscreen doesn

  12. TASK 2.5.4 DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENERGY SAVINGS CALCULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A; New, Joshua Ryan; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; Huang, Joe; Erdem, Ender; Ronnen, Levinson

    2010-03-01

    California s major energy utilities and the California Energy Commission (CEC) are seeking to allocate capital that yields the greatest return on investment for energy infrastructure that meets any part of the need for reliable supplies of energy. The utilities are keenly interested in knowing the amount of electrical energy savings that would occur if cool roof color materials are adopted in the building market. To meet this need the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have been collaborating on a Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) project to develop an industry-consensus energy-savings calculator. The task was coordinated with an ongoing effort supported by the DOE to develop one calculator to achieve both the DOE and the EPA objectives for deployment of cool roof products. Recent emphasis on domestic building energy use has made the work a top priority by the Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program. The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) tool is designed to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and practitioners easily run complex simulations. The latest web technologies and usability design were employed to provide an easy input interface to an annual simulation of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim. Building defaults were assigned based on the best available statistical evidence and can provide energy and cost savings after the user selects nothing more than the building location. A key goal for the tool is to promote the energy benefits of cool color tile, metal and asphalt shingle roof products and other energy saving systems. The RSC tool focuses on applications for the roof and attic; however, the code conducts a whole building simulation that puts the energy and heat flows of the roof and attic into the perspective of the whole house. An annual simulation runs in about 30 sec. In addition to cool reflective roofs, the RSC tool will simulate high- medium- and low-slope roofs, and has a custom selection for the user whose house has a unique inclination. There is an option for above sheathing ventilation, which is prevalent in tile and stone-coated metal roof assemblies. The tool also accommodates the effects of radiant barriers and low-emittance surfaces in the inclined air space above the sheathing. The practitioner can select to have air-conditioning ducts either in the conditioned space or in the attic. If in the attic, the user can select one of three air leakage options. Option 1 is an inspected duct having 4% leakage and code level of duct insulation; option 2 is a poorly insulated duct having 14% air leakage; and option 3 is a custom leakage rate specified by the user. The practitioner can setup multiple layers of ceiling insulation. AtticSim is benchmarked against the field data acquired for Ft. Irwin located near Barstow, CA, first as a standalone simulation program and then again integrated within the DOE-2.1E program. The standalone benchmark was very useful to determining how well AtticSim replicates the building physics of an attic. The coupled benchmark was useful to verify that the DOE-2.1E/AtticSim code is modeling correctly the dynamic relationship between the attic and the occupied space below, as well as the interactions between the attic and the HVAC system, in particular when the ducts are located in the attic.

  13. Sustainable Retrofit of Residential Roofs Using Metal Roofing Panels, Thin-Film Photovoltaic Laminates, and PCM Heat Sink Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan; Miller, William A; Childs, Phillip W; Biswas, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    During September-October 2009, research teams representing Metal Construction Association (the largest North American trade association representing metal building manufacturers, builders, and material suppliers), CertainTeed (one of the largest U.S. manufacturers of thermal insulation and building envelope materials), Unisolar (largest U.S. producer of amorphous silicone photo-voltaic (PV) laminates), Phase Change Energy (manufacturer of bio-based PCM), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) installed three experimental attics utilizing different roof retrofit strategies in the ORNL campus. The main goal of this project was experimental evaluation of a newly-developed sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing amorphous silicone PV laminates integrated with metal roof and PCM heat sink. The experimental attic with PV laminate was expected to work during the winter time as a passive solar collector with PCM storing solar heat, absorbed during the day, and increasing overall attic air temperature during the night.

