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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A study of surface film formation on LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathodes u sing attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface films formed on commercial LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathodes (ATD Gen2) charged from 3.75V to 4.2V vs. Li/Li+ in EC:DEC - 1M LiPF6 were analyzed using ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. A surface layer of Li2CO3 is present on the virgin cathode, probably from reaction of the active material with air during the cathode preparation procedure. The Li2CO3 layer disappeared even after soaking in the electrolyte, indicating that the layer dissolved into the electrolyte possibly even before potential cycling of the electrode. IR features only from the binder (PVdF) and a trace of polyamide from the Al current collector were observed on the surfaces of cathodes charged to below 4.2 V, i.e., no surface species from electrolyte oxidation. Some new IR features were, however, found on the cathode charged to 4.2 V and higher. An electrolyte oxidation product was observed that appeared to contain dicarbonyl anhydride and (poly)ester functionalities. The reaction appears to be an indirect electrochemical oxidation with overcharging (removal of > 0.6 Li ions) destabilizing oxygen in the oxide lattice resulting in oxygen transfer to the solvent molecules.

Song, S.-W.; Zhuang, G.V.; Ross Jr., P.N.

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

Degradation of Radar Reflectivity by Cloud Attenuation at Microwave Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main object of this paper is to emphasize that clouds—the nonprecipitating component of condensed atmospheric water—can produce a strong attenuation at operational microwave frequencies, although they present a low reflectivity preventing ...

Olivier Pujol; Jean-François Georgis; Laurent Féral; Henri Sauvageot

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Prisms with total internal reflection as solar reflectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved reflective wall for radiant energy collection and concentration devices is provided. The wall is comprised of a plurality of prisms whose frontal faces are adjacent and which reflect the desired radiation by total internal reflection.

Rabl, Arnulf (Downers Grove, IL); Rabl, Veronika (Downers Grove, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Effect of Mean and Differential Attenuation on the Precision and Accuracy of the Estimates of Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error propagation analysis is applied to evaluate the effects of correcting horizontal and differential attenuation on the precision of the estimates of reflectivity and differential reflectivity. The analysis shows that the loss of precision on ...

Enrico Torlaschi; Isztar Zawadzki

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Correction of Radar Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity for Rain Attenuation at X Band. Part I: Theoretical and Empirical Basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, a correction for rain attenuation of radar reflectivity (ZH) and differential reflectivity (ZDR) at the X-band wavelength is presented. The correction algorithm that is used is based on the self-consistent method with ...

S-G. Park; V. N. Bringi; V. Chandrasekar; M. Maki; K. Iwanami

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Total Resonant Transmission and Reflection by Periodic Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonant scattering of plane waves by a periodic slab under conditions close to those that support a guided mode is accompanied by sharp transmission anomalies. For two-dimensional structures, we establish sufficient conditions, involving structural symmetry, under which these anomalies are characterized by total transmission and total reflection at frequencies separated by an arbitrarily small amount. The loci of total reflection and total transmission are real-analytic curves in frequency-wavenumber space that intersect quadratically at a single point corresponding to the guided mode. A single anomaly or multiple anomalies can be excited by the interaction with a single guided mode.

Stephen P. Shipman; Hairui Tu

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

Rainfall Parameter Estimation from Dual-Radar Measurements Combining Reflectivity Profile and Path-integrated Attenuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain rate estimation properties of multiparameter radar measurements combining radar reflectivity and microwave attenuations are studied through simulations using a two-year disdrometer dataset. In the first simulation, properties of “complete” ...

Toshiaki Kozu; Kenji Nakamura

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Correction of Radar Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity for Rain Attenuation at X Band. Part II: Evaluation and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the attenuation-correction methodology presented in Part I is applied to radar measurements observed by the multiparameter radar at the X-band wavelength (MP-X) of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster ...

S-G. Park; M. Maki; K. Iwanami; V. N. Bringi; V. Chandrasekar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with a frustrated total internal reflection absorber  

SciTech Connect

Coupling a dielectric compound parabolic concentrator (DCPC) to an absorber across a vacuum gap by means of frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) can theoretically approach the maximum concentration permitted by physical laws, thus allowing higher radiative fluxes in thermal applications. The calculated optical performance of 2-D DCPCs with FTIR absorbers indicates that the ratio of gap thickness to optical wavelength must be /0.22 before the optical performance of the DCPC is superior to that of the nondielectric CPC.

Hull, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Estimation of Liquid Cloud Properties that Conserve Total-Scene Reflectance Using Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of deriving statistical moments related to the distribution of liquid water path over partially cloudy scenes is tested using a satellite cloud climatology. The method improves the ability to reconstruct total-scene visible ...

Michael J. Foster; Ralf Bennartz; Andrew Heidinger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

12

Dielectric compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with frustrated total internal reflection absorber  

SciTech Connect

Since its introduction, the concept of nonimaging solar concentrators, as exemplified by the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) design, has greatly enhanced the ability to collect solar energy efficiently in thermal and photovoltaic devices. When used as a primary concentrator, a CPC can provide significant concentration without the complication of a tracking mechanism and its associated maintenance problems. When used as a secondary, a CPC provides higher total concentration, or for a fixed concentration, tolerates greater tracking error in the primary.

Hull, J.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

14

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

15

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

16

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

17

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

18

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

19

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

20

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

22

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

23

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

24

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

25

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

26

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

27

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

28

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

29

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

30

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

31

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

32

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

33

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

34

Variable laser attenuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprising one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength. 9 figs.

Foltyn, S.R.

1987-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Variable laser attenuator  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to low loss, high power variable attenuators comprng one or more transmissive and/or reflective multilayer dielectric filters. The attenuator is particularly suitable to use with unpolarized lasers such as excimer lasers. Beam attenuation is a function of beam polarization and the angle of incidence between the beam and the filter and is controlled by adjusting the angle of incidence the beam makes to the filter or filters. Filters are selected in accordance with beam wavelength.

Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Modified Hitschfeld–Bordan Equations for Attenuation-Corrected Radar Rain Reflectivity: Application to Nonuniform Beamfilling at Off-Nadir Incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As shown by Takahashi et al., multiple path attenuation estimates over the field of view of an airborne or spaceborne weather radar are feasible for off-nadir incidence angles. This follows from the fact that the surface reference technique, which ...

Robert Meneghini; Liang Liao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

38

Polarimetric Radar at Attenuated Wavelength as a Hydrological Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the estimation of the rain rate using a polarimetric radar at attenuated wavelengths is proposed. At attenuated wavelengths, the differential reflectivity for horizontal and vertical polarization, ZDR, is the addition of a term ...

Henri Sauvageot

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Retrieval of Reflectivity in a Networked Radar Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for reflectivity and attenuation retrieval for rain medium in a networked radar environment is described. Electromagnetic waves backscattered from a common volume in networked radar systems are attenuated differently along the different ...

V. Chandrasekar; S. Lim

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Tandem resonator reflectance modulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Planar Total Internal Reflection Biofouling Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind- driven reverse osmosis desalination system withfeedback control," Desalination, vol. 150, pp. 277-287,a filtration process," Desalination, vol. 206, pp. 36-41,

Nam, Koo Hyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The mission of the Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative is to seek holistic solutions to DOE’s groundwater contamination problems that consider not only...

44

Radiofrequency attenuator and method  

SciTech Connect

Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3 C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Hall, Simon B. (Palmerston North, NZ)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiofrequency attenuator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Agrawal, Anoop (Tucson, AZ); Hall, Simon B. (Palmerston North, NZ)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

46

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

47

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluation and Improvement of an Iterative Scattering Correction Scheme for in situ Absorption and Attenuation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of several scattering correction schemes for reflecting-tube absorption and beam attenuation measurements is evaluated with data collected in European shelf seas. Standard scattering correction procedures for absorption ...

David McKee; Jacek Piskozub; Rüdiger Röttgers; Rick A. Reynolds

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Attenuation Calibration of an X-Band Weather Radar Using a Microwave Link  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The attenuation of a radar signal is a serious problem facing meteorologists and hydrologists. In heavy rain, reflectivity information can be completely lost from large portions of a radar scan. The problem is particularly acute for X-band ...

A. R. Rahimi; A. R. Holt; G. J. G. Upton; S. Krämer; A. Redder; H-R. Verworn

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

51

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

52

LINE-ABOVE-GROUND ATTENUATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The line-above-ground attenuator provides a continuously variable microwave attenuator for a coaxial line that is capable of high attenuation and low insertion loss. The device consists of a short section of the line-above- ground plane type transmission lime, a pair of identical rectangular slabs of lossy material like polytron, whose longitudinal axes are parallel to and indentically spaced away from either side of the line, and a geared mechanism to adjust amd maintain this spaced relationship. This device permits optimum fineness and accuracy of attenuator control which heretofore has been difficult to achieve.

Wilds, R.B.; Ames, J.R.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

54

C-Band Attenuation by Tropical Rainfall in Darwin, Australia, Using Climatologically Tuned Ze-R Relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probability matching method (PMM) is used as a basis for estimating attenuation in tropical rains near Darwin, Australia. PMM provides a climatological relationship between measured radar reflectivity and rain rate, which includes the effects ...

David Atlas; Daniel Rosenfeld; David B. Wolff

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

Wood, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

58

Reflective diffraction grating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

NIST Terahertz Reflection Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... b) Superimposed Fourier Transform amplitude and power reflection map ... laser for broadband (0.2-2.5) THz GaAs antenna generation and detection ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Neutron reflecting supermirror structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: SELECTED CASE STUDIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003 the US Department of Energy (DOE) embarked on a project to explore an innovative approach to remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes that focused on introducing mechanisms for augmenting natural attenuation to achieve site closure. Termed enhanced attenuation (EA), this approach has drawn its inspiration from the concept of monitored natural attenuation (MNA).

Vangelas, K; W. H. Albright, W; E. S. Becvar, E; C. H. Benson, C; T. O. Early, T; E. Hood, E; P. M. Jardine, P; M. Lorah, M; E. Majche, E; D. Major, D; W. J. Waugh, W; G. Wein, G; O. R. West, O

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reflective Insulation Handbook.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When reflective-foil insulation manufacturers wanted the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to include their products in the Residential Weatherization Program, they lacked conclusive test data to prove that their products met program specifications. Reflective foils lacked widespread acceptance because of uncertainty about their insulation values. BPA discovered that the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was preparing a study to test how well reflective foils reduced horizontal heat flow. Because the insulation value of reflective foils depends upon the direction of heat flow, BPA provided additional funding to test their effectiveness in reducing upward and downward heat flow and to produce this Handbook. The objectives of this study were to develop acceptable test and evaluation methods, produce an initial data base of idealized reflective-foil insulation systems, extend this data base to a limited number of commercially available products to develop and test analytical models to predict thermal performance and develop a Reflective Insulation Handbook for homeowners and insulation contractors. This handbook describes how heat is transferred; the function of an insulation; what reflective insulation is; types of reflective insulation; where it can be used; installation procedures; thermal performance; and useful sources of information. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Desjarlais, Andre O.; Tye, Ronald P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

In-Place Estimation of Wet Radome Attenuation at X Band  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of wet radome attenuation is estimated on a French operational X-band weather radar deployed in the Maritime Alps of southeastern France. As the radar is deployed in a remote location, the reflectivity factor in the immediate vicinity ...

Stephen J. Frasier; Fadela Kabeche; Jordi Figueras i Ventura; Hassan Al-Sakka; Pierre Tabary; Jeffrey Beck; Olivier Bousquet

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Measurment and Interpretation of Seismic Attenuation for Hydrocarbon Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project is the combined effort of several leading research groups. Advanced theoretical work is being conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Here, the fundamental controls on loss mechanisms are being examined, primarily by use of numerical models of heterogeneous porous media. At the University of California, Berkeley, forward modeling is combined with direct measurement of attenuation. This forward modeling provides an estimate of the influence of 1/Q on the observed seismic signature. Direct measures of losses in Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSPs) indicate mechanisms to separate scattering versus intrinsic losses. At the Colorado School of Mines, low frequency attenuation measurements are combined with geologic models of deep water sands. ChevronTexaco is our corporate cosponsor and research partner. This corporation is providing field data over the Genesis Field, Gulf of Mexico. In addition, ChevronTexaco has rebuilt and improved their low frequency measurement system. Soft samples representative of the Genesis Field can now be measured for velocities and attenuations under reservoir conditions. Throughout this project we have: Assessed the contribution of mechanical compaction on time-lapse monitoring; Developed and tested finite difference code to model dispersion and attenuation; Heterogeneous porous materials were modeled and 1/Q calculated vs. frequency; 'Self-affine' heterogeneous materials with differing Hurst exponent modeled; Laboratory confirmation was made of meso-scale fluid motion influence on 1/Q; Confirmed theory and magnitude of layer-based scattering attenuation at Genesis and at a shallow site in California; Scattering Q's of between 40 and 80 were obtained; Measured very low intrinsic Q's (2-20) in a partially saturated vadose zone VSP; First field study to separate scattering and intrinsic attenuation in real data set; Revitalized low frequency device at ChevronTexaco's Richmond lab completed; First complete frequency dependent measurements on Berea sandstones from dry to various saturations (brine and decane); Frequency dependent forward modeling code is running, and tested on a couple of Cases--derives frequency dependent reflectivity from porosity based logs; Genesis seismic data obtained but is on hold until forward modeling is complete; Boundary and end effects modeled for soft material measurements at CSM; and Numerous papers published or submitted and presentations made.

Michael Batzle; Luca Duranti; James Rector; Steve Pride

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Shape optimization using reflection lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many common objects have highly reflective metallic or painted finishes. Their appearance is primarily defined by the distortion the curved shape of the surface introduces in the reflections of surrounding objects. Reflection lines are commonly used ...

