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1

Glossary Term - Atomic Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Previous Term (Alpha Particle) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Avogadro's Number) Avogadro's Number Atomic Number Silver's atomic number is 47 The atomic number is equal to...

2

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

3

Why is hydrogen's atomic number 1?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the number of protons in an atom's nucleus. Hydrogen's atomic number is 1 because all hydrogen atoms contain exactly one proton. Author: Steve Gagnon, Science Education Specialist...

4

The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

5

The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

1950-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Institute for Atom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for...

8

The New Element Americium (Atomic Number 95)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Several isotopes of the new element 95 have been produced and their radiations characterized. The chemical properties of this tripositive element are similar to those of the typical tripositive lanthanide rare-earth elements. Element 95 is different from the latter in the degree and rate of formation of certain compounds of the complex ion type, which makes possible the separation of element 95 from the lanthanide rare-earths. The name americium (after the Americas) and the symbol Am are suggested for the element on the basis of its position as the sixth member of the actinide rare-earth series, analogous to europium, Eu, of the lanthanide series.

Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.; Morgan, L.O.

1948-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

9

Spatial chemical distance based on atomic property fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9316-x Spatial chemical distance based on atomicSimilarity of compound chemical structures often leads tonot always true, as distinct chemical scaffolds can exhibit

Grigoryan, A. V.; Kufareva, I.; Totrov, M.; Abagyan, R. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Atomic-scale Chemical Quantification of Oxide Interfaces Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Multifunctional Oxides. Presentation Title, Atomic-scale Chemical ...

11

Atoms of multistationarity in chemical reaction networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical reaction networks taken with mass-action kinetics are dynamical systems that arise in chemical engineering and systems biology. Deciding whether a chemical reaction network admits multiple positive steady states is to determine existence of multiple positive solutions to a system of polynomials with unknown coefficients. In this work, we consider the question of whether the minimal (in a precise sense) networks, which we propose to call `atoms of multistationarity,' characterize the entire set of multistationary networks. We show that if a subnetwork admits multiple nondegenerate positive steady states, then these steady states can be extended to establish multistationarity of a larger network, provided that the two networks share the same stoichiometric subspace. Our result provides the mathematical foundation for a technique used by Siegal-Gaskins et al. of establishing bistability by way of `network ancestry.' Here, our main application is for enumerating small multistationary continuous-flow stir...

Joshi, Badal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Distribution Category: Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic, Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Physics (UC-411) ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, TIlinois 60439 ANLI APSILS-151 RESULTS OF DESIGN CALCULATIONS FOR THE MODULATOR OF THE CROSSED FIELD UNDULATOR DEVICE by Roland S8:voy Advanced Photon Source August 1990 Work sponsored by ~--~,P:a7te~n7t~C~le-.a-re-d--b\-!------ Pen"" .... + D - CII, epartrnent, AND R':-lr-!, ("'1:' ' "'"",,, l... ,r:.. ,'\')k. . f\UTHOF?IZED BY 1l;J6r1l11Cal Publications Ser " O(;ite~ ~ 'vjces Technicallnf ~avld R .* ·i;;~rln - ormatIon Services, ANL Uo So DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research 1 Abstract: The modulator in the crossed field undulator device is used to shift the

13

Enhanced and Reduced Atom Number Fluctuations in a BEC Splitter  

SciTech Connect

We measure atom number statistics after splitting a gas of ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms in a purely magnetic double-well potential created on an atom chip. Well below the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation T{sub c}, we observe reduced fluctuations down to -4.9 dB below the atom shot noise level. Fluctuations rise to more than +3.8 dB close to T{sub c}, before reaching the shot noise level for higher temperatures. We use two-mode and classical field simulations to model these results. This allows us to confirm that the supershot noise fluctuations directly originate from quantum statistics.

