National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for atomic weight chemical

  1. Forecast of Standard Atomic Weights for the Mononuclidic Elements – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In this short report, I will provide an early warning about potential changes to the standard atomic weight values for the twenty mononuclidic and the so-called pseudo-mononuclidic ({sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa) chemical elements due to the estimated changes in the mass values to be published in the next Atomic Mass Tables within the next two years. There have been many new measurements of atomic masses, since the last published Atomic Mass Table. The Atomic Mass Data Center has released an unpublished version of the present status of the atomic mass values as a private communication. We can not update the Standard Atomic Weight Table at this time based on these unpublished values but we can anticipate how many changes are probably going to be expected in the next few years on the basis of the forthcoming publication of the Atomic Mass Table. I will briefly discuss the procedures that the Atomic Weights Commission used in deriving the recommended Standard Atomic Weight values and their uncertainties from the atomic mass values. I will also discuss some concern raised about a proposed change in the definition of the mole. The definition of the mole is now connected directly to the mass of a {sup 12}C isotope (which is defined as 12 exactly) and to the kilogram. A change in the definition of the mole will probably impact the mass of {sup 12}C.

  2. Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2007-08-04

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value.

  3. RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value. For the elements, which have no stable characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on the half-lives and the relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest for those elements have been evaluated. The values of the half-lives with their uncertainties are listed in the table. The uncertainties are given for the last digit quoted of the half-life and are given in parentheses. A half-life entry for the Table having a value and an uncertainty of 7 {+-} 3 is listed in the half-life column as 7 (3). The criteria to include data in this Table, is to be the same as it has been for over sixty years. It is the same criteria, which are used for all data that are evaluated for inclusion in the Standard Table of Atomic Weights. If a report of data is published in a peer-reviewed journal, that data is evaluated and considered for inclusion in the appropriate table of the biennial report of the Atomic Weights Commission. As better data becomes available in the future, the information that is contained in either of the Tables of Standard Atomic Weights or in the Table of Radioactive Elements may be modified. It should be noted that the appearance of any datum in the Table of the Radioactive Elements is merely for the purposes of calculating an atomic mass value for any sample of a radioactive material, which might have a variety of isotopic compositions and it has no implication as to the priority for claiming discovery of a given element and is not intended to. The atomic mass values have been taken primarily from the 2003 Atomic Mass Table. Mass values for those radioisotopes that do not appear in the 2003 Atomic mass Table have been taken from preliminary data of the Atomic Mass Data Center. Most of the quoted half-lives.

  4. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  5. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - an Energy Frontier Research Center The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) employs a...

  6. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific roadblocks to U.S. energy security. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)...

  7. Optimizing Atomic Neighborhoods for Speedier Chemical Reactions...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    processes involved in energy production and pollution control. Employing in-operation tools to atomic-level interactions in palladium-based catalysts enhances the discovery and...

  8. Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted wet chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzegar Vishlaghi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farzalipour Tabriz, M., E-mail: meisam.fa@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammad Moradi, O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ? Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) assisted chemical synthesis of nickel nanoparticles is reported. ? Substituting water with non-aqueous media prevents the formation of nickel hydroxide. ? Size of particles decreased from 10 to 20 nm down to 2–4 nm by using multi-jet mode. ? Synthesized nanoparticles have diffraction patterns similar to amorphous materials. -- Abstract: In this study nickel nanoparticles were prepared via chemical reduction of nickel acetate using sodium borohydride using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. This technique was used to spray a finely dispersed aerosol of nickel precursor solution into the reductive bath. Obtained particles were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results confirmed the formation of nickel nanoparticles and showed that applying EHDA technique to chemical reduction method results in producing smaller particles with narrower size distribution in comparison with conventional reductive precipitation method.

  9. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  10. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of which are crucial for evaluating performance in the proverbial vacuum. Using atomic layer deposition (ALD), researchers can create highly specific nanobowls, controlling...

  11. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marshall Name Christopher L. Marshall Institution Argonne National Laboratory Department Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Areas of Focus Characterization & Catalytic...

  12. Chemical Bonding: The Classical Description sharing or transferring electrons between atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Chemical Bonding: The Classical Description sharing or transferring electrons between atoms LEWIS electron dot diagram -> formula (SF6) VSEPR (valence-shell electron-pair repulsion) theory Molecular Structure (w/o quantum mechanics) Chapter. 3 Two or more atoms approach -> their electrons interact and form

  13. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James Dumesic, Steenbock Professor and Michel Boudart Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been...

  14. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provides links to each partner's participating organizations. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Center for Nanoscale Materials Energy Systems...

  15. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James Dumesic, Steenbock Professor and Michel Boudart Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been elected a...

  16. An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    ) their unique structure makes them suitable for tailored nanometer- scale membranes and molecular sieves [5]; (dAn atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes M Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition

  17. Constant centrifugal potential approximation for atom-diatom chemical reaction dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    Constant centrifugal potential approximation for atom-diatom chemical reaction dynamics Kengo,Myodaiji, Okazaki 444. Japan (Received 28 September 1993; accepted 8 December 1993) The constant centrifugal of such practically useful approxima- tions the constant centrifugal potential approximation (CCPA) (or the energy

  18. pH-weighted molecular imaging of gliomas using amine chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of gliomas using amine chemical exchange saturation transferenhancement mediated chemical exchange saturation transferZu Z, et al. On the origins of chemical exchange saturation

  19. How to Make an Atomic Blog in Your Own Kitchen. Summary of the Workshop: Uncertainties in Atomic Data and How They Propagate in Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luridiana, Valentina; Aggarwal, Kanti; Bautista, Manuel; Bergemann, Maria; Delahaye, Franck; del Zanna, Giulio; Ferland, Gary; Lind, Karin; Manchado, Arturo; Mendoza, Claudio; Delgado, Adal Mesa; Díaz, Manuel Núñez; Shaw, Richard A; Wesson, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This workshop brought together scientists (including atomic physicists, theoretical astrophysicists and astronomers) concerned with the completeness and accuracy of atomic data for astrophysical applications. The topics covered in the workshop included the evaluation of uncertainties in atomic data, the propagation of such uncertainties in chemical abundances, and the feedback between observations and calculations. On a different level, we also discussed communication issues such as how to ensure that atomic data are correctly understood and used, and which forum is the best one for a fluid interaction between all communities involved in the production and use of atomic data. This paper reports on the discussions held during the workshop and introduces AstroAtom, a blog created as a platform for timely and open discussions on the needs and concerns over atomic data, and their effects on astronomical research. The complete proceedings will be published on http://astroatom.wordpress.com/.

  20. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2013-04-19

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  1. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  2. Quantum simulation of a triatomic chemical reaction with ultracold atoms on a waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Torrontegui; A. Ruschhaupt; D. Guéry-Odelin; J. G. Muga

    2011-02-23

    We study the scaling and coordinate transformation to physically simulate quantum three-body collinear chemical reactions of the type A+BC $\\rightarrow$ AB+C by the motion of single ultracold atoms or a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate on an $L$-shaped waveguide. As an example we show that the parameters to model the reaction F+HH $\\to$ H+HF with lithium are at reach with current technology. This mapping provides also an inverse scattering tool to find an unknown potential, and a way to transfer the knowledge on molecular reaction dynamics to design beam splitters for cold atoms with control of the channel outcome and vibrational excitation.

  3. Reduced weight decontamination formulation for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2014-06-03

    A reduced weight DF-200 decontamination formulation that is stable under high temperature storage conditions. The formulation can be pre-packed as an all-dry (i.e., no water) or nearly-dry (i.e., minimal water) three-part kit, with make-up water (the fourth part) being added later in the field at the point of use.

  4. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  5. In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on GaAs using trimethyaluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on Ga 26 June 2008; published online 21 July 2008 In situ atomic-layer deposition ALD of Al2O3 on p­4 Recently, many ex situ methods such as atomic-layer deposition ALD of high-k on GaAs have achieved success

  6. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

  7. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  8. Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

    2012-06-01

    Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

  9. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  10. Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

    1982-09-02

    Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

  11. Numerical study of He/CF{sub 3}I pulsed discharge used to produce iodine atom in chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jiao; Wang Yanhui; Wang Dezhen [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Duo Liping; Li Guofu [Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-04-15

    The pulsed discharge for producing iodine atoms from the alkyl and perfluoroalky iodides (CH{sub 3}I, CF{sub 3}I, etc.) is the most efficient method for achieving the pulse operating mode of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of pulsed discharge in CF{sub 3}I-He mixture. By solving continuity equation, momentum equation, Poisson equation, Boltzmann equation, and an electric circuit equation, the temporal evolution of discharge current density and various discharge products, especially the atomic iodine, are investigated. The dependence of iodine atom density on discharge parameters is also studied. The results show that iodine atom density increases with the pulsed width and pulsed voltage amplitude. The mixture ratio of CF{sub 3}I and helium plays a more significant role in iodine atom production. For a constant voltage amplitude, there exists an optimal mixture ratio under which the maximum iodine atom concentration is achieved. The bigger the applied voltage amplitude is, the higher partial pressure of CF{sub 3}I is needed to obtain the maximum iodine atom concentration.

  12. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350?°C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  13. Crystallinity and microstructure in Si films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition: A simple atomic-scale model validated by experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, P. L.; Le Donne, A.; Cereda, S.; Miglio, Leo; Pizzini, S.; Binetti, S.; Montalenti, F. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali and L-NESS, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Rondanini, M.; Cavallotti, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali, e Ingegneria Chimica 'G. Natta', Politecnico di Milano, Via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milan (Italy); Chrastina, D.; Moiseev, T.; Kaenel, H. von; Isella, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica and L-NESS, Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2009-02-02

    A joint theoretical and experimental analysis of the crystalline fraction in nanocrystalline films grown by low-energy plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is presented. The effect of key growth parameters such as temperature, silane flux, and hydrogen dilution ratio is analyzed and modeled at the atomic scale, introducing an environment-dependent crystallization probability. A very good agreement between experiments and theory is found, despite the use of a single fitting parameter.

  14. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2012-06-20

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  15. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2012-01-01

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  16. Pure and Hybrid Evolutionary Computing in Global Optimization of Chemical Structures: from Atoms and Molecules to Clusters and Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Kanchan

    2015-01-01

    The growth of evolutionary computing (EC) methods in the exploration of complex potential energy landscapes of atomic and molecular clusters, as well as crystals over the last decade or so is reviewed. The trend of growth indicates that pure as well as hybrid evolutionary computing techniques in conjunction of DFT has been emerging as a powerful tool, although work on molecular clusters has been rather limited so far. Some attempts to solve the atomic/molecular Schrodinger Equation (SE) directly by genetic algorithms (GA) are available in literature. At the Born-Oppenheimer level of approximation GA-density methods appear to be a viable tool which could be more extensively explored in the coming years, specially in the context of designing molecules and materials with targeted properties.

  17. Atomic data for S II—toward better diagnostics of chemical evolution in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisielius, Romas; Bogdanovich, Pavel [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 (Lithuania); Kulkarni, Varsha P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ferland, Gary J.; Lykins, Matt L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (?0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  18. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2013-03-20

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  19. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2013-01-01

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  20. Light weight phosphate cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Natarajan, Ramkumar, (Woodridge, IL); Kahn, David (Miami, FL)

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  1. CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY ELEMENTARY PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    of the Elements, Journal of Chemical Education, publishers,1977). weights, these new chemicals might have undergoneisotopes up to 17 Gev CHEMICAL SIGNATURES FOR SUPERHEAVY

  2. Green Weight 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Haji, A.; Al-Omair, A.

    2010-01-01

    Green-weight is a novel system designed to supply a high-rise building with all its needs of electricity using wind energy and to supplement its lighting needs with natural sunlight. David Fisher has proposed an ingenious method to harness the wind...

  3. Weighted Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weighted Guidelines Weighted Guidelines Weighted Guidelines More Documents & Publications Weighted Guidelines DOE F 4220.23...

  4. BAR-CODE BASED WEIGHT MEASUREMENT STATION FOR PHYSICAL INVENTORY TAKING OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTAINERS AT THE MINING AND CHEMICAL COMBINE RADIOCHEMICAL REPROCESSING PLANT NEAR KRASNOYARSK, SIBERIA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUDA,S.

    1999-09-20

    This paper describes the technical tasks being implemented to computerize the physical inventory taking (PIT) at the Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Khimichesky Kombinat, GKhK) radiochemical plant under the US/Russian cooperative nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) program. Under the MPC and A program, Lab-to-Lab task agreements with GKhK were negotiated that involved computerized equipment for item verification and confirmatory measurement of the Pu containers. Tasks under Phase I cover the work for demonstrating the plan and procedures for carrying out the comparison of the Pu container identification on the container with the computerized inventory records. In addition to the records validation, the verification procedures include the application of bar codes and bar coded TIDs to the Pu containers. Phase II involves the verification of the Pu content. A plan and procedures are being written for carrying out confirmatory measurements on the Pu containers.

  5. A Preliminary Report on X-Ray Photoabsorption Coefficients and Atomic Scattering Factors for 92 Elements in the 10-10,000 eV Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henke, B.L.; Davis, J.C.; Gullikson, E.M.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Ref. Atomic Scattering Factors, f 1 +if 2 71 - Lutetium (Lu ) Lutetium ( Lu ) - 71 Atomic Weight = 174.97 (barns/

  6. Mining Weighted Association Rules without Preassigned Weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Fengshan

    Mining Weighted Association Rules without Preassigned Weights Ke Sun and Fengshan Bai Abstract--Association rule mining is a key issue in data mining. However, the classical models ignore the difference between the transactions, and the weighted association rule mining does not work on databases with only binary attributes

  7. Scale-invariant power law and fractality for molecular weights V. Paar a,*, N. Pavin a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavin, Nenad

    to the molecular level, and in partic- ular, can one trace the ®ngerprints of fractality in the systematic for atomic weights [25]: Ar acZbc : 1 We ®nd that Eq. (1) provides a good ®t of the data on atomic weights [1] with the power law exponent bc 1.120. The atomic power law (1) provides a good phenomenological

  8. Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

  9. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  10. 29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal was discovered in a dense interstellar is the ratio of carbon atoms to hydrogen atoms in propanal? Problem 4 - If the mass of a hydrogen atom of a propanal molecule in AMUs? Problem 5 - What is the complete chemical formula for propanal? C3 H __ O

  11. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors Using Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, B. P.; Norman, A. G.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.; Guthrey, H.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2011-01-01

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  12. Chaotic transport in phase space with applications to atomic physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Korana

    2011-01-01

    Reinhardt. Chaos in Atomic Physics. Cambridge University uabsorption. Chemical Physics Letters, 86(3):235 – 241,theory with experiment. Physics Reports, 201(1):1 – 56,

  13. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  14. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  15. Measuring Atomic Properties with an Atom Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Tony David

    2006-06-28

    Two experiments are presented which measure atomic properties using an atom interferometer. The interferometer splits the sodium de Broglie wave into two paths,

  16. Generalized constructive tree weights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivasseau, Vincent E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org; Tanasa, Adrian E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org

    2014-04-15

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given.

  17. Light-weight analyzer for odor recognition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vass, Arpad A; Wise, Marcus B

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides a light weight analyzer, e.g., detector, capable of locating clandestine graves. The detector utilizes the very specific and unique chemicals identified in the database of human decompositional odor. This detector, based on specific chemical compounds found relevant to human decomposition, is the next step forward in clandestine grave detection and will take the guess-work out of current methods using canines and ground-penetrating radar, which have historically been unreliable. The detector is self contained, portable and built for field use. Both visual and auditory cues are provided to the operator.

  18. Chemical leukoderma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

    2011-01-01

    the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

  19. Atomic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47JulyInnovationAtomic Layer

  20. Atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  1. Bayesian locally weighted online learning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edakunni, Narayanan U.

    2010-01-01

    Locally weighted regression is a non-parametric technique of regression that is capable of coping with non-stationarity of the input distribution. Online algorithms like Receptive FieldWeighted Regression and Locally ...

  2. Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Urban, Radovan [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Wolkow, Robert A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada)

    2012-04-21

    Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

  3. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  4. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

    2011-07-01

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  5. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Figliola, Richard S. (Central, SC); Molnar, Holly M. (Palm Bay, FL)

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  6. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  7. The Future of Atomic Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  8. PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; ELECTRONS; HELIUM; LIGHT SOURCES; RADIATIONS; STORAGE RINGS; SYNCHROTRONS SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SYNCHROTRONLIGHT SOURCES QUANTUM CHAOS...

  9. Atomic Energy Commission : Atomic Power at Shippingport - 1958 Educational Film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-02-02

    The United States Atomic Energy Commission & Westinghouse Electric Company take us on a tour of an atomic power station.

  10. Apparatus for molecular weight separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Liu, Chuanliang (Haverhill, MA)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations (0-2.5 mM NH4OAc) of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, (4) conducting a two-stage separation or (5) any combination of (1), (2), (3) and (4).

  11. Single Atom Plasmonic Switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emboras, Alexandros; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2015-01-01

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moores law in the electronics industry. And while electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling-similar to electronics-is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled single atom plasmonic switch. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or at most - a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ration of 10 dB and operation at room temperature with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of a CMOS compatible, integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the single-atom level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully i...

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition to Fine-Tune the Surface Properties and Diameters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic Layer Deposition to Fine-Tune the Surface Properties and Diameters of Fabricated Nanopores 02138 Received April 23, 2004; Revised Manuscript Received May 12, 2004 ABSTRACT Atomic layer deposition. The control over the chemical and physical nature of the pore surface provided by atomic layer deposition

  13. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

  14. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  15. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  16. Chemical & Engineering News Serving the chemical, life sciences and laboratory worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, David A.