E. Tosun; Y. I. Gingold; J. Reisman; D. Zorin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

67

Polarizer reflectivity variations  

SciTech Connect

On Shiva the beam energy along the chain is monitored using available reflections and/or transmission through beam steering, splitting, and polarizing optics without the intrusion of any additional glass for diagnostics. On the preamp table the diagnostic signal is obtained from the signal transmitted through turning mirrors. At the input of each chain the signal is obtained from the transmission through one of the mirrors used for the chain input alignment sensor (CHIP). At the chain output the transmission through the final turning mirror is used. These diagnostics have proved stable and reliable. However, one of the prime diagnostic locations is at the output of the beta rod. The energy at this location is measured by collecting small reflections from the last polarizer surface of the beta Pockels cell polarizer package. Unfortunately, calibration of this diagnostic has varied randomly, seldom remaining stable for a week or more. The cause of this fluctuation has been investigated for the past year and'it has been discovered that polarizer reflectivity varies with humidity. This report will deal with the possible causes that were investigated, the evidence that humidity is causing the variation, and the associated mechanism.

Ozarski, R.G.; Prior, J.

1980-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Documentation : a reflective practice approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Center for Reflective Community Practice in MIT's Department of Urban studies is involved in projects helping community organizers working on social change. In order to foster reflection, they are currently utilizing ...

Ouko, Luke Odhiambo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

70

Generalization of Lambert's reflectance model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lambert's model for body reflection is widely used in computer graphics. It is used extensively by rendering techniques such as radiosity and ray tracing. For several real-world objects, however, Lambert's model can prove to be a very inaccurate approximation ... Keywords: BRDF, Lambert's model, moon reflectance, reflection models, rough surfaces

Michael Oren; Shree K. Nayar

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

MISMATCHES CREATE REFLECTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike low-power, metal-gate CMOS, high-speed 54HC/74HC devices readily drive long cable runs and backplanes. While the family maintains CMOS’s traditional noise immunity, you must watch transmission-line effects in such applications. Because of 54HC/74HC high-speed CMOS’s short propagation delays and fast rise and fall times, you must understand its transmission-line behavior when driving lines as short as even a foot or two, whether those lines are coaxial cables, twisted pairs or backplanes. Moreover, the devices ’ fast edge rates increase the likelihood of crosstalk among interconnecting cables. Despite the need, however, to take design precautions that minimize adverse effects related to high-speed operation, 54HC/74HC logic—unlike slower metal-gate CMOS—includes many features that suit it to driving transmission lines. For example, its symmetrical push-pull outputs result in stiff logic levels, and its high output drive allows fast bit rates. Another advantage of high-speed-CMOS designs is that they don’t prove to be as difficult as those based on other high-speed logic families. In general, high-speed CMOS doesn’t require the detailed attention to pc-board layout and transmission-line characteristics that Schottky TTL or ECL designs do. Furthermore, controlling unwanted reflections is easier in the CMOS designs, because 54HC/74HC devices’ electrostatic-protection diodes tend to clamp the reflected voltages to the power-supply levels.

unknown authors

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

EEEL Researchers Develop Novel Attenuator for High-energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EEEL Researchers Develop Novel Attenuator for High-energy Lasers. For Immediate Release: June 2, 2008. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Backscatter-contour-attenuation joint estimation model for attenuation compensation in ultrasound imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasound B-scan exhibits shadowing and enhancement artifacts due to acoustic wave propagation and spatially varying scatter attenuation across layers of tissues. These artifacts hide underlying echo signals that are truly clinically indicative of diseases. ... Keywords: attenuation compensation, backscatter, optimization, shadowing artifact, ultrasound imaging

Yongjian Yu; Jue Wang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the solar reflectance of asphalt roofing shingles that are covered with pigmented mineral roofing granules. The reflecting surface is rough, with a total area approximately twice the nominal area. We introduce a simple analytical model that relates the 'micro-reflectance' of a small surface region to the 'macro-reflectance' of the shingle. This model uses a mean field approximation to account for multiple scattering effects. The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are known. Simple linear averaging works well, with small corrections to linear averaging derived for highly reflective materials. Reflective base granules and reflective surface coatings aid achievement of high solar reflectance. Other factors that influence the solar reflectance are the size distribution of the granules, coverage of the asphalt substrate, and orientation of the granules as affected by rollers during fabrication.

Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Jacobs, Jeffry; Klink, Frank

2008-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

76

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

77

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

78

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

79

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles.

Howard, Thomas C. (Raleigh, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ALPHA ATTENUATION DUE TO DUST LOADING  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies had been done in order to show the attenuation of alpha particles in filter media. These studies provided an accurate correction for this attenuation, but there had not yet been a study with sufficient results to properly correct for attenuation due to dust loading on the filters. At the Savannah River Site, filter samples are corrected for attenuation due to dust loading at 20%. Depending on the facility the filter comes from and the duration of the sampling period, the proper correction factor may vary. The objective of this study was to determine self-absorption curves for each of three counting instruments. Prior work indicated significant decreases in alpha count rate (as much as 38%) due to dust loading, especially on filters from facilities where sampling takes place over long intervals. The alpha count rate decreased because of a decrease in the energy of the alpha. The study performed resulted in a set of alpha absorption curves for each of three detectors. This study also took into account the affects of the geometry differences in the different counting equipment used.

Dailey, A; Dennis Hadlock, D

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

82

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

83

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

84

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

85

Computing the Seismic Attenuation in Complex Porous Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

attenuation peak is observed at lower frequencies due to oilor when oil is invading water, a single attenuation peak isusing oil as ?uid 1 and water as ?uid 2. The two peaks in

Masson, Yder Jean

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

87

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

88

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

89

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

90

Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter was tested with two different reflected pulse trajectories in flowing air at ambient conditions against an orifice meter. The flowmeter was designed to be highly accurate, to require ...

Hoyle, David C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radar Reflectivity of Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between the radar reflectivity factor Z and significant physical cloud parameters are studied from a dataset collected with an instrumented aircraft in non- or very weakly precipitating warm clouds. The cloud droplet populations ...

Henri Sauvageot; Jilani Omar

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ground Reflections and Green Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested that green light often observed in association with severe thunderstorms is caused by sunlight being reflected onto the cloud by green vegetation. Colorimetric observations were recorded of green-colored and blue-colored ...

Frank W. Gallagher III

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

94

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

95

Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change?  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? 5/17/99 Click here to start Table of Contents PPT Slide Did 1998 Reflect Structural Change? Demand U.S. Propane Demand Sectors (1996) PPT Slide 1998 Propane Prices Fell with Crude Oil PPT Slide Warm Weather Behind Demand Decline 1998 Warm Weather Kept Demand Down Supply Propane Production Fell in 1998 1998 Propane Net Imports Increased Algeria Was Major Source of ‘98 Import Increase U.S. Chemical Use & Large Storage Attracts Excess Propane Petroleum & Propane Market Over Supply Average Stock Levels: Crude Market & Propane Futures Market Incentives to Build Petroleum Stocks New “Structure” or Cycle? Near-Term Future Large January Draw Did Not Remove Excess How Might Excess Stocks Decline? Near Term U.S. Propane Production

96

High power radio frequency attenuation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

Kerns, Quentin A. (Bloomingdale, IL); Miller, Harold W. (Winfield, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe  

SciTech Connect

A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ?), where (1-?) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Reflection Survey Details Activities (35) Areas (22) Regions (2) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

99

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

100

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions.      ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Title Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2002 Authors Berdahl, Paul, Hashem...

102

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

103

NIST X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients - Version History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... year, month day with database access date.) Hubbell, JH and Seltzer, SM (2004), Tables of X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients and Mass Energy- ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied...

105

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about...

106

Radio-adaptive regimen attenuates features of cellular senescence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radio-Adaptive Regimen Attenuates Features of Cellular Senescence Albert Davalos Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Recent work from several laboratories suggest that...

107

A Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shallow Attenuating Anomaly Inside The Ring Fracture Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Shallow...

108

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

109

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

110

Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

THE ATTENUATED RADON TRANSFORM: APPLICATION TO SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE PRESENCE OF A VARIABLE ATTENUATING MEDIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

section imaging of radionuclide distributions in heart,the myocardium ivith radionuclides, Radiology, 125 (1977),attenuation correction in radionuclide computed tomography,

Gullberg, Grant T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.  

SciTech Connect

Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.

Brock, Billy C.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Structure of Protein Layers in Polyelectrolyte Matrices Studied by Neutron Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyelectrolyte multilayer films obtained by localized incorporation of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) within electrostatically assembled matrices of poly(styrene sulfonate)/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PSS/PAH) via spin-assisted layer-by-layer growth were discovered to be highly structured, with closely packed monomolecular layers of the protein within the bio-hybrid films. The structure of the films was evaluated in both vertical and lateral directions with neutron reflectometry, using deuterated GFP as a marker for neutron scattering contrast. Importantly, the GFP preserves its structural stability upon assembly as confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) and in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Atomic force microscopy was complimented with X-ray reflectometry to characterize the external roughness of the biohybrid films. Remarkably, films assembled with a single GFP layer confined at various distances from the substrate exhibit a strong localization of the GFP layer without intermixing into the LbL matrix. However, partial intermixing of the GFP layers with polymeric material is evidenced in multiple-GFP layer films with alternating protein-rich and protein-deficient regions. We hypothesize that the polymer-protein exchange observed in the multiple-GFP layer films suggests the existence of a critical protein concentration which can be accommodated by the multilayer matrix. Our results yield new insights into the mechanism of GFP interaction with a polyelectrolyte matrix and open opportunities for fabrication of bio-hybrid films with well-organized structure and controllable function, a crucial requirement for advanced sensing applications.

Kozlovskaya, Veronika [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Zhang, Qiu [ORNL; Kharlampieva, Eugenia [University of Alabama, Birmingham

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

116

Seismic imaging for velocity and attenuation structure in geothermal fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have applied the attenuation inversion technique developed by Evans and Zucca (1988) to a seismic tomographic data set taken at Newberry Volcano by Achauer et al. (1988). Our preliminary results suggest that the interpretation of the velocity data by Achauer et al. that a magma chamber is present 3 km beneath the caldera is not confirmed by the attenuation data.

Zucca, J.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Evans, J.R. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Polarimetric Attenuation Correction in Heavy Rain at C Band  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of C-band polarimetric radar to account for strong attenuation/differential attenuation is demonstrated in two cases of heavy rain that occurred in the Chicago, Illinois, metropolitan area on 5 August 2008 and in central Oklahoma on ...

Ji-Young Gu; A. Ryzhkov; P. Zhang; P. Neilley; M. Knight; B. Wolf; Dong-In Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Discharge lamp with reflective jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A discharge lamp includes an envelope, a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope, a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed around the envelope and defining an opening, the reflector being configured to reflect some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit through the opening. The reflector may be made from a material having a similar thermal index of expansion as compared to the envelope and which is closely spaced to the envelope. The envelope material may be quartz and the reflector material may be either silica or alumina. The reflector may be formed as a jacket having a rigid structure which does not adhere to the envelope. The lamp may further include an optical clement spaced from the envelope and configured to reflect an unwanted component of light which exited the envelope back into the envelope through the opening in the reflector. Light which can be beneficially recaptured includes selected wavelength regions, a selected polarization, and selected angular components.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Comparison of Advanced Radar Polarimetric Techniques for Operational Attenuation Correction at C Band  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rain path attenuation correction is a challenging task for quantitative use of weather radar measurements at frequencies higher than S band. The proportionality relationship between specific attenuation ?hh (specific differential attenuation ?dp) ...

Gianfranco Vulpiani; Pierre Tabary; Jacques Parent du Chatelet; Frank S. Marzano

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Spatial Convergence of Bidirectional Reflectance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of bidirectional reflectance data are presented with implications regarding the spatial scales appropriate for inferring irradiances from radiances reflected by various surface–atmosphere scenes. Multiple-angle radiance data collected in ...

John M. Davis; Stephen K. Cox

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Semantic Models for Distributed Object Reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generic formal model of distributed object reflection is proposed, that combines logical reflection with a structuring of distributed objects as nested configurations of metaobject that can control subobjects under them. The model provides mathematical ...

José Meseguer; Carolyn L. Talcott

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microsoft Word - S05418_NatEnhAttenuation.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural and Enhanced Attenuation Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site 2008 Pilot Study Status Report August 2009 LMS/MON/S05418 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MON/S05418 Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site 2008 Pilot Study Status Report August 2009 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy 2008 Pilot Study Status Report August 2009 Doc. No. S05418 Page iii Contents Abbreviations.......................................................................................................................... vii Executive Summary.................................................................................................................