Maussang, Kenneth; Marti, G. Edward; Schneider, Tobias; Sinatra, Alice; Long, Romain; Esteve, Jerome; Reichel, Jakob [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, ENS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75 231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Treutlein, Philipp [Departement Physik, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Li Yun [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, ENS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75 231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Precision Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy Frontier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations DOE Logo Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations DOE Logo Focus Areas Reaction Mechanisms Controlled Active Metals Materials Synthesis Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home > Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations > IACT Home IACT News IACT Partners IACT Staff IACT Awards Publications & Presentations Jobs at IACT Energy Frontier Research Centers at Argonne Strategic Alliances Research Facilities & Tools Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - an Energy Frontier Research Center The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) employs a multidisciplinary approach to address key catalytic conversions that could improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis for the efficient conversion of energy resources into usable forms. IACT's goal is to find ways to achieve control and efficiency of chemical conversions comparable to those in nature.

15

Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging via Combination of Scanning Tunneling and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging via Combination of Scanning Tunneling and Electron Energy Loss visualization of chemical reaction pathways to provide mechanistic understanding for catalytically important systems at atomic level Develop atomically resolved chemical imaging platform via combination of low

16

ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the utilization of stable isotopes in geology, geochemistry, biogeochemistry, paleoceanography and elsewhere____________________________ ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION ____________________________ Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. The term `isotope

Zeebe, Richard E.

17

The depleted hydrogen atoms in chemical graph theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm which explicitly describes the depleted hydrogen atoms is proposed for chemical graph computations, and especially for molecular connectivity model studies. The new algorithm continues to be centred on the concepts of complete graphs ... Keywords: General chemical graphs, complete graphs, hydrogen perturbation, molecular connectivity computations

Lionello Pogliani

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Parent--daughter system: D Number of daughter atoms, today  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as atoms are transferred from the liquid melt to the solid crystal. Some of the elements incorporated Depleted Mantle: 0.6 ppm Rb, 19.9 ppm Sr #12;carbonate shells hydrothermal fluids sea water river water 87 of the oceans is determined by the relative contributions of Sr from river waters and hydrothermal sources #12

Siebel, Wolfgang

19

Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

1989-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

20

Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H/sub 2/ /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ /minus/> C/sub 2/HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs.

Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Questions and Answers - What would happen to the atomic number and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

many protons, neutrons,and electrons are in an atom? many protons, neutrons,<br>and electrons are in an atom? Previous Question (How many protons, neutrons, and electrons are in an atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What are vector quantities and how do they work?) What are vector quantitiesand how do they work? What would happen to the atomic number and the electric charge of an atom if two neutrons escaped the nucleus? If you could magically make two neutrons in the nucleus of an atom disappear, the atomic number and the electrical charge of that atom would remain unchanged. Neutrons do not carry an electrical charge so adding or removing them from the nucleus does not change the electrical charge of the nucleus. It does, however, change the mass of the nucleus. Adding or

22

Chemical reduction of refractory oxides by atomic hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical reduction of UO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ by atomic hydrogen was studied. Results of the UO/sub 2//H investigation indicates that reduction of UO/sub 2/ by atomic hydrogen proceeds by the production of water vapor and hypostoichiometric urania. Water vapor and aluminum metal are formed in the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//H system. The relative ease which UO/sub 2/ is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is due to two factors. The first is related to the thermochemistry of the reactions. The second factor which favors efficient reduction of UO/sub 2/ but not of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is the oxygen diffusivity. (LK)

