Sample records for atomic weight chemical

  1. Forecast of Standard Atomic Weights for the Mononuclidic Elements – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this short report, I will provide an early warning about potential changes to the standard atomic weight values for the twenty mononuclidic and the so-called pseudo-mononuclidic ({sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa) chemical elements due to the estimated changes in the mass values to be published in the next Atomic Mass Tables within the next two years. There have been many new measurements of atomic masses, since the last published Atomic Mass Table. The Atomic Mass Data Center has released an unpublished version of the present status of the atomic mass values as a private communication. We can not update the Standard Atomic Weight Table at this time based on these unpublished values but we can anticipate how many changes are probably going to be expected in the next few years on the basis of the forthcoming publication of the Atomic Mass Table. I will briefly discuss the procedures that the Atomic Weights Commission used in deriving the recommended Standard Atomic Weight values and their uncertainties from the atomic mass values. I will also discuss some concern raised about a proposed change in the definition of the mole. The definition of the mole is now connected directly to the mass of a {sup 12}C isotope (which is defined as 12 exactly) and to the kilogram. A change in the definition of the mole will probably impact the mass of {sup 12}C.

  2. atomic weights table: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability, atomic weights and molecular weights V. Paar, Bijeniccka 32, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia Accepted 15 January 2002 Abstract A power law is introduced weights. The power law...

  3. atomic weights tables: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability, atomic weights and molecular weights V. Paar, Bijeniccka 32, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia Accepted 15 January 2002 Abstract A power law is introduced weights. The power law...

  4. atomic weight values: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a sample of 10 100 atoms. Sumei Huang; Girish S. Agarwal 2015-01-10 3 Power laws and fractal behavior in nuclear stability, atomic weights and molecular weights Physics Websites...

  5. atomic weight determinations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Power laws and fractal behavior in nuclear stability, atomic weights and molecular weights Physics Websites...

  6. Distribution Category: Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Physics (UC-411) ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, TIlinois 60439 ANLI APSILS-151 RESULTS OF DESIGN CALCULATIONS FOR THE...

  7. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  8. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  9. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  10. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching. Abstract: We describe a solid state Br atom source for...

  11. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  12. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adsorbed in a zirconium oxide nanobowl. The brown atoms are surface oxygen and the coral atoms are zirconium. Carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms of fructose molecules are...

  13. CHEMICAL REDUCTION OF REFRACTORY OXIDES BY ATOMIC HYDROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by thermal energy atanic hydrogen has been investigated by00 2 is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with A1 0 2 3 isof redudng AlP3 by atomic hydrogen can he ohtained from the

  14. Institute for Atom-efficient Chemical Transformations trifold...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of theoretical insights at the atomic level, providing guidance in the discovery of new catalytic materials. Selectivity of formic acid decomposition to CO 2 as a function of...

  15. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marshall Name Christopher L. Marshall Institution Argonne National Laboratory Department Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Areas of Focus Characterization & Catalytic...

  16. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provides links to each partner's participating organizations. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Center for Nanoscale Materials Energy Systems...

  17. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor and Michel Boudart Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been elected a Member of the National...

  18. COMBUSTION DRIVEN ATOMIC FLUORINE GENERATORS FOR DF CHEMICAL LASERS Abstract -Conventional high pressure corabustors delivering atomic fluorine for DF chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    compositions assuming frozen isentropic expansion and with or without heat losses in the combustor. The values production at good overall laser power. 1. INTRODUCTION Available references describing combustors for also reactants. Solid propellant com- high production of F atom by thermal equilibrium positions such as NF

  19. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  20. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  1. Reduced weight decontamination formulation for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduced weight DF-200 decontamination formulation that is stable under high temperature storage conditions. The formulation can be pre-packed as an all-dry (i.e., no water) or nearly-dry (i.e., minimal water) three-part kit, with make-up water (the fourth part) being added later in the field at the point of use.

  2. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  3. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization probing of H atoms and CH3 radicals in a hot lament chemical vapour deposition reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    - lished route for forming polycrystalline diamond ®lms, which are ®nding ever increasing roles reactor used for diamond chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Parameters varied include the hydrocarbon (CH4 to reinforce the consensus view that H atom production during diamond CVD in a hot ®lament reactor arises

  4. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

  5. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  6. Chemical Bonding: The Classical Description sharing or transferring electrons between atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    new arrangements of electrons with lower total potential energy than isolated atoms covalent ionic, actinides, metal, non-metal, semi-metal #12;IONIZATION ENERGY : a measure of the stability of the electron Existence of the SHELLExistence of the SHELL 3.2 Ionization Energies and the Shell Model of Atom #12

  7. Chemical Sputtering and Surface Damage of Graphite by Low Energy Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen and Deuterium Projectiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Fred W [ORNL; Zhang, Hengda [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Krause, Herbert F [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental methane production yields for H+, H2+, and H3+ ions incident on ATJ graphite in the energy range 10-250 eV/H. Below about 60 eV/H, the molecular H species give higher methane yields/H when compared with isovelocity H+. The results are interpreted by considering the differences of the maximum binary collision energy transfer in the ejection of chemical sputtering products associated with undissociated molecules and incident atomic ions, using the same analysis as developed by Yao et al. (PRL 81, 550(1998)) in comparing sputtering of Au by isovelocity N+ and N2+ ions. For both D and H atomic and molecular projectiles, the yields/atom coalesce onto a single curve below projectile energies of approximately 60 eV/atom, when plotted as function of maximum energy transfer, under the assumption that the incident molecular species are undissociated when ejecting the hydrocarbon chemical sputtering product. Raman spectroscopy of a graphite sample exposed to high fluences of D+ and D3+ beams at high and low energies, confirmed the expectation that, according to this argument, there should also be more surface damage by incident molecular species than by isovelocity atomic ions. The two high-energy beam-exposed spots showed similar damage, while the low-energy molecular-beam- exposed spot showed slightly more damage than the corresponding D+ beam exposed spot.

  8. Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

  9. An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of the transition-metal particles and onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, carbon atom attachment to the growing. Carbon nanotubes are generally processed by laser ablation of carbon rods e.g. [7], a direct current arc

  10. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  11. Chemical and displacement atomic pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions recovered by anomalous x-ray scattering in Fe-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shaffer, L.B. [Anderson Univ., Anderson, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-range pair correlations of atoms in crystalline solid solutions consist of both chemical and displacement correlations. Measurement of these pair correlations is fundamental to understanding the properties of solid solutions. We discuss anomalous scattering techniques which have provided an important advance in our ability to recover these pair correlations and to model the local atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions of Fe-Ni alloys.

  12. apparent molecular weight: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability, atomic weights and molecular weights V. Paar, Bijeniccka 32, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia Accepted 15 January 2002 Abstract A power law is introduced weights. The power law...

  13. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  14. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  15. atomic power teller: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability, atomic weights and molecular weights V. Paar, Bijeniccka 32, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia Accepted 15 January 2002 Abstract A power law is introduced weights. The power law...

  16. atomic power laboratory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability, atomic weights and molecular weights V. Paar, Bijeniccka 32, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia Accepted 15 January 2002 Abstract A power law is introduced weights. The power law...

  17. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .1063/1.3475506 Direct observation of electron emission site on boron-doped polycrystalline diamond thin films using or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force

  18. Atomic data for S II—toward better diagnostics of chemical evolution in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisielius, Romas; Bogdanovich, Pavel [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 (Lithuania); Kulkarni, Varsha P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ferland, Gary J.; Lykins, Matt L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (?0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  19. Mechanistic study of dielectric chemical mechanical polishing by spectral and scaling analysis of atomic force microscope images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhoff, M.L.

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal oxide and PETEOS oxide surfaces, polished on an IPEC 472 with different combinations of polish pad, slurry, and polishing conditions, were studied with ex situ atomic force microscopy. The post polish surfaces were analyzed qualitatively by visual inspection and quantitatively by spectral and scaling analyses. Spectral and scaling analyses gave consistent interpretations of morphology evolution. Polishing with either a fixed abrasive pad or alumina-based slurry occurred via a mechanism for which asperities are removed and recesses are filled. A sputtering-type mechanism may contribute to material removal when polishing with silica- or ceria-based slurries.

  20. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  1. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  2. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Natarajan, Ramkumar, (Woodridge, IL); Kahn, David (Miami, FL)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  3. Green Weight 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Haji, A.; Al-Omair, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green-weight is a novel system designed to supply a high-rise building with all its needs of electricity using wind energy and to supplement its lighting needs with natural sunlight. David Fisher has proposed an ingenious method to harness the wind...

  4. BAR-CODE BASED WEIGHT MEASUREMENT STATION FOR PHYSICAL INVENTORY TAKING OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTAINERS AT THE MINING AND CHEMICAL COMBINE RADIOCHEMICAL REPROCESSING PLANT NEAR KRASNOYARSK, SIBERIA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUDA,S.

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the technical tasks being implemented to computerize the physical inventory taking (PIT) at the Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Khimichesky Kombinat, GKhK) radiochemical plant under the US/Russian cooperative nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) program. Under the MPC and A program, Lab-to-Lab task agreements with GKhK were negotiated that involved computerized equipment for item verification and confirmatory measurement of the Pu containers. Tasks under Phase I cover the work for demonstrating the plan and procedures for carrying out the comparison of the Pu container identification on the container with the computerized inventory records. In addition to the records validation, the verification procedures include the application of bar codes and bar coded TIDs to the Pu containers. Phase II involves the verification of the Pu content. A plan and procedures are being written for carrying out confirmatory measurements on the Pu containers.

  5. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  6. Mining Weighted Association Rules without Preassigned Weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Fengshan

    Mining Weighted Association Rules without Preassigned Weights Ke Sun and Fengshan Bai Abstract--Association rule mining is a key issue in data mining. However, the classical models ignore the difference between the transactions, and the weighted association rule mining does not work on databases with only binary attributes

  7. atomic power station-2: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power of 42 VK with a big change (9.6 Feenstra, Randall 7 Power laws and fractal behavior in nuclear stability, atomic weights and molecular weights Physics Websites...

  8. Multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnad, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of hypergeometric 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for weighted Hurwitz numbers is extended to multispecies families. Both the enumerative geometrical significance of multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers as weighted enumerations of branched coverings of the Riemann sphere and their combinatorial significance in terms of weighted paths in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ are derived. The particular case of multispecies quantum weighted Hurwitz numbers is studied in detail.

  9. Critical Analysis and Review of Flash Points of High Molecular Weight Poly-functional C, H, N, O Compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Derrick

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The research focuses on the critical review and prediction of flash points of high molecular weight compounds used mainly in the specialty chemical area. Thus far this area of high molecular weight specialty chemicals has ...

  10. 29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal was discovered in a dense interstellar is the ratio of carbon atoms to hydrogen atoms in propanal? Problem 4 - If the mass of a hydrogen atom of a propanal molecule in AMUs? Problem 5 - What is the complete chemical formula for propanal? C3 H __ O

  11. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    bonds, 2 to 10 ev). The methods that have revealed this richness and order of medium- and high-energy, mass spectrometry. While hot-atom studies overcome the energy limitations of thermochemical methods energies of a few electron volts. Most studies of chemical kinetics made by traditional thermochemical

  12. average atom model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (chemical potential, average ionic charge, free electron density, bound and continuum wave-functions and occupation numbers) are obtained from the average-atom model. The...

  13. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  14. atomic weights commission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Resources Websites Summary: may often be described as a transgression of the safety limit of a vital reactor parameter, followed in cases where they are terminated as...

  15. Light-weight analyzer for odor recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vass, Arpad A; Wise, Marcus B

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a light weight analyzer, e.g., detector, capable of locating clandestine graves. The detector utilizes the very specific and unique chemicals identified in the database of human decompositional odor. This detector, based on specific chemical compounds found relevant to human decomposition, is the next step forward in clandestine grave detection and will take the guess-work out of current methods using canines and ground-penetrating radar, which have historically been unreliable. The detector is self contained, portable and built for field use. Both visual and auditory cues are provided to the operator.

  16. Measuring Atomic Properties with an Atom Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Tony David

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two experiments are presented which measure atomic properties using an atom interferometer. The interferometer splits the sodium de Broglie wave into two paths,

  17. Weighted control systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Radhi, Adhi Omar

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) 50 3-10 Defects per Unit Control Charts (Sudden Increase in Number of Defects) 51 3-11 Defects per Unit Control Charts (Slow Increase in Number of Defects) 52 3-12 O. C. Curves of Fraction Defectives Control Charts. 54 3-13 O. C. Curves.... The exponential smoothing principle was introduced to quality control field in 1959. It was first adapted in the mean control chart [25]. Through this control system, the most recent information is weighted and combined with the weighted past observations. 10...

  18. Weight 1. Leadership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Weight 0 1 2 3 1. Leadership 33% Has not demonstrated impact through a leadership role Has held a leadership role in one or more organizations and demonstrated impact Has held an organization-wide leadership role in one or more

  19. Atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  20. The weighted words collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisberranger, Jérémie Du; Ponty, Yann

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by applications in bioinformatics, we consider the word collector problem, i.e. the expected number of calls to a random weighted generator of words of length $n$ before the full collection is obtained. The originality of this instance of the non-uniform coupon collector lies in the, potentially large, multiplicity of the words/coupons of a given probability/composition. We obtain a general theorem that gives an asymptotic equivalent for the expected waiting time of a general version of the Coupon Collector. This theorem is especially well-suited for classes of coupons featuring high multiplicities. Its application to a given language essentially necessitates some knowledge on the number of words of a given composition/probability. We illustrate the application of our theorem, in a step-by-step fashion, on three exemplary languages, revealing asymptotic regimes in $\\Theta(\\mu(n)\\cdot n)$ and $\\Theta(\\mu(n)\\cdot \\log n)$, where $\\mu(n)$ is the sum of weights over words of length $n$.

  1. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series On the trail of the Chimera The Atom the Chimera is still elusive. 1. Thomas F. Kelly and David J. Larson. Ann Rev. Materials Res 42 (2012) 1. 2

  2. atom-atom collisions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Safronova, Marianna 3 Atom-atom correlations in colliding Bose-Einstein condensates Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We analyze atom-atom correlations in the s-wave...

  3. Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental thorium uranium Relativeabundance(Si=106)Relative Abundance in the Sun · non-uniform trend G302.protons 90 234Th 145 #12;5 Alpha Decay - Loss of He Atom · Decay of Uranium-238 to Thorium-234 G302

  4. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  5. Atomic-vapor-laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief history of the scientific considerations leading to the development of laser isotope separation (LIS) processes. The close relationship of LIS to the broader field of laser-induced chemical processes is evaluated in terms of physical criteria to achieve an efficient production process. Atomic-vapor LIS processes under development at Livermore are reviwed. 8 figures.

  6. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  7. The Future of Atomic Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  8. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  9. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangha, Amandeep K [ORNL] [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL] [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Mark F. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S) and p- hydroxyphenyl (H). It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular-weight lignin polymers, and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di- and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p- electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages ( - or -5) react poorly and tend to cap the polymer. In general, -5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  10. Atomic swelling upon compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Dolmatov; J. L. King

    2012-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen atom under the pressure of a spherical penetrable confinement potential of a decreasing radius $r_{0}$ is explored, as a case study. A novel counter-intuitive effect of atomic swelling rather than shrinking with decreasing $r_{0}$ is unraveled, when $r_{0}$ reaches, and remains smaller than, a certain critical value. Upon swelling, the size of the atom is shown to increase by an order of magnitude, or more, compared to the size of the free atom. Examples of changes of photoabsorption properties of confined hydrogen atom upon its swelling are uncovered and demonstrated.

  11. Machine Learning for Quantum Mechanical Properties of Atoms in Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupp, Matthias; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce machine learning models of quantum mechanical observables of atoms in molecules. Instant out-of-sample predictions for proton and carbon nuclear chemical shifts, atomic core level excitations, and forces on atoms reach accuracies on par with density functional theory reference. Locality is exploited within non-linear regression via local atom-centered coordinate systems. The approach is validated on a diverse set of 9k small organic molecules. Linear scaling is demonstrated for saturated polymers with up to sub-mesoscale lengths.

  12. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  13. Molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of kraft lignins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidl, W.; Dong, D.; Fricke, A.L. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kraft lignins are the lignin degradation products from kraft pulping. They are complex, heterogeneous polymers with some polar character. The molecular weight of kraft lignins greatly affect the physical properties of black liquors, and are of primary importance in separation from black liquor and in evaluating potential uses. Several purified kraft lignins from slash pine were analyzed for number average molecular weight by vapor pressure osmometry (VPO), for weight average molecular weight by low angle laser light scattering (LALLS), and for the molecular weight distribution by high temperature size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The lignins were run in tetrahydrofuran (THF), N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF), DMF with 0.1M LiBr, and pyridine at conditions above the Theta temperature. Experimental methods are discussed. The results show that VPO may be used to determine M[sub n] for kraft lignins if the purity of the lignins and the identity of the impurities are known. LALLS can be used to determine M[sub w] for kraft lignins if measurements are made at or above the Theta temperature of the lignin-solvent pair. SEC should be used at temperatures at, or above, the Theta temperature of the lignin-solvent pair. Size separation is highly dependent on the solvent used, and DMF is a much better solvent than THF for high temperature SEC. Future work using moment resolution procedures to derive an accurate calibration curve are also discussed.