125

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

126

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

127

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

128

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

129

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

130

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

131

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

132

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

133

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

134

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

135

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

136

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

137

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

138

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

139

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

140

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

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141

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

142

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

143

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

144

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

145

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

146

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

147

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

148

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

149

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

150

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

151

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

152

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

153

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

154

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

155

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

156

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

157

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

158

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

159

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

160

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

162

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

163

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

164

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

165

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

166

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

167

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

168

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

169

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

170

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

171

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

172

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

173

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

174

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

175

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

176

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

177

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

178

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

179

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

180

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

182

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

183

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

184

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

185

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

186

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

187

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

188

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

189

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

190

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

191

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

192

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

193

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

194

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

195

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

196

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

197

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

198

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

199

Reflective coatings for solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R&D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

Jorgensen, G.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Reflective coatings for solar applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

Jorgensen, G.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Advantages of Wearable Green Reflected Photoplethysmography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the efficacy of reflected-type green light photoplethysmography (green light PPG). Transmitted infrared light was used for PPG and the arterial pulse was monitored transcutaneously. The reflected PPG signal contains AC components ... Keywords: Green light, Heat stress, Infrared light, Photoplethysmography, Reflection

Yuka Maeda; Masaki Sekine; Toshiyo Tamura

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "seismic analyses" - no indication of active/passive, reflection/refraction, etc. ---> "On the contrary, in areas with little or no volcanic activity, assumptions on the nature, size and characteristics of the source of the thermal anomaly are generally much more difficult and hypothetical. In these circumstances, some useful data can be obtained from accurate seismic analyses, together with a seismotectonic and geodynamic

204

Condenser optic with sacrificial reflective surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Employing collector optics that has a sacrificial reflective surface can significantly prolong the useful life of the collector optics and the overall performance of the condenser in which the collector optics are incorporated. The collector optics is normally subject to erosion by debris from laser plasma source of radiation. The presence of an upper sacrificial reflective surface over the underlying reflective surface effectively increases the life of the optics while relaxing the constraints on the radiation source. Spatial and temporally varying reflectivity that results from the use of the sacrificial reflective surface can be accommodated by proper condenser design.

Tichenor, Daniel A. (Castro Valley, CA); Kubiak, Glenn D. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Sung Hun (Sunnyvale, CA)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Structural Steel Attenuation of External Magnetic Fields in Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the passive attenuation of external power-frequency magnetic fields caused by structural steel members used in commercial building construction. This effect has not been considered in previous assessments of the field levels inside buildings.

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Rain-Rate Retrieval Algorithm for Attenuated Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic regularization scheme for rain-rate retrievals from attenuated radar measurements is presented. Most regularization techniques, including the optimal estimation method, use the state-space parameters to regularize the problem, which ...

Prabhat K. Koner; Alessandro Battaglia; Clemens Simmer

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tomographic Reconstruction of Rainfall Fields through Microwave Attenuation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is presented for estimating the space-time rainfall intensity distribution at ground level over a limited area. This is based on a tomographic technique that exploits the relationship between microwave attenuation and rainfall ...

D. Giuli; A. Toccafondi; G. Biffi Gentili; A. Freni

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: COMPENSATION FOR CONSTANT ATTENUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. VI, VII. VII L INTRODUCTION THE MODIFIED PROJECTIONS THEATTENUATED BACK-PROJECTION OPERATOR THE FILTER FUNCTION AND= 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 3.50 projection bin widths; attenuation

Gullberg, Grant T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

ORNL system for measurement of telephone-line attenuation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of modifying the TS-100 Automated Tempest Test System software was to use the equipment for making radio-frequency attenuation measurements between an input port and an output port of a telephone network. One set of tests was performed to simulate the electromagnetic radiation from a secure computer terminal and its coupling to telephone lines within a building. Another set of tests was conducted to determine the procedures for measuring attenuation on telephone lines between buildings that are all within the secure zone. The measurements indicate that attenuation between the terminal and the telephone is a function of many variables; however, attenuation in the cable between the buildings is proportional to the length of the cable between the buildings. 1 ref., 2 figs.

Rochelle, R.W.; Williams, I.E.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

211

Definition: Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reflection Survey Seismic reflection surveys image the structure of the subsurface through the measurement of the two way travel time of reflected artificially-generated elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Seismic Reflection References ↑ http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Geophysical-Prospecting-Milton-Dobrin/dp/0071004041 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reflection_Survey&oldid=598371" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

212

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

213

Attenuation of single event induced pulses in CMOS combinational logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented of a study of SEU generated transient pulse attenuation in combinational logic structures built using common digital CMOS design practices. SPICE circuit analysis, heavy ion tests, and pulsed, focused laser simulations were used to examine the response characteristics of transient pulse behavior in long logic strings. Results show that while there is an observable effect, it cannot be generally assumed that attenuation will significantly reduce observed circuit bit error rates.

Baze, M.P. [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States); Buchner, S.P. [SFA Inc., Landover, MD (United States)] [SFA Inc., Landover, MD (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

215

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical pr...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

218

REFLECTED LIGHT INTENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM DEFECTS ON HIGHLY REFLECTIVE SPHERES PDO 6984778, Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

A light reflection technique suitable for development into an automated surface quality certification system was investigated to determine if reflected light intensity distributions could be corre]ated with surface defect depths. Reflected laser light intensity distributions from pit and scratch defects on highly reflective spheres were studied with a commercial multi-element photodetector. It was found that the intensity distributions --Goll'lf be correlated with depths of pits and scratches in a size range of concern on highly reflective' spheres.

Klingsport, P. E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Solar Total Energy Project final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Photovoltaic module with light reflecting backskin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic module comprises electrically interconnected and mutually spaced photovoltaic cells that are encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant between a light-transparent front cover and a back cover, with the back cover sheet being an ionomer/nylon alloy embossed with V-shaped grooves running in at least two directions and coated with a light reflecting medium so as to provide light-reflecting facets that are aligned with the spaces between adjacent cells and oriented so as to reflect light falling in those spaces back toward said transparent front cover for further internal reflection onto the solar cells, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to the photovoltaic cells, thereby increasing the current output of the module. The internal reflector improves power output by as much as 67%.

Gonsiorawski, Ronald C. (Danvers, MA)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Estimating attenuation properties of bentonite layer in Cut Bank oil field, Glacier County, Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acquisition and interpretation of 3-D seismic data led DeAngelo and Hardage (2001) to describe the channel system in the south central Cut Bank area in Glacier County, Montana. The presence of a low velocity layer called Bentonite was also discovered in the area with the help of well-logs. Bentonite is a volcanic ash, which lies on both sides of the channel system and is absent within the channel. DeAngelo and Hardage (2001) shot a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) survey at well # 54-8 to analyze the formation structure in depth, since seismic signals around the reservoir area were unclear in the 3-D survey. This research attempts to estimate the attenuation properties of the Bentonite layer in the Cut Bank oil field. VSP data is processed for velocity information and estimation of seismic Q using the spectral ratios method (SRM). The SRM theoretically assumes that the propagating signal is a plane seismic wave traveling vertically from one point to another in a homogeneous model. The amplitudes at the start and end points are known and relate to each other with the attenuation coefficient in a frequency range. The relation between the seismic amplitudes at z distance from each other can be expressed as a linear function of frequency after a few modifications. SRM uses the linearity of the logarithmic ratio of the seismic amplitudes over a frequency range. In theory, ratios plotted against a frequency range must produce a flat line. However, in practice, the logarithmic ratios are expected to draw an approximate line (curve), where some of the data points deviate from the origin of the line. Thus fitting a line to the ratios curve and calculating the slope of this curve are necessary. Slope of the curve relates to the seismic attenuation coefficient and further to the seismic Q. The SRM results suggest that Bentonite may have a Q value as low as 5. This highly attenuative and thin (20 to 40 feet throughout the south central Cut Bank Unit) layer alters seismic signals propagating through it. A thorough analysis of the amplitude spectra suggests that seismic signals dramatically lose their energy when they pass through Bentonite. Low energy content of the signals below the Bentonite layer highlights that the recovery of the seismic energy is less likely despite the presence of multiples, which are known to affect the seismic signals constructively. Therefore, separation of reflected events is a greater challenge for the thin reservoir sand units lying underneath the Bentonite layer. Thus the Bentonite layer in the Cut Bank oil field has to be taken seriously and data processing should be done accordingly for better accuracy.

Karakurt, Necdet

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

On HVAC duct acoustical end reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Duct end reflection (ER) is the apparent loss of sound power resulting from an abrupt change in a cross?sectional area of the duct. In most references

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 99 5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring The restructuring of the natural gas ...

224

Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carlo program simulating light propagation in isotropic orTerms—Lambertian reflection, light collection, Monte Carloy-axis) and fraction specular light (right y- axis) for a

Janecek, Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Reflective Coherent Spatial Light Modulator (RCSLM)  

Reflective Coherent Spatial Light Modulator (RCSLM) Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

226

Does Shareholder Voting Reflect Shareholder Preferences?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

=980422. Kamar, Ehud. 2006. “Does Shareholder Voting onDoes Shareholder Voting Reflect Shareholder Preferences?contests. The literature that does exist is methodologically

Listokin, Yair Jason

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Sandia National Laboratories Solar Reflection Panels  

Sandia National Laboratories Solar Reflection Panels HTTPS://IP.SANDIA.GOV Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia ...

228

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

229

Identification coding schemes for modulated reflectance systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An identifying coding apparatus employing modulated reflectance technology involving a base station emitting a RF signal, with a tag, located remotely from the base station, and containing at least one antenna and predetermined other passive circuit components, receiving the RF signal and reflecting back to the base station a modulated signal indicative of characteristics related to the tag.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Platts, David (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, David D. (Santa Fe, NM)

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Data Souvenirs: Environmental psychology and reflective design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical form of technology and its relationship to the surrounding environment is an important factor in design; we argue that this is especially true in the design of reflective technology. We suggest environmental psychology theory as a tool for ... Keywords: Design, Environmental psychology, Personal reflection, Tangible interfaces

Ryan Aipperspach; Ben Hooker; Allison Woodruff

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

232

Aging of reflective roofs: soot deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs remain cooler than absorptive roofs and thus conserve electricity otherwise needed for air conditioning. A currently controversial aspect of solar-reflective cool roofing is the extent to which an initially high solar reflectance decreases with time. We present experimental data on the spectral absorption of deposits that accumulate on roofs, and we attribute most of the absorption to carbon soot originally produced by combustion. The deposits absorb more at short wavelengths (e.g., in the blue) than in the red and infrared, imparting a slightly yellow tinge to formerly white surfaces. The initial rate of reflectance reduction by soot accumulation is consistent with known emission rates that are due to combustion. The long-term reflectance change appears to be determined by the ability of the soot to adhere to the roof, resisting washout by rain.

Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Rose, Leanna S.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Reflectance based optical fiber chemical sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film chemical sensor undergoes changes in reflective optical properties when exposed to a chemical species. A thin metal film is deposited at the end of an optical fiber, and exposure of the thin film to the chemical species causes changes in the effective thickness of the thin film, thereby changing its reflective properties. A chemical detection system based on the thin film sensor includes a light source and an optical divider for dividing light from the light source into a first and second light path. The first light path leads to circuitry for providing a reference signal. The thin film chemical sensor receives light from the second light path, and a photoelectric detector detects light reflected from the chemical sensor and provides an electrical signal representative of the reflected light. Circuitry is provided for comparing the reference signal with the reflected light signal, thereby providing a measurement signal indicative of the presence of the chemical species. 5 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Pfeifer, K.B.; Ricco, A.J.

1988-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

U-043: Attachmate Reflection Buffer Overflow in FTP Client Lets...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for HP version 14.x Reflection for UNIX and OpenVMS version 14.x Reflection for ReGIS Graphics version 14.x Reflection for IBM version 14.x Reflection X version 14.x ABSTRACT: A...

235

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. Total 135,676 127,682 120,936 133,646 119,888 93,672 1936-2012 PAD District 1 78,197 73,348 69,886 88,999 79,188 59,594 1981-2012...

237

Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic inhibition may help identify potential benefits of this medication in cocaine addiction.

Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance  

SciTech Connect

Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 ?m, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

B. R. Marshall

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

239

A viscoelastic representation of wave attenuation in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theories developed by White and co-workers describe the complex moduli of a medium partially saturated with spherical gas pockets and those of stratified layers composed of two heterogeneous porous media. A generalization to gas patches of arbitrary ... Keywords: Mesoscopic loss, Porous media, Wave attenuation, Zener model

Stefano Picotti; José M. Carcione; J. Germán Rubino; Juan E. Santos; Fabio Cavallini

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Rain Attenuation Prediction Model for Lagos at Millimeter Wave Bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“Rain Attenuation Prediction Model for Lagos at Millimeter Wave bands” is the subject of this work. Lagos (geog. Lat. 6.350N and Long. 3.20E), is a coastal station in the rain forest area in the South-Western Nigeria with an altitude of 380 ...

Abayomi Isiaka Yussuff; Nor Hisham Haji Khamis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

242

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

243

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

244

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

245

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

246

NETL: Utilization Projects - Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities The overall objective of this project is to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (arsenic, selenium and mercury) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion by-products. Specific objectives of the project are: 1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCB management sites (about 25 sites), including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; and 2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic and selenium species at 3 CCB sites. The fundamental or mechanistic data to reliably model many of the inorganics in CCB leachate are lacking. There is a large degree of uncertainty in the initial leachate concentrations, long-term leaching characteristics of CCBs, and the attenuation coefficients typically used in groundwater transport models. As a result, the model simulations are either highly conservative, or they can be manipulated to obtain almost any desired result. This research project will develop a coherent field leachate database and soil attenuation coefficients for improved modeling and evaluation of the potential for groundwater impacts at CCB management facilities. The work is focused on speciation of four key constituents at CCB sites: arsenic, selenium, chromium, and mercury. The proposed work will help to narrow the uncertainties in the range of values of these critical inputs and improve the accuracy of the modeling results.