  14. Best available control technology (BACT) equivalent for the control of volatile organic emissions from paint dipping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenship, W.R.; Pugh, C.W. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides details of a study conducted to demonstrate an equivalent method of Best Available Control Technology (BACT) compliance for volatile organic emissions from dip coating of certain miscellaneous metal parts. The study was proposed to show that the total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from 3.8 lb of VOC/gallon coating formulations were no greater than the total VOC emissions from 3.5 lb/gallon formulations used under the same conditions for coating steel joists. The presumptive BACT standard enforced by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for dip coating of steel joists is 3.5 lb/gallon. The requirement of 3.5 lb/gallon was derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency Guideline Series Control of Volatile Organic Emissions from Existing Stationary Sources--Volume 6: Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products. On June 5, 1998 the source completed a 12 month, full scale comparison study under a consent order with the Virginia DEQ. During the study period, the source made daily measurements of product produced, paint used, and emissions from the control and test paint tanks, and reported data to EPA and the DEQ every two months. The study concluded that a 26 percent reduction in paint usage and a 20 percent reduction in emissions was achieved in the test tanks using a 3.8 lb/gal coating compared to the control tanks using a 3.5 lb/gal coating. This study enables the source to achieve greater emission reductions than the presumptive BACT level and at the same time reduce painting costs by 34%. This study provides positive results for the environment, the steel joist industry, and the construction industry. This study could impact EPA's current Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule development for Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products and national VOC rules for this source category under Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  15. COMPARATIVE MEDICINE LABORATORY ANIMAL FACILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    environment should be immediately reported to the CMLAF floor supervisor: BEB 3rd floor and ground floor Kathy Thaler 829-6829 BEB 2nd floor Kathy Bender 829-6830 BEB 1st floor Kim Pufpaff 829-6824 Sherman Kathy

  16. Construction News Report Construction News Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 3rd floors. · Continued heating hot water piping on the 1st floor. · Continued low pressure duct. · Continued plumbing and HVAC insulation on the 4th floor. · Continued duct insulation on the 3rd floor and domestic at restrooms on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th floors. · Started testing sanitary and domestic on the 2nd

  17. Residential Services Off campus accommodation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Cleaning Food safety Energy efficiency Heating 11 Water efficiency Lighting Recycling Waste Grounds Pest Condensation 17 Toilets Hot water and heating Sinks Health and safety 18 Health services Security Night Porter Floor Flat 20,21,22 6 Floor Flat 17,18,19 5 Floor Flat 14,15,16 4 Floor Flat 11,12,13 3 Floor Flat 8

  18. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Miller, William A; Huang, Yu; Levinson, Ronnen

    2014-01-01

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  19. Scorpions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.; Brown, Elizabeth

    2005-10-10

    , and it often is found in attics of homes. During hot weather, scorpions may move into living areas to escape high temperatures in attics. Scorpion Stings A scorpion?s sting may be painful, or even deadly, depending on the species. Of 1,500 species... to crush and draw the prey toward its mouth so it can ingest the prey?s body juices. Although some scorpion species may live for 20 to 25 years, the typical scorpion?s longevity is between 3 and 8 years. Adult scorpions may have several broods...

  20. Winter Break Projects 2012 December 4, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Mechanical Engineering: 1st Floor air handler: heating and cooling Dec 22 ­ Jan 2 Mechanical Laboratory: 2nd Floor heating and hot water pipe replacement Dec 10 ­ Dec 22 #12;Herzstein Hall 2nd floor air handler

  1. Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig

    2010-01-01

    value 0) ! - Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {Floor Area {m3/s-m2} Flow {m3/s} Flow Fraction ! - HeatingHeating Maximum Air Air Flow Rate {m3/s} Flow per Zone Floor

  2. Comparison groups on bills: Automated, personalized energy information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Maithili

    2008-01-01

    characteristics (floor area, housing type and heating fuel);at least floor area, house type, and heating fuel. Although0% N/A. Floor area Date built Heating fuel Differences

  3. Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzisera,, Judy Lai, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Equip _ Energy Bldg _ Floor _ Area Heating_EUI in units ofIntensity = Annual _ Heating _ Load Floor _ Area Annual_kBtu Bldg_Floor_Area = area served by heating equipment in

  4. Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, S.

    2010-01-01

    A.  (2002).  Radiant?Floor Heating: When It  Does?and A hydronic radiant floor  heating runs hot water through were provided with a floor heating system.  In case of very 

  5. Window performance for human thermal comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizenga, C; Zhang, H.; Mattelaer, P.; Yu, T.; Arens, Edward A; Lyons, P.

    2006-01-01

    in the Elderly When Using Floor Heating and Air ConditioningS. 2001, “A Review of Floor Heating Research in Japan”.Literatures Related to Floor Heating Environment in Japan”.