  14. Weighted Watson-Crick automata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamrin, Mohd Izzuddin Mohd [Department of Information System, Kulliyyah of Information and Communication Technology, International Islamic University Malaysia, 50728 Gombak, Selangor (Malaysia); Turaev, Sherzod; Sembok, Tengku Mohd Tengku [Department of Computer Science, Kulliyyah of Information and Communication Technology, International Islamic University Malaysia, 50728 Gombak, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    There are tremendous works in biotechnology especially in area of DNA molecules. The computer society is attempting to develop smaller computing devices through computational models which are based on the operations performed on the DNA molecules. A Watson-Crick automaton, a theoretical model for DNA based computation, has two reading heads, and works on double-stranded sequences of the input related by a complementarity relation similar with the Watson-Crick complementarity of DNA nucleotides. Over the time, several variants of Watson-Crick automata have been introduced and investigated. However, they cannot be used as suitable DNA based computational models for molecular stochastic processes and fuzzy processes that are related to important practical problems such as molecular parsing, gene disease detection, and food authentication. In this paper we define new variants of Watson-Crick automata, called weighted Watson-Crick automata, developing theoretical models for molecular stochastic and fuzzy processes. We define weighted Watson-Crick automata adapting weight restriction mechanisms associated with formal grammars and automata. We also study the generative capacities of weighted Watson-Crick automata, including probabilistic and fuzzy variants. We show that weighted variants of Watson-Crick automata increase their generative power.

  15. Molecular Weight & Energy Transport 7 September 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    't transport the bulk of the energy in the sun. #12;Molecular Weight & Energy Transport 7 September 2011 Goals · Review mean molecular weight this intuitively before looking back at your quantitative results. #12;molecular weight & energy transport 2 Energy

  16. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  17. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  18. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuldt, Thilo; Krutzik, Markus; Bote, Lluis Gesa; Gaaloul, Naceur; Hartwig, Jonas; Ahlers, Holger; Herr, Waldemar; Posso-Trujillo, Katerine; Rudolph, Jan; Seidel, Stephan; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Sven; Kubelka-Lange, André; Milke, Alexander; Rievers, Benny; Rocco, Emanuele; Hinton, Andrew; Bongs, Kai; Oswald, Markus; Franz, Matthias; Hauth, Matthias; Peters, Achim; Bawamia, Ahmad; Wicht, Andreas; Battelier, Baptiste; Bertoldi, Andrea; Bouyer, Philippe; Landragin, Arnaud; Massonnet, Didier; Lévèque, Thomas; Wenzlawski, Andre; Hellmig, Ortwin; Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus; von Klitzing, Wolf; Chaloner, Chris; Summers, David; Ireland, Philip; Mateos, Ignacio; Sopuerta, Carlos F; Sorrentino, Fiodor; Tino, Guglielmo M; Williams, Michael; Trenkel, Christian; Gerardi, Domenico; Chwalla, Michael; Burkhardt, Johannes; Johann, Ulrich; Heske, Astrid; Wille, Eric; Gehler, Martin; Cacciapuoti, Luigi; Gürlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus; Rasel, Ernst

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry...

  19. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krssig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H....

  20. Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. Keywords: SustainableHuman Toxicity Potential (HTP) is used for the human healthassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  1. Schematic Characterization of Human Health Impact of Toxic Chemicals for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Y.; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. With an explicitHuman toxicity potential (HTP), proposed by Guinée andassessment of toxic chemicals. HTP is a computed weighting

  2. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  3. Producing and Detecting Correlated atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph I. Westbrook; Martijn Schellekens; Aurélien Perrin; Valentina Krachmalnicoff; Jose Carlos Viana Gomes; Jean-Baptiste Trebbia; Jérôme Estève; Hong Chang; Isabelle Bouchoule; Denis Boiron; Alain Aspect; Tom Jeltes; John McNamara; Wim Hogervorst; Wim Vassen

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss experiments to produce and detect atom correlations in a degenerate or nearly degenerate gas of neutral atoms. First we treat the atomic analog of the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment, in which atom correlations result simply from interference effects without any atom interactions.We have performed this experiment for both bosons and fermions. Next we show how atom interactions produce correlated atoms using the atomic analog of spontaneous four-wavemixing. Finally, we briefly mention experiments on a one dimensional gas on an atom chip in which correlation effects due to both interference and interactions have been observed.

  4. 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyer, Sylvia Teresse

    Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of ...

  5. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.) [comps.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 2 contains the data base in tabular format. There are two sections, the first with records on nondrug substances, and the second with records on drugs. Chemicals in each section are arranged alphabetically by CAS preferred name, CAS registry number, formula, atomic weight, melting point, boiling point, and vapor pressure. Tissues are listed alphabetically with exposure route, analytical method, number of cases, range, and mean - when available in the source document. A variety of information may also be included that is pertinent to the range and mean as well as experimental design, demography, health effects, pathology, morphology, and toxicity. Review articles are included in the data base; however, no data have been extracted from such documents because the original research articles are included.

  6. Effects of dairy intake on weight maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemel, Michael B.; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Smith, Bryan K.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Richards, Joanna; Morgan-Hanusa, Danielle; Mayo, Matthew S.; Sun, Xiaocun; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Bailey, Bruce W.; Van Walleghen, Emily L.; Washburn, Richard A.

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    . However, weight maintenance following successful weight loss is a critical component to the successful management of obesity, and although there are animal data to support the concept of calcium and dairy attenuation of weight and fat regain [23... or components of body composition. The premise of this investigation was that correction of dietary calcium and dairy insufficiency may attenuate weight regain following successful weight loss. Accord- ingly, it was important to have a clear comparison of inad...

  7. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  8. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  9. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

    2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  10. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  11. Atomic mass compilation 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

  12. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2008-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  13. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  14. Chemical binding energies of point defects in palladium doped with hydrogen and d impurities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1001 Chemical binding energies of point defects in palladium doped with hydrogen and d impurities C calculate the chemical binding energy of a pair of hydrogen atoms in palladium within the infinite dilution] it is often assumed that the dominant contribution to the interaction energy between hydrogen atoms

  15. Weighted Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong, Smart,Department of EnergyEnergyWeighted

  16. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deltuva

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  17. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deltuva, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  18. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  19. Energy Aware Scheduling for Weighted Completion Time and Weighted Tardiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrasco, Rodrigo A; Stein, Cliff

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever increasing adoption of mobile devices with limited energy storage capacity, on the one hand, and more awareness of the environmental impact of massive data centres and server pools, on the other hand, have both led to an increased interest in energy management algorithms. The main contribution of this paper is to present several new constant factor approximation algorithms for energy aware scheduling problems where the objective is to minimize weighted completion time plus the cost of the energy consumed, in the one machine non-preemptive setting, while allowing release dates and deadlines.Unlike previous known algorithms these new algorithms can handle general job-dependent energy cost functions, extending the application of these algorithms to settings outside the typical CPU-energy one. These new settings include problems where in addition, or instead, of energy costs we also have maintenance costs, wear and tear, replacement costs, etc., which in general depend on the speed at which the machine r...

  20. Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M. R.

    CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF ELECTROHVDRAULIC CAVITATION FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTROL MICHAEL R. HOFFMANN, PROFESSOR, CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, PASADENA, CA 91125 Abstract We have been investigating the fundamental chemistry..., production of hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms, hydrogen peroxide and aquated electrons. The chemical changes of compounds in water pulsed with these different sources of power are induced in part by the violent collapse of cavitation bubbles...

  1. Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution Ahad Jamalizadeh§ & Debasis Kundu of weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential distribu- tions. This new singular distribution has of this paper is to introduce a weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential (WMOBE) distribution, using

  2. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centers Newsletter Editorial Board photo of Natalie Ray Natalie Ray, an IACT graduate student from Northwestern University who is working with Peter Stair on Synthesis, has been...

  3. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    set-up and synchrotron X-ray data acquisition with particular focus on high energy X-ray scattering techniques, data processing, and development of algorithms for...

  4. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - IACT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas: Reaction Mechanisms Controlled Active Metals Materials Synthesis woodchips, pellets, and logs as examples of biomass that can be converted to fuels. Woodchips, pellets,...

  5. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Controlled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Problem Many heterogeneous catalysts are inappropriate for conversion of biomass and hydrogen (H2) production in aqueous media, and the structural features of catalysts that...

  6. atomic layer chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ... Baugher,...

  7. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofuels, transportation, energy efficiency, electricity storage and transmission, clean coal and carbon capture and sequestration, and nuclear energy. EFRC Brochure (PDF 1.7MB...

  8. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Reaction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    separately. While the simultaneous processing of all carbohydrates, such as in gasification or pyrolysis, offers the potential for simplicity of operation, the fractionation...

  9. Characterization and analysis of the molecular weight of lignin for biorefining studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolbert, Allison [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Akinosho, Hannah [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Khunsupat, Taya Ratayakorn [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular weight of lignin is a fundamental property that infl uences the recalcitrance of biomass and the valorization of lignin. The determination of the molecular weight of lignin in native biomass is dependent on the bioresources used and the isolation and purifi cation procedures employed. The three most commonly employed isolation methods are milled wood lignin (MWL), cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL), and enzymatic mild acidolysis lignin (EMAL). Common characterization techniques for determining the molecular weight of lignin will be addressed, with an emphasis on gel permeation chromatography (GPC). This review also examines the mechanisms behind several biological, physical, and chemical pre-treatments and their impact on the molecular weight of lignin. The number average molecular weight (Mn), weight average molecular weight (Mw) and polydispersity index (D) all vary in magnitude depending on the biomass source, pre-treatment conditions, and isolation method. Additionally, there is a growing body of literature that supports changes in the molecular weight of lignin in response to genetic modifi cations in the lignin biosynthetic pathways. This review summarizes different procedures for obtaining the molecular weight of lignin that have been used in recent years and highlight future opportunities for applications of lignin.

  10. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES Thematerials | Center forChemical

  11. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  12. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  13. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  14. Is Dark Energy Abnormally Weighting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fuzfa; J. -M. Alimi

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new interpretation of dark energy in terms of an \\textit{Abnormally Weighting Energy} (AWE). This means that dark energy does not couple to gravitation in the same way as ordinary matter, yielding a violation of the weak and strong equivalence principles on cosmological scales. The resulting cosmological mechanism accounts for the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae in terms of both cosmic acceleration and variation of the gravitational constant while still accounting for the present tests of general relativity. This explanation allows to build dark energy models (i) without violation of the strong energy condition $p<-\\rho c^2/3$ (ii) with non-negligible direct couplings to gravitation and (iii) natural convergence mechanism toward general relativity.

  15. Breakdown of the Equivalence between Energy Content and Weight in a Weak Gravitational Field for a Quantum Body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Lebed

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that weight operator of a composite quantum body in a weak external gravitational field in the post-Newtonian approximation of the General Relativity does not commute with its energy operator, taken in the absence of the field. Nevertheless, the weak equivalence between the expectations values of weight and energy is shown to survive at a macroscopic level for stationary quantum states for the simplest composite quantum body - a hydrogen atom. Breakdown of the weak equivalence between weight and energy at a microscopic level for stationary quantum states can be experimentally detected by studying unusual electromagnetic radiation, emitted by the atoms, supported and moved in the Earth gravitational field with constant velocity, using spacecraft or satellite. For superpositions of stationary quantum states, a breakdown of the above mentioned equivalence at a macroscopic level leads to time dependent oscillations of the expectation values of weight, where the equivalence restores after averaging over time procedure.

  16. Atom Probe Tomography | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is important to accurately describe ion-solid... Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN. Atomistic structures of high-energy ion irradiated GaN have been examined using...

  17. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

  18. Local atomic structure in disordered and nanocrystalline catalytic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmowski, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Egami, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Swider-Lyons, K. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power of the atomic pair density function method to study the local atomic structure of dispersed materials is discussed for three examples (I) supercapacitor hydrous ruthenia, (II) electroctalyst platinum-iron phosphate and (III) nanoparticle gold catalyst. Hydrous ruthenia appears to be amorphous, but was found to be nanocomposite with RuO{sub 2} nanocrystals supporting electronic and hydrous boundaries protonic conductivity. A platinum-iron phosphate electrocatalyst, that exhibits activity for the oxygen reduction reaction has platinum in a non-metallic state. In catalysts comprised of gold nanoparticles supported on TiO{sub 2}, atomic correlations in the second atomic shell were observed suggesting interaction with the support that could modify gold chemical activity.

  19. Atom-by-atom nucleation and growth of graphene nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Atom-by-atom nucleation and growth of graphene nanopores Christopher J. Russoa,b and J. A February 17, 2012 (received for review December 9, 2011) Graphene is an ideal thin membrane substrate structures in graphene with atomic preci- sion. It consists of inducing defect nucleation centers with ener

  20. Atomic phenomena in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following chapters are included: (1) the plasma environment, (2) perturbations of atomic structure, (3) perturbations of atomic collisions, (4) formation of spectral lines, and (5) dielectronic recombination. (MOW)

  1. assigning individual weights: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    understeer, and cornering shifts weight to the opposite side, unloading the inside tires. But why does weight shift during these maneuvers? How can weight shift when...

  2. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Corbin1 , Niklas Dellby1 , Matthew F. Murfitt1 , Christopher S. Own1 , Zoltan S. Szilagyi1 , Mark P

  3. atoms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory...

  4. Calibration of a single atom detector for atomic micro chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Stibor; S. Kraft; T. Campey; D. Komma; A. Günther; J. Fortágh; C. J. Vale; H. Rubinsztein-Dunlop; C. Zimmermann

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally investigate a scheme for detecting single atoms magnetically trapped on an atom chip. The detector is based on the photoionization of atoms and the subsequent detection of the generated ions. We describe the characterization of the ion detector with emphasis on its calibration via the correlation of ions with simultaneously generated electrons. A detection efficiency of 47.8% (+-2.6%) is measured, which is useful for single atom detection, and close to the limit allowing atom counting with sub-Poissonian uncertainty.

  5. A microfabricated atomic clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knappe, Svenja; Shah, Vishal; Schwindt, Peter D.D.; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John; Liew, Li-Anne; Moreland, John [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Electromagnetics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States)

    2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication techniques usually applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are used to reduce the size and operating power of the core physics assembly of an atomic clock. With a volume of 9.5 mm{sup 3}, a fractional frequency instability of 2.5x10{sup -10} at 1 s of integration, and dissipating less than 75 mW of power, the device has the potential to bring atomically precise timing to hand-held, battery-operated devices. In addition, the design and fabrication process allows for wafer-level assembly of the structures, enabling low-cost mass-production of thousands of identical units with the same process sequence, and easy integration with other electronics.

  6. Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheifets, A. S. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-4030 (United States); Ivanov, I. A. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence ns and np subshells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the apparent 'time zero' when the photoelectron leaves the atom. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the 2s and 2p subshells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [Science 328, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than half of the measured time delay of 21{+-}5 as. We argue that the extreme ultraviolet pulse alone cannot produce such a large time delay and it is the streaking IR field that is most likely responsible for this effect.

  7. "EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application...

  8. Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Alexander D.

    Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic ...

  9. Tank 40 Final Sludge Batch 8 Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon(r) vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

  10. Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

  11. Chapter 11Chapter 11 Estimating the Weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    Chapter 11Chapter 11 Estimating the Weighted Average Cost of Capital DES Chapter 11 1 #12;U i th C.xls for shortfor short. DES Chapter 11 2 #12;S i l i hSteps to estimate value using the Corporate Valuation stockholders DES Chapter 11 7 #12;Estimating Target Weights Page 223: To calculate WACC, we need to estimate

  12. Semiring Artificial Neural Networks and Weighted Automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoelldobler, Steffen

    Semiring Artificial Neural Networks and Weighted Automata And an Application to Digital Image neural networks and weighted automata. For this task, we introduce semiring artificial neural networks, that is, artificial neural networks which implement the addition and the multiplication of semirings. We

  13. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  14. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department through processing for improving their performance for engineering applications · Use and develop with usable ­ Chemical ­ Electronic ­ Optical ­ Magnetic ­ Transport, thermal and mechanical properties

  15. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

  16. Research in the chemical sciences: Summaries of FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary book is published annually on research supported by DOE`s Division of Chemical Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Research in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced batteries is arranged according to national laboratories, offsite institutions, and small businesses. Goal is to add to the knowledge base on which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. The special facilities used in DOE laboratories are described. Indexes are provided (topics, institution, investigator).