247

Comparison of Reg. Guide 1.99 fluence attenuation methods  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1988, 'Radiation Embrittlement of Reactor Vessel Materials,' Regulatory Guide 1.99, Revision 2, Washington, D.C.) provides for the use of two substantially different methods for determining through-wall fluence in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. One method is a generic attenuation curve based on a simplistic exponential decay equation. Partly due to the simplicity of its application, the generic attenuation method is predominantly used for licensing calculations. However, it has a limitation in that at increasing distances away from the core belt-line, it becomes increasingly less accurate because it cannot account for neutron streaming effects in the cavity region surrounding the pressure vessel. The other attenuation method is based on a displacement per atom (dpa) calculation specific to the reactor vessel structure. The dpa method provides a more accurate representation of fluence attenuation through the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall at all elevations of the pressure vessel because it does account for neutron streaming in the cavity region. A requirement for using the dpa method, however, is an accurate flux solution through the RPV wall. This requirement has limited the use of traditional transport methods, such as discrete ordinates, that are limited by their treatment of cavity regions (i.e., air) outside the pressure vessel wall. TransWare Enterprises, under the sponsorship of EPRI and BWRVIR has developed an advanced three-dimensional transport methodology capable of producing fully converged flux solutions throughout the entire reactor system, including in the cavity region and primary shield structures. This methodology provides an accurate and reliable determination of through-wall fluence in boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessels, thus allowing the dpa method to be implemented with high reliability. Using this advanced 3-D methodology, this paper presents comparisons of the generic and dpa attenuation methods at critical locations in both BWR and PWR pressure vessel walls. (author)

Jones, E.N. [TransWare Enterprises Inc., 1565 Mediterranean Dr., Sycamore, IL 60178 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Proof Synthesis and Reflection for Linear Arithmetic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents detailed implementations of quantifier elimination for both integer and real linear arithmetic for theorem provers. The underlying algorithms are those by Cooper (for Z) and by Ferrante and Rackoff ... Keywords: Linear arithmetic, Proof synthesis, Reflection

Amine Chaieb; Tobias Nipkow

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Diffuse reflectance imaging with astronomical applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffuse objects generally tell us little about the surrounding lighting, since the radiance they reflect blurs together incident lighting from many directions. In this paper we discuss how occlusion geometry can help invert ...

Hasinoff, Samuel W.

250

Solar Reflection Panels - Energy Innovation Portal  

Patent 7,077,532: Solar reflection panels A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front ...

251

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Butler, PA); Turner, Brian (Damascus, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Propagation and Attenuation of Surge Voltages and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... reflected pulse appearing 740 ns later, from which a propagation speed of ... nonreflection obtained by terminating the line with a resistance equal to ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Reflective masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect

Extreme ultraviolet lithographic masks are made by patterning multilayer reflective coatings with high normal incidence reflectivity. Masks can be patterned by depositing a patterned absorber layer above the coating or by etching the pattern directly into the coating itself. Electromagnetic simulations showed that absorber-overlayer masks have superior imaging characteristics over etched masks (less sensitive to incident angles and pattern profiles). In an EUVL absorber overlayer mask, defects can occur in the mask substrate, reflective coating, and absorber pattern. Electromagnetic simulations showed that substrate defects cause the most severe image degradation. A printability study of substrate defects for absorber overlayer masks showed that printability of 25 nm high substrate defects are comparable to defects in optical lithography. Simulations also indicated that the manner in which the defects are covered by multilayer reflective coatings can affect printability. Coverage profiles that result in large lateral spreading of defect geometries amplify the printability of the defects by increasing their effective sizes. Coverage profiles of Mo/Si coatings deposited above defects were studied by atomic force microscopy and TEM. Results showed that lateral spread of defect geometry is proportional to height. Undercut at defect also increases the lateral spread. Reductions in defect heights were observed for 0.15 {mu}m wide defect lines. A long-term study of Mo/Si coating reflectivity revealed that Mo/Si coatings with Mo as the top layer suffer significant reductions in reflectivity over time due to oxidation.

Nguyen, Khanh Bao

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

256

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

257

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

259

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS S. H. Kim January 8, 2001 1. Introduction and Summary The ceramic beam chambers in the sections of the kicker magnets for the beam injection and extraction in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are made of alumina. The inner surface of the ceramic chamber is coated with a conductive paste. The choice of coating thickness is intended to reduce the shielding of the pulsed kicker magnetic field while containing the electromagnetic fields due to the beam bunches inside the chamber, and minimize the Ohmic heating due to the fields on the chamber [1]. The thin coating generally does not give a uniform surface resistivity for typical dimensions of the ceramic chambers in use. The chamber cross section is a circular or

260

Attenuation structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse widths Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Attenuation structure of Coso geothermal area, California, from wave pulse widths Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Pulse width data are used to invert for attenuation structure in the Coso geothermal area, California. The dataset consists of pulse width measurements of 838 microseismic events recorded on a seismic array of 16 downhole stations between August 1993 and March 1994. The quality factor Q correlates well with surface geology and surface heat flow observations. A broad region of low Q (≈ 30 to 37) is located at 0.5 to 1.2 km in depth below Devil's Kitchen, Nicol Prospects, and Coso Hot Springs. A vertical,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Attenuation and source properties at the Coso Geothermal Area, California |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source properties at the Coso Geothermal Area, California source properties at the Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Attenuation and source properties at the Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use a multiple-empirical Green's function method to determine source properties of small (M -0.4 to 1.3) earthquakes and P- and S-wave attenuation at the Coso Geothermal Field, California. Source properties of a previously identified set of clustered events from the Coso geothermal region are first analyzed using an empirical Green's function (EGF) method. Stress-drop values of at least 0.5-1 MPa are inferred for all of the events; in many cases, the corner frequency is outside the usable bandwidth, and the stress drop can only be constrained as being higher than

262

Monitored Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents - Moving Beyond Reuctive Dechlorination  

SciTech Connect

Monitored natural attenuation (MNA), while a remedy of choice for many sites, can be challenging when the contaminants are chlorinated solvents. Even with many high quality technical guidance references available there continue to be challenges implementing MNA at some chlorinated solvent sites. The U.S. Department of Energy, as one organization facing such challenges, is leading a project that will incorporate developing concepts and tools into the existing toolbox for selecting and implementing MNA as a remediation option at sites with chlorinated solvents contamination. The structure and goals of this project were introduced in an article in the Winter 2004 issue of Remediation (Sink et al.). This article is a summary of the three technical areas being developed through the project: mass balance, enhanced attenuation, and characterization and monitoring supporting the first two areas. These topics will be documented in separate reports available from the US Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information at www.osti.gov.

Vangelas, K

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Interlaboratory comparison of radiation-induced attenuation in optical fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of the losses induced in step index multimode, graded index multimode and single mode fibers by pulsed radiation exposure has been made among 12 laboratories over a period of 5 years. The recoveries of the incremental attenuations from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup 1} s are reported. Although a standard set of measurement parameters was attempted, differences between the laboratories are evident; possible origins for these are discussed. 18 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs.

Friebele, E.J.; Lyons, P.B.; Blackburn, J.C.; Henschel, H.; Johan, A.; Krinsky, J.A.; Robinson, A.; Schneider, W.; Smith, D.; Taylor, E.W. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (USA); Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (USA); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Trendanalysen (INT), Euskirchen (Germany, F.R.); Direction des Recherches, Etudes et Techni

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) Reflection Survey (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones. References E. L. Majer (2003) 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary

266

Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

Berdahl, P.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Reflection Survey At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After reviewing bids from six firms, LDG contracted with Bird Geophysical Services ("Bird") to conduct a test to determine if relatively small, spring-assisted, drop weights could be used to successfully acquire deep reflections. This test showed that the contractor could produce usable data to depths of more than 1,500 ms two-way travel time. (For a given velocity model, this two-way travel time is equivalent to several kilometers of depth penetration.) Subsequently, LDG used Bird's services to acquire new traverses totaling about 27.6 km (17.2 mi.) along roads leading through the

269

X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

Wang, Lily L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berry, Phillip C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reflection Survey (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Seismic Imaging, Majer, Gritto and Daley. The project objective includes the development and application of active seismic methods for improved understanding of the subsurface structure, faults, fractures lithology, and fluid paths in geothermal reservoirs. While the objective of the work previous to FY2003 was concerned with the detection and location of faults and fractures based on an existing 3-D seismic data set collected at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir, the current work was aimed at investigating

271

A Robust Estimator of Rainfall Rate Using Differential Reflectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional estimator of rainfall rate using reflectivity factor and differential reflectivity ZDR becomes unstable when the measured values of ZDR are small due to measurement errors. An alternate estimator of rainfall rate using reflectivity ...

Eugenio Gorgucca; Gianfranco Scarchilli; V. Chandrasekar

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

273

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

274

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

275

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Title Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5022E Year...

276

Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions Title Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and...

277

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces,transfer at the siding surface. Direct solar radiation tosiding, reflected solar radiation from nearby surfaces,

Hart, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

279

Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP)...

280

Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electrochromic window with high reflectivity modulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-layered, active, thin film, solid-state electrochromic device having a high reflectivity in the near infrared in a colored state, a high reflectivity and transmissivity modulation when switching between colored and bleached states, a low absorptivity in the near infrared, and fast switching times, and methods for its manufacture and switching are provided. In one embodiment, a multi-layered device comprising a first indium tin oxide transparent electronic conductor, a transparent ion blocking layer, a tungsten oxide electrochromic anode, a lithium ion conducting-electrically resistive electrolyte, a complimentary lithium mixed metal oxide electrochromic cathode, a transparent ohmic contact layer, a second indium oxide transparent electronic conductor, and a silicon nitride encapsulant is provided. Through elimination of optional intermediate layers, simplified device designs are provided as alternative embodiments. Typical colored-state reflectivity of the multi-layered device is greater than 50% in the near infrared, bleached-state reflectivity is less than 40% in the visible, bleached-state transmissivity is greater than 60% in the near infrared and greater than 40% in the visible, and spectral absorbance is less than 50% in the range from 0.65-2.5 .mu.m.

Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Gerouki, Alexandra (Medford, MA); Liu, Te-Yang (Arlington, MA); Goldner, Mark A. (Cambridge, MA); Haas, Terry E. (Southborough, MA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Land Surface Reflectance: A Possible Earth Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are in magenta, water bodies are outlined in white. MODIS Surface Reflectance South Africa From: E. Vermote, UMD correction (low, medium, high) ­ cloud and cloud shadow ­ snow flag ­ land/water flag · Supplemental information ­ Viewing geometry (view and solar zenith and azimuth angles) ­ Geolocation (lat

283

Dynamic shading enhancement for reflectance transformation imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a set of dynamic shading enhancement techniques for improving the perception of details, features, and overall shape characteristics from images created with Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) techniques. Selection of these perceptual ... Keywords: Visualization, cultural heritage shading enhancement, illumination, image processing

Gianpaolo Palma; Massimiliano Corsini; Paolo Cignoni; Roberto Scopigno; Mark Mudge

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Heat reflecting tape for thermoelectric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Threads are interlaced with thermoelectric wires to provide a woven cloth in tape form, there being an intermediate layer of heat radiation reflecting material (e.g., aluminum foil) insulated electrically from said wires, which are of opposite thermoelectric polarity and connected as a plurality of thermocouples.

Purdy, David L. (Indiana, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Reflected Solar Radiances from Regional Scale Scenes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of bi-directional reflectance models is presented for various atmospheric scene types. The models were composited from data collected from an aircraft platform in May-July 1979 during Summer MONEX. The space scale of the composited models ...

John M. Davis; Stephen K. Cox

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

287

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

288

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

289

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

290

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

291

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

292

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

293

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

294

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

295

Characterization of background reflectivity for MEDUSA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DARPA MEDUSA program goal is to detect, locate, and identify electro-optical threats in the vicinity of a moving platform. Laser sensing will be employed to find these threats by looking for anomalous reflections from threat sensors. However, the reflectivity variability (clutter) in both natural and manmade backgrounds will inherently limit target detection levels. In parallel with advanced component development by several aerospace contractors, a study of this clutter limitation was initiated in the long-wave (LW) and midwave (MW) infrared spectral regions to properly drive system design parameters. The analysis of clutter and associated limits on detection has been a major component of LANL efforts in laser remote sensing for non-proliferation. LANL is now analyzing existing data and conducting additional selected measurements in both the LWIR (9 and 10.6 pm) and MWIR (4.6 pm) in support of the DARPA program to increase our understanding of these clutter limitations and, thereby aid in the design and development of the MEDUSA system. The status of the LANL effort will be discussed. A variety of different natural and manmade target types have been investigated. Target scenes range from relatively low clutter sites typical of a southwestern desert to higher clutter downtown urban sites. Images are created by conducting raster scans across a scene interest. These images are then analyzed using data clustering techniques (e g K-means) to identify regions within the scene that contain similar reflectivity profiles. Data will be presented illustrating the reflectivity variability among different samples of the same target type, Le. within the same cluster, and among different data clusters. In general, it is found that the variability of reflectivities among similar targets is well represented by a log-normal distribution. Furthermore, manmade target tend to have higher reflectivities and more variability than natural targets. The implications of this observation for MEDUSA systems designed to locate and identify threat sensors will be discussed. The implications for chemical sensing applications will also be addressed.

Oldenborg, R. C. (Richard C.); Tiee, J. J. (Joe J.); Foy, B. R. (Bernard R.); Petrin, R. R. (Roger R.); Wilson, C. W. (Carl W.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Source attenuating HVAC equipment—Just the facts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current classroom designs range from NC 63 to NC 25. The ASA/ANSI 12.60 Classroom Standard sets a relatively low background sound requirement for classrooms. Achieving 12.60 levels economically requires the maximum in source sound attenuation. This paper will provide a manufacturer’s perspective on current and low noiseHVAC products and the resulting classroomsound levels. Predictive acoustics software will be used to predict the space sound power level and some indication of equipment cost will be provided in order to assist designers in what is the best approach to low noiseclassroom design.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

High-power radio-frequency attenuation device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Milwaukee Installer Reflects on His Career In Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Interested in joining America's solar workforce? One Milwaukee solar installer shares his career reflections and advice.