    Chemical & Engineering News Serving the chemical, life sciences and laboratory worlds Science benzaldehyde foothold (green). Under basic conditions, the walker's hydrazide foot is tethered, and the sulfide was not understood in atomic detail. Instead, biological walking motors delivered conceptual inspiration to those

  17. The "skinny" on healthy weight loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    restrictions One size does not fit all Taboos lead to overconsumption #12;Disadvantages ­Yo-Yo Dieting ENERGY IN ENERGY OUT WEIGHT LOSSWEIGHT GAIN #12;What is "healthy" weight loss? Steady weight loss (1

  18. Sandia Energy - More Energy with Less Weight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Energy with Less Weight Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy More Energy with Less Weight Previous Next More Energy with Less Weight The following is from an article...

  19. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  20. The Harnessed Atom

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased,...

  1. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  2. Weighted Distance Weighted Discrimination and its Asymptotic Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hao "Helen"

    and Phrases: Fisher consistency; High-dimensional, low-sample size data; Linear discrimination; Non-standard Carolina Center for Genome Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 4 School The Support Vector Machine (SVM) (Vapnik 1995) is a powerful classification tool. Distance Weighted

  3. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF BERKELIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Stanley G.; Seaborg, Glenn T.

    2008-01-01

    under the auspices of the U„ S. Atomic Energy Commission.Laboratory Atomic Energy Commission, 'Washington Brookhaven

  4. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  5. Producing and Detecting Correlated atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph I. Westbrook; Martijn Schellekens; Aurélien Perrin; Valentina Krachmalnicoff; Jose Carlos Viana Gomes; Jean-Baptiste Trebbia; Jérôme Estève; Hong Chang; Isabelle Bouchoule; Denis Boiron; Alain Aspect; Tom Jeltes; John McNamara; Wim Hogervorst; Wim Vassen

    2006-09-04

    We discuss experiments to produce and detect atom correlations in a degenerate or nearly degenerate gas of neutral atoms. First we treat the atomic analog of the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment, in which atom correlations result simply from interference effects without any atom interactions.We have performed this experiment for both bosons and fermions. Next we show how atom interactions produce correlated atoms using the atomic analog of spontaneous four-wavemixing. Finally, we briefly mention experiments on a one dimensional gas on an atom chip in which correlation effects due to both interference and interactions have been observed.

  6. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  7. 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyer, Sylvia Teresse

    Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of ...

  8. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M.

    1981-12-01

    Part 2 contains the data base in tabular format. There are two sections, the first with records on nondrug substances, and the second with records on drugs. Chemicals in each section are arranged alphabetically by CAS preferred name, CAS registry number, formula, atomic weight, melting point, boiling point, and vapor pressure. Tissues are listed alphabetically with exposure route, analytical method, number of cases, range, and mean - when available in the source document. A variety of information may also be included that is pertinent to the range and mean as well as experimental design, demography, health effects, pathology, morphology, and toxicity. Review articles are included in the data base; however, no data have been extracted from such documents because the original research articles are included.

  9. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P.

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  10. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  11. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  12. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  13. Chemical Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci

    2007-04-05

    In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

  14. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  15. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2008-06-21

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  16. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  17. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deltuva

    2012-03-28

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  18. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deltuva, A

    2012-01-01

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  19. Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The gross weight of a vehicle (GVW) is the weight of the empty vehicle plus the weight of the maximum payload that the vehicle was designed to carry. In cars and small light trucks, the difference...

  20. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1986-08-15

    The atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process for the enrichment of uranium is evaluated. (AIP)

  1. Chemical Reaction due to Stronger Ramachandran Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2013-12-26

    The origin of a chemical reaction between two reactant atoms is associated to the activation energy, with the assumption that, high-energy collisions between these atoms, are the ones that overcome the activation energy. Here, we (i) show that a stronger attractive van der Waals (vdW) and electron-ion Coulomb interactions between two polarized atoms are responsible to initiate a chemical reaction, either before or after the collision. We derive this stronger vdW attraction formula exactly using the quasi one-dimensional Drude model within the ionization energy theory and the energy-level spacing renormalization group method. Along the way, we (ii) expose the precise physical mechanism responsible for the existence of a stronger vdW interaction for both long and short distances, and also show how to technically avoid the electron-electron Coulomb repulsion between polarized electrons from these two reactant atoms. Finally, we properly and correctly associate the existence of this stronger attraction to Ramachandran's 'normal limits' (distance shorter than what is allowed by the standard vdW bond) between chemically nonbonded atoms.

  2. Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Weighted Marshall-Olkin Bivariate Exponential Distribution Ahad Jamalizadeh§ & Debasis Kundu of weighted Marshall-Olkin bivariate exponential distribu- tions. This new singular distribution has density function; Singular distribution; Maximum likelihood estimators; Fisher information matrix; Asymp

  3. Fast Probabilistic Planning Through Weighted Model Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domshlak, Carmel

    Fast Probabilistic Planning Through Weighted Model Counting Carmel Domshlak J¨org Hoffmann Technion Fast Probabilistic Planning Through Weighted Model Countin #12;Talk Outline Probabilistic Planning Conclusion Carmel Domshlak, J¨org Hoffmann Fast Probabilistic Planning Through Weighted Model Countin #12

  4. Institute for Atom-efficient Chemical Transformations trifold...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Purdue University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Biomass Roadmap Foodstuff Inedible waste biomass Slow, selective natural enzyme production converts...

  5. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Controlled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    screening reaction that facilitates catalyst testing. Approach In order to develop a roadmap for reaction mechanisms, researchers require a basic understanding of the factors...

  6. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Reaction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    While the simultaneous processing of all carbohydrates, such as in gasification or pyrolysis, offers the potential for simplicity of operation, the fractionation of...

  7. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will involve synthesis, characterization, and catalytic reactor testing of new materials. The Postdoctoral Appointee will be working with a larger group from Argonne and...

  8. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  9. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  10. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  11. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  12. Is Dark Energy Abnormally Weighting?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fuzfa; J. -M. Alimi

    2006-09-05

    We present a new interpretation of dark energy in terms of an \\textit{Abnormally Weighting Energy} (AWE). This means that dark energy does not couple to gravitation in the same way as ordinary matter, yielding a violation of the weak and strong equivalence principles on cosmological scales. The resulting cosmological mechanism accounts for the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae in terms of both cosmic acceleration and variation of the gravitational constant while still accounting for the present tests of general relativity. This explanation allows to build dark energy models (i) without violation of the strong energy condition $p<-\\rho c^2/3$ (ii) with non-negligible direct couplings to gravitation and (iii) natural convergence mechanism toward general relativity.

  13. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  14. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecoveryplanning CareerNationalCNMSTHEmaterials |Chemical

  15. Light-weight primitive, feather-weight security a cryptanalytic knock-out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Light-weight primitive, feather-weight security ­ a cryptanalytic knock-out (Preliminary results) V Kingdom page@cs.bris.ac.uk ABSTRACT In [12], the authors present a new light-weight cryptographic systems; D.4.6 [Security and Protection]: Authentication Keywords Light-weight block cipher, structural

  16. Coherent atom-trimer conversion in a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Jing; J. Cheng; P. Meystre

    2007-03-26

    We show that the use of a generalized atom-molecule dark state permits the enhanced coherent creation of triatomic molecules in a repulsive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, with further enhancement being possible in the case of heteronuclear trimers via the constructive interference between two chemical reaction channels.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATOMIC STRUCTURE OF NiO ZrO2(CUBIC) INTERFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATOMIC STRUCTURE OF NiO± ZrO2(CUBIC) INTERFACES E. C. DICKEY{1 , V. P. DRAVID1-dimensional atomic structure of low-energy NiO±ZrO2(cubic) interfaces is determined through a combination of electron the structural and chemical aspects of the interface and associ- ated interfacial relaxation mechaubic) interface

  18. Ultracold Atoms: How Quantum Field Theory Invaded Atomic Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultracold Atoms: How Quantum Field Theory Invaded Atomic Physics Eric Braaten Ohio State University May 6, 2015 4:00 p.m. (coffee @ 3:30) The development of the technology for...

  19. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic

  20. Environmental Performance Characterization of Atomic Layer Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Rahtu and R. Gordon. “Atomic layer deposition of transitionoxide films grown by atomic layer deposition from iodide andand S. M. George. “Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin and

  1. A microfabricated atomic clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knappe, Svenja; Shah, Vishal; Schwindt, Peter D.D.; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John; Liew, Li-Anne; Moreland, John [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Electromagnetics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States)

    2004-08-30

    Fabrication techniques usually applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are used to reduce the size and operating power of the core physics assembly of an atomic clock. With a volume of 9.5 mm{sup 3}, a fractional frequency instability of 2.5x10{sup -10} at 1 s of integration, and dissipating less than 75 mW of power, the device has the potential to bring atomically precise timing to hand-held, battery-operated devices. In addition, the design and fabrication process allows for wafer-level assembly of the structures, enabling low-cost mass-production of thousands of identical units with the same process sequence, and easy integration with other electronics.

  2. Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Joilet, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid). A poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

  3. Production of high molecular weight polylactic acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonsignore, P.V.

    1995-11-28

    A degradable high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) is described. The poly(lactic acid) has a terminal end group of one of carboxyl or hydroxyl groups with low molecular weight poly(lactic acid) units coupled with linking agents of di-isocyanates, bis-epoxides, bis-oxazolines and bis-ortho esters. The resulting high molecular weight poly(lactic acid) can be used for applications taking advantage of the improved physical properties.

  4. CRYSTALLINE EXTENSIONS AND THE WEIGHT PART OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-07-24

    crystalline lifts with specified Hodge-Tate weights. To complete the proof, one must show that Lcrys = Lflat. An analogous result was proved in generic unramified ...

  5. WEIGHTED NORM INEQUALITIES FOR FRACTIONAL MAXIMAL ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-19

    We study classical weighted Lp ? Lq inequalities for the fractional max- imal operators on Rd, proved originally by Muckenhoupt and Wheeden in the 70's. We

  6. Chemical passivity of III-VI bilayer terminated Si,,111... Jonathan A. Adamsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olmstead, Marjorie

    Chemical passivity of III-VI bilayer terminated Si,,111... Jonathan A. Adamsa and Aaron A online 17 October 2005 The chemical stability of Si 111 , terminated with bilayer AlSe and GaSe, upon electronic and atomic structure do not imply similar chemical passivity. While Si 111 :GaSe is largely

  7. Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Stephan

    Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase B. Roth, D-cooled ion trapping apparatus, we have investigated laser-induced chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba is to investigate chemical reactions between cold atomic and molecular ions trapped in radio-frequency traps

  8. Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Alexander D.

    Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic ...

  9. Processes for converting methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons via sulfur-containing intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, S.; Palermo, R.E.

    1989-09-05

    This patent describes a process for converting methane to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. The process comprising the steps of contacting methane with carbonyl sulfide in the presence of UV light under conditions sufficient to generate Ch/sub 3/SH; and contacting CH/sub 3/SH with a catalyst under conditions sufficient to produce hydrogen sulfide and a mixture of hydrocarbons having at least two carbon atoms.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Jeffrey W. Elam,*, David A. Baker, Alex B. F. Martinson,, Michael J. Pellin, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Precursors Jeffrey W: NoVember 8, 2007 This article describes a new atomic layer deposition (ALD) method for preparing,2 sol-gel methods,3 chemical vapor deposition,4 pulsed laser deposition,5 and atomic layer

  11. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Chemical engineering students must complete not included in the required chemical engineering curriculum. All technical electives are subject to approval be in chemical engineering. 2. Chemical engineering students must complete a minimum of 18 credits in the Social

  12. Surface passivation of c-Si by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of Al2O3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    passivation has to date been mostly deposited by conventional atomic layer deposition (ALD), a technique-effect transistors subjected to on-state bias stress J. Appl. Phys. 111, 084504 (2012) Atomic imaging of atomic layerSurface passivation of c-Si by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of Al2O3 Lachlan E

  13. Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2012-11-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

  14. Tank 40 Final Sludge Batch 8 Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-09-19

    A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon(r) vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

  15. Inversion of weighted Radon transforms via finite Fourier series weight approximations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillement, Jean-Pol

    Inversion of weighted Radon transforms via finite Fourier series weight approximations J Moscow, Russia e-mail: novikov@cmap.polytechnique.fr Abstract. We consider weighted Radon transforms approach by numerical examples for the case of the attenuated Radon transforms in the framework

  16. Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  17. Laser induced chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orel, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    the simplest prototype chemical reaction, and since it is soLASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D. E.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

  18. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  19. Sandia Energy - Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Chemical DynamicsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:37+00:00...

  20. Rheological properties essential for the atomization of Coal Water Slurries (CWS). Final report, September 1, 1991--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohene, F.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to understand the effect of low shear, high shear rheology, viscoelastic, and extensional properties on the atomization of CWS. In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays were determined at various air-to-CWS ratios using a Malvern 2600 particle size analyzer and a Delavan Solid Cone Atomizing Nozzle. Solids-loading, coal particle size distributions, and chemical additives were varied in order to determine the significant properties that influence CWS atomization. A correlation of the mass mean droplet size with high shear, viscoelastic and extensional behaviors were made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on CWS atomization.

  1. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  2. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a Sustainable 21st Century Chemical Industry ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New...

  3. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

  4. Quantum transport in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Chun Chien; Sebastiano Peotta; Massimiliano Di Ventra

    2015-04-11

    Ultracold atoms confined by engineered magnetic or optical potentials are ideal systems for studying phenomena otherwise difficult to realize or probe in the solid state because their atomic interaction strength, number of species, density, and geometry can be independently controlled. This review focuses on quantum transport phenomena in atomic gases that mirror and oftentimes either better elucidate or show fundamental differences with those observed in mesoscopic and nanoscopic systems. We discuss significant progress in performing transport experiments in atomic gases, contrast similarities and differences between transport in cold atoms and in condensed matter systems, and survey inspiring theoretical predictions that are difficult to verify in conventional setups. These results further demonstrate the versatility offered by atomic systems in the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and their promise for novel applications.

  5. Research in the chemical sciences: Summaries of FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This summary book is published annually on research supported by DOE`s Division of Chemical Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Research in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced batteries is arranged according to national laboratories, offsite institutions, and small businesses. Goal is to add to the knowledge base on which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. The special facilities used in DOE laboratories are described. Indexes are provided (topics, institution, investigator).

  6. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  7. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process...

  8. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  9. Einstein's Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. S. Kim

    2011-12-02

    In 1905, Einstein formulated his special relativity for point particles. For those particles, his Lorentz covariance and energy-momentum relation are by now firmly established. How about the hydrogen atom? It is possible to perform Lorentz boosts on the proton assuming that it is a point particle. Then what happens to the electron orbit? The orbit could go through an elliptic deformation, but it is not possible to understand this problem without quantum mechanics, where the orbit is a standing wave leading to a localized probability distribution. Is this concept consistent with Einstein's Lorentz covariance? Dirac, Wigner, and Feynman contributed important building blocks for understanding this problem. The remaining problem is to assemble those blocks to construct a Lorentz-covariant picture of quantum bound states based on standing waves. It is shown possible to assemble those building blocks using harmonic oscillators.

  10. A Library for Locally Weighted Projection Regression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klanke, Stefan; Vijayakumar, Sethu; Schaal, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an improved implementation of locally weighted projection regression (LWPR), a supervised learning algorithm that is capable of handling high-dimensional input data. As the key features, our ...

  11. Microdialysis unit for molecular weight separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Liu, Chuanliang (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for separating high molecular weight molecules from low molecular weight molecules. More specifically, the invention relates to the use of microdialysis for removal of the salt (low molecular weight molecules) from a nucleotide sample (high molecular weight molecules) for ESI-MS analysis. The dialysis or separation performance of the present invention is improved by (1) increasing dialysis temperature thereby increasing desalting efficiency and improving spectrum quality; (2) adding piperidine and imidazole to the dialysis buffer solution and reducing charge states and further increasing detection sensitivity for DNA; (3) using low concentrations (0-2.5 mM NH4OAc) of dialysis buffer and shifting the DNA negative ions to higher charge states, producing a nearly 10-fold increase in detection sensitivity and a slightly decreased desalting efficiency, or (4) any combination of (1), (2), and (3).

  12. The Equal Weight View, Agreement, and Commutativity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckler, Rose

    2011-11-23

    This paper investigates Elga’s (2007) Equal Weight View (EWV) and its consequences when understood as a view requiring epistemic peers to ‘split the difference’ following disagreement. The traditional disagreement debate ...

  13. Big Bang Day : The Great Big Particle Adventure - 1. Atom

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In this series, comedian and physicist Ben Miller asks the CERN scientists what they hope to find. The notion of atoms dates back to Greek philosophers who sought a natural mechanical explanation of the Universe, as opposed to a divine one. The existence what we call chemical atoms, the constituents of all we see around us, wasn't proved until a hundred years ago, but almost simultaneously it was realised these weren't the indivisible constituents the Greeks envisaged. Much of the story of physics since then has been the ever-deeper probing of matter until, at the end of the 20th century, a complete list of fundamental ingredients had been identified, apart from one, the much discussed Higgs particle. In this programme, Ben finds out why this last particle is so pivotal, not just to atomic theory, but to our very existence - and how hopeful the scientists are of proving its existence.