  17. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederalAshley BoyleAn overhead viewAtom-split it

  18. Using Brain Weight to Predict Gestation in Mammals Bivariate Fit of Gestation By Brain Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    1 Using Brain Weight to Predict Gestation in Mammals Bivariate Fit of Gestation By Brain Weight 0 100 200 300 400 500 Gestation 0 500 1000 1500 BrainWgt Linear Fit (All 50 mammals) Predicted Gestation = 85.248543 + 0.299867 Brain Weight Summary of Fit RSquare 0.372483 RSquare Adj 0.35941 Root Mean

  19. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  20. chemical analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions....

  1. Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  2. Quantum transport in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Chun Chien; Sebastiano Peotta; Massimiliano Di Ventra

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultracold atoms confined by engineered magnetic or optical potentials are ideal systems for studying phenomena otherwise difficult to realize or probe in the solid state because their atomic interaction strength, number of species, density, and geometry can be independently controlled. This review focuses on quantum transport phenomena in atomic gases that mirror and oftentimes either better elucidate or show fundamental differences with those observed in mesoscopic and nanoscopic systems. We discuss significant progress in performing transport experiments in atomic gases, contrast similarities and differences between transport in cold atoms and in condensed matter systems, and survey inspiring theoretical predictions that are difficult to verify in conventional setups. These results further demonstrate the versatility offered by atomic systems in the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and their promise for novel applications.

  3. Cold flow tudy of a fluidized bed reactor for catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Shirish Ramniklal

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COLD FLOW STUDY OF A FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR FOR CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF METHANOL TO LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCAREONS A Thesis by SHIRISH RAMNIKLAL MEHTA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE March 1982 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering COLD FLOW STUDY OF A FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR FOR CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF METHANOL TO LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBON A Thesis by SHIRISH RAMNIKLAL MEHTA...

  4. Region-based Dynamic Weighting Probabilistic Geocoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhongxia

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    it extremely important that geocoding results be as accurate as possible. Existing global-weighting approaches to geocoding assume spatial stationarity of addressing systems and address data characteristic distributions across space, resulting in heuristics...

  5. A Library for Locally Weighted Projection Regression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klanke, Stefan; Vijayakumar, Sethu; Schaal, Stefan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce an improved implementation of locally weighted projection regression (LWPR), a supervised learning algorithm that is capable of handling high-dimensional input data. As the key features, our ...

  6. Weight Perception Discrepancy Among Ethnically Diverse Youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cromwell, Kate Duncan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    not feel they are, may be at risk for negative health conditions. Social Comparison Theory may provide a tool for evaluating identified discrepancies. Given that minorities have higher obesity rates, it is hypothesized that weight perception discrepancy...

  7. Big Bang Day : The Great Big Particle Adventure - 1. Atom

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this series, comedian and physicist Ben Miller asks the CERN scientists what they hope to find. The notion of atoms dates back to Greek philosophers who sought a natural mechanical explanation of the Universe, as opposed to a divine one. The existence what we call chemical atoms, the constituents of all we see around us, wasn't proved until a hundred years ago, but almost simultaneously it was realised these weren't the indivisible constituents the Greeks envisaged. Much of the story of physics since then has been the ever-deeper probing of matter until, at the end of the 20th century, a complete list of fundamental ingredients had been identified, apart from one, the much discussed Higgs particle. In this programme, Ben finds out why this last particle is so pivotal, not just to atomic theory, but to our very existence - and how hopeful the scientists are of proving its existence.

  8. Guidance Document Reactive Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    showers and chillers. Health Hazards: The reactive chemicals are grouped primarily because of the physical

  9. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  10. Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M. L. Martina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M at absolute zero, (TAE0) of benzene, C6H6, was computed fully ab initio by means of W2h theory as 1306.6 kcal for systems the size of benzene, chemically accurate molecular atomization energies can be obtained from fully

  11. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Universite Paris 13, Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430-Villetaneuse (France); Bocvarski, V. [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 - Belgrade-Zemun (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 {mu}m for He*, 1.2 {mu}m for Ne*, 0.87 {mu}m for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2{mu}m-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to ''vdW-Zeeman'' transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.

  12. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  13. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

  14. Bogoliubov theory and bosonic atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phan Thanh Nam

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the Bogoliubov variational principle in a mathematical framework similar to the generalized Hartree-Fock theory. Then we analyze the Bogoliubov theory for bosonic atoms in details. We discuss heuristically why the Bogoliubov energy should give the first correction to the leading energy of large bosonic atoms.

  15. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

  17. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proslier, Th.; Ha, Y.; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Ciovati, G.; Kneissel, P.; Reece, C.; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Gurevich, A.; /Natl. High Mag. Field Lab.; Cooley, L.; Wu, G.; /Fermilab; Pellin, M.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: (1) results from ALD coated cavities and coupons, (2) new evidence from point contact tunneling (PCT) showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, (3) a study of high pressure rinsing damage on niobium samples.

  18. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

  19. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  20. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  1. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, the United States consumed about 11% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  2. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, the United States consumed about 10% of world chromite ore production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Imported chromite was consumed by one chemical firm to produce chromium chemicals. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel

  3. Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability of Chemical Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahnoune, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life Cycle Assessment & Sustainability of Chemical Products Abdelhadi Sahnoune ExxonMobil Chemical Company Industrial Energy Technology Conference (IETC 2014) New Orleans, May 20-23, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-38 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial... Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Products in our daily lives Plastics Packaging - Protects and extends shelf life Building & Construction – Insulation, design, flooring Plastics in Automotive Applications - Light weighting...

  4. Graphene oxide sheets, the chemical exfoliation product of graphite powders and precursor for the bulk production of graphene based materials, are found to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    #12;Graphene oxide sheets, the chemical exfoliation product of graphite powders and precursor), is the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powders that was first synthesized over a cen atomic layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms (Fig. 1a). In 2004, it was isolated by mechanical exfoliation

  5. Detection of transient fluorine atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loge, G.W.; Nereson, N.; Fry, H.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A KrF eximer laser with a fluence of 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ was used to photolyze either uranium hexafluoride or molecular fluorine, yielding a transient number density of fluorine atoms. The rise and decay of the atomic fluorine density was observed by transient absorption of a 25-..mu..m Pb-salt diode laser. To prevent the diode laser wavelength from drifting out of resonance with the atomic fluorine line, part of the beam was split off and sent through a microwave discharge fluorine atom cell. This allowed a wavelength modulation-feedback technique to be used to lock the diode laser wavelength onto the atomic line. The remaining diode laser beam was made collinear with the eximer laser beam using a LiF window with a 45/sup 0/ angle of incidence to reflect the infrared beam while transmitting most of the uv beam. Using this setup along with a transient digitizer to average between 100 and 200 transient absorption profiles, fluorine atom number densities on the order of 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ in a 1.7 m pathlength were detected. The signals observed were about a factor of two less than expected from known photolysis and atomic fluorine absorption cross-sections. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Anticipating the atom: popular perceptions of atomic power before Hiroshima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d'Emal, Jacques-Andre Christian

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before Hiroshima made the Bomb an object of popular concern, possible implications and applications of atomic physics had been discussed in the public forum. The new science of X-rays and radium promised the possibilities of unlimited energy...

  7. atomization atomic absorption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in vacuum. The...

  8. PART I: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PART I: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom Department Name: Position Number WEIGHTED JOB QUESTIONNAIRE (WJQ) CUSTOM PARTI: JOB DESCRIPTION 1. POSITION IDENTIFICATION Department

  9. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  10. Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy Krakauer and Krakauer, J Obes Weight Loss Ther 2014, 4:2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy Krakauer and Krakauer, J Obes Weight Loss Ther 2014, 4:2 http the original author and source are credited. Keywords: Waist circumference; Body shape index; Obesity Introduction Obesity has historically been a sign of good health, except at the greatestexcess[1

  11. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  12. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

  13. Helium in Chemically Peculiar Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Leone

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of deriving the helium abundances in chemically peculiar stars, the importance of assuming a correct helium abundance has been investigated for determining the effective temperature and gravity of main sequence B-type stars, making full use of the present capability of reproducing their helium lines. Even if the flux distribution of main sequence B-type stars appears to depend only on the effective temperature for any helium abundance, the effective temperature, gravity and helium abundance have to be determined simultaneously by matching the Balmer line profiles. New MULTI NLTE calculations, performed adopting ATLAS9 model atmospheres and updated helium atomic parameters, reproduce most of the observed equivalent widths of neutral helium lines for main sequence B-type stars and they make us confident of the possibility to correctly derive the helium abundance in chemically peculiar stars. An application of previous methods to the helium rich star HD 37017 shows that helium could be stratified in the magnetic pole regions, as expected in the framework of the diffusion theory in the presence of mass loss.

  14. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction on Multifunctional Pd Catalysts. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction...

  15. and Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    is constructing a new building that will house the Department of Chemical Engineering and the DepartmentBiological and Chemical Engineering Building #12;2 Biological and Chemical Engineering Building sta and Engineering Quad, the new building will be part of a neighborhood of four buildings that house a community

  16. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuo Shibata; Shin-ichi Sasa

    1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  17. Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Chemical Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, we educate students in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering, giving them.Va. Department of Chemical Engineering benefit from a modern academic curriculum and state

  18. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  19. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  20. Recent Progress in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    , cold gas experiments 2. How to make a BEC out of fermions 3. Recent Progress: Controlling Interaction (Feshbach Resonance) 4. From BCS to BEC: Rotating trap and spin- polarized condensates. 5. Future research and Einstein What is Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)? #12;300 K to 1 mK 109 atoms 1 mK to 1 mK 108 106 atoms

  1. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Sancho

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multiparticle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.

  2. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  3. PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 2008 Prepared by _________________________________________________ T. Mullen Physics Division Chemical Hygiene Officer Reviewed by ___________________________________________________ J. Woodring Site Chemical Hygiene Officer Approved

  4. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  5. Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering June 2014 #12;Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 POLICY.......................................................................................... 2 2.1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER

  6. Magnetic fields, spots and weather in chemically peculiar stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Kochukhov

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New observational techniques and sophisticated modelling methods has led to dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the interplay between the surface magnetism, atomic diffusion and atmospheric dynamics in chemically peculiar stars. Magnetic Doppler images, constructed using spectropolarimetric observations of Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters, reveal the presence of small-scale field topologies. Abundance Doppler mapping has been perfected to the level where distributions of many different chemical elements can be deduced self-consistently for one star. The inferred chemical spot structures are diverse and do not always trace underlying magnetic field geometry. Moreover, horizontal chemical inhomogeneities are discovered in non-magnetic CP stars and evolving chemical spots are observed for the first time in the bright mercury-manganese star alpha And. These results show that in addition to magnetic fields, another important non-magnetic structure formation mechanism acts in CP stars.

  7. Weighted median of the data in solving least absolute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scitovski, Rudolf

    is illustrated by an example of hourly natural gas consumption forecast. Key words. median, weighted median

  8. Manipulation of Weighted Voting Games and the Effect of Quota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Vicki H.

    for measuring voters' power in weighted voting games. We consider two methods of manipulating weighted voting of manipulators to have more power over the outcomes of the games. We evaluate the extent of susceptibility, Weighted voting games, Manipulation, Annexation, Merging, Power indices. 1 Introduction Weighted voting

  9. Highly Hazardous Chemicals and Chemical Spills EPA Compliance Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Highly Hazardous Chemicals and Chemical Spills EPA Compliance Fact Sheet Vanderbilt Environmental.safety.vanderbilt.edu HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTES Certain chemical wastes must be handled by special procedures due to their highly hazardous nature. These chemicals include expired isopropyl and ethyl ethers (these chemicals

  10. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Emphasis in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, materials, energy

  11. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    · ChemicalEngineering (Nanotechnology) Bachelor of Science 131 units · ChemicalEngineering(Petroleum38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

  12. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Polymers38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

  13. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  14. Accelerometer using atomic waves for space applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of a dilute gas of trapped atoms in a single quantum state [18, 19, 20 of such devices in the field of navigation, surveying and analysis of earth structures. Matter-wave interferometry that the use of Bose-Einstein condensed atoms will bring the science of atom optics, and in particular atom

  15. Exploring Weight Identity: An Examination of the Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Components of Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study sought to expand social identity theory (Tajfel, 1978; Tajfel & Turner, 1979) to include the concept of weight. Previous research has shown that individuals have social identities associated with age ...

  16. Atomic Cascade in Muonic and Hadronic Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Jensen; V. P. Popov; V. N. Pomerantsev

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The atomic cascade in $\\mu^- p$ and $\\pi^- p$ atoms has been studied with the improved version of the extended cascade model in which new quantum mechanical calculations of the differential and integral cross sections of the elastic scattering, Stark transitions and Coulomb de-excitation have been included for the principal quantum number values $n\\le 8$ and the relative energies $E \\ge 0.01$ eV. The $X$-ray yields and kinetic energy distributions are compared with the experimental data.

  17. Replication regulates volume weighting in quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartle, James [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Hertog, Thomas [APC, UMR 7164 (CNRS, Universite Paris 7), 10 rue A.Domon et L.Duquet, 75205 Paris (France) and Intl Solvay Institutes, Boulevard du Triomphe, ULB-C.P. 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilities for observations in cosmology are conditioned both on the Universe's quantum state and on local data specifying the observational situation. We show the quantum state defines a measure for prediction through such conditional probabilities that is well-behaved for spatially large or infinite universes when the probabilities that our data are replicated are taken into account. In histories where our data are rare volume weighting connects top-down probabilities conditioned on both the data and the quantum state to the bottom-up probabilities conditioned on the quantum state alone. We apply these principles to a calculation of the number of inflationary e-folds in a homogeneous, isotropic minisuperspace model with a single scalar field moving in a quadratic potential. We find that volume weighting is justified and the top-down probabilities favor a large number of e-folds, hereby predicting the curvature of our Universe at the present time to be approximately zero.

  18. Information weights of nucleotides in DNA sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Dudek; S. Cebrat; M. Kowalczuk; P. Mackiewicz; A. Nowicka; D. Mackiewicz; M. Dudkiewicz

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The coding sequence in DNA molecule is considered as a message to be transferred to receiver, the proteins, through a noisy information channel and each nucleotide is assigned a respective information weight. With the help of the nucleotide substitution matrix we estimated the lower bound of the amount of information carried out by nucleotides which is not subject of mutations. We used the calculated weights to reconstruct k-oligomers of genes from the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. We showed, that to this aim there is sufficient a simple rule, that the number of bits of the carried information cannot exceed some threshold value. The method introduced by us is general and applies to every genome.

  19. Quantum Electrodynamics of Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Ballesteros; Jérémy Faupin; Jürg Fröhlich; Baptiste Schubnel

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple model of an atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field is studied. The atom has a finite mass $m$, finitely many excited states and an electric dipole moment, $\\vec{d}_0 = -\\lambda_{0} \\vec{d}$, where $\\| d^{i}\\| = 1,$ $ i=1,2,3,$ and $\\lambda_0$ is proportional to the elementary electric charge. The interaction of the atom with the radiation field is described with the help of the Ritz Hamiltonian, $-\\vec{d}_0\\cdot \\vec{E}$, where $\\vec{E}$ is the electric field, cut off at large frequencies. A mathematical study of the Lamb shift, the decay channels and the life times of the excited states of the atom is presented. It is rigorously proven that these quantities are analytic functions of the momentum $\\vec{p}$ of the atom and of the coupling constant $\\lambda_0$, provided $|\\vec{p}| < mc$ and $| \\Im\\vec{p} |$ and $| \\lambda_{0} |$ are sufficiently small. The proof relies on a somewhat novel inductive construction involving a sequence of `smooth Feshbach-Schur maps' applied to a complex dilatation of the original Hamiltonian, which yields an algorithm for the calculation of resonance energies that converges super-exponentially fast.