  6. Summary Report: Control Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam; Lee, Yoonsu

    2007-01-01

    GSHP; Radiant floor and passive solar heating; decentralizedSlab heating and/or cooling UFAD Forced Air Under Floor Airheating and cooling, conditioned air is delivered through an under floor

  7. The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    Application Water Heating Fig.2 Commercial Floor Area andSpace Heating Technology Shift in Office Building Floor areaDistrict Heating has supplied about 25% of the total floor

  8. 2.1E BDL Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    FPH HVSYS UHT UVT Floor Panel Heating System Heating andS y s t em Type: Floor Panel Heating System Command KeywordFLOOR-MULTIPLIER BASEBOARD-RATING TROM-VENT-SCH SYSTEM-CONTROL HEATING-

  9. Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelby, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    1) the usage of radiant floor heating to create “warmerPeople Lazy) Tile Floors Bad Heating System (More Control)Heating Radiant Water Heating in Floors and Walls for Use in

  10. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01

    entrance, heating in a private office on the 6 th floor canHeating, cooling - personal Ventilation - zone, room, WB Ventilation - personal Lighting - open floorHeating, cooling - personal Ventilation - zone, room, WB Ventilation - personal Lighting - open floor

  11. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    100% of the floor space is covered; for space heating, theSpace heating, however, will increase from 40% of floorHeating Cooling Finally, it is assumed that 100% of office floor

  12. DOE-1 USERS GUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Page 300. FPH - Floor Panel Heating System. able. TPFC - TwoMULTIPUU FLOoR VOl.UME AREA cun SQFT SON1 CUNT HEATING LOAD~ MULTIPLIER FLOOR AREA VOLUME SQFT CUFT SQMT CUIIT HEATING

  13. Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating. Radiant heating has a number of advantages. It is...

  14. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development: Personal Comfort Systems and Radiant Slab Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    to the discovery that floor heating had been inadvertentlyDec 15-17 Chair T2-F Floor heating failed Jan 12- 16 Chairpoints for 306 3 rd floor total heating load and temperature

  15. Ensemble Perception: summarizing the scene and broadening the limits of visual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, David

    of a tree, the blades of grass, the tiles of the floor are redundant, giving rise to the percept of `tree-ness,' `lawn-ness,'and `floor-ness,' respectively. The individual components of those textures are lost

  16. Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demand for energy Macro-Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demand for energy Macro-Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demand for energy Macro-

  17. Impact of Fixed Exterior Shading on Daylighting: A Case Study of the David Brower Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelenay, Krystyna

    2011-01-01

    shading type Fixed exterior white-painted aluminum louvers on 2nd and 3rd floors, awning at ground floor, photovoltaic

  18. High-performance facades design strategies and applications in North America and Northern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelenay, Krystyna; Perepelitza, Mark; Lehrer, David

    2011-01-01

    shading type Fixed exterior white-painted aluminum louvers on 2nd and 3rd floors, awning at ground floor, photovoltaic

  19. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel T.

    2010-01-01

    water heating space heating cooling floor area distributionwater heating space heating cooling floor area distributionfloor area in commercial building type n in m 2 , and space heating

  20. Electronics Come of Age: A Taxonomy for Miscellaneous and Low Power Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordman, Bruce; Sanchez, Marla C.

    2006-01-01

    Heating, boiler Heating, furnace baseboard, floor or wallFloor polisher Pet fence Power tool Power tool, cordless Pump, sump Pump, well Water heating

  1. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    big space or if cooling/heating floor/ceiling systems areheating system (radiant panels, convectors, radiators or fan coil units at floor

  2. Simulation of radiant cooling performance with evaporative cooling sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    B W. 2002. Radiant Floor Heating in Theory and Practice.floors combined eliminates the VAV boxes and permits a reduction in the number of heating

  3. Progress in thermal comfort research over the last twenty years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    e.g. in the case of floor heating). Plenty of research into heat the legs and a floor-heating panel for providing

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade-Madison Residence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    This basement insulation project included a dimple mat conveying inbound moisture to a draintile, airtight spray polyurethane foam wall and floor insulation, and radiant floor heat installation

  5. Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First-of-Its-Kind Seismic Floor Berkeley Lab's New Computing Sciences Facility Features First-of-Its-Kind Seismic Floor...