299

U.S. Reflects World Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: U.S. crude oil inventories reflect the world situation. U.S. inventories were drawn down in 1999 as world demand exceeded world supply of crude oil as OPEC cut back on production. Low crude oil inventories go hand in hand with low product inventories. Product inventories were also drawn down to help meet demand, as was seen with gasoline this Spring. The rise in crude oil inventories earlier this year, while indicating an improvement in the market balance, appears to be short-lived, just as we had predicted a few months ago. Looking at U.S. crude stock levels in April and May can be misleading, since increases then were more reflective of the surge in WTI and U.S. product prices in the 1st quarter. With U.S. crude oil stocks drawn down by more than 20 million barrels from

300

Modeling the effects of reflective roofing  

SciTech Connect

Roofing materials which are highly reflective to sunlight are currently being developed. Reflective roofing is an effective summertime energy saver in warm and sunny climates. It has been demonstrated to save up to 40% of the energy needed to cool a building during the summer months. Buildings without air conditioning can reduce their indoor temperatures and improve occupant comfort during the summer if highly reflective roofing materials are used. But there are questions about the tradeoff between summer energy savings and extra wintertime energy use due to reduced heat collection by the roof. These questions are being answered by simulating buildings in various climates using the DOE-2 program (version 2.1E). Unfortunately, DOE-2 does not accurately model radiative, convective and conductive processes in the roof-attic. Radiative heat transfer from the underside of a reflective roof is much smaller than that of a roof which absorbs heat from sunlight, and must be accounted for in the building energy model. Convection correlations for the attic and the roof surface must be fine tuned. An equation to model the insulation`s conductivity dependence on temperature must also be added. A function was written to incorporate the attic heat transfer processes into the DOE-2 building energy simulation. This function adds radiative, convective and conductive equations to the energy balance of the roof. Results of the enhanced DOE-2 model were compared to measured data collected from a school bungalow in a Sacramento Municipal Utility District monitoring project, with particular attention paid to the year-round energy effects.

Gartland, L.M.; Konopacki, S.J.; Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Total Ore Processing Integration and Management  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the technical progress achieved for project DE-FC26-03NT41785 (Total Ore Processing Integration and Management) during the period 01 January through 31 March of 2006. (1) Work in Progress: Minntac Mine--Graphical analysis of drill monitor data moved from two-dimensional horizontal patterns to vertical variations in measured and calculated parameters. The rock quality index and the two dimensionless ({pi}) indices developed by Kewen Yin of the University of Minnesota are used by Minntac Mine to design their blasts, but the drill monitor data from any given pattern is obviously not available for the design of that shot. Therefore, the blast results--which are difficult to quantify in a short time--must be back-analyzed for comparison with the drill monitor data to be useful for subsequent blast designs. {pi}{sub 1} indicates the performance of the drill, while {pi}{sub 2} is a measure of the rock resistance to drilling. As would be expected, since a drill tends to perform better in rock that offers little resistance, {pi}{sub 1} and {pi}{sub 2} are strongly inversely correlated; the relationship is a power function rather than simply linear. Low values of each Pi index tend to be quantized, indicating that these two parameters may be most useful above certain minimum magnitudes. (2) Work in Progress: Hibtac Mine--Statistical examination of a data set from Hibtac Mine (Table 1) shows that incorporating information on the size distribution of material feeding from the crusher to the autogenous mills improves the predictive capability of the model somewhat (43% vs. 44% correlation coefficient), but a more important component is production data from preceding days (26% vs. 44% correlation coefficient), determined using exponentially weighted moving average predictive variables. This lag effect likely reflects the long and varied residence times of the different size fragments in the grinding mills. The rock sizes are also correlated with the geologic layers from which they originate. Additional predictive parameters include electric power drawn by the crusher and the inverse of the average grind index of the ore being milled.

Leslie Gertsch

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

V-022: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities 2: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities V-022: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities November 13, 2012 - 1:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Attachmate Reflection Products Java Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Reflection X 2011 Reflection Suite for X 2011 Reflection for Secure IT Server for Windows Reflection for Secure IT Client and Server for UNIX ABSTRACT: Security issues related to Reflection PKI Services Manager REFERENCE LINKS: PKI Services Manager Technical Note 2560 Secunia Advisory SA51256 CVE-2012-0551 CVE-2012-1711 CVE-2012-1713 CVE-2012-1716 CVE-2012-1717 CVE-2012-1718 CVE-2012-1719 CVE-2012-1720 CVE-2012-1721 CVE-2012-1722 CVE-2012-1723 CVE-2012-1724 CVE-2012-1725 CVE-2012-1726 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Attachmate has acknowledged multiple vulnerabilities in some Reflection

305

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

306

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

307

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

308

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

309

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

310

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

313

Reflection and Transmission for Conformal Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider conformal defects joining two conformal field theories along a line. We define two new quantities associated to such defects in terms of expectation values of the stress tensors and we propose them as measures of the reflectivity and transmissivity of the defect. Their properties are investigated and they are computed in a number of examples. We obtain a complete answer for all defects in the Ising model and between certain pairs of minimal models. In the case of two conformal field theories with an enhanced symmetry we restrict ourselves to non-trivial defects that can be obtained by a coset construction.

Thomas Quella; Ingo Runkel; Gerard M. T. Watts

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fractionally total colouring Gn,p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fractional total chromatic number of G"n","p as p varies from 0 to 1. We also present an algorithm that computes the fractional total chromatic number of a random graph in polynomial expected time. Keywords: Fractional total colouring, Graph colouring, Random graphs

Conor Meagher; Bruce Reed

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

High-reflectivity Cr/Sc multilayer condenser for compact soft x-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condenser is a critical component in compact water-window x-ray microscopes as it influences the exposure time via its efficiency and the resolution via its numerical aperture. Normal-incidence multilayer mirrors can reach large geometrical collection efficiencies and match the numerical aperture of the zone plate but require advanced processing for high total reflectivity. In the present article we demonstrate large-diameter normal-incidence spherical Cr/Sc multilayer condensers with high and uniform reflectivity. Dc-magnetron sputtering was used to deposit 300 bilayers of Cr/Sc with a predetermined d-spacing matching the {lambda}=3.374 nm operating wavelength on spherical substrates. The mirrors show a uniform reflectivity of {approx}3% over the full 58 mm diameter condenser area. With these mirrors an improvement in exposure time by a factor of 10 was achieved, thereby improving the performance of the compact x-ray microscope significantly.

Stollberg, H.; Yulin, S.; Takman, P. A. C.; Hertz, H. M. [Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fraunhofer-Institut fur Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

317

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

318

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

319

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

320

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

322

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

323

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

324

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

325

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

326

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

327

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

328

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

329

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

330

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

331

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

332

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

333

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

334

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

335

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

336

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

337

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

338

Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes an envelope with a discharge forming fill disposed therein which emits light, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the absorbed light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill, a source of microwave energy coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity and configured to reflect at least some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length.

MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A replaceable reflective film for solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 3M Company manufactures a silvered acrylic film called ECP-305 that is regarded as the preferred reflective film for use on stretched-membrane heliostats. However, ECP-305 will degrade in time, due to both corrosion of the silver layer and delamination at the film's silver-to-acrylic interface, and will eventually need to be replaced. 3M uses a very aggressive adhesive on this film, and once it is laminated, replacement is very difficult. The purpose of this investigation was the development of a replaceable reflector, a reflective film that can be easily removed and replaced. A replaceable reflector was successfully configured by laminating ECP-305 to the top surface of a smooth, dimensionally stable polymer film, with a removable adhesive applied to the underside of the polymer film. Several stages of screening and testing led to the selection of a 0.010-inch thick polycarbonate (GE 8030) as the best polymer film and a medium tack tape (3M Y-9425) was selected as the best removable adhesive. To demonstrate the feasibility of the replaceable reflector concept and to provide a real-time field test, the chosen construction was successfully applied to the 50-m{sup 2} SKI heliostat at the Central Receiver Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. 4 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Reflection-Based Python-C++ Bindings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Python is a flexible, powerful, high-level language with excellent interactive and introspective capabilities and a very clean syntax. As such, it can be a very effective tool for driving physics analysis. Python is designed to be extensible in low-level C-like languages, and its use as a scientific steering language has become quite widespread. To this end, existing and custom-written C or C++ libraries are bound to the Python environment as so-called extension modules. A number of tools for easing the process of creating such bindings exist, such as SWIG and Boost. Python. Yet, the process still requires a considerable amount of effort and expertise. The C++ language has few built-in introspective capabilities, but tools such as LCGDict and CINT add this by providing so-called dictionaries: libraries that contain information about the names, entry points, argument types, etc. of other libraries. The reflection information from these dictionaries can be used for the creation of bindings and so the process can be fully automated, as dictionaries are already provided for many end-user libraries for other purposes, such as object persistency. PyLCGDict is a Python extension module that uses LCG dictionaries, as PyROOT uses CINT reflection information, to allow /cwPython users to access C++ libraries with essentially no preparation on the users' behalf. In addition, and in a similar way, PyROOT gives ROOT users access to Python libraries.

Generowicz, Jacek; Lavrijsen, Wim T.L.P.; Marino, Massimo; Mato, Pere

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

342

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

343

Measurement of radio wave reflection due to temperature rising from rock salt and ice irradiated by an electron beam for an ultra-high-energy neutrino detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra-high-energy neutrino (UHE{nu}) gives temperature rise along the hadronic and electromagnetic shower when it enters into rock salt or ice. Permittivities of them arise with respect the temperatures at ionization processes of the UHE{nu} shower. It is expected by Fresnel's formula that radio wave reflects at the irregularity of the permittivity in the medium. We had found the radio wave reflection effect in rock salt. The reflection effect and long attenuation length of radio wave in rock salt and ice would yield a new UHE{nu} detection method. An experiment for ice was performed to study the reflection effect. A coaxial tube was filled with rock salt powder or ice. Open end of the coaxial tube was irradiated by a 2 MeV electron beam. Radio wave of 435 MHz was introduced to the coaxial tube. We measured the reflection wave from the open end. We found the radio wave reflection effect due to electron beam irradiation in ice as well as in rock salt.

Tanikawa, Takahiro; Chiba, Masami; Kamijo, Toshio; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Ohsawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Seikei University, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180-8633 (Japan); Department of Applied Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); School of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo-shi, Shimane 693-8501 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

Satellite-Observed Reflectance of Snow and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of snow and cloud cover on bidirectional reflectance were examined using visible radiation (0.5–0.7 ?m) data measured by NOAA polar orbiting satellites between June 1974 and February 1978. Reflectances resulting from different cloud/...

Alan Robock; Dale Kaiser

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Narrowband to Broadband Conversion with Spatially Autocorrelated Reflectance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for estimating broadband reflectance from Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) narrowband reflectances in channel 1 and 2 is developed. The data used are simultaneous and coincident narrowband and broadband ...

Zhanqing Li; H. G. Leighton

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

RefaFlex: safer refactorings for reflective Java programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If programs access types and members through reflection, refactoring tools cannot guarantee that refactorings on those programs are behavior preserving. Refactoring approaches for highly reflective languages like Smalltalk therefore check behavior preservation ...

Andreas Thies; Eric Bodden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reflected Fluxes for Broken Clouds over a Lambertian Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for broken cloudiness (i.e., nonplane parallel) as a function of cloud cover, cloud optical depth, solar zenith angle and surface albedo. These calculations extend previous results for broken cloud reflected fluxes ...

Ronald M. Welch; Bruce A. Wielicki

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Reconstruction of shape and reflectance properties based on visual hull  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method based on Visual Hull is proposed for simultaneously recovering an object's shape and its reflectance properties from multiple images. Here, the reflectance properties are described by the Ward BRDF model. Firstly, the shape represented by voxels ...

Zuoyong Zheng; Lizhuang Ma; Zhong Li; Zhihua Chen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Low-Latitude Reflection of Rossby Wave Trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear reflection of an isolated Rossby wave train at a low-latitude wave-breaking region is contrasted with the more familiar longitudinally periodic case. General theoretical arguments for nonlinear reflection based on absorptivity ...

G. Brunet; P. H. Haynes

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Modeling the effect of reflection from metallic walls on spectroscopic measurements  

SciTech Connect

A modification of JET is presently being prepared to bring operational experience with ITER-like first wall (Be) and divertor (W) materials, geometry and plasma parameters. Reflectivity measurements of JET sample tiles have been performed and the data are used within a simplified model of the JET and ITER vessels to predict additional contributions to quantitative spectroscopic measurements. The most general method to characterize reflectivity is the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF). For extended sources however, such as bremsstrahlung and edge emission of fuel and intrinsic impurities, the results obtained in the modeling are almost as accurate if the total reflectivity with ideal Lambertian angular dependence is used. This is in contrast to the experience in other communities, such as optical design, lighting design, or rendering who deal mostly with pointlike light sources. This result is so far based on a very limited set of measurements and will be reassessed when more detailed BRDF measurements of JET tiles have been made. If it is true it offers the possibility of in situ monitoring of the reflectivity of selected parts of the wall during exposure to plasma operation, while remeasurement of the BRDF is performed during interventions. For a closed vessel structure such as ITER, it is important to consider multiple reflections. This makes it more important to represent the whole of the vessel reasonably accurately in the model, which on the other hand is easier to achieve than for the more complex internal structure of JET. In both cases the dominant contribution is from the first reflection, and a detailed model of the areas intersected by lines of sight of diagnostic interest is required.

Zastrow, K.-D. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Keatings, S. R.; O'Mullane, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XQ (United Kingdom); Marot, L. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Temmerman, G. de [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Basel, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Use of Batch and Column Methodologies to Assess Utility Waste Leaching and Subsurface Chemical Attenuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Often, a combination of batch and column methods is used in the laboratory to test wastes for leaching and attenuation potentials. This literature review addresses the strengths and limitations of using these two methods to predict leachate generation and subsequent attenuation at coal combustion waste management sites.