  20. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Schuldt; Christian Schubert; Markus Krutzik; Lluis Gesa Bote; Naceur Gaaloul; Jonas Hartwig; Holger Ahlers; Waldemar Herr; Katerine Posso-Trujillo; Jan Rudolph; Stephan Seidel; Thijs Wendrich; Wolfgang Ertmer; Sven Herrmann; André Kubelka-Lange; Alexander Milke; Benny Rievers; Emanuele Rocco; Andrew Hinton; Kai Bongs; Markus Oswald; Matthias Franz; Matthias Hauth; Achim Peters; Ahmad Bawamia; Andreas Wicht; Baptiste Battelier; Andrea Bertoldi; Philippe Bouyer; Arnaud Landragin; Didier Massonnet; Thomas Lévèque; Andre Wenzlawski; Ortwin Hellmig; Patrick Windpassinger; Klaus Sengstock; Wolf von Klitzing; Chris Chaloner; David Summers; Philip Ireland; Ignacio Mateos; Carlos F. Sopuerta; Fiodor Sorrentino; Guglielmo M. Tino; Michael Williams; Christian Trenkel; Domenico Gerardi; Michael Chwalla; Johannes Burkhardt; Ulrich Johann; Astrid Heske; Eric Wille; Martin Gehler; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Norman Gürlebeck; Claus Braxmaier; Ernst Rasel

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry, the detection unit, the vacuum system for $10^{-11}$ mbar ultra-high vacuum generation, and the high-suppression factor magnetic shielding as well as the thermal control system. The laser system is based on a hybrid approach using fiber-based telecom components and high-power laser diode technology and includes all laser sources for 2D-MOT, 3D-MOT, ODT, interferometry and detection. Manipulation and switching of the laser beams is carried out on an optical bench using Zerodur bonding technology. The instrument consists of 9 units with an overall mass of 221 kg, an average power consumption of 608 W (819 W peak), and a volume of 470 liters which would well fit on a satellite to be launched with a Soyuz rocket, as system studies have shown.

  1. Degeneracy Breaking of Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agung Trisetyarso; Pantur Silaban

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The three dimensional rotation group, SO(3), is a symmetry group of the normal hydrogen atom. Each reducible representation of this group can be associated with a degenerate energy level. If this atom is placed in an external magnetic field, the interaction between the orbital magnetic moment with this field will lead to a symmetry breaking where the symmetry group of the atom is a new group distinct from the SO(3) group. This phenomenon describes the normal Zeeman effect, where a degenerate energy level splits into several new energy levels. It is explicitly shown that each of the new energy levels can be associated with an irreducible representation of the new symmetry group.

  2. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  3. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  4. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  5. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  6. EMSL - chemical analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical-analysis en Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  7. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  8. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  9. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Samuel D. (Aiken, SC); Fondeur, Fernando F. (North Augusta, SC)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  10. Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, possesses many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, possesses many excellent chemical species onto the graphene plane offers an effective route to alter and engineer the properties of graphene. NSF-supported researchers have demonstrated that graphene covered dilutely with covalently bonded

  11. Nanoplasmonic Lattices for Ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gullans; T. Tiecke; D. E. Chang; J. Feist; J. D. Thompson; J. I. Cirac; P. Zoller; M. D. Lukin

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use sub-wavelength confinement of light associated with the near field of plasmonic systems to create nanoscale optical lattices for ultracold atoms. Our approach combines the unique coherence properties of isolated atoms with the sub-wavelength manipulation and strong light-matter interaction associated with nano-plasmonic systems. It allows one to considerably increase the energy scales in the realization of Hubbard models and to engineer effective long-range interactions in coherent and dissipative many-body dynamics. Realistic imperfections and potential applications are discussed.

  12. An ultra-bright atom laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bolpasi; N. K. Efremidis; M. J. Morrissey; P. Condylis; D. Sahagun; M. Baker; W. von Klitzing

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel, ultra-bright atom-laser and ultra-cold thermal atom beam. Using rf-radiation we strongly couple the magnetic hyperfine levels of 87Rb atoms in a magnetically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. At low rf-frequencies gravity opens a small hole in the trapping potenital and a well collimated, extremely bright atom laser emerges from just below the condensate. As opposed to traditional atom lasers based on weak coupling, this technique allows us to outcouple atoms at an arbitrarily large rate. We demonstrate an increase in flux per atom in the BEC by a factor of sixteen compared to the brightest quasi-continuous atom laser. Furthermore, we produce by two orders of magnitude the coldest thermal atom beam to date (200 nK).

  13. CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY ABBREVIATION CHEMICAL NAME HAZARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Corrosive - base LiCl Lithium chloride Harmful MeOH Methanol Flammable #12;CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY Irritant destain Methanol,acetic acid,H2O Flammable, Corrosive - acid DI H2O Deionized water DCM FeCl3 Iron(III) chloride Corrosive - acid FeSO4 Iron(II) sulfate Toxic H2O Water HCl Hydrochloric

  14. The adsorption of selected chemical compounds on soil clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, William Leroy

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by such chemical compounds and atomic wastes might be a potent weapon in time of war. Also, such contaminants are adding to the numerous local problems in this country during time of peace, and there is every indication that the problems will increase in magni...- tude in the future, Analogous problems exist with detergent wastes, atomic wastes, factory and industrial wastes, and the widespread uses of insecticides and fungicides. The various high adsorbing soil-clays may provide an answer, or at least a...

  15. ELECTRONIC SPUTTERING: FROM ATOMIC PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    ELECTRONIC SPUTTERING: FROM ATOMIC PHYSICS TO CONTINUUM MECHANICS Ejection of simple and complex molecules from surfaces probes the response of condensed matter to electronic excitations and has and Engineering Physics at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Bo Sundqvist holds the Chair in Ion

  16. Photoabsorption by Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, Steven T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of photoabsorption by atoms and ions is presented. Specifically, examples of near-chaotic behavior in photoionization of positive ions, low-energy manifestations of nondipole effects, high-energy breakdown of the single particle picture and new phenomenology uncovered in the inner-shell photoabsorption by negative ions are discussed.

  17. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Jeong, Seung Y. (Westmont, IL); Lohan, Dirk (Chicago, IL); Elizabeth, Anne (Chicago, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  18. Nutrition, Weight Control and Fast Food.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page in Original Bulletin] Nutrition, Weight Control and Fast Food Mary K. Sweeten* The Fast Food Trend More people are eating fewer meals at home and more snack-type meals at fast food ' restaurants. Fast food sales in 1978 in the United States... chain when eating out 60 percent of the time. This trend is a result of more women employed outside the home, a higher per capita disposable income and more leisure time. Although they may cost more than the same meals prepared at home, fast food res...

  19. Realization of a superconducting atom chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Nirrengarten; Angie Qarry; Cédric Roux; Andreas Emmert; Gilles Nogues; Michel Brune; Jean-Michel Raimond; Serge Haroche

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have trapped rubidium atoms in the magnetic field produced by a superconducting atom chip operated at liquid Helium temperatures. Up to $8.2\\cdot 10^5$ atoms are held in a Ioffe-Pritchard trap at a distance of 440 $\\mu$m from the chip surface, with a temperature of 40 $\\mu$K. The trap lifetime reaches 115 s at low atomic densities. These results open the way to the exploration of atom--surface interactions and coherent atomic transport in a superconducting environment, whose properties are radically different from normal metals at room temperature.

  20. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  1. Remote atom entanglement in a fiber-connected three-atom system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo Yan-Qing; Chen Jing; Song He-Shan

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An Ising-type atom-atom interaction is obtained in a fiber-connected three-atom system. The interaction is effective when $\\Delta\\approx \\gamma _{0}\\gg g$. The preparations of remote two-atom and three-atom entanglement governed by this interaction are discussed in specific parameters region. The overall two-atom entanglement is very small because of the existence of the third atom. However, the three-atom entanglement can reach a maximum very close to 1.

  2. Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hockemeyer, Jill Renee

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the negative effects of distress on weight loss and maintenance through improved emotional self-regulatory processes. This study examined the effects of expressive writing on weight regain, stress, and emotional eating among individuals who have recently lost...

  3. PARTI: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARTI: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom Meeting, Event and Conference UNIVERSITY & C.U.P.E., Local 3338 WEIGHTED JOB QUESTIONNAIRE (WJQ) CUSTOM PARTI: JOB DESCRIPTION 1. POSITION

  4. A weighted iterative algorithm for neuromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorodnitsky, I. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)); George, J.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Lewis, P.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of neuromagnetic source reconstruction is high resolution 3-D mapping of the current distribution within the brain. However, the neuromagnetic inverse problem is ill-posed and typically underdetermined. The Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse provides a linear algebraic inverse calculation that simultaneously minimizes chisquare and the Euclidean norm of the component currents. Such minimum norm'' reconstructions tend to produce diffuse and superficial current distributions because voxels nearer the sensor array can account for more power in the data with less current than deeper voxels. We describe an algorithm that overcomes the bias of minimum norm procedures toward superficial solutions by using weights chosen to compensate for the distance dependence of magnetic signal strength. We also apply a Bayesian weighting strategy in an iterative pseudoinverse computation, to address the bias of the linear estimator procedure toward diffuse solutions. This strategy produces a progressively more focal current distribution while accomodating distributed current sources, and appears to effectively reduce the problems associated with the under-determined linear system.

  5. A weighted iterative algorithm for neuromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorodnitsky, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); George, J.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Lewis, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of neuromagnetic source reconstruction is high resolution 3-D mapping of the current distribution within the brain. However, the neuromagnetic inverse problem is ill-posed and typically underdetermined. The Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse provides a linear algebraic inverse calculation that simultaneously minimizes chisquare and the Euclidean norm of the component currents. Such ``minimum norm`` reconstructions tend to produce diffuse and superficial current distributions because voxels nearer the sensor array can account for more power in the data with less current than deeper voxels. We describe an algorithm that overcomes the bias of minimum norm procedures toward superficial solutions by using weights chosen to compensate for the distance dependence of magnetic signal strength. We also apply a Bayesian weighting strategy in an iterative pseudoinverse computation, to address the bias of the linear estimator procedure toward diffuse solutions. This strategy produces a progressively more focal current distribution while accomodating distributed current sources, and appears to effectively reduce the problems associated with the under-determined linear system.

  6. GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Olivia L.

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................25 Satisfaction and Weight Loss 37 Measurement of Goals, Expectations, and Satisfaction with Weight Loss...............41 Goals, Expectations, and Satisfaction in the Treatment of Obesity 43 Limitations of Previous Research... of approximately 15-25% of initial weight in 2 to 4 months of treatment, but may also result in substantially greater weight regain than more conventional, calorie-restrictive diets (Wadden & Osei, 2002). Pharmacological interventions have been presented...

  7. Role of atomic collisions in fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, D.E.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

  8. Preliminary steps to the Atomic Energy Commission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program to the newly created Atomic Energy Commission. He had succeeded in ending the war, but the transition to peacetime use of atomic energy was not something the Army was...

  9. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  10. Constrained Clustering with Minkowski Weighted Renato Cordeiro de Amorim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amorim, Renato Cordeiro de

    Constrained Clustering with Minkowski Weighted K-Means Renato Cordeiro de Amorim Department: renato@dcs.bbk.ac.uk Abstract--In this paper we introduce the Constrained Minkowski Weighted K-Means ratify the general superiority of using feature weighting in K-Means, particularly when applying

  11. The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP , Sangxia Huang2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP Modulo k Heng Guo1 , Sangxia Huang2 , Pinyan Lu3@gmail.com Abstract We prove a complexity dichotomy theorem for counting weighted Boolean CSP modulo k for any similar to the one for the complex weighted Boolean #CSP, found by [Cai, Lu and Xia, STOC 2009]. Then we

  12. atomic kitteni lauljatar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory...

  13. atoms barrasiye barhamkoneshhaye: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory...

  14. atomic mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Negative *) Atomic composition Graham, Nick 3 Prospects in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry CERN Preprints Summary: Tendencies in five main branches of atomic spectrometry...

  15. Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

  16. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction...

  17. Abstract--This paper describes an approach for choosing and updating measurement weights used in weighted least squares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Auto Tuning; Measurement Weights; Power System State Estimation; Random Error Variances. I is not always true. M is used for estimating measurement e1 Abstract--This paper describes an approach for choosing and updating measurement weights used

  18. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

  19. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  20. Chaotic Behaviour of Atomic Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yilmaz; G. Hacibekiroglu; E. Bolcal; Y. Polatoglu

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors of this paper studied Schrodinger wave equation to investiagate the chaotic behavior of atomic energy levels in relation with three quantum numbers n, l, m by means of derived inequality. It could give rise to the siplitting of atomic spectral lines. Keywords: Chaos, Schrodinger wave equation, atomic energy levels

  1. Riso Report No. Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagiellonski Institute of Physics Krakow, Poland and P. A. Lindgård Mogensen The Danish Atomic EnergyfM O o 8- OL '·O c/i Riso Report No. Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Riso/t on exchangefrom: Library, Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Risd, Roskilde, Denmark #12;May, 1966 Ris6 Report No

  2. Driven Ratchets for Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzoni, F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brownian motors, or ratchets, are devices which "rectify" Brownian motion, i.e. they can generate a current of particles out of unbiased fluctuations. The ratchet effect is a very general phenomenon which applies to a wide range of physical systems, and indeed ratchets have been realized with a variety of solid state devices, with optical trap setups as well as with synthetic molecules and granular gases. The present article reviews recent experimental realizations of ac driven ratchets with cold atoms in driven optical lattices. This is quite an unusual system for a Brownian motor as there is no a real thermal bath, and both the periodic potential for the atoms and the fluctuations are determined by laser fields. Such a system allowed us to realize experimentally rocking and gating ratchets, and to precisely investigate the relationship between symmetry and transport in these ratchets, both for the case of periodic and quasiperiodic driving.

  3. Driven Ratchets for Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Renzoni

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Brownian motors, or ratchets, are devices which "rectify" Brownian motion, i.e. they can generate a current of particles out of unbiased fluctuations. The ratchet effect is a very general phenomenon which applies to a wide range of physical systems, and indeed ratchets have been realized with a variety of solid state devices, with optical trap setups as well as with synthetic molecules and granular gases. The present article reviews recent experimental realizations of ac driven ratchets with cold atoms in driven optical lattices. This is quite an unusual system for a Brownian motor as there is no a real thermal bath, and both the periodic potential for the atoms and the fluctuations are determined by laser fields. Such a system allowed us to realize experimentally rocking and gating ratchets, and to precisely investigate the relationship between symmetry and transport in these ratchets, both for the case of periodic and quasiperiodic driving.

  4. ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

  5. Volume-weighted measure for eternal inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winitzki, Sergei [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany) and Yukawa Institute of Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose a new volume-weighted probability measure for cosmological 'multiverse' scenarios involving eternal inflation. The 'reheating-volume (RV) cutoff' calculates the distribution of observable quantities on a portion of the reheating hypersurface that is conditioned to be finite. The RV measure is gauge-invariant, does not suffer from the 'youngness paradox', and is independent of initial conditions at the beginning of inflation. In slow-roll inflationary models with a scalar inflaton, the RV-regulated probability distributions can be obtained by solving nonlinear diffusion equations. I discuss possible applications of the new measure to 'landscape' scenarios with bubble nucleation. As an illustration, I compute the predictions of the RV measure in a simple toy landscape.

  6. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  7. Gauge invariant hydrogen atom Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Min Sun; Xiang-Song Chen; Xiao-Fu Lu; Fan Wang

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a classical external electromagnetic field, there is an apparent puzzle that the matrix element of the canonical momentum and Hamiltonian operators is gauge dependent. A resolution to this puzzle is recently provided by us in [2]. Based on the separation of the electromagnetic potential into pure gauge and gauge invariant parts, we have proposed a new set of momentum and Hamiltonian operators which satisfy both the requirement of gauge invariance and the relevant commutation relations. In this paper we report a check for the case of the hydrogen atom problem: Starting from the Hamiltonian of the coupled electron, proton and electromagnetic field, under the infinite proton mass approximation, we derive the gauge invariant hydrogen atom Hamiltonian and verify explicitly that this Hamiltonian is different from the Dirac Hamiltonian, which is the time translation generator of the system. The gauge invariant Hamiltonian is the energy operator, whose eigenvalue is the energy of the hydrogen atom. It is generally time-dependent. In this case, one can solve the energy eigenvalue equation at any specific instant of time. It is shown that the energy eigenvalues are gauge independent, and by suitably choosing the phase factor of the time-dependent eigenfunction, one can ensure that the time-dependent eigenfunction satisfies the Dirac equation.

  8. NAAP Hydrogen Atom 1/9 The Hydrogen Atom Student Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Name: NAAP ­ Hydrogen Atom 1/9 The Hydrogen Atom ­ Student Guide Background Material Carefully read and the Quantum model represent the Hydrogen atom. In some cases they both describe things in the same way frequency, smaller energy, and the same velocity through space as a blue photon". #12;NAAP ­Hydrogen Atom 2

  9. Fast transport, atom sample splitting and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkl, Gerhard

    Fast transport, atom sample splitting and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation and the manipulation of ultra-cold implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator-based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more

  10. Semiclassical Szego limit of resonance clusters for the hydrogen atom Stark Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter D. Hislop; Carlos Villegas-Blas

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the weighted averages of resonance clusters for the hydrogen atom with a Stark electric field in the weak field limit. We prove a semiclassical Szego-type theorem for resonance clusters showing that the limiting distribution of the resonance shifts concentrates on the classical energy surface corresponding to a rescaled eigenvalue of the hydrogen atom Hamiltonian. This result extends Szego-type results on eigenvalue clusters to resonance clusters. There are two new features in this work: first, the study of resonance clusters requires the use of non self-adjoint operators, and second, the Stark perturbation is unbounded so control of the perturbation is achieved using localization properties of coherent states corresponding to hydrogen atom eigenvalues.