  14. The Atomic City / The Magic of the Atom - 1950's Atomic Energy Commission Documentary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-06-04

    The story of American cities located near atomic power plants, and steps taken monitoring radiation to ensure the safety of the public who live nearby. .

  15. A study of the catalytic conversion of synthesis gas to low molecular weight hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Ting Yee

    1981-01-01

    A STUDY 0F THE CA'ALYTIC CONVERSION OF SYNTHESIS GAS TO LON NOIECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBONS A Thesis by TIN G YEE CHAN Submitted to the Graduate College of exas ARE University in partial fulf illment of the requirement f or the degree... of NASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Nejor Subject: Chemical Engineering A STUDY OF CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SYNTHESIS GAS TO LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBONS A Thesis TING YEE CHAN Approved as to style and content by hairman o ommit ee Member ember...

  16. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  17. Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M. L. Martina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M at absolute zero, (TAE0) of benzene, C6H6, was computed fully ab initio by means of W2h theory as 1306.6 kcal for systems the size of benzene, chemically accurate molecular atomization energies can be obtained from fully

  18. Hydrogen Atom Loss in Pyrimidine DNA Bases Induced by Low-Energy Electrons: Energetics Predicted by Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Hydrogen Atom Loss in Pyrimidine DNA Bases Induced by Low-Energy Electrons: Energetics Predicted In addition to inducing DNA strand breaks, low-energy electrons (LEEs) also have been shown to induce of a hydrogen atom from a DNA base-electron adduct initiates chemical modification of the base, which can cause

  19. New possible properties of atomic nuclei investigated by non linear methods: Fractal and recurrence quantification analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elio Conte; Andrei Yu. Khrennikov; Joseph P. Zbilut

    2007-04-06

    For the first time we apply the methodologies of nonlinear analysis to investigate atomic matter. We use these methods in the analysis of Atomic Weights and of Mass Number of atomic nuclei. Using the AutoCorrelation Function and Mutual Information we establish the presence of nonlinear effects in the mechanism of increasing mass of atomic nuclei considered as a function of the atomic number. We find that increasing mass is divergent, possibly chaotic. We also investigate the possible existence of a Power Law for atomic nuclei and, using also the technique of the variogram, we conclude that a fractal regime could superintend to the mechanism of increasing mass for nuclei. Finally, using the Hurst exponent, evidence is obtained that the mechanism of increasing mass in atomic nuclei is in the fractional Brownian regime. The most interesting results are obtained by using Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA). New recurrences, psudoperiodicities, self-resemblance and class of self-similarities are identified with values of determinism showing oscillating values indicating the presence of more or less stability during the process of increasing mass of atomic nuclei. In brief, new regimes of regularities are identified for atomic nuclei that deserve to be studied by future researches. In particular an accurate analysis of binding energy values by nonlinear methods is further required.

  20. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  1. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  2. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

  3. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  4. Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    and interdisciplinary areas, including biochemical solar energy research, artificial photosynthesis and bio candidates for possible side-effects, RECON/TAE transferable atom equivalent (TAE) modeling, and machine

  5. Effective Polyakov line actions, and their solutions at finite chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Greensite

    2014-11-03

    I outline recent progress in the relative weights approach to deriving effective Polyakov line actions from an underlying lattice gauge theory, and compare mean field and complex Langevin methods for solving such theories at finite chemical potential.

  6. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  7. Anticipating the atom: popular perceptions of atomic power before Hiroshima 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d'Emal, Jacques-Andre Christian

    1994-01-01

    Before Hiroshima made the Bomb an object of popular concern, possible implications and applications of atomic physics had been discussed in the public forum. The new science of X-rays and radium promised the possibilities of unlimited energy...

  8. Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste heat recovery using mixed radiant and convective heat transfer Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for...

  9. Changes in Body Image and Sexuality in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors During a Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunter, Rebecca

    2015-08-31

    This study evaluated changes in body image dimensions in breast cancer survivors after a weight control trial and predictors of those changes. Postmenopausal rural breast cancer survivors enrolled in an 18-month phone-based weight loss and weight...

  10. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Arafat, M Tarik; Yin, Jie; Wood, David J; Russell, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activ...

  11. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  12. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2014-06-27

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  13. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  14. Theoretical studies of atomic transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, C.F.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses: lifetime of excited states; core-polarization studies; large relativistic calculations; Monte Carlo Hartree-Fock (MCHF) atomic structure package; and MCHF codes for the hypercube. (LSP)

  15. Efimov physics in cold atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric . E-mail: braaten@mps.ohio-state.edu; Hammer, H.-W. . E-mail: hammer@itkp.uni-bonn.de

    2007-01-15

    Atoms with a large scattering length have universal low-energy properties that do not depend on the details of their structure or their interactions at short distances. In the 2-atom sector, the universal properties are familiar and depend only on the scattering length. In the 3-atom sector for identical bosons, the universal properties include the existence of a sequence of shallow triatomic molecules called Efimov trimers and log-periodic dependence of scattering observables on the energy and the scattering length. In this review, we summarize the universal results that are currently known. We also summarize the experimental information that is currently available with an emphasis on 3-atom loss processes.

  16. Efimov Physics in Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Braaten; H. -W. Hammer

    2006-12-05

    Atoms with a large scattering length have universal low-energy properties that do not depend on the details of their structure or their interactions at short distances. In the 2-atom sector, the universal properties are familiar and depend only on the scattering length. In the 3-atom sector for identical bosons, the universal properties include the existence of a sequence of shallow triatomic molecules called Efimov trimers and log-periodic dependence of scattering observables on the energy and the scattering length. In this review, we summarize the universal results that are currently known. We also summarize the experimental information that is currently available with an emphasis on 3-atom loss processes.

  17. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  18. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  19. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  20. Algorithms for Pure Nash Equilibria in Weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conati, Cristina

    Algorithms for Pure Nash Equilibria in Weighted Congestion Games Panagopoulou and Spirakis Review strategies. · This paper only deals with pure strategies. #12;Game Theory · A Nash Equilibrium is where players stay fixed. #12;Game Theory · A Nash equilibrium is guaranteed to exist when players can use mixed

  1. THE FOURIER TRANSFORM IN WEIGHTED LORENTZ SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    the Lorentz space p(v) to be the collection of functions f : Rn R for which f p(v) = 0 (f )p v 1/p 1991, Weights, Lorentz Space. Support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada transform as a map on p(v). Our work here represents a development of his ideas in a different direction

  2. NIST Weights and Measures Division Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and inch-pound measurement units in a net quantity of contents statement. The term metric labeling refers to using only metric measurement units in a net quantity of contents statement. 2 (15 U.S.C. §§ 1451NIST Weights and Measures Division Marketplace Assessment ­ Metric Labeling on Packages in Retail

  3. Weight Perception Discrepancy Among Ethnically Diverse Youth 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cromwell, Kate Duncan

    2012-10-19

    is higher among these groups as the comparison is with a heavier than normal peers it may be skewed. This study used the Center for Disease Control’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System from 2009 to evaluate weight perception discrepancy among Caucasian...

  4. Chemical Sciences Division - CSD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSD Chemical Sciences Division CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Research Areas Research Highlights Organization Contacts Publications Awards Employment...

  5. MECS 2006- Chemicals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  6. 3-D Atomic-Scale Mapping of Manganese Dopants in Lead Sulfide Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isheim, Dieter; Kaszpurenko, Jason; Yu, Dong; Mao, Zugang; Seidman, David N.; Arslan, Ilke

    2012-03-22

    Dopants in nanowires, whether intentional or unintentional, can ultimately control the material's properties and therefore need to be understood on the atomic scale. We study vapor-liquid-solid grown manganese-doped lead sulfide nanowires by atom-probe tomography for the first time for lead salt materials. The three-dimensional chemical concentration maps at the atomic scale demonstrate a radial distribution profile of Mn ions, with a concentration of only 0.18 at.% and 0.01 at.% for MnCl2 and Mn-acetate precursors, respectively. The ability to characterize these small concentrations of dopant atoms in Pb1-xMnxS nanowires (x = 0.0036 and 0.0002), important for spintronic and thermoelectric devices, sets a platform for similar analyses for all nanostructures. First-principles calculations confirm that Mn atoms substitute for Pb in the PbS structure.

  7. Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Servatius, Brigitte

    Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites Finite Zeolites The Layer . . . Holes University (Brigitte Servatius -- WPI) #12;Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites. Chemical Zeolites · crystalline solid · units: Si + 4O Si O O O O · two covalent bonds per oxygen #12

  8. Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Chemical Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, we educate students in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering, giving them.Va. Department of Chemical Engineering benefit from a modern academic curriculum and state

  9. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuo Shibata; Shin-ichi Sasa

    1997-10-30

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  10. HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

  11. 26 May 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 322 2000 321326

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jie

    26 May 2000 Z .Chemical Physics Letters 322 2000 321­326 www.elsevier.nlrlocatercplett A scalable 2000; in final form 20 March 2000 Abstract Z .Single-walled carbon nanotubes SWNT are known to possess is greater than 200% the weight of the catalysts. q 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. 1

  12. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    V. , Ed. , Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. J. Chem.£d. Amer/can Chemical Society. Easlon. PA. 18042. Vol. Lof Laboratory Safety. the Chemical Rubber Company Cleveland.

  13. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    strongly-connected chemical reaction, and the compu- tationcredited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks Referencesto persistence analysis in chemical reaction networks. In:

  14. Contemporary Mathematics Local Non-injectivity for Weighted Radon Transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boman, Jan

    Contemporary Mathematics Local Non-injectivity for Weighted Radon Transforms Jan Boman Abstract. A weighted plane Radon transform R is considered, where (x, L) is a smooth positive function. It is proved of smooth positive weight functions. 1. Introduction We shall consider a weighted plane Radon transform (1

  15. Surface structure, composition, and polarity of indium nitride grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition have been studied. Atomic hydrogen cleaning produced and heterostructures--which can be accomplished by low- pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD --the- rium vapor pressure of nitrogen during growth. This requires different approaches in growing structures

  16. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  17. Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering June 2015 #12;Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 POLICY..........................................................................................2 2.1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER

  18. Sudden transition from naked atom decay to dressed atom decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Zhu; D. L. Zhou

    2015-07-09

    The studies on quantum open system play key roles not only in fundamental problems in quantum mechanics but also in quantum computing and information processes. Here we propose a scheme to use a one dimensional coupling cavity array (CCA) as an artificial electromagnetic environment of a two-level atom. For a finite length of CCA, we find that after a turning time the population of excited state deviates suddenly from the exponential decay. We show that physically this phenomena corresponds to a transition from a naked atom decay to a dressed state decay. We hope that our finding will promote the studies on quantum system with a finite size environment.

  19. Quantum Electrodynamics of Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Ballesteros; Jérémy Faupin; Jürg Fröhlich; Baptiste Schubnel

    2015-03-09

    A simple model of an atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field is studied. The atom has a finite mass $m$, finitely many excited states and an electric dipole moment, $\\vec{d}_0 = -\\lambda_{0} \\vec{d}$, where $\\| d^{i}\\| = 1,$ $ i=1,2,3,$ and $\\lambda_0$ is proportional to the elementary electric charge. The interaction of the atom with the radiation field is described with the help of the Ritz Hamiltonian, $-\\vec{d}_0\\cdot \\vec{E}$, where $\\vec{E}$ is the electric field, cut off at large frequencies. A mathematical study of the Lamb shift, the decay channels and the life times of the excited states of the atom is presented. It is rigorously proven that these quantities are analytic functions of the momentum $\\vec{p}$ of the atom and of the coupling constant $\\lambda_0$, provided $|\\vec{p}| maps' applied to a complex dilatation of the original Hamiltonian, which yields an algorithm for the calculation of resonance energies that converges super-exponentially fast.

  20. Magnetic fields, spots and weather in chemically peculiar stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Kochukhov

    2007-11-30

    New observational techniques and sophisticated modelling methods has led to dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the interplay between the surface magnetism, atomic diffusion and atmospheric dynamics in chemically peculiar stars. Magnetic Doppler images, constructed using spectropolarimetric observations of Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters, reveal the presence of small-scale field topologies. Abundance Doppler mapping has been perfected to the level where distributions of many different chemical elements can be deduced self-consistently for one star. The inferred chemical spot structures are diverse and do not always trace underlying magnetic field geometry. Moreover, horizontal chemical inhomogeneities are discovered in non-magnetic CP stars and evolving chemical spots are observed for the first time in the bright mercury-manganese star alpha And. These results show that in addition to magnetic fields, another important non-magnetic structure formation mechanism acts in CP stars.

  1. Design of a dual species atom interferometer for space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Schuldt; Christian Schubert; Markus Krutzik; Lluis Gesa Bote; Naceur Gaaloul; Jonas Hartwig; Holger Ahlers; Waldemar Herr; Katerine Posso-Trujillo; Jan Rudolph; Stephan Seidel; Thijs Wendrich; Wolfgang Ertmer; Sven Herrmann; André Kubelka-Lange; Alexander Milke; Benny Rievers; Emanuele Rocco; Andrew Hinton; Kai Bongs; Markus Oswald; Matthias Franz; Matthias Hauth; Achim Peters; Ahmad Bawamia; Andreas Wicht; Baptiste Battelier; Andrea Bertoldi; Philippe Bouyer; Arnaud Landragin; Didier Massonnet; Thomas Lévèque; Andre Wenzlawski; Ortwin Hellmig; Patrick Windpassinger; Klaus Sengstock; Wolf von Klitzing; Chris Chaloner; David Summers; Philip Ireland; Ignacio Mateos; Carlos F. Sopuerta; Fiodor Sorrentino; Guglielmo M. Tino; Michael Williams; Christian Trenkel; Domenico Gerardi; Michael Chwalla; Johannes Burkhardt; Ulrich Johann; Astrid Heske; Eric Wille; Martin Gehler; Luigi Cacciapuoti; Norman Gürlebeck; Claus Braxmaier; Ernst Rasel

    2014-12-08

    Atom interferometers have a multitude of proposed applications in space including precise measurements of the Earth's gravitational field, in navigation & ranging, and in fundamental physics such as tests of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and gravitational wave detection. While atom interferometers are realized routinely in ground-based laboratories, current efforts aim at the development of a space compatible design optimized with respect to dimensions, weight, power consumption, mechanical robustness and radiation hardness. In this paper, we present a design of a high-sensitivity differential dual species $^{85}$Rb/$^{87}$Rb atom interferometer for space, including physics package, laser system, electronics and software. The physics package comprises the atom source consisting of dispensers and a 2D magneto-optical trap (MOT), the science chamber with a 3D-MOT, a magnetic trap based on an atom chip and an optical dipole trap (ODT) used for Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) creation and interferometry, the detection unit, the vacuum system for $10^{-11}$ mbar ultra-high vacuum generation, and the high-suppression factor magnetic shielding as well as the thermal control system. The laser system is based on a hybrid approach using fiber-based telecom components and high-power laser diode technology and includes all laser sources for 2D-MOT, 3D-MOT, ODT, interferometry and detection. Manipulation and switching of the laser beams is carried out on an optical bench using Zerodur bonding technology. The instrument consists of 9 units with an overall mass of 221 kg, an average power consumption of 608 W (819 W peak), and a volume of 470 liters which would well fit on a satellite to be launched with a Soyuz rocket, as system studies have shown.

  2. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  3. Atomic Layer DepositionAtomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Conformality in(ALD) Conformality in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Atomic Layer DepositionAtomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Conformality in(ALD) Conformality in Nanopores, removal of template, and subsequent TEM analysis. Significance Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely in Nanopores Intellectual merit While atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables unprecedented control of atomic

  4. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  5. Ramsey interferometry with ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Seidel; J. G. Muga

    2006-02-02

    We examine the passage of ultracold two-level atoms through two separated laser fields for the nonresonant case. We show that implications of the atomic quantized motion change dramatically the behavior of the interference fringes compared to the semiclassical description of this optical Ramsey interferometer. Using two-channel recurrence relations we are able to express the double-laser scattering amplitudes by means of the single-laser ones and to give explicit analytical results. When considering slower and slower atoms, the transmission probability of the system changes considerably from an interference behavior to a regime where scattering resonances prevail. This may be understood in terms of different families of trajectories that dominate the overall transmission probability in the weak field or in the strong field limit.

  6. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  7. Average-Atom Thomson Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    -Atom Approximation W. R. Johnson, Notre Dame J. Nilsen & K. T. Cheng, LLNL The cross section for Thomson scattering Average-Atom Model Divide plasma into WS cells with a nucleus and Z electrons p2 2 - Z r + V a(r) = a a(r) V(r) = VKS(n(r), r) n(r) = nb(r) + nc(r) 4r2nb(r) = nl 2(2l+1) 1+exp[( nl -µ)/kBT] Pnl(r)2 Z = r

  8. Chemical evolution of galaxies. I. A composition-dependent SPH model for chemical evolution and cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco J. Martínez-Serrano; Arturo Serna; Rosa Domínguez-Tenreiro; Mercedes Mollá

    2008-04-23

    We describe an SPH model for chemical enrichment and radiative cooling in cosmological simulations of structure formation. This model includes: i) the delayed gas restitution from stars by means of a probabilistic approach designed to reduce the statistical noise and, hence, to allow for the study of the inner chemical structure of objects with moderately high numbers of particles; ii) the full dependence of metal production on the detailed chemical composition of stellar particles by using, for the first time in SPH codes, the Qij matrix formalism that relates each nucleosynthetic product to its sources; and iii) the full dependence of radiative cooling on the detailed chemical composition of gas particles, achieved through a fast algorithm using a new metallicity parameter zeta(T) that gives the weight of each element on the total cooling function. The resolution effects and the results obtained from this SPH chemical model have been tested by comparing its predictions in different problems with known theoretical solutions. We also present some preliminary results on the chemical properties of elliptical galaxies found in self-consistent cosmological simulations. Such simulations show that the above zeta-cooling method is important to prevent an overestimation of the metallicity-dependent cooling rate, whereas the Qij formalism is important to prevent a significant underestimation of the [alpha/Fe] ratio in simulated galaxy-like objects.