Dooley, D.; Balooch, M.; Olander, D.R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Manipulating atoms in an optical lattice: Fractional fermion number and its optical quantum measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a detailed analysis of our previously proposed scheme [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 180401, (2002)] to engineer the profile of the hopping amplitudes for atomic gases in a 1D optical lattice so that the particle number becomes fractional. We consider a constructed system of a dilute two-species gas of fermionic atoms where the two components are coupled via a coherent electromagnetic field with a topologically nontrivial phase profile. We show both analytically and numerically how the resulting atomic Hamiltonian in a prepared dimerized optical lattice with a defect in the pattern of alternating hopping amplitudes exhibits a fractional fermion number. In particular, in the low-energy limit we demonstrate the equivalence of the atomic Hamiltonian to a relativistic Dirac Hamiltonian describing fractionalization in quantum field theory. Expanding on our earlier argument [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 150404 (2003)] we show how the fractional eigenvalues of the particle number operator can be detected via light scattering. In particular, we show how scattering of far-off resonant light can convey information about the counting statistics of the atoms in an optical lattice, including state-selective atom density profiles and atom number fluctuations. Optical detection could provide a truly quantum mechanical measurement of the particle number fractionalization in a dilute atomic gas.

J. Ruostekoski; J. Javanainen; G. V. Dunne

2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

Generating conditional atomic entanglement by measuring photon number in a single output channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polarization analysis of quantized probe light transmitted through an atomic ensemble has been used to prepare entangled collective atomic states. In a "balanced" detection configuration, where the difference signal from two detection ports is analyzed, the continuous monitoring of a component of the Stokes field vector provides a means for conditional projective measurements on the atomic system. Here, we make use of classical driving fields, in the pulsed regime, and of an "unbalanced" detection setup (single detector) where the effective photon number of scattered photons is the detected observable. Conditional atomic spin squeezed states and superpositions of such squeezed states can be prepared in this manner.

Berman, C G P R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Generating conditional atomic entanglement by measuring photon number in a single output channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polarization analysis of quantized probe light transmitted through an atomic ensemble has been used to prepare entangled collective atomic states. In a "balanced" detection configuration, where the difference signal from two detection ports is analyzed, the continuous monitoring of a component of the Stokes field vector provides a means for conditional projective measurements on the atomic system. Here, we make use of classical driving fields, in the pulsed regime, and of an "unbalanced" detection setup (single detector) where the effective photon number of scattered photons is the detected observable. Conditional atomic spin squeezed states and superpositions of such squeezed states can be prepared in this manner.

C. Genes P. R. Berman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM ELEMENTS HAVING AN ATOMIC NUMBER NOT LESS THAN 92  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

other elements having atomic numbers nnt less than 92, It has been proposed in the past to so separate plutonium by solvent extraction iato an organic solvent using triglycoldichlcride as the organic solvent. The improvement lies in the discovery that triglycoldichloride performs far more efflciently as an extractant, wher certain second organie compounds are added to it. Mentioned as satisfactory additive compounds are benzaldehyde, saturated aliphatic aldehydes containtng at least twc carbon atoms, and certain polyhydric phenols.

Fitch, F.T.; Russell, D.S.

1958-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

28

Atomic-resolution Chemical Analysis by Aberration-corrected ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In fact, it is possible to analyze materials in the atomic resolution since both the ... State-of-the-art strain Microscopy for Ferroelectrics and Battery Materials.

29

Case for an Improved Effective-Atomic-Number for the Electronic Baggage Scanning Program  

SciTech Connect

Z{sub eff}, a parameter representing an 'effective atomic number' for a material, plays an important role in the Electronic Baggage Scanning Program (EBSP) to detect threats in dual-energy computed tomography (CT) baggage-scanning systems. We believe that Z{sub eff}, as defined and used on this program, does not provide the accurate representation of a material's x-ray absorption properties that is needed by the EBSP. We present the case for a new method that defines an effective atomic number for compounds and mixtures, which we refer to as Z{sub e}. Unlike Z{sub eff}, Z{sub e} is tied by definition to the x-ray absorption properties of each specific material. Use of this alternative will provide a more accurate scale for calibrating Micro-CT and EDS systems against standard reference materials and will provide a more accurate physical characterization of the x-ray properties of materials evaluated on those systems. This document: (1) Describes the current usage of the Z{sub eff} parameter; (2) Details problems entailed in the use of the Z{sub eff} parameter; (3) Proposes a well-defined alternative - Z{sub e}; (4) Proposes and demonstrates an algorithm for optimally associating Z{sub e} with any specified compound or mixture; (5) Discusses issues that can impact the usefulness of an effective-Z model; and (6) Recommends that, in order that the chosen effective-Z parameter not materially impact the accuracy of data produced by the EBSP program, the use of Z{sub eff} be replaced by Z{sub e}.