  6. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: John Wesley Miller, Tucson, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This builder worked with the National Association of Home Builders Research Center to build two net-zero energy homes with foam-sheathed masonry walls, low-E windows 2.9 ACH50 air sealing, transfer grilles, ducts in insulated attic, PV, and solar water heating.

  7. Cluster Flies Family, Home & Garden Education Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , or "attic," flies often invade New Hampshire homes in the fall to become annoying wintertime pests containers safely, according to NH regulations. If you suspect pesticide poisoning, call the New Hampshire frames and electrical fixtures. Cluster flies are usually sluggish and make little attempt to escape, so

  8. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    in three areas Envelope Equipment System/building integration Develop component technologies that are more in real buildings #12;6 Envelope research lab facilities Heat Flow Through Roof/Attic Assemblies Heat FlowSensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance for Building Technologies Charles

  9. SIMULATION OF THE THERMAL INTERACTION BETWEEN A BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAIC COLLECTOR AND AN AIR-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    enables to take into account the thermal interaction between each physical object (heat pump, PV collector of the heat pump is installed in the attic just beneath the PV collector, which preheats the incoming air the thermal interaction between a Photovoltaic ­ Thermal (PV-T) collector and an air-source heat pump

  10. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  11. Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

    1995-01-01

    evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging...

  12. Best Practices Case Study: Tindall Homes - Princeton, NJ, Legends at Mansfield, Columbus, NJ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    Case Study of Tindall Homes, who worked with Building America to design an optimal package including advanced framing, insulated precast concrete basement walls, polyurethane foam in the walls, and R-49 of batt plus blown cellulose in the attics. Some homes included a detached garden shed with photovoltaic panel-covered roofs.

  13. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - NextGen Home, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on the NextGen demo home built in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44 with R-40 spray foam attic insulation, R-40 insulated concrete walls, and a 4kW DC solar laminate

  14. DOE ZERH Case Study: High Performance Homes, Chamberlain Court #75, Gettysburg, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning production home in the cold climate that got a HERS 37 without PV, or HERS 23 with PV, with R-24 SIP walls, Basement with R-10 under slab, and R-15 unfaced batt on walls, sealed attic with R-49 ocsf under roof deck; ground source heat pump COP 4.4.

  15. The Economics of Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Economics of Energy Efficiency Winter 2013 Why does Comcast give you set-top boxes that use the adoption of more energy- efficient technologies. This course will mostly not cover the "big picture landlord insulate the attic? What makes an investment in energy efficiency attractive? How does a company

  16. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Levinson, Ronnen; Huang, Yu; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Miller, William A.; Mellot, Joe; Childs, Kenneth W.; Kriner, Scott

    2014-06-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  17. .All ~ ...,. .J.'I..f.~ t"'.IIC-~ ,... ..,--':' If':--.....1c. ~ ...:. ~~-f.~'-r." ~...r ...t \\,,,:,'" ~ '" "'c...... ~.t~.-: ....... :......

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a fork. Heat asparagus; drain Combine soup and milk and heat until soup IS thawed, stirrir.g occasionally asparagus and sprinkle with paprika. Serves 6. Source; U S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries ------------------~-I and Beaton Hill / ' From the angle-beamed attic of an old-l~n..: ~family home come recipes like

  18. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN AIR-TO-AIR HEAT PUMP COUPLED WITH TEMPERATE AIR-SOURCES INTEGRATED INTO A DWELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN AIR-TO-AIR HEAT PUMP COUPLED WITH TEMPERATE AIR-SOURCES INTEGRATED.peuportier@mines-paristech.fr, Tel.: +33 1 40 51 91 51 ABSTRACT An inverter-driven air-to-air heat pump model has been developped capacity air-to-air heat pump coupled with temperate air sources (crawlspace, attic, sunspace, heat

  19. Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    TVA has conducted a study to determine the effects of radiant barriers (RBI (i.e., material with a low emissivity surface facing an air space), when used with fiberglass, on attic heat transfer during summer and winter. This study employed five...

  20. Best Practices Case Study: Schneider Homes, Inc. - Village at Miller Creek, Burien, W

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    Case study of Schneider Homes, who achieved 50% savings over the 2004 IECC with analysis and recommendations from DOE’s Building America including moving ducts and furnace into conditioned space, R-23 blown fiberglass in the walls and R-38 in the attics, and high-performance HVAC, lighting, appliances, and windows.