  9. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  10. Chemical Cleaning Program Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview...

  11. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  12. Quantum And Classical Dynamics Of Atoms In A Magneto-optical Lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutsch, Ivan H.

    motion. Experiments, performed deep in the quantum regime, correspond to dynamic quantum tunneling in the experiment, but undergoing classical Hamiltonian flow. We study conditions under which the trapped atoms can with applications ranging from engineered chemical reactions [1] to electron transport in semiconductors [2

  13. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fink, Samuel D. (Aiken, SC); Fondeur, Fernando F. (North Augusta, SC)

    2011-10-18

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  14. Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, possesses many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, possesses many excellent chemical species onto the graphene plane offers an effective route to alter and engineer the properties of graphene. NSF-supported researchers have demonstrated that graphene covered dilutely with covalently bonded

  15. Kinetic study of the collisional quenching of spinorbitally excited atomic chlorine, Cl(2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kono, Mitsu

    Kinetic study of the collisional quenching of spin­orbitally excited atomic chlorine, Cl(2 P1 Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory and Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, 3 interactions, there have been a number of studies on the kinetics of physical and chemical relaxation processes

  16. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  17. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravaine, B; Derevianko, A; Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    Searches for CP violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability $\\beta^\\mathrm{CP}$: a magnetic moment $\\mu^\\mathrm{CP}$ is induced by an electric field $\\mathcal{E}_0$ applied to an atom, $\\mu^\\mathrm{CP} = \\beta^\\mathrm{CP} \\mathcal{E}_0 $. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate betaCP to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, betaCP scales steeply as Z^5 R(Z), where slowly-varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate a feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetizat...

  18. WEIGHTED GUIDELINES PROFIT/FEE OBJECTIVE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel Efficiency &Report-Bradley Nickell DirectorWEIGHTED

  19. Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lothar Ratschbacher; Christoph Zipkes; Carlo Sias; Michael Köhl

    2012-09-26

    The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achieving quantum-limited control of chemical reactions and indicate limits for buffer gas cooling of single ion clocks.

  20. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  1. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Jeong, Seung Y. (Westmont, IL); Lohan, Dirk (Chicago, IL); Elizabeth, Anne (Chicago, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  2. ON WEIGHTED INEQUALITIES FOR FRACTIONAL INTEGRALS OF RADIAL FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Nápoli, Pablo Luis

    for this operator (also called weighted Hardy-Little- wood-Sobolev inequalities) go back to G. H. Hardy and J. E for the fractional integral with general weights were later stud- ied by several people, see for example [8

  3. Heaviest Nuclei: New Element with Atomic Number 117

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Oganessian, Yuri [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    2010-09-01

    One of the fundamental outcomes of the nuclear shell model is the prediction of the 'stability islands' in the domain of the hypothetical super heavy elements. The talk is devoted to the experimental verification of these predictions - the synthesis and study of both the decay and chemical properties of the super heavy elements. The discovery of a new chemical element with atomic number Z=117 is reported. The isotopes 293117 and 294117 were produced in fusion reactions between 48Ca and 249Bk. Decay chains involving 11 new nuclei were identified by means of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator. The measured decay properties show a strong rise of stability for heavier isotopes with Z =111, validating the concept of the long sought island of enhanced stability for heaviest nuclei.

  4. PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School facultyD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description

  5. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-06-06

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample. SEM analysis of the SAS sample could not be performed due to the presence of a significant concentration of Hg in the sample. (7) Essentially all the Na and the S in the off-gas samples were soluble in water. (8) The main soluble anion was NO{sub 3}{sup -} with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} being second. (9) In contrast to the results for the off-gas deposits analyzed in 2003, soluble compounds of fluoride and chloride were detected; however, their concentrations in the Quencher and SAS deposits were less than one weight percent. (10) The results suggest that the S is primarily in the deposits as the sulfate anion.

  7. Origin of Cosmic Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maio, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e$^-$, H, H$^+$, H$^-$, He, He$^+$, He$^{++}$, D, D$^+$, H$_2$, H$_2^+$, HD, HeH$^+$), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at redshift $z\\gtrsim 2$. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below $\\sim 10^4\\,\\rm K$, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/...

  8. The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP , Sangxia Huang2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP Modulo k Heng Guo1 , Sangxia Huang2 , Pinyan Lu3@gmail.com Abstract We prove a complexity dichotomy theorem for counting weighted Boolean CSP modulo k for any similar to the one for the complex weighted Boolean #CSP, found by [Cai, Lu and Xia, STOC 2009]. Then we

  9. Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

  10. QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of model atoms in fields Milonni, P.W. 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ATOMS; OPTICAL MODELS; QUANTUM MECHANICS;...

  11. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  12. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  13. Instead of splitting the atom --the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instead of splitting the atom - - the principle behind the 1940s Manhattan Project that build infinite. Instead of splitting the atom -- the principle behind the 1940s Manhattan Project that build gravitational forces ram hydrogen atoms together to produce helium, with solar energy the byproduct. On Earth

  14. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Jentsch, Ch. [Astrium GmbH-Satellites, 88039 Friedrichshafen (Germany); Schleich, W. P. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-01-25

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193.

  15. Atomic Representations of Rank 2 Graph Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ken

    Atomic Representations of Rank 2 Graph Algebras Kenneth R. Davidson a , Stephen C. Power b , Dilian University, Lancaster LA1 4YF, U.K. Abstract We provide a detailed analysis of atomic -representations- posed into a direct sum or direct integral of irreducible atomic representations. The building blocks

  16. PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS MARK ELLERMANN II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    #12;PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS by MARK ELLERMANN II Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School OF SCIENCE December 2010 #12;PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS Approved: Adviser Dean of the College of Arts & Science Dean of Graduate Studies and Research ii #12;ABSTRACT PRODUCTION OF EXOTIC ATOMS Mark Ellermann

  17. Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light and then trapped in a bottle whose "walls" are magnetic fields. Cooled atoms are ideal for exploring basic. Atoms can now be cooled by shining laser light directly on them. The radiation pres sure exerted

  18. NAAP Hydrogen Atom 1/9 The Hydrogen Atom Student Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Name: NAAP ­ Hydrogen Atom 1/9 The Hydrogen Atom ­ Student Guide Background Material Carefully read and the Quantum model represent the Hydrogen atom. In some cases they both describe things in the same way frequency, smaller energy, and the same velocity through space as a blue photon". #12;NAAP ­Hydrogen Atom 2

  19. Fast transport, atom sample splitting and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkl, Gerhard

    Fast transport, atom sample splitting and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation and the manipulation of ultra-cold implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator-based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more

  20. low weight NFS--Oliver Schirokauer version 20060318 The number field sieve for integers of low weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    low weight NFS--Oliver Schirokauer version 20060318 The number field sieve for integers of low{1,-1}. Since arithmetic modulo a prime of low weight is particularly efficient, it is tempting logarithm problem modulo a prime N of low weight, as well as the difficulty of factoring an integer N of low

  1. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

  2. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  3. Fuzzy Chemical Abstract Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syropoulos, Apostolos

    2009-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory opens new vistas in computability theory and here I show this by defining a new computational metaphor--the fuzzy chemical metaphor. This metaphor is an extension of the chemical metaphor. In particular, I introduce the idea of a state of a system as a solution of fuzzy molecules, that is molecules that are not just different but rather similar, that react according to a set of fuzzy reaction rules. These notions become precise by introducing fuzzy labeled transition systems. Solutions of fuzzy molecules and fuzzy reaction rules are used to define the general notion of a fuzzy chemical abstract machine, which is a {\\em realization} of the fuzzy chemical metaphor. Based on the idea that these machines can be used to describe the operational semantics of process calculi and algebras that include fuzziness as a fundamental property, I present a toy calculus that is a fuzzy equivalent of the $\\pi$-calculus.

  4. Chemical Processing White Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    hydrogen from hydrocarbon mixtures, and propylene from propane, and if scaled up, could cut the cost fibers as a platform," says Sankar Nair, a professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

  5. 219-S chemical compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOODWIN, L.D.

    1999-08-31

    This document consists of tables of the materials that make up the ''wetted'' parts of the 219-S waste handling facility and a combination of manufacturer lists of chemicals that are not recommended.

  6. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  7. Chemical Hygiene Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Chemical Hygiene Plan Michigan State University Environmental Health and Safety Engineering 2014 #12;ii Michigan State University Chemical Hygiene Plan Table of Contents 1.0 SCOPE.................................................................................................... 1 1.4 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL DEFINITIONS

  8. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    IUPAC) or the Chemical Abstracts Service (CA,S} -'lee ofTerms CAS Number Chemical Abstract Service registry number,is indicated. CAS Number: Chemical Abstract Service registry

  9. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study Research Facilities Financial Aid Applying Correspondence The Department of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering has well-established programs at both area of chemical engineering and include both fundamental and applied topics. The Department has

  10. Quantum search protocol for an atomic array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2001-01-01

    of atoms, one atom at each (i , j) site. Each atom ~lattice site! is coupled via an optical fiber to a particular detector, so that spontaneously emitted radiation from an atom at site (i , j). causes a count in detector Di j @see Fig. 1~b... manifold of the so-called detector states indicated by ud&. A transition from u1,0& to u18,08& is forbidden, and this protects straw atoms from excitation, i.e., a dashed line is not allowed. ~c! One way of eliminating error counts. Even though z radiation...

  11. Low velocity limits of cold atom clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Muñoz; I. Lizuain; J. G. Muga

    2009-09-08

    Fundamental low-energy limits to the accuracy of quantum clock and stopwatch models in which the clock hand motion is activated by the presence of a particle in a region of space have been studied in the past, but their relevance for actual atomic clocks had not been assessed. In this work we address the effect of slow atomic quantum motion on Rabi and Ramsey resonance fringe patterns, as a perturbation of the results based on classical atomic motion. We find the dependence of the fractional error of the corresponding atomic clocks on the atomic velocity and interaction parameters.

  12. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susanne Pielawa; Luiz Davidovich; David Vitali; Giovanna Morigi

    2010-04-06

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  13. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielawa, Susanne; Vitali, David; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  14. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  15. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    source are credited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networksalgorithms for minimal siphons in Petri nets based on placewe characterize the minimal siphons of a chemical reaction

  16. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. ?-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  17. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-{Tc} systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  18. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Summaries are given of research in the following fields: photochemistry of materials in stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, laser sources and techniques, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H[sub 2], and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO[sub 2], potentially catalytic and conducting organometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures. Under exploratory R and D funds, the following are discussed: technical evaluation of beamlines and experimental stations for chemical cynamics applications at the ALS synchrotron, and molecular beam threshold time-of-flight spectroscopy of rare gas atoms. Research on normal and superconducting properties of high-[Tc] systems is reported under work for others. (DLC)

  19. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  20. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  1. General Atomics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway Edit HistoryGearyAtomics Jump to:

  2. Enhancing the Benefit of the Chemical Mixture Methodology: A Report on Methodology Testing and Potential Approaches for Improving Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Glantz, Clifford S.; Booth, Alexander E.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive testing shows that the current version of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is meeting its intended mission to provide conservative estimates of the health effects from exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. However, the current version of the CMM could benefit from several enhancements that are designed to improve its application of Health Code Numbers (HCNs) and employ weighting factors to reduce over conservatism.

  3. Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing NAOKI MATSUMARU, FLORIAN-07743 Jena, Germany http://www.minet.uni-jena.de/csb/ Submitted 14 November 2005 In chemical computing- gramming chemical systems a theoretical method to cope with that emergent behavior is desired

  4. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    ) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor to Separation Pro- cesses (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material and energy

  5. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Introduction to Separation Processes (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor design

  6. Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me? If you are interested in the uses and processes surrounding the engineering of new and raw materials, a degree in Chemical Engineering may be well suited to you. The Chemical Engineering degree programme will focus on the development of products

  7. Experimental method of detecting relic neutrino by atomic de-excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yoshimura; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka

    2014-09-12

    The cosmic background neutrino of temperature 1.9 K affects rates of radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP) from metastable excited atoms, since its presence blocks the pair emission by the Pauli exclusion principle. We quantitatively investigate how the Pauli blocking distorts the photon energy spectrum and calculate its sensitivity to cosmic parameters such as the neutrino temperature and its chemical potential. Important quantities for high sensitivities to these parameter measurement are found to be the level spacing of atomic de-excitation and the unknown mass value of lightest neutrino, in particular their mutual relation.

  8. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Yang, Lefu; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Mayzel, Dina; Prasai, Binay; Wang, Lingyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-05-05

    Alloying palladium (Pd) with other transition metals at the nanoscale has become an important pathway for preparation of low-cost, highly-active and stable catalysts. However the lack of understanding of how the alloying phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of the alloys at the nanoscale influence their catalytic activity impedes the rational design of Pd-nanoalloy catalysts. This work addresses this challenge by a novel approach to investigating the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) over palladium-nickel (PdNi) nanoalloys with well-defined bimetallic composition, which reveals a remarkable a maximal catalytic activity at Pd:Ni ratio of ~50:50. Key to understanding the structural-catalytic synergy is the use of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function (HE-XRD/PDF) analysis to probe the atomic structure of PdNi nanoalloys under controlled thermochemical treatments and CO reaction conditions. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the atomic structure of the nanoalloy particles were generated by reverse Monte Carlo simulations (RMC) guided by the experimental HE-XRD/PDF data. Structural details of the PdNi nanoalloys were extracted from the respective 3D models and compared with the measured catalytic properties. The comparison revealed a strong correlation between the phase state, chemical composition and atomic-scale structure of PdNi nanoalloys and their catalytic activity for CO oxidation. This correlation is further substantiated by analyzing the first atomic neighbor distances and coordination numbers inside the nanoalloy particles and at their surfaces. These findings have provided new insights into the structural synergy of nanoalloy catalysts by controlling the phase state, composition and atomic structure, complementing findings of traditional density functional theory studies.

  9. Mexico: swapping crude for atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarro, B.

    1982-06-24

    Mexico, considered the Saudi Arabia of the Western Hemisphere because of its proven and potential petroleum reserves, has surprised the world: it has embarked on the biggest nuclear-electric program in the Third World, only to postpone it days before scheduled approval of an international bidding (on which the atomic energy industry had pinned its hopes). A graph shows Mexican supplies of electricity by source with official projections to 1990. The point of entrance of the first nuclear reactor, originally scheduled for 1982, won't come onstream until 1983; and how nuclear-generated electricity grows close to 5% of the total in 1990. The big question is, will the future President of Mexico give the green light to the atomic megaproject. And if he does, how will Mexico deal with the serious logistics problems and grave ecological implications confronting the industry worldwide. In this issue, the author and Energy Detente touch on these questions and review the nuclear power status of Mexico, as well as addressing some of its global problems. Also presented in this issue is an update of the fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries.

  10. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  11. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  12. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C. (Port Jefferson, NY); Wang, Chengpu (Upton, NY)

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  13. Weight Distribution of a Class of Binary Linear Block Codes Formed from RCPC Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yushi Dr.; Cosman, Pamela C; Milstein, Laurence B

    2006-01-01

    On the weight distribution of terminated convolutionalViterbi, “On the weight distribution of linear block codes9, SEPTEMBER 2005 Weight Distribution of a Class of Binary

  14. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  15. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  16. Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofChemicalEngineering-credit EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to a chemical engineering t engineering.wayne.edu/che #12;What is chemical engineering? Imagine saving the lives of pediatric patients

  17. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Placitas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals.

  18. 2-D weighted least-squares phase unwrapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ghiglia, D.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1995-06-13

    Weighted values of interferometric signals are unwrapped by determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for unweighted values of the interferometric signals; and then determining the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals by preconditioned conjugate gradient methods using the unweighted solutions as preconditioning values. An output is provided that is representative of the least squares solution of phase unwrapping for weighted values of the interferometric signals. 6 figs.

  19. Weight Loss Regime for Massive Low Temperature Electrons | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weight Loss Regime for Massive Low Temperature Electrons A compound made out of ytterbium (Yb), platinum (Pt), and bismuth (Bi) offers researchers the opportunity to watch the...

  20. Low molecular weight thermostable .beta.-D-glucosidase from acidotherm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visual Patent Search Success Stories News Events Find More Like This Return to Search Low molecular weight thermostable .beta.-D-glucosidase from acidothermus cellulolyticus...

  1. 5-Week Weight Management Class - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-Week Weight Management Class Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and Screenings...

  2. Method for enhanced atomization of liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Richard E. (27121 Puerta del Oro, Mission Viejo, CA 92691); White, Jerome R. (44755 Wyandotte, Hemet, CA 92544)

    1993-01-01

    In a process for atomizing a slurry or liquid process stream in which a slurry or liquid is passed through a nozzle to provide a primary atomized process stream, an improvement which comprises subjecting the liquid or slurry process stream to microwave energy as the liquid or slurry process stream exits the nozzle, wherein sufficient microwave heating is provided to flash vaporize the primary atomized process stream.