  11. Enhancing the Benefit of the Chemical Mixture Methodology: A Report on Methodology Testing and Potential Approaches for Improving Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Glantz, Clifford S.; Booth, Alexander E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive testing shows that the current version of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is meeting its intended mission to provide conservative estimates of the health effects from exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. However, the current version of the CMM could benefit from several enhancements that are designed to improve its application of Health Code Numbers (HCNs) and employ weighting factors to reduce over conservatism.

  12. Ultracold Atoms: How Quantum Field Theory Invaded Atomic Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold Atoms: How Quantum

  13. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susanne Pielawa; Luiz Davidovich; David Vitali; Giovanna Morigi

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  14. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielawa, Susanne; Vitali, David; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  15. atomic recoil laser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Recoil Laser Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We formulate a wave atom optics theory of the Collective Atomic Recoil Laser, where the atomic center-of-mass motion...

  16. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals chemicals result from the direct or indirect actions of humans. Build- ing materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  17. Appendix H. Chemicals Appendix H. Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals chemicals result from the direct or indirect actions of humans. Build- ing materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  18. PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    phenomena in nature and technology. The chemical engineer leverages knowledge of molecular processes across1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School faculty

  19. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  20. General Atomics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/Puesta en Marcha,Geary,GenSelfandAtomics

  1. Weighted power counting and chiral dimensional regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damiano Anselmi

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a modified dimensional-regularization technique that overcomes several difficulties of the ordinary technique, and is specially designed to work efficiently in chiral and parity violating quantum field theories, in arbitrary dimensions greater than 2. When the dimension of spacetime is continued to complex values, spinors, vectors and tensors keep the components they have in the physical dimension, therefore the $\\gamma $ matrices are the standard ones. Propagators are regularized with the help of evanescent higher-derivative kinetic terms, which are of the Majorana type in the case of chiral fermions. If the new terms are organized in a clever way, weighted power counting provides an efficient control on the renormalization of the theory, and allows us to show that the resulting chiral dimensional regularization is consistent to all orders. The new technique considerably simplifies the proofs of properties that hold to all orders, and makes them suitable to be generalized to wider classes of models. Typical examples are the renormalizability of chiral gauge theories and the Adler-Bardeen theorem. The difficulty of explicit computations, on the other hand, may increase.

  2. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G-31 Fluorocarbonhydrocarbons, and (3) fluorocarbon solvents. However, aHigh Hazard Chemicals Fluorocarbon Solvents Fluorocarbon

  3. November 2006 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    .0 DEPARTMENTAL SAFETY MANAGEMENT 4.1 CHEMISTRY SAFETY COMMITTEE 4.2 TRAINING 4.3 CHEMICAL SAFETY PROTOCOLS 4.2 CHEMICAL HAZARD INFORMATION 6.3 CHEMICAL STORAGE IN LABORATORIES 6.4 WORKING WITH PARTICULARLY HAZARDOUS PROCEDURES 6.8 CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL 6.9 COMPRESSED GASES 6.10 CRYOGENIC LIQUIDS #12;November 2006 3 6

  4. Atoms can be divided into three categories: polar, non-polar and hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei-Lin You

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the time of Rutherford 1911) physicists and chemists commonly believed that with no electric field, the nucleus of an atom is at the centre of the electron cloud, atoms do not have permanent electric dipole moment (EDM), so that there is no polar atom in nature. In the fact, the idea is untested hypothesis. After ten years of intense research, our experiments showed that atoms can be divided into three categories: polar, non-polar and hydrogen atom. Alkali atoms are all polar atoms. The EDM of a Sodium, Potassium, Rubidium and Cesium atom in the ground state have been obtained as follows: d(Na)=1.28*10 to-8 power e.cm; d(K)=1.58*10 to-8 power e.cm; d(Rb)=1.70 *10 to-8 power e.cm; d(Cs)=1.86*10 to-8 power e.cm. All kind of atoms are non-polar atoms except for alkali and hydrogen atoms. Hydrogen atom is quite distinct from the others. The ground state in hydrogen is non-polar atom(d=0) but the excited state is polar atom, for example, the first excited state has a large EDM: d(H)=3ea=1.59*10 to-8 power e.cm (a is Bohr radius).

  5. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  6. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  7. Weight Distribution of a Class of Binary Linear Block Codes Formed from RCPC Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yushi Dr.; Cosman, Pamela C; Milstein, Laurence B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the weight distribution of terminated convolutionalViterbi, “On the weight distribution of linear block codes9, SEPTEMBER 2005 Weight Distribution of a Class of Binary

  8. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2000, the United States consumed about 13% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  9. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 13% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 76%; full-alloy steel, 8

  10. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2001, the United States consumed about 14% of world chromite ore production in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    46 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal was predominantly for the production of stainless and heat-resisting steel and superalloys

  11. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 16% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 74%; full-alloy steel

  12. (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States consumes about 12% of world chromite ore production in various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    44 CHROMIUM (Data in thousand metric tons, gross weight, unless otherwise noted) Domestic chromium chemicals, chromium ferroalloys, and chromite-containing refractories, respectively. Consumption of chromium ferroalloys and metal by end use was: stainless and heat-resisting steel, 68%; full-alloy steel, 8

  13. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  14. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  15. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C. (Port Jefferson, NY); Wang, Chengpu (Upton, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  16. Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jarvinen

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

  17. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Placitas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals.

  18. Static atomic displacements in crystalline solid solution alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.; Sparks, C.; Robertson, J.L.; Epperson, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jiang, Xiaogang [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic size differences induce static displacements from an average alloy lattice and play an important role in controlling alloy phase stability and properties. Details of this, however, are difficult to study, as chemical order and displacements are strongly interrelated and static displacements are hard to measure. Diffuse x-ray scattering with tunable-synchrotron radiation can now measure element- specific static displacements with an accuracy of {+-}0.1 pm and can simultaneously measure local chemical order out to 20 shells or more. Ideal alloys for this are those that have previously been the most intractable: alloys with small Z contrast, alloys with only local order and alloys with small size differences. The combination of precise characterization of local chemical order and precise measurement of static displacement provides new information that challenges existing alloy models. This paper reports on an ongoing systematic study of static displacements in the Fe/Ni/Cr alloys and compares the observed static displacements to these predicted by current theories. Availability of more brilliant 3rd generation hard x-ray sources will greatly enhance these measurements.

  19. affects body weight: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weight perceptions may be influ- enced by food habits and food environments, nutritional knowledge, cultural norms and expectations and mass media Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Maxwell,...

  20. FORCE RECONSTRUCTION USING THE SUM OF WEIGHTED ACCELERATIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coordinates. This methodof determiningthe SWAT weights would Now recall the definition of the SWAT dof, equation be equivalentto inverting the mode-shape matrix to...

  1. How much ``weight`` should be assigned to toxicity test results in ecological risk assessment?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, R.N.; Gilron, G.L. [Beak Consultants Ltd., Brampton, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxicity tests are an integral part of ecological assessment activities such as Canada`s Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) programs and the USA`s Superfund program. Both of these types of programs encourage the use of the weight-of-evidence approach for the evaluation of ecological risks. This approach uses data from biological surveys, toxicity tests, and ambient media chemical analyses. Currently, there is no guidance available which identifies the relative importance of these different data types in the risk assessment. The quality of the data generated will necessarily determine the ``weight`` assigned to each line of evidence. Decisions often are made on the basis of toxicity test results. However, routine tests are conducted frequently without consideration of their appropriateness (e.g., species sensitivity, ecological relevance). Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine the relative sensitivities of various test methods used to assess toxicity from various industries. Different industries were selected to represent different classes of contaminants. For example, the pulp and paper industry releases organic compounds and the mining sector primarily releases heavy metals. The comparative sensitivities of toxicity tests will be illustrated for two industrial sector case studies. With a better understanding of toxicity test method sensitivity, the ecological risk assessor is better able to assign the appropriate weight to the toxicity test results in a risk characterization. This will allow toxicity testing programs to be focused and increase the confidence in the entire risk assessment and any resulting decisions.

  2. Classification of fossil fuels according to structural-chemical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; G.S. Golovin; S.G. Gagarin [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of a set of linear equations that relate the amount of major elements n{sub E} (E = C, H, O, N, S) in the organic matter of fossil fuels to structural characteristics, such as the number of cycles R, the number of atoms n{sub E}, the number of mutual chemical bonds, the degree of unsaturation of the structure {delta}, and the extent of its reduction B, a structural-chemical classification of fossil coals that is closely related to the parameters of the industrial-genetic classification (GOST 25543-88) is proposed. Structural-chemical classification diagrams are constructed for power-generating coals of Russia; coking coals; and coals designed for nonfuel purposes including the manufacture of adsorbents, synthetic liquid fuel, ion exchangers, thermal graphite, and carbon-graphite materials.

  3. Phases of Atom-Molecule Vortex Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, S. J.; Bigelow, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Park, Q-Han [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study ground state vortex configurations in a rotating atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. It is found that the coherent coupling between the atomic and molecular condensates can render a pairing of atomic and molecular vortices into a composite structure that resembles a carbon dioxide molecule. Structural phase transitions of vortex lattices are also explored through different physical parameters including the rotational frequency of the system.

  4. Method for enhanced atomization of liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Richard E. (27121 Puerta del Oro, Mission Viejo, CA 92691); White, Jerome R. (44755 Wyandotte, Hemet, CA 92544)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process for atomizing a slurry or liquid process stream in which a slurry or liquid is passed through a nozzle to provide a primary atomized process stream, an improvement which comprises subjecting the liquid or slurry process stream to microwave energy as the liquid or slurry process stream exits the nozzle, wherein sufficient microwave heating is provided to flash vaporize the primary atomized process stream.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  6. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  7. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  8. Chemical and Biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    - nology fields where they can test the side effects of antibiotics or develop agricultural chemicals clean drinking water to a village in Kenya, a country experiencing its worst drought in 20 years," said and three collab- orating institutions to improve the manufacture of pharmaceutical, food, and agricultural

  9. CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Westinghouse Atomic 1 U.S. Department of Energy Interim Residual Contamination and Waste Control Guidelines for bormerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) d Remote...

  10. Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' By Jared Sagoff * December 4, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Like snowflakes, nanoparticles come in a wide variety of shapes and...

  11. Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials section of the Tennessee Code covers all of the regulations, licenses, permits, siting requirements, and practices relevant to a nuclear energy development. ...

  12. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhan Saif

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits dynamical localization and quantum recurrences.

  13. United States Atomic Energy Commission formed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weapons problem, the United States worked to establish its own formal organization. The transition from military civilian control of nuclear energy was defined in the Atomic...

  14. Remote preparation of an atomic quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjamin Rosenfeld; Stefan Berner; Juergen Volz; Markus Weber; Harald Weinfurter

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and quantum communication. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped 87Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  15. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  16. Subwavelength Transportation of Light with Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Siu-Tat; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and investigate a new type of optical waveguide made by an array of atoms without involving conventional Bragg scattering or total internal reflection. A finite chain of atoms collectively coupled through their intrinsic resonance supports a propagating mode with minimal radiative loss when the array spacing $a$ is around 0.6$\\lambda_0/2\\pi$ where $\\lambda_0$ is the wavelength of the nearly resonant optical transition. We find that the transportation is robust with respect to position fluctuation and remains possible when the atoms are placed on a circle. Our result paves the way to implement the subwavelength transportation of light in integrated optical circuits with cold atoms.

  17. Measurement of positive gain on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine pumped by O2,,a1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    state I 2 P3/2 . Conventionally, the O2 1 is produced by a liquid chemistry singlet oxygen generator of gain. © 2004 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.1784519] The classic chemical oxygen the metastable excited singlet oxygen molecule, O2 a1 [de- noted O2 1 hereafter], and the iodine atom ground

  18. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  19. CARBON ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, S.J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY~4720 1 U.S.A. IntroductioE. Dual Phase steels are currentlymartensite-austenite dual phase steel, although the results

  20. Vibrational Modes of Adsorbed Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of adsorbed atoms. vi rational modes *Present address: S h University of H c ool of Scienc City, Tex. ouston at Clear La ', r e e and Technology Lake City, Clea Lak %. R. wrence and R. E. Allen published). Allen, Phys. Rev. B (to be 2G. P... are about t r Ne on Kr. The d ou he same as fo mode labeled 2V a as large in the f' t X is almost erst (adsorbate) la e od( b t t)l pure surface mod e ayer. The 1H mode at X is a 4, this mode bec m e. Just to the r'right of X in Fig. e ecomes a...

  1. 2012 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwier, Timothy

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At the 2012 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conference, there will be talks in several broadly defined and partially overlapping areas: ? Intramolecular and single-collision reaction dynamics; ? Photophysics and photochemistry of excited states; ? Clusters, aerosols and solvation; ? Interactions at interfaces; ? Conformations and folding of large molecules; ? Interactions under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. The theme of the Gordon Research Seminar on Atomic & Molecular Interactions, in keeping with the tradition of the Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference, is far-reaching and involves fundamental research in the gas and condensed phases along with application of these ideas to practical chemical fields. The oral presentations, which will contain a combination of both experiment and theory, will focus on four broad categories: ? Ultrafast Phenomena; ? Excited States, Photoelectrons, and Photoions; ? Chemical Reaction Dynamics; ? Biomolecules and Clusters.

  2. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Zhan Jun [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Yang, Ying Chao [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Li, Kai Yuan [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Tao, Xin Yong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Zhang, Li Tong [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, China; Li, Xiao Dong [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Pan, Zhengwei [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix

  3. A Nonempirical Test on the Weight of Pseudorandom Number Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Makoto

    A Nonempirical Test on the Weight of Pseudorandom Number Generators Makoto Matsumoto1 and Takuji introduce a theoretical test, named weight discrepancy test, on pseu- dorandom number generators. This test selected. This test can be performed for most generators based on a linear recursion over the two

  4. Implementing Weighted Abduction in Markov Logic James Blythe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Implementing Weighted Abduction in Markov Logic James Blythe USC ISI blythe@isi.edu Jerry R. Hobbs@cs.utexas.edu Abstract Abduction is a method for finding the best explanation for observations. Arguably the most advanced approach to abduction, especially for natural language processing, is weighted abduction, which

  5. Weighted Hypothesis Testing Larry Wasserman and Kathryn Roeder1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    loss remains nearly constant. specified weights, but minute power loss for poorly specified weights; and (ii) in the non-sparse case, under weak conditions, the worst case power loss for poorly specified the potential power loss. Figure 2 shows the non-sparse case. The plots on the left show the power as a function

  6. Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Weighted Parametric Operational Hydrology Forecasting Thomas E. Croley II1 1 Great Lakes forecasts in operational hydrology builds a sample of possibilities for the future, of climate series from-parametric method can be extended into a new weighted parametric hydrological forecasting technique to allow

  7. Weighted Graph Cuts without Eigenvectors: A Multilevel Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to handle data that is not linearly separable; spectral clustering and kernel k-means are two of the main different methods--in particular, a general weighted kernel k-means objective is mathematically equivalent multilevel algorithm removes this restriction by using kernel k-means to optimize weighted graph cuts

  8. A component GARCH model with time varying weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    2007/19 A component GARCH model with time varying weights Luc Bauwens and Giuseppe Storti #12;CORE DISCUSSION PAPER 2007/19 A component GARCH model with time varying weights Luc BAUWENS1 and Giuseppe STORTI2 March2007 Abstract We present a novel GARCH model that accounts for time varying, state dependent

  9. Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duursma, Iwan M.

    Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes I. M. Duursma Dept for the computation of structural parameters for ring-linear codes. This article therefore presents a method to eÃ?ciently compute weight enumerators of linear codes over primary integer residue rings. For the lifted QR-codes

  10. The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP with Mixed Signs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulatov, Andrei

    The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP with Mixed Signs Andrei Bulatova , Martin Dyerb , Leslie constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which corresponds to the case where all functions in have range {0, 1}. The problem we consider here is to compute the partition function of a given instance of weighted CSP; that is

  11. Characterizing Ideal Weighted Threshold Secret Amos Beimel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    Characterizing Ideal Weighted Threshold Secret Sharing Amos Beimel1 , Tamir Tassa1,2 , and Enav Science, The Open University, Ra'anana, Israel. Abstract. Weighted threshold secret sharing was introduced by Shamir in his seminal work on secret sharing. In such settings, there is a set of users where each user

  12. Weighted modulated secret image sharing method Chien-Chang Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    Weighted modulated secret image sharing method Chien-Chang Chen Hsuan Chuang University Department-layered structure for grouping participants with different weights in a secret image sharing problem. Conventional secret im- age sharing methods suffer from truncation distortion, which is the difference between a pixel

  13. Chemical Peeling of Tomatoes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heddins, Gerald C.; Burns, E. E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frrrzts 41CkFw calded m 21 percent NaOH (230" F.) for 20 seconds, 4> percetlt CaCI, (a6 F.) JW seconds and water (212" F.) for 90 seconds, respectively. The fruits were photographed immediately after scalding. bical Peeling of Tomatoes... UNIVERSITY Summary I Tomato fruits of the Chico and Homestead varieties were scalded in solutions of water, NaOH and CaC12 at various concentrations, times and tem- peratures. Fruits were weighed before and after ' peeling to determine percent weight...