Smith, J A; Martz, H E; Kallman, J S

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

30

Following Ostwald ripening in nanoalloys by high-resolution imaging with single-atom chemical sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several studies have shown that substantial compositional changes can occur during the coarsening of bimetallic nanoparticles (CoPt, AuPd). To explain this phenomenon that could dramatically impacts all the technologically relevant properties of nanoalloys, we have exploited the sensitivity of the latest generation of electron microscope to prove that during the beam-induced coarsening of CoPt nanoparticles, the dynamic of atom exchanges between the particles is different for Co and Pt. By distinguishing the chemical nature of individual atoms of Co and Pt, while they are diffusing on a carbon film, we have clearly shown that Co atoms have a higher mobility than Pt atoms because of their higher evaporation rate from the particles. These atomic-scale observations bring the experimental evidence on the origin of the compositional changes in nanoalloys induced by Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

Alloyeau, D.; Nelayah, J.; Wang, G.; Ricolleau, C. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Paris Diderot/CNRS, UMR 7162, Batiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Oikawa, T. [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, Universite Paris Diderot/CNRS, UMR 7162, Batiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); JEOL Ltd, 1-2 Musashino 3-Chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

31

Name that compound: The numbers game for CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical formula, given the number: first add 90 to the abc number, to obtain a 3-digit def number, where: d is the number of carbon atoms; e is the number of hydrogen atoms; f...

32

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

Intrinsic atomic orbitals: An unbiased bridge between quantum theory and chemical concepts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern quantum chemistry can make quantitative predictions on an immense array of chemical systems. However, the interpretation of those predictions is often complicated by the complex wave function expansions used. Here we show that an exceptionally simple algebraic construction allows for defining atomic core and valence orbitals, polarized by the molecular environment, which can exactly represent self-consistent field wave functions. This construction provides an unbiased and direct connection between quantum chemistry and empirical chemical concepts, and can be used, for example, to calculate the nature of bonding in molecules, in chemical terms, from first principles.

Knizia, Gerald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

atomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

theory and fundamental quantum mechanics In addition to research on hadronic and nuclear physics, we also conduct research in atomic physics, neutron physics, and quantum...

35

Extracting the Chern number from the dynamics of a Fermi gas: Implementing a quantum Hall bar for cold atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scheme to measure the quantized Hall conductivity of an ultracold Fermi gas initially prepared in a topological (Chern) insulating phase, and driven by a constant force. We show that the time evolution of the center of mass, after releasing the cloud, provides a direct and clear signature of the topologically invariant Chern number. We discuss the validity of this scheme, highlighting the importance of driving the system with a sufficiently strong force to displace the cloud over measurable distances while avoiding band-mixing effects. The unusual shapes of the driven atomic cloud are qualitatively discussed in terms of a semi-classical approach.

Alexandre Dauphin; Nathan Goldman

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Near-coincident K-line and K-edge energies as ionization diagnostics for some high atomic number plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For some high atomic number atoms, the energy of the K-edge is tens of eVs higher than the K-line energy of another atom, so that a few eV increase in the line's energy results in a decreasing transmission of the x-ray through a filter of the matching material. The transmission of cold iridium's Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV K{alpha}{sub 2} line through a lutetium filter is 7% lower when emitted by ionized iridium, consistent with an energy increase of {Delta}{epsilon} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV associated with the ionization. Likewise, the transmission of the K{beta}{sub 1} line of ytterbium through a near-coincident K-edge filter changes depending on plasma parameters that should affect the ionization. Systematic exploration of filter-line pairs like these could become a unique tool for diagnostics of suitable high energy density plasmas.

Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., P.O. Box 528, Springfield, Virginia 22150 (United States); Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D. G.; Schumer, J. W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Carroll, J. J. [Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20873 (United States); Vanhoy, J. R. [United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21402 (United States); Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Atomic-level investigation of the growth of Si/Ge by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Si and Ge films can be prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by chemical vapor deposition using disilane and digermane as source gases. These gases offer a high sticking probability, and are suitable for atomic layer epitaxy. Using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we have examined the surface processes associated with the heteroepitaxial growth of Ge/Si. The measured surface-induced shifts and chemical shifts of the Si 2p and Ge 3d core levels allow us to identify the surface species and to determine the surface chemical composition, and this information is correlated with the atomic features observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Issues related to precursor dissociation, attachment to dangling bonds, diffusion, surface segregation, growth morphology, and pyrolytic reaction pathways will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

Lin, D. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China); Miller, T.; Chiang, T. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays  

SciTech Connect

Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E{sub c}, below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E{sub c}. These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production.

Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Glossary Term - Avogadro's Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Previous Term (Atomic Number) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Beta Decay) Beta Decay Avogadro's Number Avogadro's number is the number of particles in one mole of a...

40

Laser-induced fluorescence measurements and kinetic analysis of Si atom formation in a rotating disk chemical vapor deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect

An extensive set of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of Si atoms during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane and disilane in a research rotating disk reactor are presented. The experimental results are compared in detail with predictions from a numerical model of CVD from silane and disilane that treats the fluid flow coupled to gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry. The comparisons showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH[sub 2] could not account for the observed gas-phase Si atom density profiles. The H[sub 3]SiSiH [leftrightarrow] Si + SiH[sub 4] and H[sub 3]SiSiH + SiH[sub 2] [leftrightarrow] Si + Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] reactions are proposed as the primary Si atom production routes. The model is in good agreement with the measured shapes of the Si atom profiles and the trends in Si atom density with susceptor temperature, pressure, and reactant gas mixture. 33 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Ho, P.; Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Electrical properties and interfacial chemical environments of in situ atomic layer deposited Al2O3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy grown GaAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfacial chemical analyses and electrical characterization of in situ atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al"2O"3 on freshly molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown n- and p- GaAs (001) with a (4x6) surface reconstruction are performed. The capacitance-voltage ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition, III-V compound semiconductor, Molecular beam epitaxy

Y. H. Chang; M. L. Huang; P. Chang; C. A. Lin; Y. J. Chu; B. R. Chen; C. L. Hsu; J. Kwo; T. W. Pi; M. Hong

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

High energy atomic chemistry and chemical radiation effects. Progress report, January 1, 1973--December 31, 1973  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported on high energy atomic chemistry studies that include stopping power research; classical trajectory calculations; F to HF abstraction reactions; hot substitution reactions; and fast neutron dosimetry. A listing is included of technical publications resulting from the research and manuscripts in preparation. Abstracts of technical papers scheduled for presentation are also included. (DHM)