  3. Wet-spinnability and crosslinked fibre properties of two collagen polypeptides with varied molecular weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Tronci; Ramya Sri Kanuparti; M. Tarik Arafat; Jie Yin; David J. Wood; Stephen J. Russell

    2015-07-26

    The formation of naturally-derived materials with wet stable fibrous architectures is paramount in order to mimic the features of tissues at the molecular and microscopic scale. Here, we investigated the formation of wet-spun fibres based on collagen-derived polypeptides with comparable chemical composition and varied molecular weight. Gelatin and hydrolysed fish collagen (HFC) were selected as widely-available linear amino-acidic chains of high and low molecular weight, respectively, and functionalised in the wet-spun fibre state in order to preserve the material geometry in physiological conditions. Wet-spun fibre diameter and morphology were dramatically affected depending on the polypeptide molecular weight, wet-spinning solvent (i.e. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) and coagulating medium (i.e. acetone and ethanol), resulting in either bulky or porous internal geometry. Dry-state tensile moduli were significantly enhanced in gelatin and HFC samples following covalent crosslinking with activated 1,3 phenylenediacetic acid (Ph) (E: 726 +/- 43 - 844 +/- 85 MPa), compared to samples crosslinked via intramolecular carbodiimide-mediated condensation reaction (E: 588 +/- 38 MPa). Resulting fibres displayed a dry diameter in the range of 238 +/- 18 - 355 +/- 28 micron and proved to be mechanically-stable (E: 230 kPa) following equilibration with PBS, whilst a nearly-complete degradation was observed after 5-day incubation in physiological conditions.

  4. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhan Saif

    2006-04-10

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits dynamical localization and quantum recurrences.

  5. Atom-split it for nuclear energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adjustments were provided by the 'Calutron Girls' Seaborg-Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission 1961-1971; discovered many elements Buckyball-Buckminsterfullerene; 60...

  6. Subwavelength Transportation of Light with Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Siu-Tat; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2015-01-01

    We propose and investigate a new type of optical waveguide made by an array of atoms without involving conventional Bragg scattering or total internal reflection. A finite chain of atoms collectively coupled through their intrinsic resonance supports a propagating mode with minimal radiative loss when the array spacing $a$ is around 0.6$\\lambda_0/2\\pi$ where $\\lambda_0$ is the wavelength of the nearly resonant optical transition. We find that the transportation is robust with respect to position fluctuation and remains possible when the atoms are placed on a circle. Our result paves the way to implement the subwavelength transportation of light in integrated optical circuits with cold atoms.

  7. Influence of Age, Type and Fertility in Rambouillet Ewes on Fineness of Fibers, Fleece Weight, Staple Length, and Body Weight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, R.E.; Warwick, B.L.; Davis, S. P; Dameron, W. H.; Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

    1944-01-01

    . Shrinkage of the fleeces from the R type ewes averaged 62.9 per cent as compared with 59.4 per cent shrinkage from the C type ewes. There were no significant differences in body weights between the plain bodied and the \\I-rinkly or folded types used... of Animal on Diameter of Fiber 14 .................... f Age of Animal on Body Weight 16 ................ f Staple Length on Diameter of Fiber 16 ............ lnnuence of Fertility on Fleece Weight and Shrinkage 17 ......................... Influence...

  8. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  9. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  10. Mass spectral characterization of oxygen-containing aromatics with methanol chemical ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, M.V.

    1984-03-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry with methanol and deuterated methanol as ionization reagents is used to differentiate oxygen-containing aromatics, including phenols, aromatic ethers, and aromatic substituted alcohols, as well as compounds containing more than one oxygen atom. The analogous sulfur-containing aromatics may be similarly differentiated. Methanol chemical ionization is used to characterize a neutral aromatic polar subfraction of a coal-derived liquid by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. 16 references, 2 tables, 1 figure.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  12. CARBON ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY~4720 1 U.S.A. IntroductioE. Dual Phase steels are currentlymartensite-austenite dual phase steel, although the results

  13. Classification of fossil fuels according to structural-chemical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; G.S. Golovin; S.G. Gagarin [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15

    On the basis of a set of linear equations that relate the amount of major elements n{sub E} (E = C, H, O, N, S) in the organic matter of fossil fuels to structural characteristics, such as the number of cycles R, the number of atoms n{sub E}, the number of mutual chemical bonds, the degree of unsaturation of the structure {delta}, and the extent of its reduction B, a structural-chemical classification of fossil coals that is closely related to the parameters of the industrial-genetic classification (GOST 25543-88) is proposed. Structural-chemical classification diagrams are constructed for power-generating coals of Russia; coking coals; and coals designed for nonfuel purposes including the manufacture of adsorbents, synthetic liquid fuel, ion exchangers, thermal graphite, and carbon-graphite materials.

  14. AN EXACT SEQUENCE OF WEIGHTED NASH LAURA TAALMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    AN EXACT SEQUENCE OF WEIGHTED NASH COMPLEXES LAURA TAALMAN Abstract. Given a three of weighted Nash complexes. 1. Introduction Suppose (V, v) is an n-dimensional complex algebraic variety V). The Nash blowup U of U is the closure of the image of the section : U - v Grn(TCN ) that sends each point

  15. A General Weighted Grammar Library Cyril Allauzen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roark, Brian

    A General Weighted Grammar Library Cyril Allauzen1 , Mehryar Mohri2 , and Brian Roark3 1 AT&T Labs present a general weighted grammar software library, the GRM Library, that can be used in a variety hundred million rules or transitions. We describe several algorithms and utilities of this library

  16. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF INPUT WEIGHT FREEZING IN CONSTRUCTIVE NEURAL NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeung, Dit-Yan

    EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF INPUT WEIGHT FREEZING IN CONSTRUCTIVE NEURAL NETWORKS Tin­Yau Kwok Dit network. One calls for freezing the input weights of the original network and training only those of freezing is different for different problem domains and hence is not conclusive. This paper describes

  17. An Information-Theoretic Characterization of Weighted -Proportional Fairness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurose, Jim

    An Information-Theoretic Characterization of Weighted -Proportional Fairness Masato Uchida Network discussed in this paper indicate that the well-known fairness concept called weighted -proportional fairness-min fairness [1], proportional fairness [2], and potential delay minimization [3]. A general class

  18. On Quanti ed Weighted MAX-SAT Amol Dattatraya Mali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mali, Amol D.

    On Quanti#12;ed Weighted MAX-SAT Amol Dattatraya Mali Dept. of Electrical Engg. & Computer Science, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211, mali@miller.cs.uwm.edu, Phone: 1-414-229-6762, Fax: 1-414-229-2769, http://www.cs.uwm.edu/faculty/mali Abstract In this paper we introduce quanti#12;ed weighted MAX-SAT (Q

  19. Infinite Runs in Weighted Timed Automata with Energy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Infinite Runs in Weighted Timed Automata with Energy Constraints Patricia Bouyer1 , Uli Fahrenberg2 Cachan, France {bouyer,markey}@lsv.ens-cachan.fr 2 Dept. of Computer Science, Aalborg University, Denmark and negative weights on transitions and locations, corresponding to the production and consumption of some

  20. A Nonempirical Test on the Weight of Pseudorandom Number Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Makoto

    . In middle 80's, physicists began to find the failure of these generators in simulations of physical modelsA Nonempirical Test on the Weight of Pseudorandom Number Generators Makoto Matsumoto1 and Takuji introduce a theoretical test, named weight discrepancy test, on pseu- dorandom number generators. This test

  1. The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP with Mixed Signs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulatov, Andrei

    The Complexity of Weighted Boolean #CSP with Mixed Signs Andrei Bulatova , Martin Dyerb , Leslie constraint satisfaction problem (CSP), which corresponds to the case where all functions in have range {0, 1}. The problem we consider here is to compute the partition function of a given instance of weighted CSP; that is

  2. Predicting breast cancer using an expression values weighted clinical classifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting breast cancer using an expression values weighted clinical classifier Minta Thomas 1. Results: We compared and evaluated the proposed methods on five breast cancer case studies. Compared to LS Curve (AUC), on all breast cancer case studies. Conclusions: Thus a clinical classifier weighted

  3. A new chemical scheme to study carbon-rich exoplanet atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venot, Olivia; Agúndez, Marcelino; Decin, Leen; Bounaceur, Roda

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheres with a high C/O ratio are expected to contain an important quantity of hydrocarbons, including heavy molecules (with more than 2 carbon atoms). To study correctly these C-rich atmospheres, a chemical scheme adapted to this composition is necessary. We have implemented a chemical scheme that can describe the kinetics of species with up to 6 carbon atoms. This chemical scheme has been developed with specialists of combustion and validated through experiments on a wide range of T and P. This chemical network is available on the online database KIDA. We have created a grid of 12 models to explore different thermal profiles and C/O ratios. For each of them, we have compared the chemical composition determined with a C0-C2 chemical scheme (species with up to 2 carbon atoms) and with the C0-C6 scheme. We found no difference in the results obtained with the two schemes when photolyses are not included in the model, whatever the temperature of the atmosphere. In contrast, when there is photochemistry, diff...

  4. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  5. A new Embedded Atom Method potential for atomic-scale modeling of metal-silicon systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    A new Embedded Atom Method potential for atomic-scale modeling of metal-silicon systems Avinash M efficient interatomic potentials for metal-silicon systems. For metals, the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) [1 for the description of interatomic interactions in metal-silicon systems. The potential is based on reformulation

  6. Chemical Peeling of Tomatoes. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heddins, Gerald C.; Burns, E. E.

    1965-01-01

    percent NaOH (230" F.) for 20 seconds, 4> percetlt CaCI, (a6 F.) JW seconds and water (212" F.) for 90 seconds, respectively. The fruits were photographed immediately after scalding. bical Peeling of Tomatoes UNIVERSITY Summary I Tomato fruits... of the Chico and Homestead varieties were scalded in solutions of water, NaOH and CaC12 at various concentrations, times and tem- peratures. Fruits were weighed before and after ' peeling to determine percent weight loss and were. , visually rated...

  7. 2012 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwier, Timothy

    2012-07-20

    At the 2012 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conference, there will be talks in several broadly defined and partially overlapping areas: ? Intramolecular and single-collision reaction dynamics; ? Photophysics and photochemistry of excited states; ? Clusters, aerosols and solvation; ? Interactions at interfaces; ? Conformations and folding of large molecules; ? Interactions under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. The theme of the Gordon Research Seminar on Atomic & Molecular Interactions, in keeping with the tradition of the Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference, is far-reaching and involves fundamental research in the gas and condensed phases along with application of these ideas to practical chemical fields. The oral presentations, which will contain a combination of both experiment and theory, will focus on four broad categories: ? Ultrafast Phenomena; ? Excited States, Photoelectrons, and Photoions; ? Chemical Reaction Dynamics; ? Biomolecules and Clusters.

  8. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Graduation Checklist Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Graduation Checklist Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering College of Engineering For Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2014 (Co-op students graduating in Calendar Year 2015

  9. Appendix H. Chemicals Appendix H. Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  10. Appendix B: Chemicals Appendix B: Chemicals B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation

  11. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  12. Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

  13. Spectroscopic measurement of an atomic wave function 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapale, KT; Qamar, S.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple spectroscopic method based on Autler-Townes spectroscopy to determine the center-of-mass atomic wave function. The detection of spontaneously emitted photons from a three-level atom, in which two upper levels are driven by a...

  14. In situ study of atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on GaP (100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Qin, X.; Hinkle, C. L.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-09-16

    The interfacial chemistry of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on chemically treated GaP (100) has been studied using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “self-cleaning” effect for Ga-oxide upon exposure to trimethylaluminum is seen to be efficient on the native oxide and chemically treated surfaces. The phosphorus oxide chemical states are seen to change during the ALD process, but the total concentration of P-oxides is seen to remain constant throughout the ALD process.

  15. A High Resolution, Light-Weight, Synthetic Aperture Radar for UAV Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I. Pace, F.; Walker, B,C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-05-27

    (U) Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA) has designed and built a high resolution, light-weight, Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) known as "Lynx". Although Lynx can be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, its design is optimized for use on medium altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS). In particular, it can be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, and Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA. (U) The radar production weight is less than 120 lb and operates within a 3 GHz band from 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz with a peak output power of 320 W. Operating range is resolution and mode dependent but can exceed 45 km in adverse weather (4 mm/hr rain). Lynx has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode, over substantial depression angles (5 to 60 deg) and squint angles (broadside ±45 deg). Real-time Motion Compensation is implemented to allow high-quality image formation even during vehicle turns and other maneuvers.

  16. Nanophotonic hybridization of narrow atomic cesium resonances and photonic stop gaps of opaline nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, Philip J; Mosk, Allard P; Vos, Willem L

    2014-01-01

    We study a hybrid system consisting of a narrowband atomic optical resonance and the long-range periodic order of an opaline photonic nanostructure. To this end, we have infiltrated atomic cesium vapor in a thin silica opal photonic crystal. With increasing temperature, the frequencies of the opal's reflectivity peaks shift down by >20% due to chemical reduction of the silica. Simultaneously, the photonic bands and gaps shift relative to the fixed near-infrared cesium D1 transitions. As a result the narrow atomic resonances with high finesse (f/df=8E5) dramatically change shape from a usual dispersive shape at the blue edge of a stop gap, to an inverted dispersion lineshape at the red edge of a stop gap. The lineshape, amplitude, and off-resonance reflectivity are well modeled with a transfer-matrix model that includes the dispersion and absorption of Cs hyperfine transitions and the chemically-reduced opal. An ensemble of atoms in a photonic crystal is an intriguing hybrid system that features narrow defect-...

  17. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  18. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Stevenson; M. Hush; T. Bishop; I. Lesanovsky; T. Fernholz

    2015-04-21

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  19. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  20. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  1. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  2. Enhancing the Chemical Mixture Methodology in Emergency Preparedness and Consequence Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Glantz, Clifford S.; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Doug K.; Ciolek, John T.; Booth, Alexander E.

    2013-11-01

    Emergency preparedness personnel at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities use the chemical mixture methodology (CMM) to estimate the potential health impacts to workers and the public from the unintended airborne release of chemical mixtures. The CMM uses a Hazard Index (HI) to compare a chemical’s concentration at a receptor location to an appropriate concentration limit for that chemical. This limit is typically based on Protection Action Criteria (PAC) values developed and published by the DOE. As a first cut, the CMM sums the HIs for all the chemicals in a mixture to conservatively estimate their combined health impact. A cumulative HI ? 1.0 represents a concentration at or exceeding the concentration limit and indicates the potential for adverse health effects. Next, health code numbers (HCNs) are used to identify the target organ sets that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The sum of the HIs for the maximally impacted target organ set is used to provide a refined, though still conservative estimate, of the potential for adverse health effects from exposure to the chemical mixture. This paper explores approaches to further enhance the effectiveness of the CMM by using HCN weighting factors to reduce over-conservatism. A series of 24 case studies have been defined to evaluate both the existing CMM and three new approaches for improving the CMM. The first approach uses a set of HCN weighting factors that are applied based on the priority ranking of the HCNs for each chemical. The second approach uses weighting factors based on the priority rankings of the HCNs established for a given type of concentration limit. The third approach uses information on the exposure route used to derive PAC values and the second approach’s HCN ranking to derive and apply its HCN weighting factors. Initial testing indicates that applying weighting factors reduces the over-conservatism in the CMM for certain types of chemical mixtures, though care must be taken to avoid introducing non-conservative results. In the near future, additional testing and analysis will be conducted that will lead to the adoption of one of the tested approaches into the CMM. The long-term goal is to develop and implement a more comprehensive approach that will take into account the specific health effects that were observed during the studies used to derive the chemical-specific concentration limits used in the CMM.

  3. Atom structures of relation algebras Ian Hodkinson \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodkinson, Ian

    Atom structures of relation algebras Ian Hodkinson \\Lambda October 24, 1995 Abstract We study atom structures of relation algebras. We prove that the class of atom structures that arise from representable is not determined by its atom structure, by exhibiting two (countable) relation algebras with the same atom

  4. On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Kornyushin

    2009-07-30

    It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

  5. Computing Energy Levels of the Confined Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Computing Energy Levels of the Confined Hydrogen Atom Karl K¨astner 02/03/2012 Supervisors: Martin of the Unconfined Atom The Confined Hydrogen Atom Energy Levels of the Confined Two Dimensional Hydrogen Atom Thesis of the Free Hydrogen Atom principal quantum number n EineV 0 5 10 15 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 Energy Levels

  6. Towards new states of matter with atoms and photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards new states of matter with atoms and photons Jonas Larson Stockholm University-field coupling ~ 1 ( effective mode volume). Strong coupling regime , (/ atom/photon decay rates). 6Haroche Photon blockade 9 Jaynes-Cummings physics Kimble, Nature 436 (2005). #12;Cavity QED Atom-atom, atom

  7. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive Hazardous or Other Location LBL On-Site Bldgs.hazardous chemicals usedin the laboratory: and (v} The locationhazardous chemicals are present: and. (irl}The location and

  8. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  9. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Doohee (Macungie, PA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  10. Nano Res. 2011, 4(12): 124212471242 Chemical Versus Thermal Folding of Graphene Edges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Nano Res. 2011, 4(12): 1242­12471242 Chemical Versus Thermal Folding of Graphene Edges Ninghai Su dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the kinetics of the graphene edge folding processV/Å (or about 120 meV per edge atom) for folding the edges of intrinsic clean single-layer graphene (SLG

  11. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, D.