  14. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    actions of humans. Building materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  15. Appendix G: Chemicals Appendix G: Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    actions of humans. Building materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  16. Appendix H: Chemicals Appendix H: Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    actions of humans. Building materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  17. Appendix B: Chemicals Appendix B: Chemicals B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  18. Assembly and Characterization of Well Defined High Molecular Weight Poly(p-phenylene) Polymer Brushes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonzo Calderon, Jose E [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Britt, Phillip F [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL; Deng, Suxiang [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby [ORNL; Swader, Onome A [ORNL; Yu, Xiang [ORNL; Bredas, Jean-Luc E [ORNL; Malagoli, Massimo [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assembly and characterization of well-defined, end-tethered poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) brushes having high molecular weight, low polydispersity and high 1,4-stereoregularity are presented. The PPP brushes are formed using a precursor route that relies on either self-assembly or spin coating of high molecular weight (degrees of polymerizations 54, 146, and 238) end-functionalized poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) chains from benzene solutions onto silicon or quartz substrates, followed by aromatization of the end-attached PCHD chains on the surface. The approach allows the thickness (grafting density) of the brushes to be easily varied. The dry brushes before and after aromatization are characterized by ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, grazing angle attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The properties of the PPP brushes are compared with those of films made using oligo-paraphenylenes and with ab initio density functional theory simulations of optical properties. Our results suggest conversion to fully aromatized, end-tethered PPP polymer brushes having effective conjugation lengths of 5 phenyl units.

  19. Assembly and Characterization ofWell-DefinedHigh-Molecular-Weight Poly(p-phenylene) Polymer Brushes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Britt, Phillip F [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Alonzo Calderon, Jose E [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Bredas, Jean-Luc E [ORNL; Malagoli, Massimo [ORNL; Deng, Suxiang [ORNL; Swader, Onome A [ORNL; Yu, Xiang [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assembly and characterization of well-de ned, end-tethered poly- (p-phenylene) (PPP) brushes having high molecular weight, low polydispersity and high 1,4-stereoregularity are presented. The PPP brushes are formed using a precursor route that relies on either self-assembly or spin coating of high molecular weight (degrees of poly- merizations 54, 146, and 238) end-functionalized poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) chains from benzene solutions onto silicon or quartz substrates, followed by aromatization of the end-attached PCHD chains on the surface. The approach allows the thickness (grafting density) of the brushes to be easily varied. The dry brushes before and after aromatization are characterized by ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, grazing angle attenuated total re ectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectros- copy. The properties of the PPP brushes are compared with those of lms made using oligo- paraphenylenes and with ab initio density functional theory simulations of optical proper- ties. Our results suggest conversion to fully aromatized, end-tetheredPPPpolymerbrusheshaving eective conjugation lengths of 5 phenyl units.

  20. A High Resolution, Light-Weight, Synthetic Aperture Radar for UAV Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I. Pace, F.; Walker, B,C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    (U) Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA) has designed and built a high resolution, light-weight, Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) known as "Lynx". Although Lynx can be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, its design is optimized for use on medium altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS). In particular, it can be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, and Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA. (U) The radar production weight is less than 120 lb and operates within a 3 GHz band from 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz with a peak output power of 320 W. Operating range is resolution and mode dependent but can exceed 45 km in adverse weather (4 mm/hr rain). Lynx has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode, over substantial depression angles (5 to 60 deg) and squint angles (broadside ±45 deg). Real-time Motion Compensation is implemented to allow high-quality image formation even during vehicle turns and other maneuvers.

  1. COOEE bitumen: chemical aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study chemical aging in "COOEE bitumen" using molecular dynamic simulations. The model bitumen is composed of four realistic molecule types: saturated hydrocarbon, resinous oil, resin, and asphaltene. The aging reaction is modelled by the chemical reaction: "2 resins $\\rightarrow$ 1 asphaltene". Molecular dynamic simulations of four bitumen compositions, obtained by a repeated application of the aging reaction, are performed. The stress autocorrelation function, the fluid structure, the rotational dynamics of the plane aromatic molecules, and the diffusivity of each molecule, are determined for the four different compositions. The aging reaction causes a significant dynamics slowdown, which is correlated to the aggregation of asphaltene molecules in larger and dynamically slower nanoaggregates. Finally, a detailed description of the role of each molecule types in the aggregation and aging processes is given.

  2. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Doohee (Macungie, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  3. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, D.

    1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  4. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  5. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    More, R.M.

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described. (MOW)

  6. Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

  7. Photoassociative molecular spectroscopy for atomic radiative lifetimes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    very far apart, in so-called long- range molecular states, their mutual interaction is ruled by plain atomic properties. The high- resolution spectroscopic study of some molecular excited states populated by photoassociation of cold atoms (photoassociative spectroscopy) gives a good illustration of this property

  8. THE NEW ELEMENT CALIFORNIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 98)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the chemical homologs of europium (No. 63)~ gadolinium (Nooterbium-gadolinium-europium. The comparison is based in part

  9. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  10. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  11. AGRI-SCIENCE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    photosynthetic efficiency Improve chemical agronomic and agro-ecological control measures Modelling through translation of chemical biology tools and technologies Control weeds, disease and pests Minimise a platform to steer future research and policy directions. · Encourage external outreach to engage

  12. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive Hazardous or Other Location LBL On-Site Bldgs.hazardous chemicals usedin the laboratory: and (v} The locationhazardous chemicals are present: and. (irl}The location and

  13. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  14. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  15. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    What do we mean by a chemical element? A chemical element is matter, all of whose atoms are alike in having the same positive charge on the nucleus and the same number of extra-nuclear electrons. As we shall see in the following elemental review, the origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having an origin in antiquity, other elements having been discovered within the past few hundred years and still others have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements since these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature.

  16. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  17. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Stevenson; M. Hush; T. Bishop; I. Lesanovsky; T. Fernholz

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  18. Cotton Harvest-Aid Chemicals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzer, Robert B.; Supak, James

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Application Managing Harvest-Aid Program Secondary Growth Insect Control Care of Equipment Safety with Chemicals Guide for Using Cotton Harvest Aids Defoliants Desiccants Mixtures Plant Regulators-Conditioners 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 6 7 7 COTTON... HARVEST-AID CHEMICALS Robert B. Metzer and James Supak* As the name implies, harvest-aid chemicals pre pare the cotton crop for harvest by reducing foliage and plant moisture that interfere with harvesting operations. Harvest-aid chemicals...

  19. On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Kornyushin

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

  20. Engineering atom-atom thermal entanglement via two-photon process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Q. Guo; L. Zhou; H. S. Song

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the system that two atoms simultaneously interact with a single-mode thermal field via different couplings and different spontaneous emission rates when two-photon process is involved. It is found that we indeed can employ the different couplings to produce the atom-atom thermal entanglement in two-photon process. The different atomic spontaneous emission rates are also utilizable in generating thermal entanglement. We also investigate the effect of the cavity leakage. To the initial atomic state $|ee> ,$a slight leakage can relieve the restriction of interaction time and we can obtain a large and steady entanglement.

  1. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  2. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs____________________19 #12;3 Introduction 12/4/2013 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research University of California at Santa Barbara Spectroscopy Department Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR and EPR

  3. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs______________________19 #12;3 Introduction 10/23/09 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research Department Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR Laboratory Form Version 8/6/98 1. General Laboratory Information

  4. Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical & Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the...

  5. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  6. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengio, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) sq root 3x sq root 3R30 sup 0 , H sub 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH sub 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( sq root 3 sq root 3)R30 sup 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H sub 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was esta...

  7. Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

  8. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  9. Scattering properties of dark atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James M. Cline; Zuowei Liu; Guy D. Moore; Wei Xue

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter exists in the form of atoms, analogous to those of the visible world. An important input for understanding the cosmological consequences of dark atoms is their self-scattering. Making use of results from atomic physics for the potentials between hydrogen atoms, we compute the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections for dark atoms. We find an intricate dependence upon the ratio of the dark proton to electron mass, allowing for the possibility to "design" low-energy features in the cross section. Dependences upon other parameters, namely the gauge coupling and reduced mass, scale out of the problem by using atomic units. We derive constraints on the parameter space of dark atoms by demanding that their scattering cross section does not exceed bounds from dark matter halo shapes. We discuss the formation of molecular dark hydrogen in the universe, and determine the analogous constraints on the model when the dark matter is predominantly in molecular form.

  10. Scattering properties of dark atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, James M; Moore, Guy; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter exists in the form of atoms, analogous to those of the visible world. An important input for understanding the cosmological consequences of dark atoms is their self-scattering. Making use of results from atomic physics for the potentials between hydrogen atoms, we compute the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections for dark atoms. We find an intricate dependence upon the ratio of the dark proton to electron mass, allowing for the possibility to "design" low-energy features in the cross section. Dependences upon other parameters, namely the gauge coupling and reduced mass, scale out of the problem by using atomic units. We derive constraints on the parameter space of dark atoms by demanding that their scattering cross section does not exceed bounds from dark matter halo shapes. We discuss the formation of molecular dark hydrogen in the universe, and determine the analogous constraints on the model when the dark matter is predominantly in ...

  11. Ps-atom scattering at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, I I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pseudopotential for positronium-atom interaction, based on electron-atom and positron-atom phase shifts, is constructed, and the phase shifts for Ps-Kr and Ps-Ar scattering are calculated. This approach allows us to extend the Ps-atom cross sections, obtained previously in the impulse approximation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 243201 (2014)], to energies below the Ps ionization threshold. Although experimental data are not available in this low-energy region, our results describe well the tendency of the measured cross sections to drop with decreasing velocity at $v<1$ a.u. Our results show that the effect of the Ps-atom van der Waals interaction is weak compared to the polarization interaction in electron-atom and positron-atom scattering. As a result, the Ps scattering length for both Ar and Kr is positive, and the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum is not observed for Ps scattering from these targets. This makes Ps scattering quite different from electron scattering in the low-energy region, in contrast to the inter...

  12. Studying coherence in ultra-cold atomic gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis will discuss the study of coherence properties of ultra-cold atomic gases. The atomic systems investigated include a thermal cloud of atoms, a Bose-Einstein condensate and a fermion pair condensate. In each ...

  13. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  14. Chemical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  15. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  16. Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron,Chemicals

  17. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced Chemical Cleaning

  18. Sandia Energy - Chemical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied & ComputationalBriefChemical

  19. Solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Dennis M. (Livermore, CA); Chiu, Ing Lap (Castro Valley, CA)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents. Solutions of detoxifying reagent for chemical and biological agents are coated using small quantities of hydrophobic nanoparticles by vigorous agitation or by aerosolization of the solution in the presence of the hydrophobic nanoparticles to form a solid powder. For example, when hydrophobic fumed silica particles are shaken in the presence of IN oxone solution in approximately a 95:5-weight ratio, a dry powder results. The hydrophobic silica forms a porous coating of insoluble fine particles around the solution. Since the chemical or biological agent tends to be hydrophobic on contact with the weakly encapsulated detoxifying solution, the porous coating breaks down and the detoxifying reagent is delivered directly to the chemical or biological agent for maximum concentration at the point of need. The solid-water (coated) detoxifying solutions can be blown into contaminated ventilation ducting or other difficult to reach sites for detoxification of pools of chemical or biological agent. Once the agent has been detoxified, it can be removed by flushing the area with air or other techniques.

  20. 1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howard, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  1. 1985 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howald, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1985. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  2. Gain narrowing in few-atom systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Savels; Allard P. Mosk; Ad Lagendijk

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a density matrix approach, we study the simplest systems that display both gain and feedback: clusters of 2 to 5 atoms, one of which is pumped. The other atoms supply feedback through multiple scattering of light. We show that, if the atoms are in each other's near-field, the system exhibits large gain narrowing and spectral mode redistribution. The observed phenomena are more pronounced if the feedback is enhanced. Our system is to our knowledge the simplest exactly solvable microscopic system which shows the approach to laser oscillation.

  3. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, Graeme [OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States); Curry, John J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  4. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bouyer; P. Lemonde; M. Ben Dahan; A. Michaud; C. Salomon; J. Dalibard

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  5. The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosling, F.G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  6. 1982 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; McKnight, R.H.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.; Phaneuf, R.A. (comps.)

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1982. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA AREA WEIGHTED AVERAGE CALCULATION WORKSHEET: RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a building feature, material, or construction assembly occur in a building, a weighted average there is more than one level of floor, wall, or ceiling insulation in a building, or more than one type

  8. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevisan, Luca

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time Bernard Chazelle #3; Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum spanning tree- components algorithm picks O(1=#15; 2 ) vertices in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose

  9. Human Growth and Body Weight Dynamics: An Integrative Systems Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and ...

  10. Technology Portfolio Planning by Weighted Graph Analysis of System Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Technology Portfolio Planning by Weighted Graph Analysis of System Architectures Peter Davison and Bruce Cameron Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 Edward F. Crawley Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Skolkovo 143025, Russia Abstract5 Many systems undergo significant

  11. Robust and Stochastically Weighted Multi-Objective Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 12, 2010 ... and identically distributed samples from an unknown distribution of weights. Then ...... yields are highly related to temperature, precipitation, and soil condition (see ..... S. He, J. Chen, W. Xu, Y. Sun, T. Preetha, and X. Shen.

  12. An improved method for weighted least squares IIR filter design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila-Pazmino, Javier

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new method for IIR weighted least squares filter design has been proposed. In this method, the problem of approximating a desired frequency response using a rational function is solved using an iterative approach. After studying...

  13. Optimization of parameters for coverage of low molecular weight proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Stephan A.

    Proteins with molecular weights of <25 kDa are involved in major biological processes such as ribosome formation, stress adaption (e.g., temperature reduction) and cell cycle control. Despite their importance, the coverage ...

  14. abnormally weighting energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Is Dark Energy Abnormally Weighting? Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We present a new interpretation of...

  15. Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    92 Created on: 3262015 1:21:33 PM Table 26. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South...

  16. PART I: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PART I: JOB DESCRIPTION Weighted Job Questionnaire (WJQ) Custom Department Name: Student,1412 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY & C.U.P.E., Local 3338 JOB DESCRIPTION 1. POSITION IDENTIFICATION Department

  17. Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for stochastic particle coagulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVille, R.E.L., E-mail: rdeville@illinois.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1409 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Riemer, N., E-mail: nriemer@illinois.edu [Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 105 S. Gregory Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); West, M., E-mail: mwest@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods are a useful way to compute the time evolution of the multi-dimensional size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. An effective approach to improve the efficiency of such models is the use of weighted computational particles. Here we introduce particle weighting functions that are power laws in particle size to the recently-developed particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC and present the mathematical formalism of these Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for particle coagulation and growth. We apply this to an urban plume scenario that simulates a particle population undergoing emission of different particle types, dilution, coagulation and aerosol chemistry along a Lagrangian trajectory. We quantify the performance of the Weighted Flow Algorithm for number and mass-based quantities of relevance for atmospheric sciences applications.

  18. Trends and inferred emissions of atmospheric high molecular weight perfluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivy, Diane Jean

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric observations and atmospheric observation-based global emission estimates are presented for the five high molecular weight perfluorocarbons (PFCs): decafluorobutane (C 4 F 1 0 ), dodecafluoropentane (C5 F1 2 ), ...

  19. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  20. Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery.

  1. Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouhani, S.Z.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery. 35 figs.

  2. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  3. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  4. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  5. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  6. Interaction of an aluminum atom with a closed subshell metal atom: Spectroscopic analysis of AlZn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Michael D.

    Interaction of an aluminum atom with a closed subshell metal atom: Spectroscopic analysis of Al-block main group element, aluminum, and the 3d series of transi- tion metal atoms. Although the bonding in Al

  7. acoustic wave atomization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fluid and acoustic computations, hybrid methodologies still Kohlenbach, Ulrich 12 Propagation of atomic matter waves inside an atom wave guide Quantum Physics (arXiv)...

  8. atomic emission spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a...

  9. atomic photoabsorption process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    individual sites within atom-trap arrays. Cecilia Muldoon; Lukas Brandt; Jian Dong; Dustin Stuart; Edouard Brainis; Matthew Himsworth; Axel Kuhn 2012-03-21 306 Atomic...