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Quantification of differences in the effective atomic numbers of healthy and cancerous tissues: A discussion in the context of diagnostics and dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: There are a range of genetic and nongenetic factors influencing the elemental composition of different human tissues. The elemental composition of cancerous tissues frequently differs from healthy tissue of the same organ, particularly in high-Z trace element concentrations. For this reason, one could suggest that this may be exploited in diagnostics and perhaps even influence dosimetry. Methods: In this work, for the first time, effective atomic numbers are computed for common cancerous and healthy tissues using a robust, energy-dependent approach between 10 keV and 100 MeV. These are then quantitatively compared within the context of diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: Differences between effective atomic numbers of healthy and diseased tissues are found to be typically less than 10%. Fibrotic tissues and calcifications of the breast exhibit substantial (tens to hundreds of percent) differences to healthy tissue. Expectedly, differences are most pronounced in the photoelectric regime and consequently most relevant for kV imaging/therapy and radionuclides with prominent low-energy peaks. Cancerous tissue of the testes and stomach have lower effective atomic numbers than corresponding healthy tissues, while diseased tissues of the other organ sites typically have higher values. Conclusions: As dose calculation approaches improve in accuracy, there may be an argument for the explicit inclusion of pathologies. This is more the case for breast, penile, prostate, nasopharyngeal, and stomach cancer, less so for testicular and kidney cancer. The calculated data suggest dual-energy computed tomography could potentially improve lesion identification in the aforementioned organs (with the exception of testicular cancer), with most import in breast imaging. Ultimately, however, the differences are very small. It is likely that the assumption of a generic 'tissue ramp' in planning will be sufficient for the foreseeable future, and that the Z differences do not notably aid lesion detection beyond that already facilitated by differences in mass density.

Taylor, M. L. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovation Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3001 (Australia) and Medical Physics, WBRC, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

NIST: Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data - Atomic Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 20 Calcium 21 Scandium 22 Titanium 23 Vanadium 24 Chromium 25 Manganese 26 Iron 27 Cobalt 28 Nickel 29 Copper 30 Zinc 31 Gallium 32 ...

48

NIST: Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data - Atomic Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 27 Cobalt 60 Neodymium 93 Neptunium 28 Nickel 61 Promethium 94 Plutonium 29 Copper 62 Samarium 95 Americium 30 Zinc 63 Europium 96 ...

49

Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mercury (Hg) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg). ...

50

Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plutonium (Pu) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu). ...

51

Atomic Data for Uranium (U )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Uranium (U). ...

52

Atomic Data for Thorium (Th)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thorium (Th) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Thorium (Th). ...

53

Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen (H) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H). ...

54

Atomic Data for Tungsten (W )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tungsten (W) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Tungsten (W). ...

55

Measurements and Prediction of Particulate Number Concentrations and their Chemical Composition over Yanbu Industrial City, Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many recent studies have highlighted the substantial health-related impacts of particle number (PMno) rather than particle mass. The aim of this study is to determine… (more)

Al-Mahmodi, Jaafar Nasheed hameed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

K-shell radiation physics in low-to moderate-atomic-number z-pinch plasmas on the Z accelerator.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense z-pinches produced by 100 ns implosions of wire arrays or gas puffs produce substantial soft X-ray power. One class of z-pinch radiation sources includes low- to moderate-atomic-number K-shell radiators, such as aluminum and iron. These loads are designed for 1-10 keV K-shell X-ray generation, and offer opportunities for crystal spectroscopy that can reveal fundamental properties of the plasma when studied using plasma spectroscopic modeling. Typically these plasmas are characterized by ion densities of {approx} 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, diameters of 1-5 mm, electron temperatures up to several keV, and a range of opacities of the K-shell lines. Measurements from wire arrays on Sandia's 20 MA Z accelerator are presented along with collisional radiative and hydrodynamic simulations. The impact of opacity and 3D structure on non-LTE, non-diffusive radiation transport and X-ray production is discussed.

Clark, Robert W. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Maron, Yitzhak (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel); Davis, J. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Whitney, Ken G. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); LePell, Paul David (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Velikovich, Aleksandr Lazarevich (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Deeney, Christopher E.; McKenney, John Lee; Thornhill, Joseph W. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Oreshkin, V. I. (High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia); Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich (University of Nevada, Reno, NV); Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S. (University of Nevada, Reno, NV)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

VOLUME 67, NUMBER 15 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 7 OCTOBER 1991 Time-Resolved Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Optically Driven Atomic Sublevel Coherences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between atomic substates are driven by a resonant interaction with light and transferred between polarizations in the medium, but, in the frequently encountered case of multi- ple substates of the electronic ground state, also popula- tion differences and coherences between these sublevels [1]. These atomic