    1991-01-29

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  12. COVERPHOTOGRAPHS Center: Floyd L. Culler, Director of the Chemical Technology Division, 1953-196.5.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission and the Clinton National Laboratory. . . . . . . . . . 1.1.7 The Oak Ridge National-6285 managed by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE.1.5 Monsanto Chemical Company, Reactors, and Fuel Processing. . . . . . . . : 1. .. : ... 1.1.6 The Atomic

  13. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  14. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  15. Crystallographic evidence for chemical ordering in UCu{sub 5{minus}x}Pd{sub x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chau, R.; Maple, M.B. [Department of Physics and the Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Institute for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Robinson, R.A. [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    We report elastic neutron-diffraction measurements on UCu{sub 5{minus}x}Pd{sub x} (x=0.65, 1.0, and 1.5) using the High-Intensity Powder Diffractometer instrument at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Data from six detector banks were simultaneously refined using Rietveld analysis. From the refinements of the data, we find that for Pd concentrations x{lt}1, Pd atoms preferentially occupy the minority Cu/Pd 4c sites, and Cu atoms fully occupy the majority Cu/Pd 16e sites. For Pd concentrations x{gt}1, Pd atoms fully occupy the minority sites and a mixture of Cu and Pd atoms occupy the 16e sites. At the special concentration x=1, we find that the Pd and Cu atoms occupy separate crystallographic sites. This arrangement of atoms is indicative of chemical ordering, although no superlattice peaks were observed. The implications of chemical ordering in UCu{sub 5{minus}x}Pd{sub x} on disorder-driven models of non-Fermi-liquid behavior will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Atomic imaging and modeling of passivation, functionalization, and atomic layer deposition nucleation of the SiGe(001) surface via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Atomic imaging and modeling of passivation, functionalization, and atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Passivation, functionalization, and atomic layer\\OH and Ge\\O bonds while annealing induces an atomic layer ex- change bringing Si to the surface to bond

  17. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks Matthew Cook1 , David Soloveichik2 , Erik Winfree2 Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a for- mal model that considers a set of chemical reactions acting Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri Nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive Recursive

  18. Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Sagusa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Saguésa and Irving R. Epsteinb a Departament de Química Física March 2003 The interdisciplinary field of nonlinear chemical dynamics has grown significantly in breadth an overview of some of the key results of nonlinear chemical dynamics, with emphasis on those areas most

  19. CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY MANUAL August 2013 #12;ii Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince-Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 6472 Biological the safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

  20. Qualitative Theory and Chemical Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Michael

    Abstract Roald Hoffmann and other theorists claim that we we ought to use highly idealized chemical modelsQualitative Theory and Chemical Explanation Michael Weisberg Stanford University February 15, 2003 ("qualitative models") in order to in- crease our understanding of chemical phenomena, even though other models

  1. 48 Chemical Engineering Education Incorporating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesketh, Robert

    48 Chemical Engineering Education Incorporating GREEN ENGINEERING Into a Material and Energy prob- lems in chemical engineering. Problems of the type that can be used to motivate the student-mail: wilkes@umich.edu), Chemical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  2. Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopyof Chemical Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopyof Chemical Reactions - Joseph L. Kneeand AhmedH. Zewail California of chemical physics is to understand how chemi- cal reactions complete their journey from reactants to prod at the molecular level. The making of new bonds (and the breaking of old ones) in elementary chemical reactions

  3. Scattering properties of dark atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, James M; Moore, Guy; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-01

    There has been renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter exists in the form of atoms, analogous to those of the visible world. An important input for understanding the cosmological consequences of dark atoms is their self-scattering. Making use of results from atomic physics for the potentials between hydrogen atoms, we compute the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections for dark atoms. We find an intricate dependence upon the ratio of the dark proton to electron mass, allowing for the possibility to "design" low-energy features in the cross section. Dependences upon other parameters, namely the gauge coupling and reduced mass, scale out of the problem by using atomic units. We derive constraints on the parameter space of dark atoms by demanding that their scattering cross section does not exceed bounds from dark matter halo shapes. We discuss the formation of molecular dark hydrogen in the universe, and determine the analogous constraints on the model when the dark matter is predominantly in ...

  4. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-02-10

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  5. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengio, S

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) sq root 3x sq root 3R30 sup 0 , H sub 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH sub 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( sq root 3 sq root 3)R30 sup 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H sub 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was esta...

  6. Studying coherence in ultra-cold atomic gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis will discuss the study of coherence properties of ultra-cold atomic gases. The atomic systems investigated include a thermal cloud of atoms, a Bose-Einstein condensate and a fermion pair condensate. In each ...

  7. Integrated Sustainability Analysis of Atomic Layer Deposition for Microelectronics Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

    2010-01-01

    E. , 2002, “Thin Film Atomic Layer Deposition Equipment forA. , 2000, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Oxide FromHarsta, A. , 2001, “Atomic Layer Deposition of Zirco- nium

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition Enabled Synthesis of Multiferroic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Calvin Dinh-Tu

    2015-01-01

    Thin Films by Atomic Layer Deposition." Advanced FunctionalPlasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of HfO 2 and ZrO 2et al. (2003). "Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) of Bismuth

  9. New analogies between extreme QCD and cold atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishida, Yusuke

    2012-08-15

    We discuss two new analogies between extreme QCD and cold atoms. One is the analogue of 'hard probes' in cold atoms. The other is the analogue of 'quark-hadron continuity' in cold atoms.

  10. Phase stabilization of laser beams in a cold atom accelerometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Nicole (Nicole Malenie)

    2014-01-01

    A cold atom accelerometer measures the displacement of a proof mass of laser cooled atoms with respect to an instrument reference frame. The cold atom interferometer's reference frame is defined by a pair of specially ...

  11. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, Graeme [OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States); Curry, John J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2011-05-11

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  12. Constraints on extra dimensions from atomic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahia, F

    2015-01-01

    We consider a hydrogen atom confined in a thick brane embedded in a higher-dimensional space. Due to effects of the extra dimensions, the gravitational potential is amplified in distances smaller than the size of the supplementary space, in comparison with the Newtonian potential. Studying the influence of the gravitational interaction modified by the extra dimensions on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, we find independent constraints for the higher-dimensional Planck mass in terms of the thickness of the brane by using accurate measurements of atomic transition frequencies. The constraints are very stringent for narrow branes.

  13. Constraints on extra dimensions from atomic spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Dahia; A. S. Lemos

    2015-09-23

    We consider a hydrogen atom confined in a thick brane embedded in a higher-dimensional space. Due to effects of the extra dimensions, the gravitational potential is amplified in distances smaller than the size of the supplementary space, in comparison with the Newtonian potential. Studying the influence of the gravitational interaction modified by the extra dimensions on the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, we find independent constraints for the higher-dimensional Planck mass in terms of the thickness of the brane by using accurate measurements of atomic transition frequencies. The constraints are very stringent for narrow branes.

  14. 1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howard, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1985-04-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  15. The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosling, F.G.

    1994-09-01

    This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  16. Gain narrowing in few-atom systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Savels; Allard P. Mosk; Ad Lagendijk

    2006-05-31

    Using a density matrix approach, we study the simplest systems that display both gain and feedback: clusters of 2 to 5 atoms, one of which is pumped. The other atoms supply feedback through multiple scattering of light. We show that, if the atoms are in each other's near-field, the system exhibits large gain narrowing and spectral mode redistribution. The observed phenomena are more pronounced if the feedback is enhanced. Our system is to our knowledge the simplest exactly solvable microscopic system which shows the approach to laser oscillation.

  17. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  18. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  19. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  20. Sandia Energy - Chemical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen GenerationTechnologies |EducationChemical Sciences Home Energy

  1. Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948California (MillionThousandChemicals Industry

  2. Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical and Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the...

  3. Technology Portfolio Planning by Weighted Graph Analysis of System Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Technology Portfolio Planning by Weighted Graph Analysis of System Architectures Peter Davison architecture selection and technology investment decisions will constrain the system to certain regions architectures, with a view to enabling robustness to technology portfolio realization and later architectural

  4. Testing the weighted salience model of conceptual combination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Merryl Joy

    2004-09-30

    In two experiments the Weighted Salience Model (WSM) of conceptual combination was examined. Several of the hypotheses set forth in the WSM were evaluated, including the importance of salience of constituent features, ...

  5. An improved method for weighted least squares IIR filter design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila-Pazmino, Javier

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a new method for IIR weighted least squares filter design has been proposed. In this method, the problem of approximating a desired frequency response using a rational function is solved using an iterative approach. ...

  6. Optimization of parameters for coverage of low molecular weight proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Stephan A.

    Proteins with molecular weights of <25 kDa are involved in major biological processes such as ribosome formation, stress adaption (e.g., temperature reduction) and cell cycle control. Despite their importance, the coverage ...

  7. Robust and Stochastically Weighted Multi-Objective Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-07-29

    Oct 12, 2010 ... and identically distributed samples from an unknown distribution of weights. Then ...... yields are highly related to temperature, precipitation, and soil condition (see ..... S. He, J. Chen, W. Xu, Y. Sun, T. Preetha, and X. Shen.

  8. Human Growth and Body Weight Dynamics: An Integrative Systems Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and ...

  9. Weighted Energy Decay for 1D Dirac Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kopylova

    2011-02-10

    We obtain a dispersive long-time decay in weighted energy norms for solutions of the 1D Dirac equation with generic potential. The decay extends the results obtained by Jensen, Kato and Murata for the Schr\\"odinger equations.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Helicopter Weight and Mass Center Estimation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Bradley Whitten

    2013-04-09

    Real-time estimates of weight and mass center location for helicopters are desirable for flight control and condition-based maintenance purposes. While methods to estimate mass parameters of helicopters have been developed, they often assume near...

  11. Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

  12. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F.

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  13. PPPL and General Atomics scientists make breakthrough in understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shows a response that was ineffective. Simulation by General Atomics. Researchers from General Atomics and the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory...

  14. Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful...

  15. Atom transfer radical polymerization of ionic liquid monomer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atom transfer radical polymerization of ionic liquid monomer: The influence of saltcounterion on polymerization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atom transfer radical...

  16. General Atomics Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    General Atomics Agreement Name General Atomics Compliance Order, October 6, 1995 HWCA 9596-017 State California Agreement Type Compliance Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope...

  17. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics You are accessing a document...

  18. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics Authors: Brodsky, Stanley J. ;...

  19. Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic Layer Deposition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Next-Generation Lithium Metal Anode Engineering via Atomic...

  20. Atom-Probe Tomographic Measurement of Trapped Hydrogen Isotopes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atom-Probe Tomographic Measurement of Trapped Hydrogen Isotopes Atom-Probe Tomographic Measurement of Trapped Hydrogen Isotopes Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group...

  1. Spatial atomic layer deposition on flexible substrates using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spatial atomic layer deposition on flexible substrates using a modular rotating cylinder reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spatial atomic layer deposition on...

  2. Electroless Atomic Layer Deposition: A Scalable Approach to Surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electroless Atomic Layer Deposition: A Scalable Approach to Surface Modified Metal Powders. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroless Atomic Layer Deposition: A...

  3. An electroless approach to atomic layer deposition on noble metal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An electroless approach to atomic layer deposition on noble metal powders. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An electroless approach to atomic layer deposition on noble...

  4. Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to Automotive Thermoelectric Systems Development Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to...

  5. Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on...

  6. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  7. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  8. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  9. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1981-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  10. Solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Dennis M. (Livermore, CA); Chiu, Ing Lap (Castro Valley, CA)

    2006-04-18

    Formation of solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents. Solutions of detoxifying reagent for chemical and biological agents are coated using small quantities of hydrophobic nanoparticles by vigorous agitation or by aerosolization of the solution in the presence of the hydrophobic nanoparticles to form a solid powder. For example, when hydrophobic fumed silica particles are shaken in the presence of IN oxone solution in approximately a 95:5-weight ratio, a dry powder results. The hydrophobic silica forms a porous coating of insoluble fine particles around the solution. Since the chemical or biological agent tends to be hydrophobic on contact with the weakly encapsulated detoxifying solution, the porous coating breaks down and the detoxifying reagent is delivered directly to the chemical or biological agent for maximum concentration at the point of need. The solid-water (coated) detoxifying solutions can be blown into contaminated ventilation ducting or other difficult to reach sites for detoxification of pools of chemical or biological agent. Once the agent has been detoxified, it can be removed by flushing the area with air or other techniques.

  11. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, A.L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations.

  12. Stout: Cloudy's Atomic and Molecular Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lykins, M L; Kisielius, R; Chatzikos, M; Porter, R L; van Hoof, P A M; Williams, R J R; Keenan, F P; Stancil, P C

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new atomic and molecular database we developed for use in the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. The design of Stout is driven by the data needs of Cloudy, which simulates molecular, atomic, and ionized gas with kinetic temperatures 2.8 K data are stored in a format as close as possible to the original data sources. Few data sources include the full range of data we need. We describe how we fill in the gaps in the data or extrapolate rates beyond their tabulated range. We tabulate data sources both for the atomic spectroscopic parameters and for collision data for the next release of Cloudy. This is not intended as a review of the current status of atomic data, but rather a description of the features of the database which we will build ...

  13. Atomic physics: An almost lightless laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    Lasers are often described in terms of a light field circulating in an optical resonator system. Now a laser has been demonstrated in which the field resides primarily in the atomic medium that is used to generate the light.

  14. Accurate capacitive metrology for atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzeo, Aaron D. (Aaron David), 1979-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents accurate capacitive sensing metrology designed for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) originally developed in the MIT Precision Motion Control Lab. The capacitive measurements use a set of ...

  15. Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Britton William Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ...

  16. Fast atomic transport without vibrational heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Torrontegui; S. Ibáñez; Xi Chen; A. Ruschhaupt; D. Guéry-Odelin; J. G. Muga

    2010-10-15

    We use the dynamical invariants associated with the Hamiltonian of an atom in a one dimensional moving trap to inverse engineer the trap motion and perform fast atomic transport without final vibrational heating. The atom is driven non-adiabatically through a shortcut to the result of adiabatic, slow trap motion. For harmonic potentials this only requires designing appropriate trap trajectories, whereas perfect transport in anharmonic traps may be achieved by applying an extra field to compensate the forces in the rest frame of the trap. The results can be extended to atom stopping or launching. The limitations due to geometrical constraints, energies and accelerations involved are analyzed, as well as the relation to previous approaches (based on classical trajectories or "fast-forward" and "bang-bang" methods) which can be integrated in the invariant-based framework.

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Let me congratulate you on your selection as President of this 51st General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency. I also wish to thank Dr. ElBaradei for...

  18. Testing Lorentz symmetry with atoms and Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Russell

    2011-09-04

    This article reports on the Fifth Meeting on CPT and Lorentz Symmetry, CPT'10, held at the end of June 2010 in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The focus is on recent tests of Lorentz symmetry using atomic and optical physics.

  19. Quantum micro-mechanics with ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Botter; Daniel Brooks; Subhadeep Gupta; Zhao-Yuan Ma; Kevin L. Moore; Kater W. Murch; Tom P. Purdy; Dan M. Stamper-Kurn

    2008-10-21

    In many experiments isolated atoms and ions have been inserted into high-finesse optical resonators for the study of fundamental quantum optics and quantum information. Here, we introduce another application of such a system, as the realization of cavity optomechanics where the collective motion of an atomic ensemble serves the role of a moveable optical element in an optical resonator. Compared with other optomechanical systems, such as those incorporating nanofabricated cantilevers or the large cavity mirrors of gravitational observatories, our cold-atom realization offers direct access to the quantum regime. We describe experimental investigations of optomechanical effects, such as the bistability of collective atomic motion and the first quantification of measurement backaction for a macroscopic object, and discuss future directions for this nascent field.

  20. Atomic quantum memory for photon polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloom, Benjamin Jacob, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Using an ensemble of ultracold Cesium atoms in an optical cavity we demonstrate the efficient storage and retrieval of quantum information in the form of single photons. We use a photon that has scattered into the cavity ...

  1. Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouhani, S.Z.

    1996-12-03

    In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery. 35 figs.

  2. Method and apparatus for indicating electric charge remaining in batteries based on electrode weight and center of gravity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouhani, S. Zia (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    In most electrochemical batteries which generate electricity through the reaction of a battery electrode with an electrolyte solution, the chemical composition, and thus the weight and density, of the electrode changes as the battery discharges. The invention measures a parameter of the battery which changes as the weight of the electrode changes as the battery discharges and relates that parameter to the value of the parameter when the battery is fully charged and when the battery is functionally discharged to determine the state-of-charge of the battery at the time the parameter is measured. In one embodiment, the weight of a battery electrode or electrode unit is measured to determine the state-of-charge. In other embodiments, where a battery electrode is located away from the geometrical center of the battery, the position of the center of gravity of the battery or shift in the position of the center of gravity of the battery is measured (the position of the center of gravity changes with the change in weight of the electrode) and indicates the state-of-charge of the battery.

  3. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  4. ac-driven atomic quantum motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Ponomarev; S. Denisov; P. Hanggi

    2009-06-09

    We invent an ac-driven quantum motor consisting of two different, interacting ultracold atoms placed into a ring-shaped optical lattice and submerged in a pulsating magnetic field. While the first atom carries a current, the second one serves as a quantum starter. For fixed zero-momentum initial conditions the asymptotic carrier velocity converges to a unique non-zero value. We also demonstrate that this quantum motor performs work against a constant load.