  10. Structure of ?-Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases. Structure of -Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases....

  11. Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful...

  12. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys....

  13. atomic carbon nanowires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Electron Transport Properties of Atomic Carbon Nanowires between Graphene Electrodes CERN Preprints Summary: Long, stable and free-standing linear atomic...

  14. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer...

  15. atom trap trace: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors Physics Websites Summary: An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring...

  16. Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to Automotive Thermoelectric Systems Development Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to...

  17. atomic number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  18. atomic number density: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We study atom-atom correlations and relative...

  19. atomic mass number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  20. atomic number electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  1. atom interferometry measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bose-condensed atoms . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Bose-Einstein condensates are coherent matter waves, produced by cooling gaseous atomic clouds to ultra-low...

  2. atomic wave packets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistics of atomic populations in output coupled wave packets from Bose-Einstein condensates: Four-wave mixing Physics Websites Summary: Statistics of atomic populations in...

  3. atomic number range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  4. atom interferometry progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bose-condensed atoms . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Bose-Einstein condensates are coherent matter waves, produced by cooling gaseous atomic clouds to ultra-low...

  5. Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Kevin

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    common chemical names and the corresponding chemical name for each active ingredient. Kevin Ong* ?Assistant Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist, The Texas A&M University System Table 1. Plant disease control chemicals. Common name Chemical name 1...

  6. Chemical and Radiochemical Analysis of Consolidated Sludge Samples from the K East Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmore, Monte R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Thornton, Brenda M.; Gano, Susan R.

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Consolidated sludge samples described in this report were collected from the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool in March and April 1999. Material for the samples was collected from both the basin floor and fuel canisters within the basin. Analyses persented include weight percent solids determination, uranium analysis by kinetic phosphorescence (KPA), plutonium isotope analysis by alpha energy analysis (AEA), gross beta analysis, gamma energy analysis (GEA), and metals analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  7. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

  8. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: CRITICAL REVIEW OF MOST RECENT ADVANCES. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL...

  9. NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Chemical Hygiene Plan Division of Occupational Health Chemical Hygiene Plan Evaluation and Record Keeping

  10. Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules Physisorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules Physisorption Chemisorption Surface Bonding Kinetics of Adsorption/Diffusion/Desorption (Scattering Dynamics) #12;Outcomes of Collision Process Rebound (elastically or inelastically) Elastic Scattering Inelastic Scattering Accomodation (thermalizing) Adsorption E V(r) r

  11. Atomic physics: An almost lightless laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    Lasers are often described in terms of a light field circulating in an optical resonator system. Now a laser has been demonstrated in which the field resides primarily in the atomic medium that is used to generate the light.

  12. FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MULTIPOLE POLARIZABILITIES OF ATOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1259 FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MULTIPOLE POLARIZABILITIES OF ATOMIC SYSTEMS S. I. EASA and G. C. SHUKLA et d'helium. Abstract. 2014 A variational calculation for frequency dependent multipole 1978, Classification Physics Abstracts 31.10 The calculation of multipole polarizabilities

  13. Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Britton William Herbert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ...

  14. Accurate capacitive metrology for atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzeo, Aaron D. (Aaron David), 1979-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents accurate capacitive sensing metrology designed for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) originally developed in the MIT Precision Motion Control Lab. The capacitive measurements use a set of ...

  15. Quantum Structures of the Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Jeknic-Dugic; M. Dugic; A. Francom; M. Arsenijevic

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern quantum theory introduces quantum structures (decompositions into subsystems) as a new discourse that is not fully comparable with the classical-physics counterpart. To this end, so-called Entanglement Relativity appears as a corollary of the universally valid quantum mechanics that can provide for a deeper and more elaborate description of the composite quantum systems. In this paper we employ this new concept to describe the hydrogen atom. We offer a consistent picture of the hydrogen atom as an open quantum system that naturally answers the following important questions: (a) how do the so called "quantum jumps" in atomic excitation and de-excitation occur? and (b) why does the classically and seemingly artificial "center-of-mass + relative degrees of freedom" structure appear as the primarily operable form in most of the experimental reality of atoms?

  16. United Nations Atomic Energy Commission stalls out

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commission would be short-lived and would not result in the desired control of atomic energy. In the wake of the disappointing results of the Moscow meeting, the United States...

  17. Moving closer to the Atomic Energy Commission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in some way. On October 3, 1945 the president addressed Congress on the subject of atomic energy. Here he first mentioned the need for international agreements. Attempts were made...

  18. Quantum micro-mechanics with ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Botter; Daniel Brooks; Subhadeep Gupta; Zhao-Yuan Ma; Kevin L. Moore; Kater W. Murch; Tom P. Purdy; Dan M. Stamper-Kurn

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In many experiments isolated atoms and ions have been inserted into high-finesse optical resonators for the study of fundamental quantum optics and quantum information. Here, we introduce another application of such a system, as the realization of cavity optomechanics where the collective motion of an atomic ensemble serves the role of a moveable optical element in an optical resonator. Compared with other optomechanical systems, such as those incorporating nanofabricated cantilevers or the large cavity mirrors of gravitational observatories, our cold-atom realization offers direct access to the quantum regime. We describe experimental investigations of optomechanical effects, such as the bistability of collective atomic motion and the first quantification of measurement backaction for a macroscopic object, and discuss future directions for this nascent field.

  19. Remote-State Prparation eines einzelnen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    Remote-State Präparation eines einzelnen Atoms Diplomarbeit am Department für Physik der Ludwig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3.3 Remote-State-Präparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.3.4 Zusammenfassung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3 Remote-State-Präparation 31 3.1 Einleitung

  20. Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple electrical circuits are analyzed, and the results show that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decays of atoms. As an illustration of the analogy a two-circuit electrical system...

  1. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  2. Magnetic Sensitivity and Entanglement Dynamics of the Chemical Compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. K. Kominis

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the quantum limits to the magnetic sensitivity of a new kind of magnetometer based on biochemical reactions. Radical-ion-pair reactions, the biochemical system underlying the chemical compass, are shown to offer a new and unique physical realization of a magnetic field sensor competitive to modern atomic or condensed matter magnetometers. We elaborate on the quantum coherence and entanglement dynamics of this sensor, showing that they provide the physical basis for testing our understanding of the fundamental quantum dynamics of radical-ion-pair reactions.

  3. Chemical bond and entanglement of electrons in the hydrogen molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikos Iliopoulos; Andreas F. Terzis

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the quantum correlations (in terms of concurrence of indistinguishable electrons) in a prototype molecular system (hydrogen molecule). With the assistance of the standard approximations of the linear combination of atomic orbitals and the con?guration interaction methods we describe the electronic wavefunction of the ground state of the H2 molecule. Moreover, we managed to ?find a rather simple analytic expression for the concurrence (the most used measure of quantum entanglement) of the two electrons when the molecule is in its lowest energy. We have found that concurrence does not really show any relation to the construction of the chemical bond.

  4. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  5. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  6. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  7. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditons. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  8. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  9. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Bernalillo, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  10. Hydrogen atom in rotationally invariant noncommutative space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. P. Gnatenko; V. M. Tkachuk

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the noncommutative algebra which is rotationally invariant. The hydrogen atom is studied in a rotationally invariant noncommutative space. We find the corrections to the energy levels of the hydrogen atom up to the second order in the parameter of noncommutativity. The upper bound of the parameter of noncommutativity is estimated on the basis of the experimental results for 1s-2s transition frequency.

  11. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  12. Controlling the Ratchet Effect for Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatole Kenfack; Jiangbin Gong; Arjendu K. Pattanayak

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-order quantum resonances manifested by directed currents have been realized with cold atoms. Here we show that by increasing the strength of an experimentally achievable delta-kicking ratchet potential, quantum resonances of a very high order may naturally emerge and can induce larger ratchet currents than low-order resonances, with the underlying classical limit being fully chaotic. The results offer a means of controlling quantum transport of cold atoms.

  13. ac-driven atomic quantum motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Ponomarev; S. Denisov; P. Hanggi

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We invent an ac-driven quantum motor consisting of two different, interacting ultracold atoms placed into a ring-shaped optical lattice and submerged in a pulsating magnetic field. While the first atom carries a current, the second one serves as a quantum starter. For fixed zero-momentum initial conditions the asymptotic carrier velocity converges to a unique non-zero value. We also demonstrate that this quantum motor performs work against a constant load.

  14. Comparison of a low carbohydrate and low fat diet for weight maintenance in overweight or obese adults enrolled in a clinical weight management program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeCheminant, James D.; Gibson, Cheryl A.; Dullivan, Debra K.; Hall, Sandra; Washburn, Rik; Vernon, Mary C.; Curry, Chelsea; Stewart, Elizabeth; Westman, Eric C.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20% of overweight individuals losing weight are successful for weight maintenance when defined as losing at least 10% of initial body weight and maintaining the loss for at least 1 year [1,2]. Thus, improved strategies to prevent weight re-gain... is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare body weight re-gain in overweight and obese adults consuming a low carbohy- drate or traditional low fat diet over 6 months of weight maintenance subsequent to 3 months of weight loss. Methods...

  15. From Lattice Gauge Theories to Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manu Mathur; T. P. Sreeraj

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Using canonical transformations we obtain a complete and most economical realization of the loop or physical Hilbert space of pure $SU(2)_{2+1}$ lattice gauge theory in terms of Wigner coupled Hilbert spaces of hydrogen atoms. One hydrogen atom is assigned to every plaquette of the lattice. The SU(2) gauge theory loop basis states over a plaquette are the bound energy eigenstates $|n l m>$ of the corresponding hydrogen atom. The Wigner couplings of these hydrogen atom energy eigenstates on different plaquettes provide a complete SU(2) gauge theory loop basis on the entire lattice. The loop basis is invariant under simultaneous rotations of all hydrogen atoms. The dual description of this basis diagonalizes all Wilson loop operators and is given in terms of hyperspherical harmonics on the SU(2) group manifold $S^3$. The SU(2) loop dynamics is governed by a "SU(2) spin Hamiltonian" without any gauge fields. The relevance of the hydrogen atom basis and its dynamical symmetry group SO(4,2) in SU(2) loop dynamics in weak coupling continuum limit ($g^2\\rightarrow 0$) is emphasized.

  16. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Novikova; Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; Yanhong Xiao

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements.

  17. Atoms 2014, 2, 157-177; doi:10.3390/atoms2020157 OPEN ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atoms 2014, 2, 157-177; doi:10.3390/atoms2020157 OPEN ACCESS atomsISSN 2218-2004 www]: = ne2 ¯h2 - dt1 t1 - dt2E(t1)·E(t2)ei (t1-t2) (3) where E(t1)·E(t2) = 2 3 0 vf(v)dv max 0 dE(t1

  18. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961: Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewlett, Richard G.; Holl, Jack M.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This third volume in the official history of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission covers the years of the Eisenhower Administration.

  19. Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomistic structures of high-energy ion irradiated GaN have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Single crystalline GaN substrates were irradiated at cryogenic temperature with 2 MeV Au2+ ions to a fluence of 7.35x1015 Au/cm2. Cross-sectional TEM observations revealed that damaged layers consisting of amorphous and nanocrystalline phases are formed at the surface and buried depth of the as-irradiated GaN substrate. Atomic radial distribution functions of the amorphous/poly-nanocrystalline regions showed that not only heteronuclear Ga-N bonds but also homonuclear Ga-Ga bonds exist within the first coordination shell. It was found that the ratio of heteronuclear-to-homonuclear bonds, i.e., the degree of chemical disorder is different between the surface and buried damaged layers. The alternation of chemical disorder was attributed to the difference in the defect formation processes between these layers.

  20. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  1. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the spectral profiles of HTP-B-diamond, h-BN, and c-BN.diamond differ from those of HTP-B-diamond and the reference

  2. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) – namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  3. Optimizing Atomic Neighborhoods for Speedier Chemical Reactions | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffreyMs. LindaOffice of Science (SC)

  4. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  5. FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  6. Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cost and risk in chemical manufacturing facilities. 24 25 At the core of PI is the optimization of process performance by focusing on molecular level kinetics, 26...

  7. Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection in the Zebrafish Lateral Line Rubel,1,2 and David W. Raible1,4 Abstract In humans, most hearing loss results from death of hair cells, the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear. Two goals of current hearing research are to protect hair cells from

  8. ATOMIC PHYSICS DMITRY BUDKER | DEREK F. KIMBALL | DAVID P. DEMILLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander

    symmetries, atomic magnetometers and frequency comb metrology with ultra-short laser pulses. Dmitry Budker

  9. The ORNL Chemical Technology Division, 1950-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolley, R.L.; Genung, R.K.; McNeese, L.E.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document attempts to reconstruct the role played by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the atomic era since the 1940`s related to the development and production of nuclear weapons and power reactors. Chem Tech`s early contributions were landmark pioneering studies. Unknown and dimly perceived problems like chemical hazards, radioactivity, and criticality had to be dealt with. New chemical concepts and processes had to be developed to test the new theories being developed by physicists. New engineering concepts had to be developed and demonstrated in order to build facilities and equipment that had never before been attempted. Chem Tech`s role was chemical separations, especially uranium and plutonium, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. With diversification of national and ORNL missions, Chem Tech undertook R&D studies in many areas including biotechnology; clinical and environmental chemistry; nuclear reactors; safety regulations; effective and safe waste management and disposal; computer modeling and informational databases; isotope production; and environmental control. The changing mission of Chem Tech are encapsulated in the evolving activities.

  10. Synthesis of graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, Rajendran; Felix, Sathiyanathan [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Joshi, Girish M. [Materials Physics Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Raghupathy, Bala P.C., E-mail: balapraveen2000@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Research and Advanced Engineering Division (Materials), Renault Nissan Technology and Business Center India (P) Ltd., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeong, Soon Kwan, E-mail: jeongsk@kier.re.kr [Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Grace, Andrews Nirmala, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: A schematic showing the overall reduction process of graphite to reduced graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route. - Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by diverse routes viz. chemical and electrochemical methods. • NaBH{sub 4} was effective for removing oxygen functional groups from graphene oxide. • Sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) showed high specific capacitance. • Electrochemical rendered a cheap route for production of graphene in powder form. - Abstract: Graphene platelets were synthesized from graphene oxide by chemical and electrochemical route. Under the chemical method, sodium borohydride and hydrazine chloride were used as reductants to produce graphene. In this paper, a novel and cost effective electrochemical method, which can simplify the process of reduction on a larger scale, is demonstrated. The electrochemical method proposed in this paper produces graphene in powder form with good yield. The atomic force microscopic images confirmed that the graphene samples prepared by all the routes have multilayers of graphene. The electrochemical process provided a new route to make relatively larger area graphene sheets, which will have interest for further patterning applications. Attempt was made to quantify the quantum of reduction using cyclic voltammetry and choronopotentiometry techniques on reduced graphene samples. As a measure in reading the specific capacitance values, a maximum specific capacitance value of 265.3 F/g was obtained in sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide.

  11. Design package test weights for fuel retrieval system (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a design package that documents the development of test weights used in the Spent Nuclear Fuels subproject Fuel Retrieval System. The K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project consists of the safe retrieval, preparation, and repackaging of the spent fuel stored at the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins for interim safe storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) scrap baskets and fuel baskets will be loaded and weighed under water. The equipment used to weigh the loaded fuel baskets requires daily calibration checks, using test weights traceable to National Institute of Standards Testing (NIST) standards. The test weights have been designated as OCRWM related in accordance with HNF-SD-SNF-RF'T-007 (McCormack).

  12. Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating emissions from R&D facilities using chemical inventory data.

  13. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  14. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  15. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  16. Chapter 44. Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transition. This year, we made progress in developing novel detection and cooling techniques. 1. SpinChapter 44. Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms 44-1 Cooling and Trapping Neutral Atoms RLE Groups in optical lattices. Additional cooling methods will be needed to reach this very interesting temperature

  17. Chemical Evolution in Omega Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verne V. Smith

    2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The globular cluster Omega Centauri displays evidence of a complex star formation history and peculiar internal chemical evolution, setting it apart from essentially all other globular clusters of the Milky Way. In this review we discuss the nature of the chemical evolution that has occurred within Omega Cen and attempt to construct a simple scenario to explain its chemistry.

  18. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sideris, Thomas C.