1991-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

ALGORITHMS FOR JOINT ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND EMISSION IMAGES IN PET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALGORITHMS FOR JOINT ESTIMATION OF ATTENUATION AND EMISSION IMAGES IN PET Hakan Erdogan IBM TJ information about the at- tenuating medium. To use all the available information, we propose a joint in these two scans, one can derive a joint objective function based on both scans to jointly estimate attenu

Erdogan, Hakan

353

Joint Estimation of Attenuation and Emission Images from PET Scans Hakan Erdogan and Jeffrey A. Fessler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint Estimation of Attenuation and Emission Images from PET Scans Hakan Erdogan and Jeffrey A information about the attenuating medium. To use all the available information, we propose a joint estimation optimal use of the information in these two scans, one can derive a joint objective function based on both

Erdogan, Hakan

354

Seismic-frequency attenuation and moduli estimates using a fiber-optic strainmeter Ludmila Adam 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-frequency attenuation and moduli estimates using a fiber-optic strainmeter = /(2n), where is the wavelength of light of strain gages, fiber-optic and ultrasonic data. * Not enough light was received at the detector (mirrorsSeismic-frequency attenuation and moduli estimates using a fiber-optic strainmeter Ludmila Adam 1

355

Parameters Affecting Water Hammer Wave Attenuation, Shape by Anton Bergant1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(hydroelectric power plant, pumping system) and damage the system components; for example pipe displacementParameters Affecting Water Hammer Wave Attenuation, Shape and Timing by Anton Bergant1 and Arris.s.tijsseling@TUE.nl This paper investigates parameters that may affect water hammer wave attenuation, shape and timing. Possible

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

356

Calibration of neutron-yield diagnostics in attenuating and scattering environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have performed absolute calibrations of a fusion-neutron-yield copper-activation diagnostic in environments that significantly attenuate and scatter neutrons. We have measured attenuation and scattering effects and have compared the measurements to Monte Carlo simulations using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code. We find that measurements and simulations are consistent within 10%.

Hahn, K. D.; Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; McWatters, B. R.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87111 (United States); Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J. [University of New Mexico, Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

EIA projections for carbon dioxide emissions reflect changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... The lowered projections reflect both market and policy developments that have reduced recent and projected ...

358

Oxide Multilayer Thermal Radiation Energy Reflection EBCs: Effect ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with thermal radiation energy reflection have been developed recently. The EBCs utilize interaction between ...

359

Reflection and transmission at dimensional boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein compactification of a higher dimensional spacetime may give rise to an effective 4d spacetime with distinct domains having different sizes of the extra dimensions. The domains are separated by domain walls generated by the extra dimensional scale factor. The scattering of electromagnetic and massive particle waves at such boundaries is examined here for models without warping or branes. We consider the limits corresponding to thin (thick) domain walls, i.e., limits where wavelengths are large (small) in comparison to wall thickness. We also obtain numerical solutions for a wall of arbitrary thickness and extract the reflection and transmission coefficients as functions of frequency. Results are obtained which qualitatively resemble those for electroweak domain walls and other "ordinary" domain walls for 4d theories.

Nelson De Leon; John Morris

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Autonomous recovery from hostile code insertion using distributed reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a hostile environment, an autonomous cognitive system requires a reflective capability to detect problems in its own operation and recover from them without external intervention. We present an architecture in which reflection is distributed so that ... Keywords: Anomaly, Immune systems, Meta-level, Quality-monitoring, Reflection, Self-repair

Catriona M Kennedy; Aaron Sloman

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

363

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

364

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

365

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

366

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

367

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

368

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

369

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

370

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

371

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

372

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

373

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

374

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

375

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

376

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

377

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

378

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

379

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

380

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

382

Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions,...

383

Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

384

Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

385

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

386

Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Former ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd)a New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 14. Refinery Sales During 2005

387

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

388

The Effect of Temperature on Attenuation-Correction Schemes in Rain Using Polarization Propagation Differential Phase Shift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several investigators propose estimating the rates of attenuation using the difference in the phase with increasing distance between horizontally and vertically polarized microwaves. These attenuation estimates can then be used to correct ...

A. R. Jameson

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Layered 3D: tomographic image synthesis for attenuation-based light field and high dynamic range displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop tomographic techniques for image synthesis on displays composed of compact volumes of light-attenuating material. Such volumetric attenuators recreate a 4D light field or high-contrast 2D image when illuminated ...

Wetzstein, Gordon

390

Water-Moderated and -Reflected Slabs of Uranium Oxyfluoride  

SciTech Connect

A series of ten experiments were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiment Facility in December 1955, and January 1956, in an attempt to determine critical conditions for a slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). These experiments were recorded in an Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Logbook and results were published in a journal of the American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Science and Engineering, by J. K. Fox, L. W. Gilley, and J. H. Marable (Reference 1). The purpose of these experiments was to obtain the minimum critical thickness of an effectively infinite slab of UO2F2 solution by extrapolation of experimental data. To do this the slab thickness was varied and critical solution and water-reflector heights were measured using two different fuel solutions. Of the ten conducted experiments eight of the experiments reached critical conditions but the results of only six of the experiments were published in Reference 1. All ten experiments were evaluated from which five critical configurations were judged as acceptable criticality safety benchmarks. The total uncertainty in the acceptable benchmarks is between 0.25 and 0.33 % ?k/keff. UO2F2 fuel is also evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-043, HEU-SOL-THERM-011, and HEU-SOL-THERM-012, but these those evaluation reports are for large reflected and unreflected spheres. Aluminum cylinders of UO2F2 are evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-050.

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Clinton Gross

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

High resolution seismic attenuation tomography at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano, a broad shield volcano about 50km east of Mount Shasta in northern California, produced rhylotic eruptions as recently as 400 years ago. Because of this recent activity it is of considerable interest to producers of geothermal energy. In a joint project sponsored by the Geothermal Research Program of the USGS and the Division of Geothermal and Hydropower Division of the US-DOE, the USGS and LLNL conducted an active seismic experiment designed to explore the area beneath and around the caldera. The experiment of eight explosions detonated in a 50 km radius circle around the volcano recorded on a 11 x 15 km grid of 140 seismographs. The travel time data from the experiment have been inverted for structure and are presented elsewhere in this volume. In this paper we present the results of an inversion for 1/Q structure using t* data in a modified Aki inversion scheme. Although the data are noisy, we find that in general attenuative zones correlate with low velocity zones. In particular, we observe a high 1/Q zone roughly in the center of the caldera at 4 km depth in between two large recent dacite flows. This zone could represent the still molten or partially molten source of the flows.

Zucca, J.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

OPEC 1991 results reflect hard times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that low crude oil prices and economic tough times in industrial countries cause a lean 1991 for members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. OPEC's 1991 annual report the member countries reported an overall loss of $12 billion in 1991 on oil revenues that fell 16.2%. Iraq and Kuwait were not included because of their unusual circumstances in the wake of the Persian Gulf war. Reduced oil revenues reflected a slide to $18.66/bbl in 1991 from $22.26/bbl in 1990 for the average price of OPEC basket crudes. As of last June 5 OPEC's basket crude price has averaged only $17.42/bbl this year, OPEC News Agency (Opecna) reported. First quarter 1992 prices averaged $16.77/bbl, compared wit $19.31/bbl in fourth quarter 1991. The average price jumped 52 cent/bbl the first week in June this year to $19.93/bbl, bouyed by Saudi Arabia's move at the end of May to shift its policy from price moderation to one in favor of higher prices, Opecna the. OPEC members increased production 1% in 1991 to an average 23.28 million b/d in spite of negligible production from Iraq and Kuwait and reduced production from Qatar.

Not Available

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nuclear attenuation of three-hadron systems in neutrino-induced reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time, the nuclear attenuation of three hadron systems is studied in neutrino-induced reactions using the data obtained with SKAT bubble chamber. The strongest attenuation (R_3 ~ 0.6) is observed for a system carrying an overwhelming fraction of the current quark energy, as well as for a system with the smallest effective mass. An indication is obtained that the correlation effects in the nuclear attenuation play only a minor role. The experimental data are compared with predictions of the quark string fragmentation model.

N. M. Agababyan; L. Grigorian; N. Grigoryan; H. Gulkanyan; A. A. Ivanilov; Zh. Karamyan; V. A. Korotkov

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

406

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

407

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

409

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

410

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

411

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

412

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

413

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

414

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

415

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

416

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

417

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

418

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

419

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

420

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

422

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

423

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

424

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

426

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

436

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal",...

439

Velocity and Attenuation Structure of the Geysers Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. The resource consists of primarily dry steam which is produced from a low, porosity fractured graywacke. Over the last several years steam pressure at the Geysers has been dropping. Concern over decline of the resource has prompted research to understand its fundamental nature. A key issue is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and attenuation data at the Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of approximately 300 earthquakes that are of magnitude 1.2 and are distributed in depth between sea level and 2.5 km. Using compressional-wave arrival times, we invert for earthquake location, origin time, and velocity along a three-dimensional grid. Using the initial pulse width of the compressional-wave, we invert for the initial pulse width associated with the source, and the one-dimensional Q structure. We find that the velocity structure correlates with known mapped geologic units, including a velocity high that is correlated with a felsite body at depth that is known from drilling. The dry steam reservoir, which is also known from drilling, is mostly correlated with low velocity. The Q increases with depth to the top of the dry steam reservoir and decreases with depth within the reservoir. The decrease of Q with depth probably indicates that the saturation of the matrix of the reservoir rock increases with depth.

Zucca, J. J.; Hutchings, L. J.; Kasameyer, P. W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

THE ROLE FUNGI AND YEAST IN MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION  

SciTech Connect

Fungi and yeast have been characterized as important components in the bioremediation of organic contaminants in soil and water including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); however, research into their ability to metabolize these compounds in extreme environments has been limited. In this work forty-three fungi and yeasts were isolated from a PAH-contaminated sludge waste lagoon in Poland. The lagoon was part of a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study where natural reduction of PAHs and associated toxicity over time in non-disturbed areas of the sludge lagoon indicated MNA activity. The microorganisms were initially isolated on minimal medium containing naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. Fungal isolates were then maintained on MEA and identified based on microscopic examination and BIOLOG{reg_sign}. The analysis identified several of the fungal isolates as belonging to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Aspergillus, and Eupenicillium. Yeasts included Candida parapsilosis and C. fluvialitis. Further microbial characterization revealed that several isolates were capable of rowing on acidified media of pH 4, 3, and 2.5. Over twenty percent of the fungi demonstrated growth as low as pH 2.5. Of the 43 isolates examined, 24 isolates exhibited growth at 5 C. Nine of the fungal isolates exhibiting growth at 5 C were then examined for metabolic activity using a respirometer testing metabolic activity at pH 3. Microcosm studies confirmed the growth of the fungi on PAH contaminated sediment as the sole carbon and energy source with elevated metabolic rates indicating evidence of MNA. Our findings suggest that many of the Poland fungal isolates may be of value in the bioremediation processes in acidic waste sites in northern climates typical of Northern Europe.

Brigmon, R.; Abe, M.; Johnson, B.; Simpson, W.; Mckinsey, P.

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site Paper presented at the Waste Management 2010 Conference. March 7 through March 10, 2010, Phoenix, Arizona. W.J.Waugh, D.E. Miller, S.A. Morris, L.R. Sheader, E.P. Glenn, D. Moore, K.C. Carroll, L. Benally, M. Roanhorse, R.P. Bush Natural and Enhanced Attenuation of Soil and Groundwater at the Monument Valley, Arizona, DOE Legacy Waste Site More Documents & Publications EA-1313: Final Environmental Assessment Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary

442

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of eastern California. SV and P wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles,

443

Analysis of site parameters affecting natural attenuation in saturated soil. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the natural attenuation mechanisms and some of the parameters affecting those mechanisms in the saturated zone. A literature search revealed numerous studies of various attenuation and the associated parameters. Much of the literature emphasized biodegradation as the most promising attenuation mechanism. BIOPLUME II(TM), a fate and transport model, was used to simulate the fate and transport of contaminant plume. The effects of the model parameters were investigated by observing the distance a contaminant plume was expected to migrate over a fifty year period. The investigation was limited by the model which excludes chemical reactions and some physical and physiochemical reactions. The model simulations indicated that parameters which exhibited significant influence on natural attenuation include hydraulic conductivity, reaeration, and coefficient of anaerobic biodegradation.

Potts, W.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools,...

445

Rain Attenuation of Radar Echoes Considering Finite-Range Resolution and Using Drop Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical rain attenuation correction scheme of Hitschfeld and Bordan (HIBO) and the newer iterative approach by Hildebrand (HL) are reconsidered. Although the motivation for the HL algorithm was an extension into ranges, where HIBO tends to ...

Gerhard Peters; Bernd Fischer; Marco Clemens

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation on the Bioavailability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation of contaminants in the terrestrial environment is greatly affected by a number of chemical factors and processes its fate, transport, and bioavailability. Traditionally, chemical extraction techniques have been

Sparks, Donald L.

447

A Simulation of the Optical Attenuation of TPB Coated Light-guide Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This note describes simple simulations which were performed in order to understand the attenuation behaviors of acrylic light-guides operated in air and argon, which were characterized in \\cite{Baptista:2012bf}. Whilst these simulations are only at the level of sophistication of a toy model, they illustrate interesting non-exponential light attenuation effects and the differences between operating light-guide based detectors in argon and air environments. We investigate the effects of surface absorption, surface roughness and wavelength dependence, and use a model tuned on the light-guide attenuation curve measured in air to make a prediction of the light-guide attenuation curve in argon. This curve is compared with data from a liquid argon test stand, and an improvement over a simple exponential model is observed.