  5. Hydrogen atom in rotationally invariant noncommutative space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. P. Gnatenko; V. M. Tkachuk

    2014-11-03

    We consider the noncommutative algebra which is rotationally invariant. The hydrogen atom is studied in a rotationally invariant noncommutative space. We find the corrections to the energy levels of the hydrogen atom up to the second order in the parameter of noncommutativity. The upper bound of the parameter of noncommutativity is estimated on the basis of the experimental results for 1s-2s transition frequency.

  6. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  7. Dependences of the van der Waals atom-wall interaction on atomic and material properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. O. Caride; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; S. I. Zanette

    2005-03-03

    The 1%-accurate calculations of the van der Waals interaction between an atom and a cavity wall are performed in the separation region from 3 nm to 150 nm. The cases of metastable He${}^{\\ast}$ and Na atoms near the metal, semiconductor or dielectric walls are considered. Different approximations to the description of wall material and atomic dynamic polarizability are carefully compared. The smooth transition to the Casimir-Polder interaction is verified. It is shown that to obtain accurate results for the atom-wall van der Waals interaction at shortest separations with an error less than 1% one should use the complete optical tabulated data for the complex refraction index of the wall material and the accurate dynamic polarizability of an atom. The obtained results may be useful for the theoretical interpretation of recent experiments on quantum reflection and Bose-Einstein condensation of ultracold atoms on or near surfaces of different nature.

  8. From Lattice Gauge Theories to Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manu Mathur; T. P. Sreeraj

    2014-10-13

    Using canonical transformations we obtain a complete and most economical realization of the loop or physical Hilbert space of pure $SU(2)_{2+1}$ lattice gauge theory in terms of Wigner coupled Hilbert spaces of hydrogen atoms. One hydrogen atom is assigned to every plaquette of the lattice. The SU(2) gauge theory loop basis states over a plaquette are the bound energy eigenstates $|n l m>$ of the corresponding hydrogen atom. The Wigner couplings of these hydrogen atom energy eigenstates on different plaquettes provide a complete SU(2) gauge theory loop basis on the entire lattice. The loop basis is invariant under simultaneous rotations of all hydrogen atoms. The dual description of this basis diagonalizes all Wilson loop operators and is given in terms of hyperspherical harmonics on the SU(2) group manifold $S^3$. The SU(2) loop dynamics is governed by a "SU(2) spin Hamiltonian" without any gauge fields. The relevance of the hydrogen atom basis and its dynamical symmetry group SO(4,2) in SU(2) loop dynamics in weak coupling continuum limit ($g^2\\rightarrow 0$) is emphasized.

  9. Weight-related teasing and body dissatisfaction in adolescents: Moderated-mediation by self-perceived size and weight status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elledge, Allison Renee

    2014-08-24

    ). Responses were reverse-coded to reflect higher body dissatisfaction in higher scores. This scale has demonstrated good internal consistency (? = .94), three-week test-retest reliability (r = .90), and predictive validity for eating disorder onset (Stice... Testing In addition to a CFA, invariance of the measurement model was tested across both weight groups (i.e., healthy weight and overweight) and sex (i.e., male and female) to establish equivalence of measurement across groups. Three levels of invariance...

  10. Chemical functionalization of AFM cantilevers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sunyoung, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been a powerful instrument that provides nanoscale imaging of surface features, mainly of rigid metal or ceramic surfaces that can be insulators as well as conductors. Since it has been ...

  11. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  12. 198 Chemical Engineering Education AN INTRODUCTION TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesketh, Robert

    198 Chemical Engineering Education AN INTRODUCTION TO DRUG DELIVERY FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS- maceutical sciences, engineering, and chemistry. Chemical en- gineers play an important role in this exciting- dergraduate chemical engineering students are rarely exposed to drug delivery through their coursework

  13. Two weight system for measuring depth and sediment in slurry-supported excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deming, P.; Good, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a two weight system using bar and flat shaped weights for measuring depth and detecting sediment at the bottom of slurry-supported excavations. Currently there are no standard depth measurement weights or methods for reliably identifying bottom sediment. Two weights and a procedural system for using the weights is described. Details suitable for manufacture are provided.

  14. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961: Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewlett, Richard G.; Holl, Jack M.

    1989-12-01

    This third volume in the official history of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission covers the years of the Eisenhower Administration.

  15. Unraveling the chemical dynamics of bimolecular reactions of ground state boron atoms, B(2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    growth,2 high temperature combustion processes,3,4 interstellar environments,5 and fundamental reaction and combustion fueled extensive research to characterize the temperature profile of boron-based flames of high properties are unknown (see for instance refs. 24 and 25). We have recently succeeded in generating a pulsed

  16. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English...

  17. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) – namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  18. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechin Complex Interfacial Systems.

  19. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechin Complex Interfacial Systems.Conditions.

  20. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  1. Chemical bond and entanglement of electrons in the hydrogen molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikos Iliopoulos; Andreas F. Terzis

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum correlations (in terms of concurrence of indistinguishable electrons) in a prototype molecular system (hydrogen molecule). With the assistance of the standard approximations of the linear combination of atomic orbitals and the con?guration interaction methods we describe the electronic wavefunction of the ground state of the H2 molecule. Moreover, we managed to ?find a rather simple analytic expression for the concurrence (the most used measure of quantum entanglement) of the two electrons when the molecule is in its lowest energy. We have found that concurrence does not really show any relation to the construction of the chemical bond.

  2. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  3. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditons. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  4. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Bernalillo, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  5. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  6. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  7. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1999-05-11

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  8. Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology to Identify Potential Reductions in Utility and Process Energy Consumption Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical...

  9. Chemical Burn Secondary to Propofol Extravasation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rahul; Yoshikawa, Hana; Abisaab, Josyann

    2012-01-01

    IN E MERGENCY M EDICINE Chemical Burn Secondary to Propofolof Emergency Medicine Chemical Burn Secondary to Propofol

  10. Interdisciplinary: Chemical Engineer/Mechanical Engineer (Pathways...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interdisciplinary: Chemical EngineerMechanical Engineer (Pathways Recent Graduate Program) Interdisciplinary: Chemical EngineerMechanical Engineer (Pathways Recent Graduate...

  11. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high...

  12. The unfought chemical war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

    1991-12-01

    In December 1943, in the middle of the scorching northern Australia summer, a young Australian commando, Tom Mitchell, sweated in his respirator and gas-protective clothing as he got ready to take part in a mustard-gas experiment. He grimly watched six US aircraft, B-24 Liberators, drop bombs filled with mustard gas on Brook Island, near Innisfail in the state of Queensland. Ten minutes later, Mitchell was rushing around the island to tend sampling equipment. But a few hours later, he and another Australian soldier were ordered back onto the island - this time, stripped of their respirators and protective clothing. They were forced to camp on the island from dusk to dawn in ordinary clothing without any safety equipment. Mitchell now suffers from lung and heart disease. Last year, nearly 47 years after he was burned, Mitchell settled with the Australian government for $25,000 (Australian). Publicity over his lawsuit, filed in 1981, along with revelations made in a documentary film broadcast in Australia in 1989, has prompted thousands of other Australian survivors of chemical-warfare tests to ask the Australian Department of Veterans Affairs for disability benefits. Veterans of chemical-warfare tests are also breaking their silence in the United States and Canada, stepping forward to seek compensation for their injuries. The impetus behind the US revelations came from a campaign begun in 1989 by Cong. Porter Goss, a Florida Republican, to win benefits for four participants in US Navy mustard-gas tests. During a flurry of publicity in mid-June 1991, the Department of Veterans Affairs announced that it was relaxing its rules to make it easier for World War 2 mustard-gas victims to collect benefits. In Canada, an information hot line run by the Department of National Defense in 1988 and a 1989 book by John Bryden, Deadly Allies: Canada's Secret War 1937-1947, brought the tests to national attention.

  13. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  14. Density functional theory study on the interstitial chemical shifts of main-group-element centered hexazirconium halide clusters; synthetic control of speciation in [(Zr6ZCl12)] (Z = B, C)-based mixed ligand complexes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jingyi

    2005-08-29

    The correlation between NMR chemical shifts of interstitial atoms and electronic structures of boron- and carbon-centered hexazirconium halide clusters was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The ...

  15. Chemical Engineering | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical and Engineering Materials Clean Energy Nuclear Sciences Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment...

  16. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Bioengineering/Chemical Engineering Building,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    BioE/ChemE Building Bioengineering/Chemical Engineering Building, Under Construction Lucile Packard Graduate Residences Sterling Quad Mirrielees Pearce Mitchell Houses Stanford Hospital Varsity Lot Jordan

  18. FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  19. Markers of chemically induced cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, G.; Milman, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This book is a concise review and evaluation of available data for recognizing and measuring markers of cancer or oncogenesis provoked in vivo by chemicals using relatively short-term experiments in animals. This review focuses on biochemical and immunological changes that correlate with carcinogenicity. Such ''markers,'' if occurring early enough, may be used to predict the onset of cancer in experimental animals exposed to potential chemical carcinogens long before morphological changes are seen. It is by examining all the information available about the potential carcinogenicity of chemicals that proper decisions can be made towards limiting the risk of cancer due to exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  20. Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    with opportunity space in 76 chemicals, petroleum refining, plastics, forest products, oil and gas production, and food industries 77 among others. PI innovation could deliver...

  1. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material and energy balance for design, operation of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles of probability and statistics, random to Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering (3, Fa) (Enroll in BME 410) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic

  2. INCOMPATIBLE CHEMICAL LIST PRUDENT PRACTICES FOR HANDLING CHEMICALS IN LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongfei "Mark"

    of Incompatible Chemicals CHEMICAL IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH Acetic Acid Chromic acid, nitric acid, hydroxyl compounds, finely divided organic or combustible materials Chromic acid and chromium trioxide Acetic acid Acetylene, fulminic acid, ammonia Nitrates Sulfuric acid Nitric acid (concentrated) Acetic acid, aniline

  3. UCI Chemical Hygiene Plan i August 2014 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    UCI Chemical Hygiene Plan i August 2014 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN University of California, Irvine Environmental Health and Safety 4600 Health Sciences Road, Irvine, California 92697-2725 (949) 824-6200, Fax......................................................................................5-1 Chapter 6: Inventory, Labeling, Storage, , and Transport

  4. TANK 40 FINAL SB7B CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-03-15

    A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB7b. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH{sup -}/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The ratios of the major elements for the SB7b WAPS sample are different from those measured for the SB7a WAPS sample. There is less Al and Mn relative to Fe than the previous sludge batch. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. The element ratios for Al/Fe, Ca/Fe, Mn/Fe, and U/Fe agree within 10% between this work and the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt analyses. (3) Sulfur in the SB7b WAPS sample is 82% soluble, slightly less than results reported for SB3, SB4, and SB6 samples but unlike the 50% insoluble sulfur observed in the SB5 WAPS sample. In addition, 23% of the soluble sulfur is not present as sulfate in SB7b. (4) The average activities of the fissile isotopes of interest in the SB7b WAPS sample are (in {mu}Ci/g of total dried solids): 4.22E-02 U-233, 6.12E-04 U-235, 1.08E+01 Pu-239, and 5.09E+01 Pu-241. The full radionuclide composition will be reported in a future document. (5) The fission product noble metal and Ag concentrations appear to have largely peaked in previous DWPF sludge batches, with the exception of Ru, which still shows a slight increase in SB7b.

  5. Ultra-soft fermionic excitation at finite chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Paul Blaizot; Daisuke Satow

    2014-05-13

    It has been suggested previously that an ultra-soft fermionic excitation develops, albeit with a small spectral weight, in a system of massless fermions and scalar bosons with Yukawa interaction at high temperature ($T$). In this paper we study how this excitation is modified at finite chemical potential ($\\mu$). We relate the existence of the ultra-soft mode to symmetries, in particular charge conjugation, and a supersymmetry of the free system which is spontaneously broken by finite temperature and finite density effects, as argued earlier by Lebedev and Smilga. A non vanishing chemical potential breaks both symmetries explicitly, and maximally at zero temperature where the mode ceases to exist. A detailed calculation indicates that the ultra-soft excitation persists as long as $T\\gtrsim \\mu$.

  6. Identification and quantification of organic chemicals in supplemental fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salter, F.

    1996-12-31

    Continental Cement Company, Inc. (Continental) burns waste fuels to supplement coal in firing the kiln. It is to be expected that federal and state agencies want an accounting of the chemicals burned. As rules and regulations become more plentiful, a company such as Continental must demonstrate that it has made a reasonable attempt to identify and quantify many specific organic compounds. The chemicals on the SARA 313 list can change frequently. Also the number and concentrations of compounds that can disqualify a material from consideration as a supplemental fuel at Continental continues to change. A quick and reliable method of identifying and quantifying organics in waste fuel blends is therefore crucial. Using a Hewlett-Packard 5972 GC/MS system Continental has developed a method of generating values for the total weight of compounds burned. A similar procedure is used to verify that waste streams meet Continental`s acceptance criteria.

  7. Effectiveness-weighted control method for a cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2015-12-15

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  8. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simmons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  9. Design package test weights for fuel retrieval system (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-10-26

    This is a design package that documents the development of test weights used in the Spent Nuclear Fuels subproject Fuel Retrieval System. The K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project consists of the safe retrieval, preparation, and repackaging of the spent fuel stored at the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins for interim safe storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) scrap baskets and fuel baskets will be loaded and weighed under water. The equipment used to weigh the loaded fuel baskets requires daily calibration checks, using test weights traceable to National Institute of Standards Testing (NIST) standards. The test weights have been designated as OCRWM related in accordance with HNF-SD-SNF-RF'T-007 (McCormack).

  10. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  11. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  12. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  13. Photon-Atom Coupling with Parabolic Mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Sondermann; Gerd Leuchs

    2015-07-23

    Efficient coupling of light to single atomic systems has gained considerable attention over the past decades. This development is driven by the continuous growth of quantum technologies. The efficient coupling of light and matter is an enabling technology for quantum information processing and quantum communication. And indeed, in recent years much progress has been made in this direction. But applications aside, the interaction of photons and atoms is a fundamental physics problem. There are various possibilities for making this interaction more efficient, among them the apparently 'natural' attempt of mode-matching the light field to the free-space emission pattern of the atomic system of interest. Here we will describe the necessary steps of implementing this mode-matching with the ultimate aim of reaching unit coupling efficiency. We describe the use of deep parabolic mirrors as the central optical element of a free-space coupling scheme, covering the preparation of suitable modes of the field incident onto these mirrors as well as the location of an atom at the mirror's focus. Furthermore, we establish a robust method for determining the efficiency of the photon-atom coupling.

  14. Hydrogen atom in de Sitter spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Veko; K. V. Kazmerchuk; E. M. Ovsiyuk; V. M. Red'kov; A. M. Ishkhanyan

    2014-12-28

    The hydrogen atom theory is developed for the de Sitter and anti de Sitter spaces on the basis of the Klein-Gordon-Fock wave equation in static coordinates. In both models, after separation of the variables, the problem is reduced to the general Heun equation, a second order linear differential equation having four regular singular points. A qualitative examination shows that the energy spectrum for the hydrogen atom in the de Sitter space should be quasi-stationary, and the atom should be unstable. We derive an approximate expression for energy levels within the quasi-classical approach and estimate the probability of decay of the atom. A similar analysis shows that in the anti de Sitter model the hydrogen atom should be stable in the quantum-mechanical sense. Using the quasi-classical approach, we derive approximate formulas for energy levels for this case as well. Finally, we present the extension to the case of a spin 1/2 particle for both de Sitter models. This extension leads to complicated differential equations with 8 singular points.

  15. Efimov physics in {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-01-15

    A new narrow three-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the three-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the three-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex three-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the three-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at 672+-2 G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the three-body recombination rate at 759+-1 G where the three-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  16. Efimov Physics in 6Li Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Braaten; H. -W. Hammer; Daekyoung Kang; Lucas Platter

    2010-07-26

    A new narrow 3-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the 3-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold 6Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the 3-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex 3-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the 3-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at (672 +/- 2) G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the 3-body recombination rate at (759 +/- 1) G where the 3-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  17. Method and apparatus for atomic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano K. (Milwaukee, WI); de Andres Rodriquez, Pedro L. (Madrid, ES)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for three dimensional imaging of the atomic environment of disordered adsorbate atoms are disclosed. The method includes detecting and measuring the intensity of a diffuse low energy electron diffraction pattern formed by directing a beam of low energy electrons against the surface of a crystal. Data corresponding to reconstructed amplitudes of a wave form is generated by operating on the intensity data. The data corresponding to the reconstructed amplitudes is capable of being displayed as a three dimensional image of an adsorbate atom. The apparatus includes a source of a beam of low energy electrons and a detector for detecting the intensity distribution of a DLEED pattern formed at the detector when the beam of low energy electrons is directed onto the surface of a crystal. A device responsive to the intensity distribution generates a signal corresponding to the distribution which represents a reconstructed amplitude of a wave form and is capable of being converted into a three dimensional image of the atomic environment of an adsorbate atom on the crystal surface.