Suter, Dieter

58

Golden Sections of Interatomic Distances as Exact Ionic Radii and Additivity of Atomic and Ionic Radii in Chemical Bonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Golden ratio which appears in the geometry of a variety of creations in Nature is found to arise right in the Bohr radius of the hydrogen atom due to the opposite charges of the electron and proton. The bond length of the hydrogen molecule is the diagonal of a square on the Bohr radius and hence also has two Golden sections, which form the cationic and anionic radii of hydrogen. It is shown here that these radii account for the bond lengths of many hydrides when added to the atomic and Golden ratio based ionic radii of many other atoms.

Raji Heyrovska

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas. Quarterly status report number 2, 1 January--31 March 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit. Results are discussed for the following tasks: liquid phase hydrodynamic run; catalyst activation with CO; new processes for DME (dehydration catalyst screening runs, and experiments using Robinson-Mahoney basket internal and pelletized catalysts); new fuels from DME; and new processes for alcohols and oxygenated fuel additives.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Number: 1394 Description: In what ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1752 Description: When was the Oklahoma City bombing? ... name of the plane that dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima? ...

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

Labushev, Mikhail M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Atomic Data for Americium (Am)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Atomic Number = 95. Atomic Weight = (243). Reference E95. Isotope, Mass, Abundance, Spin, Mag Moment, 241 Am, 241.056823, 0, 5/2, +1.61. ...

63

Number: 894 Description: How far is it ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1198 Description: When was Hiroshima bombed? ... 1264 Description: What is the atomic weight of ...

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

64

PHYSICAL REVIEW A VOLUME 41, NUMBER 3 1 FEBRUARY 1990 Optically driven spin nutations in the ground state of atomic sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW A VOLUME 41, NUMBER 3 1 FEBRUARY 1990 Optically driven spin nutations in the ground superposition of the magnetic substates which evolves un- der the combined influence of the magnetic and optical situation is analyzed where two states are sublevels of an electronic ground state. On the other hand, we

Suter, Dieter

65

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - John Curry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chemical equilibrium and deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium. I am also interested in the acquisition and compilation of basic atomic data. ...

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

66

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Anything with an atomic number greater...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the known nuclides. The transuranics also share the trait that they will undergo nuclear fission. We'll look at that later, also check the link for more info. But these traits...

69

THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III) oxidation state and to plutonium (IV) in its (IV) o.Y-Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record:; Volo 14B:;the americium from the plutonium required tedious The curium

Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

STATUS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE.  

SciTech Connect

During discussions within the Inorganic Chemistry Division Committee, that dealt with the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements and the official IUPAC position on its presentation, the following question was raised. When the various chemical elements are presented, each with their appropriate atomic weight value, how should the radioactive elements be presented? The Atomic Weights Commission has treated this question in a number of different ways during the past century, almost in a random manner. This report reviews the position that the Commission has taken as a function of time, as a prelude to a discussion in Ottawa about how the Commission should resolve this question for the future.

HOLDEN,N.E.

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

Ding, S. Y.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for...

73

Atomic History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These Data Centers, one on Atomic Energy Levels and one on Atomic Transition ... After a few years Kessler went on to higher management at NIST. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

Radioactive Elements in the Standard Atomic Weights Table.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value.

Holden,N.E.