Jones, B J P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Meteorological Parameterization of Specific Attenuation and Polarization Differential Phase Shift in Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the theoretical bases and detailed polynomial expressions applicable to a wide range of naturally occurring drop size distributions for more accurate parameterizations of the specific attenuations at both horizontal and ...

A. R. Jameson

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Intrinsic Ambiguities in the Retrieval of Rain Rates from Radar Returns at Attenuating Wavelengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that there are significant deterministic ambiguities inherent in trying to determine the particular rain-rate profile that produced some given sequence of air- or spaceborne radar echo powers at a single attenuating frequency. ...

Ziad S. Haddad; Eastwood Im; Stephen L. Durden

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Trends in Attenuation Coefficients in Athens, Greece, from 1954 to 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unsworth and Monteith's attenuation coefficient TUM was calculated from midday cloudless sky data in Athens, Greece, for the period 1954 to 1991. An interdependence between TUM and the Linke factor TL was found and is expressed as a mathematical ...

C. P. Jacovides; N. A. Kaltsounides; G. P. Giannourakos; G. B. Kallos

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

LBNL-5022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Authors: R. Hart*, C. Curcija, D. Arasteh, H. Goudey, C. Kohler, S. Selkowitz Environmental Energy Technologies...

452

Experimental Cell for Neutron Reflection on Lithium Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Experimental Cell for Neutron Reflection on Lithium Manganese Oxide to Study the Electrode/Electrolyte Interface. Author(s), Brian Kitchen.

453

Measuring solar reflectance-Part II: Review of practical methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Review of practical methods Title Measuring solar reflectance-Part II: Review of practical methods Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Levinson,...

454

Reflection and transmission resonances and accuracy of the wkb method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we calculate the transmission and reflection amplitudes of wave functions for different potentials such as the delta function, the rectangular barrier, the Eckart potential, and the Hulthen potential. We describe the relationship between these amplitudes and compute the reflection resonances between each potential. We describe the transmission and reflection probabilities using the WKB formula and compare the results with ones obtained from matching the boundary conditions. Furthermore, we use a two by two transfer matrix to calculate a rigorous bound on the transmission and reflection probabilities.

Tritos Ngampitipan; Petarpa Boonserm

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

455

Improvement of retrieved reflectance in the presence of clouds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many algorithms exist to invert airborne imagery from units of either radiance or sensor specific digital counts to units of reflectance. These compensation algorithms remove… (more)

Bartlett, Brent

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Rail traffic reflects more oil production, less coal-fired ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The record increase in U.S. crude oil production during 2012 and the significant decline in coal use for domestic electricity generation were reflected in the ...

457

High-Temperature Reactor for Diffuse Reflectance Infrared ...  

High-Temperature Reactor for Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier-Transform Spectroscopy Note: The technology described above is an early stage ...

458

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique...

459

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique...

460

Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Area (Goranson, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ADVANCING THE SCIENCE OF NATURAL AND ENHANCED ATTENUATION FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a three-year program that addressed key scientific and technical aspects related to natural and enhanced attenuation of chlorinated organics. The results from this coordinated three-year program support a variety of technical and regulatory advancements. Scientists, regulators, engineers, end-users and stakeholders participated in the program, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). A key result of the recent effort was the general affirmation of the approaches and guidance in the original U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chlorinated solvent MNA protocols and directives from 1998 and 1999, respectively. The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well as in the technical and regulatory documents being developed within the ITRC. Natural attenuation processes occur in all soil and groundwater systems and act, to varying degrees, on all contaminants. Thus, a decision to rely on natural attenuation processes as part of a site-remediation strategy does not depend on the occurrence of natural attenuation, but on its effectiveness in meeting site-specific remediation goals. Meeting these goals typically requires low risk, plume stability, and documentation of accepted and sustainable attenuation processes. Plume stability and sustainability depend on the balance between contaminant loading into the plume and contaminant attenuation within the plume. This ''mass balance'' is a simple and powerful idea that developed into the central framework for all aspects of the DOE MNA/EA program. The centrality of mass balance has been advocated by Chapelle and others (e.g., 1995) for several years, and the concepts proved to be critical to conceptualizing natural attenuation remedies, designing enhancements, developing characterization and monitoring strategies, and developing regulatory decision frameworks that encourage broader use of MNA/EA with clarified technical responsibility.

Looney, B; TOM O. EARLY, T; TYLER GILMORE, T; FRANCIS H. CHAPELLE, F; NORMAN H. CUTSHALL, N; JEFF ROSS, J; MARK ANKENY, M; Michael Heitkamp, M; DAVID MAJOR, D; CHARLES J. NEWELL, C; W. JODY WAUGH, W; GARY WEIN, G; Karen Vangelas, K; Karen-M Adams, K; CLAIRE H. SINK, C

2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

463

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

464

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

465

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

466

Blogs, reflective practice and student-centered learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blogging can be used to enhance education by encouraging reflective practice. We present a study in which a final year HCI course was constructed around regular blogging activity. We discuss the role of blogs in providing a social mechanism for the student ... Keywords: blogging, cultural probe, education, reflective practice

Russell Beale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Technical Section: Linear approximation of Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various empirical and theoretical models of the surface reflectance have been introduced so far. Most of these models are based on functions with non-linear parameters and therefore faces some computational difficulties involved in non-linear optimization ... Keywords: BRDF representation, Linear models, Principal components, Reflection models, Rendering

Aydin Ozturk; Murat Kurt; Ahmet Bilgili; Cengiz Gungor

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Efficient virtual machine support of runtime structural reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing trends towards adaptive, distributed, generative and pervasive software have made object-oriented dynamically typed languages become increasingly popular. These languages offer dynamic software evolution by means of reflection, facilitating ... Keywords: Dynamically typed languages, JIT compilation, Prototype-based object-oriented model, SSCLI, Structural reflection, Virtual machine

Francisco Ortin; Jose Manuel Redondo; J. Baltasar García Perez-Schofield

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A total risk assessment methodology for security assessment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performed a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a new collaborative risk assessment method to enable decision makers to fully consider the interrelationships between threat, vulnerability, and consequence. A five-step Total Risk Assessment Methodology was developed to enable interdisciplinary collaborative risk assessment by experts from these disciplines. The objective of this process is promote effective risk management by enabling analysts to identify scenarios that are simultaneously achievable by an adversary, desirable to the adversary, and of concern to the system owner or to society. The basic steps are risk identification, collaborative scenario refinement and evaluation, scenario cohort identification and risk ranking, threat chain mitigation analysis, and residual risk assessment. The method is highly iterative, especially with regard to scenario refinement and evaluation. The Total Risk Assessment Methodology includes objective consideration of relative attack likelihood instead of subjective expert judgment. The 'probability of attack' is not computed, but the relative likelihood for each scenario is assessed through identifying and analyzing scenario cohort groups, which are groups of scenarios with comparable qualities to the scenario being analyzed at both this and other targets. Scenarios for the target under consideration and other targets are placed into cohort groups under an established ranking process that reflects the following three factors: known targeting, achievable consequences, and the resources required for an adversary to have a high likelihood of success. The development of these target cohort groups implements, mathematically, the idea that adversaries are actively choosing among possible attack scenarios and avoiding scenarios that would be significantly suboptimal to their objectives. An adversary who can choose among only a few comparable targets and scenarios (a small comparable target cohort group) is more likely to choose to attack the specific target under analysis because he perceives it to be a relatively unique attack opportunity. The opposite is also true. Thus, total risk is related to the number of targets that exist in each scenario cohort group. This paper describes the Total Risk Assessment Methodology and illustrates it through an example.

Aguilar, Richard; Pless, Daniel J.; Kaplan, Paul Garry; Silva, Consuelo Juanita; Rhea, Ronald Edward; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Improving Earthquake-Explosion Discrimination using Attenuation Models of the Crust and Upper Mantle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past year, we have made significant progress on developing and calibrating methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using high-frequency regional P/S amplitude ratios. Closely-spaced earthquakes and explosions generally discriminate easily using this method, as demonstrated by recordings of explosions from test sites around the world. In relatively simple geophysical regions such as the continental parts of the Yellow Sea and Korean Peninsula (YSKP) we have successfully used a 1-D Magnitude and Distance Amplitude Correction methodology (1-D MDAC) to extend the regional P/S technique over large areas. However in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East, or the mixed oceanic-continental paths for the YSKP the lateral variations in amplitudes are not well predicted by 1-D corrections and 1-D MDAC P/S discrimination over broad areas can perform poorly. We have developed a new technique to map 2-D attenuation structure in the crust and upper mantle. We retain the MDAC source model and geometrical spreading formulation and use the amplitudes of the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg), to develop a simultaneous multi-phase approach to determine the P-wave and S-wave attenuation of the lithosphere. The methodology allows solving for attenuation structure in different depth layers. Here we show results for the P and S-wave attenuation in crust and upper mantle layers. When applied to the Middle East, we find variations in the attenuation quality factor Q that are consistent with the complex tectonics of the region. For example, provinces along the tectonically-active Tethys collision zone (e.g. Turkish Plateau, Zagros) have high attenuation in both the crust and upper mantle, while the stable outlying regions like the Indian Shield generally have low attenuation. In the Arabian Shield, however, we find that the low attenuation in this Precambrian crust is underlain by a high-attenuation upper mantle similar to the nearby Red Sea Rift. Applying this 2-D MDAC methodology with the new attenuation models can significantly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional P/S amplitude ratios. We demonstrate applications of this technique, including a study at station NIL (Nilore, Pakistan) using broad area earthquakes and the 1998 Indian nuclear explosion using a number of regional amplitude ratio discriminants. We are currently applying the technique in the YSKP region as well.

Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M; Rodgers, A J; Ford, S R; Gok, R; Sweeney, J J

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

471

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 1989 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the crustul structure of the Coso geothermal system Notes In mid-1989 the authors designed and collected four seismic reflection/refraction profiles that addressed the crustal structure of the Coso geothermal field. The two main east-west and north-south profiles crossed at the southeastern most base of Sugar Loaf Mountain. Both in-line and cross-line Vibroseis and explosion data were recorded on each of these

472

Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A reflection survey was done to analyze the brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Notes The relationships between upper crustal faults, the brittle-ductile transition zone, and underlying magmatic features imaged by multifold seismic reflection data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Coso geothermal field, which lies within an extensional step-over between dextral faults, is a young, actively developing metamorphic core complex.

473

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Abstract Seismic reflection data were collected in two geothermalareas in Nevada to support geologic structural models andgeothermal well targeting. The data were integrated withsurface mapping, well results, and other geophysical data inconceptual geologic models in both areas. Faults wereinterpreted from reflection data based on reflector offsetsand apparent fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well targeting based on the conceptualstructural model

474

Starting From Total Shutdown Initial Position  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and exposed to atmospheric pressure will destroy pump oil. #12;#12;Starting From Total Shutdown Initial Position: · Roughing pump: OFF · Forepump: OFF · Diff. pump-Vent to CENTER position. 5. Open Accumulator Valve 6. Turn on diffusion pump. Repeller light should go on

McCombe, Bruce D.

475

Total knee arthroplasty and evaluation of rehabilitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As surgical techniques and biocompatibility of the biomaterials develop, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has already been a mature medical technology. However, there are still a considerable number of adverse incidents for knee arthroplasty surgeries every ... Keywords: TKA, knee joint score, postoperative rehabilitation, preoperative rehabilitation

Xianqiang Mi; Fuqing Zhong; Zhaodan Lu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Total pressing Indonesian gas development, exports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total is on track to become Indonesia's leading gas exporter by the turn of the century. Total's aggressive development of its Mahakam Delta acreage in East Kalimantan is intended to keep pace with growing liquefied natural gas demand, mainly from Japan but also increasingly from South Korea and Taiwan. A frantic scramble is under way among natural gas suppliers in the Pacific Rim region, particularly those with current LNG export facilities, to accommodate projections of soaring natural gas demand in the region. Accordingly, Total's Indonesian gas production goal is the centerpiece of a larger strategy to become a major player in the Far East Asia gas scene. Its goals also fall in line with Indonesia's. Facing flat or declining oil production while domestic oil demand continues to soar along with a rapidly growing economy, Indonesia is heeding some studies that project the country could become a net oil importer by the turn of the century. The paper describes Total's Far East strategy, the Mahakam acreage which it operates, the shift to gas development, added discoveries, future development, project spending levels, and LNG export capacity.

Not Available

1994-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

477

U.S. Propane Total Stocks  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: U.S. inventories of propane benefited from a late pre-season build that pushed inventories to over 65 million barrels by early November 2000, the second highest peak pre-heating season level since 1986. Although propane inventories were expected to remain within the normal range for the duration of the 2000-01 heating season, cold weather in November and December, along with recently high natural gas prices that discouraged propane production from gas processing, resulted in stocks falling below the normal range by the end of December. However, if the weather remains seasonally normal, and the recent decline in natural gas prices holds, EIA expects the propane inventory drawdown to slow. This is reflected in the data for January 19, which showed a draw of only 2.1 million barrels, compared to more than twice that

478

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Measurement of a Phase of a Radio Wave Reflected from Rock Salt and Ice Irradiated by an Electron Beam for Detection of Ultra-High-Energy Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have found a radio-wave-reflection effect in rock salt for the detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos which are expected to be generated in Greisen, Zatsepin, and Kuzmin (GZK) processes in the universe. When an UHE neutrino interacts with rock salt or ice as a detection medium, a shower is generated. That shower is formed by hadronic and electromagnetic avalanche processes. The energy of the UHE neutrino shower converts to thermal energy through ionization processes. Consequently, the temperature rises along the shower produced by the UHE neutrino. The refractive index of the medium rises with temperature. The irregularity of the refractive index in the medium leads to a reflection of radio waves. This reflection effect combined with the long attenuation length of radio waves in rock salt and ice would yield a new method to detect UHE neutrinos. We measured the phase of the reflected radio wave under irradiation with an electron beam on ice and rock salt powder. The measured phase showed excellent consis...