  18. Atomically wired molecular junctions: Connecting a single organic molecule by chains of metal atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yelin, Tamar; Kuritz, Natalia; Korytár, Richard; Bagrets, Alexei; Evers, Ferdinand; Kronik, Leeor; Tal, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Using a break junction technique, we find a clear signature for the formation of conducting hybrid junctions composed of a single organic molecule (benzene, naphthalene or anthracene) connected to chains of platinum atoms. The hybrid junctions exhibit metallic-like conductance (~0.1-1G0), which is rather insensitive to further elongation by additional atoms. At low bias voltage the hybrid junctions can be elongated significantly beyond the length of the bare atomic chains. Ab initio calculations reveal that benzene based hybrid junctions have a significant binding energy and high structural flexibility that may contribute to the survival of the hybrid junction during the elongation process. The fabrication of hybrid junctions opens the way for combining the different properties of atomic chains and organic molecules to realize a new class of atomic scale interfaces.

  19. Faster Quantum Walk Search on a Weighted Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Wong

    2015-07-27

    A randomly walking quantum particle evolving by Schr\\"odinger's equation searches for a unique marked vertex on the "simplex of complete graphs" in time $\\Theta(N^{3/4})$. In this paper, we give a weighted version of this graph that preserves vertex-transitivity, and we show that the time to search on it can be reduced to nearly $\\Theta(\\sqrt{N})$. To prove this, we introduce two novel extensions to degenerate perturbation theory: an adjustment that distinguishes the weights of the edges, and a method to determine how precisely the jumping rate of the quantum walk must be chosen.

  20. Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients for their interaction with helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xi

    Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients; published 29 March 2007 The dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the rare-earth-metal atoms coefficients for the interactions of the rare-earth-metal atoms with helium atoms. The static polarizabilities

  1. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Semi-automatic delineation using weighted...

  2. Effects of pistachios on body weight in Chinese subjects with metabolic syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xin; Li, Zhaoping; Liu, Yanjun; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yang, Wenying

    2012-01-01

    on body weight in Chinese subjects with metabolic syndrome.on body weight in Chinese subjects with metabolic syndromecan improve blood lipid profiles in subjects with moderate

  3. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  4. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstratemore »prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.« less

  5. Synthesis of graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachandran, Rajendran; Felix, Sathiyanathan [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Joshi, Girish M. [Materials Physics Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Raghupathy, Bala P.C., E-mail: balapraveen2000@yahoo.com [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Research and Advanced Engineering Division (Materials), Renault Nissan Technology and Business Center India (P) Ltd., Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Jeong, Soon Kwan, E-mail: jeongsk@kier.re.kr [Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Grace, Andrews Nirmala, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Climate Change Technology Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: A schematic showing the overall reduction process of graphite to reduced graphene platelets by chemical and electrochemical route. - Highlights: • Graphene was prepared by diverse routes viz. chemical and electrochemical methods. • NaBH{sub 4} was effective for removing oxygen functional groups from graphene oxide. • Sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) showed high specific capacitance. • Electrochemical rendered a cheap route for production of graphene in powder form. - Abstract: Graphene platelets were synthesized from graphene oxide by chemical and electrochemical route. Under the chemical method, sodium borohydride and hydrazine chloride were used as reductants to produce graphene. In this paper, a novel and cost effective electrochemical method, which can simplify the process of reduction on a larger scale, is demonstrated. The electrochemical method proposed in this paper produces graphene in powder form with good yield. The atomic force microscopic images confirmed that the graphene samples prepared by all the routes have multilayers of graphene. The electrochemical process provided a new route to make relatively larger area graphene sheets, which will have interest for further patterning applications. Attempt was made to quantify the quantum of reduction using cyclic voltammetry and choronopotentiometry techniques on reduced graphene samples. As a measure in reading the specific capacitance values, a maximum specific capacitance value of 265.3 F/g was obtained in sodium borohydride reduced graphene oxide.

  6. The ORNL Chemical Technology Division, 1950-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolley, R.L.; Genung, R.K.; McNeese, L.E.; Mrochek, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    This document attempts to reconstruct the role played by the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the atomic era since the 1940`s related to the development and production of nuclear weapons and power reactors. Chem Tech`s early contributions were landmark pioneering studies. Unknown and dimly perceived problems like chemical hazards, radioactivity, and criticality had to be dealt with. New chemical concepts and processes had to be developed to test the new theories being developed by physicists. New engineering concepts had to be developed and demonstrated in order to build facilities and equipment that had never before been attempted. Chem Tech`s role was chemical separations, especially uranium and plutonium, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. With diversification of national and ORNL missions, Chem Tech undertook R&D studies in many areas including biotechnology; clinical and environmental chemistry; nuclear reactors; safety regulations; effective and safe waste management and disposal; computer modeling and informational databases; isotope production; and environmental control. The changing mission of Chem Tech are encapsulated in the evolving activities.

  7. Clare Reimers Professor, Chemical Oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Clare Reimers Professor, Chemical Oceanography Clare Reimers, Professor of Chemical Oceanography research, education and outreach in fields including geology, oceanography, atmospheric sciences, volcanism in 1976 from the University of Virginia. She received an MS in Oceanography in 1978 and a PhD in 1982 from

  8. Chemical Evolution in Omega Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verne V. Smith

    2003-10-22

    The globular cluster Omega Centauri displays evidence of a complex star formation history and peculiar internal chemical evolution, setting it apart from essentially all other globular clusters of the Milky Way. In this review we discuss the nature of the chemical evolution that has occurred within Omega Cen and attempt to construct a simple scenario to explain its chemistry.

  9. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Bo; Pupillo, Guido; Zoller, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  10. Atomic Rydberg Reservoirs for Polar Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Zhao; Alexander Glätzle; Guido Pupillo; Peter Zoller

    2011-12-18

    We discuss laser dressed dipolar and Van der Waals interactions between atoms and polar molecules, so that a cold atomic gas with laser admixed Rydberg levels acts as a designed reservoir for both elastic and inelastic collisional processes. The elastic scattering channel is characterized by large elastic scattering cross sections and repulsive shields to protect from close encounter collisions. In addition, we discuss a dissipative (inelastic) collision where a spontaneously emitted photon carries away (kinetic) energy of the collision partners, thus providing a significant energy loss in a single collision. This leads to the scenario of rapid thermalization and cooling of a molecule in the mK down to the \\mu K regime by cold atoms.

  11. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  12. Understanding the impact of the central atom on the ionic liquid behavior: Phosphonium vs ammonium cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, Pedro J.; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Batista, Marta L. S.; Schröder, Bernd; Coutinho, João A. P., E-mail: jcoutinho@ua.pt [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)] [CICECO, Departamento de Química, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)] [Departamento de Biologia e CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Esperança, José [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal)] [Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Mutelet, Fabrice [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)] [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés, CNRS (UPR3349), Nancy-Université, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451 54001 Nancy (France)

    2014-02-14

    The influence of the cation's central atom in the behavior of pairs of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids was investigated through the measurement of densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, activity coefficients at infinite dilution, refractive indices, and toxicity against Vibrio fischeri. All the properties investigated are affected by the cation's central atom nature, with ammonium-based ionic liquids presenting higher densities, viscosities, melting temperatures, and enthalpies. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution show the ammonium-based ionic liquids to present slightly higher infinite dilution activity coefficients for non-polar solvents, becoming slightly lower for polar solvents, suggesting that the ammonium-based ionic liquids present somewhat higher polarities. In good agreement these compounds present lower toxicities than the phosphonium congeners. To explain this behavior quantum chemical gas phase DFT calculations were performed on isolated ion pairs at the BP-TZVP level of theory. Electronic density results were used to derive electrostatic potentials of the identified minimum conformers. Electrostatic potential-derived CHelpG and Natural Population Analysis charges show the P atom of the tetraalkylphosphonium-based ionic liquids cation to be more positively charged than the N atom in the tetraalkylammonium-based analogous IL cation, and a noticeable charge delocalization occurring in the tetraalkylammonium cation, when compared with the respective phosphonium congener. It is argued that this charge delocalization is responsible for the enhanced polarity observed on the ammonium based ionic liquids explaining the changes in the thermophysical properties observed.

  13. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-09

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  14. Chemical analysis quality assurance at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, R.L.; Anselmo, R.W.; Black, D.B.; Jacobson, J.J.; Lewis, L.C.; Marushia, P.C.; Spraktes, F.W.; Zack, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a uranium reprocessing facility operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The chemical analysis support required for the plant processes is provided by a chemical analysis staff of 67 chemists, analysts, and support personnel. The documentation and defense of the chemical analysis data at the ICPP has evolved into a complete chemical analysis quality assurance program with training/qualification and requalification, chemical analysis procedures, records management and chemical analysis methods quality control as major elements. The quality assurance procedures are implemented on a central analytical computer system. The individual features provided by the computer system are automatic method selection for process streams, automation of method calculations, automatic assignment of bias and precision estimates at analysis levels to all method results, analyst specific daily requalification or with-method-use requalification, untrained or unqualified analyst method lockout, statistical testing of process stream results for replicate agreement, automatic testing of process results against pre-established operating, safety, or failure limits at varying confidence levels, and automatic transfer and report of analysis data plus the results of all statistical testing to the Production Department.

  15. Two dipolar atoms in a harmonic trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O?dziejewski, Rafa?; Rz??ewski, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Two identical dipolar atoms moving in a harmonic trap without an external magnetic field are investigated. Using the algebra of angular momentum a semi - analytical solutions are found. We show that the internal spin - spin interactions between the atoms couple to the orbital angular momentum causing an analogue of Einstein - de Haas effect. We show a possibility of adiabatically pumping our system from the s-wave to the d-wave relative motion. The effective spin-orbit coupling occurs at anti-crossings of the energy levels.

  16. Proton Mass Shift in Muonic Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aiichi Iwazaki

    2014-08-11

    We show that the value of the proton mass depends on each bound state of muonic or electronic hydrogen atom. The charged particle bound to the proton produces magnetic field inside the proton. This makes a change to the amount of chiral condensate inside the proton. The change gives rise to the shift in the value of the proton mass. Numerically, the shift in the $2S$ state of the muonic hydrogen atom can be of the order of $0.1$ meV. The effect may solve the puzzle of the proton radius.

  17. Raman subrecoil spectroscopy of cold cesium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Ringot; P. Szriftgiser; J. C. Garreau

    2001-07-28

    We describe and characterize a setup for subrecoil stimulated Raman spectroscopy of cold cesium atoms. We study in particular the performances of a method designed to active control and stabilization of the magnetic fields across a cold-atom cloud inside a small vacuum cell. The performance of the setup is monitored by {\\em copropagative-beam} stimulated Raman spectroscopy of a cold cesium sample. The root mean-square value of the residual magnetic field is 300 $\\mu G$, with a compensation bandwidth of 500 Hz. The shape of the observed spectra is theoretically interpreted and compares very well to numerically generated spectra.

  18. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  19. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 084103 (2011) How accurate are the nonlinear chemical Fokker-Planck and chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straube, Arthur V.

    2011-01-01

    THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 084103 (2011) How accurate are the nonlinear chemical Fokker-Planck and chemical Langevin equations? Ramon Grima,1,a) Philipp Thomas,1,2 and Arthur V. Straube2 1 School August 2011) The chemical Fokker-Planck equation and the corresponding chemical Langevin equation are com

  20. Fast and Simple Algorithms for Weighted Perfect Matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast and Simple Algorithms for Weighted Perfect Matching Mirjam Wattenhofer, Roger Wattenhofer Abstract We present two fast and simple combinatorial approximation algorithms for con- structing a minimum algorithm runs in O(n2 log n) time and is at most a factor log n worse than an optimal solution

  1. Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Exposure to air pollution Exposition is quantified as population weighted concentration of relevant Benefit Analysis The sanitary benefits brought about by air pollution improvement as a result of climate by a collateral reduction of air pollutant emissions, hence a lower cost of AQ legislation. Modelling Framework

  2. An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Analysis ­ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of OceanAn Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted Clean Energy Standards Prepared for the U Hawai`i Distributed Energy Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 12.3 Second Deliverable

  3. Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Jay

    Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics, Computer Science & Statistics Purdue University Calumet Hammond, Indiana 46323--2094 USA wood@calumet.purdue.edu http://www.calumet.purdue.edu/public/math/wood Scholarly Research Awards. #12; JAY A. WOOD 1. Linear codes as modules Throughout this extended abstract

  4. Weight and volume changing device with liquid metal transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niiyama, Ryuma

    This paper presents a weight-changing device based on the transfer of mass. We chose liquid metal (Ga-In-Tin eutectic) and a bi-directional pump to control the mass that is injected into or removed from a target object. ...

  5. Robust Subspace System Identification via Weighted Nuclear Norm Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshia, Sanjit A.

    Robust Subspace System Identification via Weighted Nuclear Norm Optimization Dorsa Sadigh Henrik via the nuclear norm relaxation. Inspired by robust PCA, we extend this framework to handle outliers, outliers, nuclear norm, sparsity, robust PCA. 1. INTRODUCTION Subspace system identification is a well

  6. Finite-order integration weights can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finite-order integration weights can be dangerous Ian H. Sloan University of New South Wales on a small subset of the variables. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the danger of relying be dangerous in applications. But before this question can be addressed, it is necessary to describe

  7. A weighted CSP approach to cost-optimal planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Marco Antonio Alba

    A weighted CSP approach to cost-optimal planning Martin COOPER, Marie De ROQUEMAUREL, Pierre REGNIER Rapport IRIT RR-2009-28-FR Summary: For planning to come of age, plans must be judged by a measure global optimality whenever the planning problem has a solution. We code the extraction of an optimal plan

  8. Data Mining Using Light Weight Object Management in Clustered Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Data Mining Using Light Weight Object Management in Clustered Computing Environments R. L. Grossman, Inc. Oak Park, Illinois February, 1996 This is a draft of the following article: Data Mining Using, and infrequently updated. These operations and access patterns are common when data mining large data stores, which

  9. Matrix Functions and Weighted Centers for Semidefinite Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuzhong

    Matrix Functions and Weighted Centers for Semidefinite Programming Jan Brinkhuis Zhi-Quan Luo smooth matrix-valued functions, and for the class of matrix convex (or concave) functions first introduced by L¨owner and Kraus in the 1930s. For a matrix monotone function, we present formulas for its

  10. GENERALIZED JACOBI WEIGHTS, CHRISTOFFEL FUNCTIONS, AND JACOBI POLYNOMIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnus, Alphonse P.

    GENERALIZED JACOBI WEIGHTS, CHRISTOFFEL FUNCTIONS, AND JACOBI POLYNOMIALS Thomas Erd´elyi, Alphonse on the occasion of his 60th birthday Abstract. We obtain such upper bounds for Jacobi polynomials which of some results on generalized Christoffel functions and some estimates of Jacobi polynomials in terms

  11. Weight Matrices for Sequence Similarity Version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morante, Silvia

    .F. Doolittle, ed. pp. 333-351. Academic Press, Inc. New York. M.O. Dayhoff (1978) Atlas of Protein Sequence specify the weight to assign a given comparison by: the cost of replacing one residue with another and columns of the matrix. That is, refers to the entry at the first row and the first column. In general

  12. On Sex, Evolution, and the Multiplicative Weights Update Reshef Meir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    On Sex, Evolution, and the Multiplicative Weights Update Algorithm Reshef Meir Harvard University, USA rmeir@seas.harvard.edu David Parkes Harvard University, USA parkes@eecs.harvard.edu "Sex innovative theory by Chastain et al. on the role of sex in evolution [10]. In short, the theory suggests

  13. Optimal Control with Weighted Average Costs and Temporal Logic Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    Optimal Control with Weighted Average Costs and Temporal Logic Specifications Eric M. Wolff Control and Dynamical Systems California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 91125 Email: ewolff@caltech.edu Ufuk Topcu Control and Dynamical Systems California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 91125

  14. Predicting Equity Market Price Impact with Performance Weighted Ensembles of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Equity Market Price Impact with Performance Weighted Ensembles of Random Forests Ash.j.mcgroarty@soton.ac.uk Abstract--For many players in financial markets, the price impact of their trading activity represents a large proportion of their transaction costs. This paper proposes a novel machine learning method

  15. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ARCTURUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, I. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Allende Prieto, C., E-mail: ivan@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: callende@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-12-20

    We derive a self-consistent set of atmospheric parameters and abundances of 17 elements for the red giant star Arcturus: T{sub eff} = 4286 {+-} 30 K, log g = 1.66 {+-} 0.05, and [Fe/H] = -0.52 {+-} 0.04. The effective temperature was determined using model atmosphere fits to the observed spectral energy distribution from the blue to the mid-infrared (0.44 to 10 {mu}m). The surface gravity was calculated using the trigonometric parallax of the star and stellar evolution models. A differential abundance analysis relative to the solar spectrum allowed us to derive iron abundances from equivalent width measurements of 37 Fe I and 9 Fe II lines, unblended in the spectra of both Arcturus and the Sun; the [Fe/H] value adopted is derived from Fe I lines. We also determine the mass, radius, and age of Arcturus: M = 1.08 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun }, R = 25.4 {+-} 0.2 R{sub Sun }, and {tau} = 7.1{sup +1.5}{sub -1.2} Gyr. Finally, abundances of the following elements are measured from an equivalent width analysis of atomic features: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. We find the chemical composition of Arcturus typical of that of a local thick-disk star, consistent with its kinematics.

  16. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  17. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation.more »?-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with « less

  18. Experimental characterization and chemical kinetics study of chemical looping combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tianjiao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the most promising technologies to achieve carbon capture in fossil fuel power generation plants. A novel rotary-bed reactor concept was proposed by Zhao et. al. [1] in 2013. It ...

  19. Appendix G: Chemicals Appendix G: Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos (formerly used in insulations and ceiling tiles

  20. Appendix H: Chemicals Appendix H: Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos (formerly used in insulations and ceiling tiles