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs____________________19 #12;3 Introduction 12/4/2013 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research Hygiene Plan NMR and EPR Laboratory Form Version 8/6/98 1. General Laboratory Information Laboratory Name

  19. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  20. Hydrogen atom in de Sitter spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Veko; K. V. Kazmerchuk; E. M. Ovsiyuk; V. M. Red'kov; A. M. Ishkhanyan

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen atom theory is developed for the de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces on the basis of the Klein-Gordon-Fock wave equation in static coordinates. In both models, after separation of the variables, the problem is reduced to the general Heun equation, a second order linear differential equation having four regular singular points. A qualitative examination shows that the energy spectrum for the hydrogen atom in the de Sitter space should be quasi-stationary, and the atom should be unstable. We derive an approximate expression for energy levels within the quasi-classical approach and estimate the probability of decay of the atom. A similar analysis shows that in the anti de Sitter model the hydrogen atom should be stable in the quantum-mechanical sense. Using the quasi-classical approach, we derive approximate formulas for energy levels for this case as well. Finally, we present the extension to the case of a spin 1/2 particle for both de Sitter models. This extension leads to complicated differential equations with 8 singular points.

  1. Method and apparatus for atomic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano K. (Milwaukee, WI); de Andres Rodriquez, Pedro L. (Madrid, ES)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for three dimensional imaging of the atomic environment of disordered adsorbate atoms are disclosed. The method includes detecting and measuring the intensity of a diffuse low energy electron diffraction pattern formed by directing a beam of low energy electrons against the surface of a crystal. Data corresponding to reconstructed amplitudes of a wave form is generated by operating on the intensity data. The data corresponding to the reconstructed amplitudes is capable of being displayed as a three dimensional image of an adsorbate atom. The apparatus includes a source of a beam of low energy electrons and a detector for detecting the intensity distribution of a DLEED pattern formed at the detector when the beam of low energy electrons is directed onto the surface of a crystal. A device responsive to the intensity distribution generates a signal corresponding to the distribution which represents a reconstructed amplitude of a wave form and is capable of being converted into a three dimensional image of the atomic environment of an adsorbate atom on the crystal surface.

  2. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A. [Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients for their interaction with helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xi

    Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients; published 29 March 2007 The dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the rare-earth-metal atoms coefficients for the interactions of the rare-earth-metal atoms with helium atoms. The static polarizabilities

  4. Optical pumping of a lithium atomic beam for atom interferometry J. Gillot, A. Gauguet, M. Buchner, and J. Vigue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optical pumping of a lithium atomic beam for atom interferometry J. Gillot, A. Gauguet, M. B.vigue@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr (Dated: May 29, 2013) We apply optical pumping to prepare the lithium beam of our atom interferometer in a single hyperfine-Zeeman sublevel: we use two components of the D1-line for pumping the 7 Li atoms

  5. Weighted Logics for Nested Words and Algebraic Formal Power Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathissen, Christian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nested words, a model for recursive programs proposed by Alur and Madhusudan, have recently gained much interest. In this paper we introduce quantitative extensions and study nested word series which assign to nested words elements of a semiring. We show that regular nested word series coincide with series definable in weighted logics as introduced by Droste and Gastin. For this we establish a connection between nested words and the free bisemigroup. Applying our result, we obtain characterizations of algebraic formal power series in terms of weighted logics. This generalizes results of Lautemann, Schwentick and Therien on context-free languages.

  6. Adrenal weight in a Texas white-tailed deer herd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Charles Warren

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADRENAL WEIGHT IN A TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER HERD A Thesis by CHARLES WARREN RAMSEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1975 Major... Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ADRENAL WEIGHT IN A TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER HERD A Thesis by CHARLES WARREN RAMSEY Approved as to style and content by: ( airman o Committ ) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1975 1. 1, 1...

  7. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundr...

  8. Understanding the impact of the central atom on the ionic liquid behavior: Phosphonium vs ammonium cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, Pedro J.; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Batista, Marta L. S.; Schröder, Bernd; Coutinho, João A. P., E-mail: jcoutinho@ua.pt [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)] [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)] [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Esperança, José [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Mutelet, Fabrice [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)] [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the cation's central atom in the behavior of pairs of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids was investigated through the measurement of densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, activity coefficients at infinite dilution, refractive indices, and toxicity against Vibrio fischeri. All the properties investigated are affected by the cation's central atom nature, with ammonium-based ionic liquids presenting higher densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, and enthalpies. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution show the ammonium-based ionic liquids to present slightly higher infinite dilution activity coefficients for non-polar solvents, becoming slightly lower for polar solvents, suggesting that the ammonium-based ionic liquids present somewhat higher polarities. In good agreement these compounds present lower toxicities than the phosphonium congeners. To explain this behavior quantum chemical gas phase DFT calculations were performed on isolated ion pairs at the BP-TZVP level of theory. Electronic density results were used to derive electrostatic potentials of the identified minimum conformers. Electrostatic potential-derived CHelpG and Natural Population Analysis charges show the P atom of the tetraalkylphosphonium-based ionic liquids cation to be more positively charged than the N atom in the tetraalkylammonium-based analogous IL cation, and a noticeable charge delocalization occurring in the tetraalkylammonium cation, when compared with the respective phosphonium congener. It is argued that this charge delocalization is responsible for the enhanced polarity observed on the ammonium based ionic liquids explaining the changes in the thermophysical properties observed.

  9. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, A. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Chagarov, E.; Kaufman-Osborn, T.; Kummel, A. C., E-mail: akummel@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Gu, S.; Wu, J.; Asbeck, P. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Madisetti, S.; Oktyabrsky, S. [Department of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany–State University of New York, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001)

  10. Chemical analysis quality assurance at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, R.L.; Anselmo, R.W.; Black, D.B.; Jacobson, J.J.; Lewis, L.C.; Marushia, P.C.; Spraktes, F.W.; Zack, N.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a uranium reprocessing facility operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The chemical analysis support required for the plant processes is provided by a chemical analysis staff of 67 chemists, analysts, and support personnel. The documentation and defense of the chemical analysis data at the ICPP has evolved into a complete chemical analysis quality assurance program with training/qualification and requalification, chemical analysis procedures, records management and chemical analysis methods quality control as major elements. The quality assurance procedures are implemented on a central analytical computer system. The individual features provided by the computer system are automatic method selection for process streams, automation of method calculations, automatic assignment of bias and precision estimates at analysis levels to all method results, analyst specific daily requalification or with-method-use requalification, untrained or unqualified analyst method lockout, statistical testing of process stream results for replicate agreement, automatic testing of process results against pre-established operating, safety, or failure limits at varying confidence levels, and automatic transfer and report of analysis data plus the results of all statistical testing to the Production Department.

  11. Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Crosse; Stefan Scheel

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

  12. Atom interferometry in an optical cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Hamilton; Matt Jaffe; Justin M. Brown; Lothar Maisenbacher; Brian Estey; Holger Müller

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate a new scheme for atom interferometry, using light pulses inside an optical cavity as matter wave beamsplitters. The cavity provides power enhancement, spatial filtering, and a precise beam geometry, enabling new techniques such as low power beamsplitters ($modest power, or new self-aligned interferometer geometries utilizing the transverse modes of the optical cavity. As a first demonstration, we obtain Ramsey-Raman fringes with $>75\\%$ contrast and measure the acceleration due to gravity, $\\mathit{g}$, to $60 \\mathrm{\\mu \\mathit{g} / \\sqrt{Hz}}$ resolution in a Mach-Zehnder geometry. We use $>10^7$ cesium atoms in the compact mode volume ($600 \\mathrm{\\mu m}$ $1/e^2$ waist) of the cavity and show trapping of atoms in higher transverse modes. This work paves the way toward compact, high sensitivity, multi-axis interferometry.

  13. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Bo; Pupillo, Guido; Zoller, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  14. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Zhao; Alexander Glätzle; Guido Pupillo; Peter Zoller

    2011-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  15. Searching for dark matter with helium atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imre Ferenc Barna

    2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    With the help of the boost operator we can model the interaction between a weakly interacting particle(WIMP) of dark matter(DAMA) and an atomic nuclei. Via this "kick" we calculate the total electronic excitation cross section of the helium atom. The bound spectrum of He is calculated through a diagonalization process with a configuration interaction (CI) wavefunction built up from Slater orbitals. All together 19 singly- and doubly-excited atomic sates were taken with total angular momenta of L=0,1 and 2. Our calculation may give a rude estimation about the magnitude of the total excitation cross section which could be measured in later scintillator experiments. The upper limit of the excitation cross section is $9.7\\cdot 10^{-8}$ barn.

  16. Atom Interferometers and the Gravitational Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha; Joseph Samuel

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    From the principle of equivalence, Einstein predicted that clocks slow down in a gravitational field. Since the general theory of relativity is based on the principle of equivalence, it is essential to test this prediction accurately. Muller, Peters and Chu claim that a reinterpretation of decade old experiments with atom interferometers leads to a sensitive test of this gravitational redshift effect at the Compton frequency. Wolf et al dispute this claim and adduce arguments against it. In this article, we distill these arguments to a single fundamental objection: an atom is NOT a clock ticking at the Compton frequency. We conclude that atom interferometry experiments conducted to date do not yield such sensitive tests of the gravitational redshift. Finally, we suggest a new interferometric experiment to measure the gravitational redshift, which realises a quantum version of the classical clock "paradox".

  17. New charge radius relations for atomic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. H. Sun; Y. Lu; J. P. Peng; C. Y. Liu; Y. M. Zhao

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the charge radii of neighboring atomic nuclei, independent of atomic number and charge, follow remarkably very simple relations, despite the fact that atomic nuclei are complex finite many-body systems governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. These relations can be understood within the picture of independent-particle motion and by assuming neighboring nuclei having similar pattern in the charge density distribution. A root-mean-square (rms) deviation of 0.0078 fm is obtained between the predictions in these relations and the experimental values, i.e., a comparable precision as modern experimental techniques. Such high accuracy relations are very useful to check the consistence of nuclear charge radius surface and moreover to predict unknown nuclear charge radii, while large deviations from experimental data is seen to reveal the appearance of nuclear shape transition or coexsitence.

  18. Rapid Estimation of Zero-Point Energies of Molecules Using Hartree-Fock Atomic Partial Adrienn Ruzsinszky, Sandor Kristyan, Jozsef L. Margitfalvi, and Gabor I. Csonka*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csonka, Gábor István

    of the kinetic molecular theory and the principle of the equipartition of energy. A database of 61 moleculesRapid Estimation of Zero-Point Energies of Molecules Using Hartree-Fock Atomic Partial Charges of Inorganic Chemistry, Budapest UniVersity of Technology and Economics, H-1521 Budapest, Hungary, and Chemical

  19. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ARCTURUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, I. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Allende Prieto, C., E-mail: ivan@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: callende@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a self-consistent set of atmospheric parameters and abundances of 17 elements for the red giant star Arcturus: T{sub eff} = 4286 {+-} 30 K, log g = 1.66 {+-} 0.05, and [Fe/H] = -0.52 {+-} 0.04. The effective temperature was determined using model atmosphere fits to the observed spectral energy distribution from the blue to the mid-infrared (0.44 to 10 {mu}m). The surface gravity was calculated using the trigonometric parallax of the star and stellar evolution models. A differential abundance analysis relative to the solar spectrum allowed us to derive iron abundances from equivalent width measurements of 37 Fe I and 9 Fe II lines, unblended in the spectra of both Arcturus and the Sun; the [Fe/H] value adopted is derived from Fe I lines. We also determine the mass, radius, and age of Arcturus: M = 1.08 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun }, R = 25.4 {+-} 0.2 R{sub Sun }, and {tau} = 7.1{sup +1.5}{sub -1.2} Gyr. Finally, abundances of the following elements are measured from an equivalent width analysis of atomic features: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. We find the chemical composition of Arcturus typical of that of a local thick-disk star, consistent with its kinematics.

  20. Feedback Cooling of a Single Neutral Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Koch; Christian Sames; Alexander Kubanek; Matthias Apel; Maximilian Balbach; Alexei Ourjoumtsev; Pepijn W. H. Pinkse; Gerhard Rempe

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate feedback cooling of the motion of a single rubidium atom trapped in a high-finesse optical resonator to a temperature of about 160 \\mu K. Time-dependent transmission and intensity-correlation measurements prove the reduction of the atomic position uncertainty. The feedback increases the 1/e storage time into the one second regime, 30 times longer than without feedback. Feedback cooling therefore rivals state-of-the-art laser cooling, but with the advantages that it requires less optical access and exhibits less optical pumping.

  1. Proton Mass Shift in Muonic Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiichi Iwazaki

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the value of the proton mass depends on each bound state of muonic or electronic hydrogen atom. The charged particle bound to the proton produces magnetic field inside the proton. This makes a change to the amount of chiral condensate inside the proton. The change gives rise to the shift in the value of the proton mass. Numerically, the shift in the $2S$ state of the muonic hydrogen atom can be of the order of $0.1$ meV. The effect may solve the puzzle of the proton radius.

  2. Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

  3. Magnetic field imaging with atomic Rb vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; I. Novikova; M. D. Havey; F. A. Narducci

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the possibility of dynamic imaging of magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency in an atomic gas. As an experimental demonstration we employ an atomic Rb gas confined in a glass cell to image the transverse magnetic field created by a long straight wire. In this arrangement, which clearly reveals the essential effect, the field of view is about 2 x 2 mm^2 and the field detection uncertainty is 0.14 mG per 10 um x 10 um image pixel.

  4. Optical method of atomic ordering estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Attolini, G. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A - 43010, Parma (Italy); Lantratov, V.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that within metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown semiconductor III-V ternary alloys atomically ordered regions are spontaneously formed during the epitaxial growth. This ordering leads to bandgap reduction and to valence bands splitting, and therefore to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission polarization. The same phenomenon occurs within quaternary semiconductor alloys. While the ordering in ternary alloys is widely studied, for quaternaries there have been only a few detailed experimental studies of it, probably because of the absence of appropriate methods of its detection. Here we propose an optical method to reveal atomic ordering within quaternary alloys by measuring the PL emission polarization.

  5. Probing Dark Energy with Atom Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clare Burrage; Edmund J. Copeland; E. A. Hinds

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  6. AtomsPeace_Dec2003.qxd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational ManagementDemand ModuleNationalAtomic,Atoms for

  7. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY Barriers Addressed #12;3 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center National

  8. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  9. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  10. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  11. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  12. Monte Carlo calculation of the collision density of superthermal produced H atoms in thermal H2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panarese, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple and reliable method to study the collision density of H atoms following their production by chemical mechanisms. The problem is relevant to PDR's, shocks, photospheres, atmospheric entry problems. We show that the thermalization of H atoms can be conveniently studied by a simple method and set the basis for further investigations. Besides our aims are also to review the theoretical basis, the limitation of simpler approaches and address the analogue problems in neutronics. The method adopted is Monte Carlo method including the thermal distri- bution of background molecules. The transport cross section is determined by the inversion of transport data. Plots of the collisions density of H atoms in H2 gas are calculated and discussed also in the context of simple theories. The application of the results to astrophysical problems is outlined.

  13. Stochastic Online Learning for Network Optimization under Unknown Random Weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qing

    the results to general network optimization problems (e.g., minimum spanning tree and dominating set minimum spanning tree and minimum (connected) dominating set. Consider a communication network where1 Stochastic Online Learning for Network Optimization under Unknown Random Weights Keqin Liu

  14. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time #3; Bernard Chazelle y Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum span- ning tree in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose sizes are speci#12;ed by a stochastic process. From

  15. The Weight of Words Construction and Implications of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    The Weight of Words Construction and Implications of Genocide Discourse in Bosnia and Sudan #12 Genocide 1975-1979 - 2,000,000 Deaths Rwanda 1994 - 800,000 Deaths Bosnia Genocide 1992-1995 - 200 INEVITABLITY #12;Bosnia- background #12;"Ethnic Cleansing" Massacres Plundering of villages Rape Camps #12

  16. Predicting Equity Market Price Impact with Performance Weighted Ensembles of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Equity Market Price Impact with Performance Weighted Ensembles of Random Forests Ash.j.mcgroarty@soton.ac.uk Abstract--For many players in financial markets, the price impact of their trading activity represents a large proportion of their transaction costs. This paper proposes a novel machine learning method

  17. A Library for Locally Weighted Projection Regression --Supplementary Documentation --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    problems: · The function to be learnt is non-linear. Otherwise having multiple local models is a waste of resources, and you should rather use ordinary linear regression, or partial least squares (PLS) for the caseA Library for Locally Weighted Projection Regression -- Supplementary Documentation -- Stefan

  18. Weight and volume changing device with liquid metal transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niiyama, Ryuma

    This paper presents a weight-changing device based on the transfer of mass. We chose liquid metal (Ga-In-Tin eutectic) and a bi-directional pump to control the mass that is injected into or removed from a target object. ...

  19. An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Analysis ­ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of OceanAn Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted Clean Energy Standards Prepared for the U Hawai`i Distributed Energy Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 12.3 Second Deliverable

  20. Finite-order integration weights can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite-order integration weights can be dangerous Ian H. Sloan University of New South Wales on a small subset of the variables. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the danger of relying be dangerous in applications. But before this question can be addressed, it is necessary to describe