Chiba, Masami; Tanikawa, Takahiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Fumiaki; Yasuda, Osamu; Chikashige, Yuichi; Kon, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Watanabe, Souichirou; Utsumi, Michiaki; Fujii, Masatoshi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 [angstrom] to 500 [angstrom  

SciTech Connect

We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 [Angstrom] to 500 [Angstrom]). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 [Angstrom] as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 [Angstrom]. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 [Angstrom]. 8 figs, 18 refs.

Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "attenuated total reflectance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Whisper gallery mirrors reflectivities from 100 {angstrom} to 500 {angstrom}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have examined optical constants and predicted reflectivities of candidate surface coatings for whisper gallery mirrors in the extreme ultraviolet (100 {Angstrom} to 500 {Angstrom}). Previous work of Vinogradov and coworkers have identified the spectral regime near 100-150 {Angstrom} as particularly promising due to the high whisper gallery mirror reflectivities of the noble metals in the vicinity of their Cooper minima in this regime. We confirm this basic result using newer optical data, and we have sought surface materials which would extend the range over which the whisper gallery mirrors may be used: between 100 to 500 {Angstrom}. We find that substantial whisper gallery mirror reflectivities (near or greater than 50%) are predicted for a variety of elements, and that the TE peak reflection is larger than TM peak reflection by on the order of 10%. However, most of the elements which do reflect well have surfaces that are vulnerable to oxygen contamination, which seriously degrades mirror performance. A cryogenic mirror design using a dynamic solid rare gas surface which has the potential to defeat such surface contaminations is described: it has peak reflectivity of more than 50% centered near 280 {Angstrom}. 8 figs, 18 refs.

Hung, Tsen-Yu; Hagelstein, P.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

483

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

484

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

485

Total atmospheric emissivities for a tropical climate  

SciTech Connect

The total atmospheric flux emissivities as a function of water vapor optical depth are reported for meteorological condtions in Thailand. The water vapor optical depth was first calculated as a function of height up to 12 km from the annual average upper air pressures, temperature, and dew points at Bangkok. The flux emissivity was then computed using tabulated data for the flux emissivities of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone at 20/sup 0/C. (SPH)

Exell, R.H.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Cogeneration Plant is Designed for Total Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes application considerations, design criteria, design features, operating characteristics and performance of a 200 MW combined cycle cogeneration plant located at Occidental Chemical Corporation's Battleground chlorine-caustic plant at La Porte, Texas. This successful application of a total energy management concept utilizing combined cycle cogeneration in an energy intensive electrochemical manufacturing process has resulted in an efficient reliable energy supply that has significantly reduced energy cost and therefore manufacturing cost.

Howell, H. D.; Vera, R. L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

MASS BALANCE: A KEY TO ADVANCING MONITORED AND ENHANCED ATTENUATION FOR CHLORINATED SOLVENTS  

SciTech Connect

Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and enhanced attenuation (EA) are two environmental management strategies that rely on a variety of attenuation processes to degrade or immobilize contaminants and are implemented at appropriate sites by demonstrating that contaminant plumes have low risk and are stable or shrinking. The concept of a mass balance between the loading and attenuation of contaminants in a groundwater system is a powerful framework for conceptualizing and documenting the relative stability of a contaminant plume. As a result, this concept has significant potential to support appropriate implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and enhanced attenuation (EA). For mass balance to be useful in engineering practice, however, it is necessary to quantify it in practical ways that facilitate overall site remediation and which are consistent with existing regulatory guidance. Two divergent philosophies exist for quantifying plume stability--empirical and deterministic. The first relies on historical contaminant concentration data and bulk geochemical information from a monitoring well network and documents plume stability using trend analysis and statistical tools. This empirical approach, when feasible, provides powerful and compelling documentation of plume behavior and mass balance. It provides an interpretation on a relevant scale under field conditions. It integrates the operative attenuation processes measured by observing their actual impact on the plume. The power of the empirical approach was recognized early in the development of MNA guidance and protocols and it is currently the basis of the three lines of evidence used in MNA studies. The empirical approach has some weaknesses, however. It requires a relatively long period of undisturbed historical data. Thus it cannot be effectively applied to sites where active remediation was initiated quickly and is currently operating. It cannot be used as a tool to determine how much source removal is needed or when to turn off active remediation and transition to MNA. It cannot be used to evaluate potential enhancement options (unless a long period of post enhancement monitoring is planned). It provides only indirect information about process and treats the plume as a ''black box''. The empirical approach has the advantage that, when sufficient monitoring data are available, the attenuation capacity can be defined inexpensively and with a high degree of certainty. Alternatively, a deterministic approach can be used to assess mass balance and plume stability. In this approach, the physical, chemical, and biological attenuation processes are used to assess contaminant loading and attenuation. The deterministic approach has the advantage that, when sufficient hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological data are available, it is possible to project how a system will respond to contaminant removal actions or enhancements of natural attenuation processes. The ''black box'' of the plume is taken apart, quantified, and put back together again. The disadvantage of the deterministic approach is that it is difficult to measure all or most of the relevant hydrologic, geochemical, and biological parameters with any certainty. Case studies over the past decade demonstrate that empirical and deterministic approaches to MNA/EA are not mutually exclusive. These studies document that improved decision support and efficiency result by combining these methods based on the individual challenges presented by a given site. Whenever possible, the empirical approach is used to quantify mass loading and attenuation capacity (mass of contaminant/unit time) at particular sites. This is the most effective way to demonstrate the efficiency of ongoing natural attenuation processes in accordance with current regulatory guidance. But in addition, the monitoring well networks needed to apply the empirical approach can also yield estimates of the hydrologic, geochemical, and biological parameters needed to apply deterministic models. These models can then be used to estimate how cont

Looney, B; Karen Vangelas, K; Karen-M Adams, K; Francis H. Chappelle; Tom O. Early; Claire H. Sink

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

489

OGJ300; Smaller list, bigger financial totals  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on Oil and Gas Journal's list of the largest, publicly traded oil and gas producing companies in the U.S. which is both smaller and larger this year than it was in 1990. It's smaller because it covers fewer companies. Industry consolidation has slashed the number of public companies. As a result, the former OGJ400 has become the OGJ300, which includes the 30 largest limited partnerships. But the assets-ranked list is larger because important financial totals - representing 1990 results - are significantly higher than those of a year ago, despite the lower number of companies. Consolidation of the U.S. producing industry gained momentum throughout the 1980s. Unable to sustain profitability in a period of sluggish energy prices and, for many, rising costs, companies sought relief through mergers or liquidation of producing properties. As this year's list shows, however, surviving companies have managed to grow. Assets for the OGJ300 group totaled $499.3 billion in 1990 - up 6.3% from the 1989 total of last year's OGJ400. Stockholders' equity moved up 5.3% to $170.7 billion. Stockholders' equity was as high as $233.8 billion in 1983.

Beck, R.J.; Biggs, J.B.

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

490

Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a projection reflection optical system having two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have aspherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 {mu}m, and preferably less than 100 {mu}m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05--0.1 {mu}m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm {times} 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

Mark Spitzer

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

492

Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

493

THE SCENARIOS APPROACH TO ATTENUATION-BASED REMEDIES FOR INORGANIC AND RADIONUCLIDE CONTAMINANTS  

SciTech Connect

Guidance materials based on use of conceptual model scenarios were developed to assist evaluation and implementation of attenuation-based remedies for groundwater and vadose zones contaminated with inorganic and radionuclide contaminants. The Scenarios approach is intended to complement the comprehensive information provided in the US EPA's Technical Protocol for Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) of Inorganic Contaminants by providing additional information on site conceptual models and extending the evaluation to consideration of Enhanced Attenuation approaches. The conceptual models incorporate the notion of reactive facies, defined as units with hydrogeochemical properties that are different from surrounding units and that react with contaminants in distinct ways. The conceptual models also incorporate consideration of biogeochemical gradients, defined as boundaries between different geochemical conditions that have been induced by waste disposal or other natural phenomena. Gradients can change over time when geochemical conditions from one area migrate into another, potentially affecting contaminant mobility. A recognition of gradients allows the attenuation-affecting conditions of a site to be projected into the future. The Scenarios approach provides a stepwise process to identify an appropriate category of conceptual model and refine it for a specific site. Scenario materials provide links to pertinent sections in the EPA technical protocol and present information about contaminant mobility and important controlling mechanism for attenuation-based remedies based on the categories of conceptual models.

Vangelas, K.; Rysz, M.; Truex, M.; Brady, P.; Newell, C.; Denham, M.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

494

Study of the Neutron Flux and Dpa Attenuation in the Reactor Pressure-Vessel Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of the neutron flux and dpa attenuation in the reactor pressure vessel (PV) wall presented in this work was performed with state-of-the art methods currently used to determine PV fluxes, the BUGLE-96 cross-section library, and the iron displacement cross sections derived from ENDF/B-VI data. The calculations showed that the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, extrapolation formula predicts slower--and therefore conservative--attenuation of the neutron flux (E > 1MeV) in the PV wall. More importantly, the calculations gave slower attenuation of the dpa rate in the PV wall than the attenuation predicted by the formula. The slower dpa rate attenuation was observed for all the cases considered, which included two different PWRs, and several configurations obtained by varying the PV wall thickness and thermal shield thickness. For example, for a PV wall thickness of {approximately}24 cm, the calculated ratio of the dpa rate at 1/4 and 3/4 of the PV wall thickness to the dpa value on the inner PV surface is {approximately}14% and 19% higher, respectively, than predicted by the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, formula.

Remec, I.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Effects of Varying RedoxConditions on Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide geochemical parameters to characterize the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) sediment as a potential source term. It is anticipated that the measured values will be used in risk calculations and will provide additional technical support for imposing Monitored Natural Attenuation at D-Area. This study provides a detailed evaluation of the DCPRB sediment and is part of another study that quantified the Monitored Natural Attenuation of inorganic contaminants more broadly at the D-Area Expanded Operable Unit, which includes the DCPRB (Powell et al. 2004). Distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values; a solid to liquid contaminant concentration ratio) and the Potentially Leachable Fraction (the percent of the total contaminant concentration in the sediment that can likely contribute to a contaminant plume) were measured in a DCPRB sediment as a function of redox conditions. Redox conditions at the DCPRB are expected to vary greatly as the system undergoes varying drying and flooding conditions. Conservative values; K{sub d} values that err on the side of being too low and Potentially Leachable Fraction values that err on the side of being too high, are presented. The K{sub d} values are high compared to conservative literature values, and underscores the importance of measuring site-specific values to provide estimates of sediments natural attenuation/sorption capacities. The Potentially Leachable Fraction indicates that as little as 27% of the As, but all of the Cu and Tl will be part of the source term. In the case of the As, the remaining 83% will likely never leach out of the sediment, thereby providing a form of natural attenuation. Importantly, Be, Cr, Cu, Ni, and V concentrations in the sediment were less-than twice background levels, indicating this sediment was not a potential source for these contaminants. K{sub d} values generally increased significantly (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Se, and Tl) when the sediment was flooded and after 36 days biostimulated through the addition of molasses. However, the contaminants that were newly sorbed tended to bind to weaker binding sites as the system was converted from an oxidizing to a reducing system. This redistribution of contaminants resulted in increased Potentially Leachable Fractions. In conclusion, these tests clearly indicate that the DCPRB sediment has a relatively high affinity to sorb most of the contaminants and that when evaluating the risk associated with this as a source term that only the Potentially Leachable Fraction of the total sediment contaminants concentration be used as the actual source term.

Kaplan, D

2004-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

496

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

497

Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

LYONDELL CHEMICAL CO b Houston Refining LP..... Houston, Texas...270,200 TOTAL SA Total Petrochemicals Inc ...

498

Standardization of Solar Mirror Reflectance Measurements - Round Robin Test: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the SolarPaces Task III standardization activities, DLR, CIEMAT, and NREL have concentrated on optimizing the procedure to measure the reflectance of solar mirrors. From this work, the laboratories have developed a clear definition of the method and requirements needed of commercial instruments for reliable reflectance results. A round robin test was performed between the three laboratories with samples that represent all of the commercial solar mirrors currently available for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The results show surprisingly large differences in hemispherical reflectance (sh) of 0.007 and specular reflectance (ss) of 0.004 between the laboratories. These differences indicate the importance of minimum instrument requirements and standardized procedures. Based on these results, the optimal procedure will be formulated and validated with a new round robin test in which a better accuracy is expected. Improved instruments and reference standards are needed to reach the necessary accuracy for cost and efficiency calculations.

Meyen, S.; Lupfert, E.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Kennedy, C.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Solar Radiative Fluxes for Broken Cloud Fields above Reflecting Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical bidirectional method for including the effects of underlying reflecting surfaces in Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric photon transport is presented. It is illustrated for the idealized Lambertian surface and a general ...

Howard W. Barker; John A. Davies

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Progress Toward Roll Processing of Solar Reflective Material (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the goal of this project which was to demonstrate that it is possible to cost-effectively produce high performance solar reflective material using vacuum deposition techniques.

Smilgys, R.; Wallace, S.; Kennedy, C.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z