2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

Quantum transport of bosonic cold atoms in double-well optical lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We numerically investigate, using the time evolving block decimation algorithm, the quantum transport of ultracold bosonic atoms in a double-well optical lattice through slow and periodic modulation of the lattice parameters (intra- and inter-well tunneling, chemical potential, etc.). The transport of atoms does not depend on the rate of change of the parameters (as along as the change is slow) and can distribute atoms in optical lattices at the quantized level without involving external forces. The transport of atoms depends on the atom filling in each double well and the interaction between atoms. In the strongly interacting region, the bosonic atoms share the same transport properties as noninteracting fermions with quantized transport at the half filling and no atom transport at the integer filling. In the weakly interacting region, the number of the transported atoms is proportional to the atom filling. We show the signature of the quantum transport from the momentum distribution of atoms that can be measured in the time-of-flight image. A semiclassical transport model is developed to explain the numerically observed transport of bosonic atoms in the noninteracting and strongly interacting limits. The scheme may serve as an quantized battery for atomtronics applications.

Qian Yinyin; Gong Ming; Zhang Chuanwei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - News & Highlights - Photo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Site Index Facilities People Publications Awards News & Highlights Events Site Index Search Argonne ... Search Argonne Home >Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for Electrical Energy Storage: Tailored Interfaces Computational Postdoctoral Fellowships Contact Us CSE Intranet Chemical Sciences & Engineering Photo Archives We offer a variety of high resolution images in a number of categories covering research done in the Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division. Simply choose a category below and you'll be taken to a page from which you can download photographs.

77

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Facilities - Actinide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical...

78

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - News & Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical...

79

JOB NUMBER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

80

KPA Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

82

Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Production mechanisms, number concentration, size distribution...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002asl2.441 Meeting Report Production mechanisms, number concentration, size distribution, chemical composition, and...

84

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

85

Atomic-Resolution STEM at Low Primary Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) can now produce electron probes as small as 1 {angstrom} at 60 keV. This level of performance allows individual light atoms to be imaged in various novel materials including graphene, monolayer boron nitride, and carbon nanotubes. Operation at 60 keV avoids direct knock-on damage in such materials, but some radiation damage often remains, and limits the maximum usable electron dose. Elemental identification by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is then usefully supplemented by annular dark-field (ADF) imaging, for which the signal is much larger and the spatial resolution significantly better. Because of its strong dependence on the atomic number Z, ADF can be used to identify the chemical type of individual atoms, both heavy and light. We review the instrumental requirements for atomic resolution imaging at 60 keV and lower energies, and we illustrate the kinds of studies that have now become possible by ADF images of graphene, monolayer BN, and single-wall carbon nanotubes, and by ADF images and EEL spectra of carbon nanotubes containing nanopods filled with single atoms of Er. We then discuss likely future developments.

Krivanek, Ondrej L. [Nion Co; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Dellby, N. [Nion Company, WA; Murfitt, M. F. [Nion Company, WA

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Hypothesis: A New Approach of Fission Product Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

Former studies assumed that, after fission process occurs, the highly ionized new born atoms (20-22 positive charge), ionize the media in which they pass through before becoming stable atoms in a manner similar to 4-MeV ?-particles. Via ordinary chemical reactions with the surroundings, each stable atom has a probability to form chemical compound. Since there are about 35 different elemental atoms created through fission processes, a large number of chemical species were suggested to be formed. But, these suggested chemical species were not found in the environment after actual releases of FP during accidents like TMI (USA, 1979), and Chernobyl (former USSR, 1986), also the models based on these suggested reactions and species could not interpret the behavior of these actual species. It is assumed here that the ionization states of the new born atoms and the long term high temperature were not dealt with in an appropriate way and they were the reasons of former models failure. Our new approach of Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) based on the following: 1-The new born atoms which are highly ionized, 10-12 electrons associated with each nucleus, having a large probability to create bonds between them to form molecules. These bonds are at the L, or M shells, and we call it DAB. 2-The molecules stay in the reactor at high temperatures for long periods, so they undergo many stages of composition and decomposition to form giant molecules. By applying DAB approach, field data from Chernobyl, TMI and nuclear detonations could be interpreted with a wide coincidence resulted. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Exotic atoms and leptonic conservations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major 1989 efforts have been on two aspects of experiments at TRIUMF. One effort was production of muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium into a vacuum. We study rates relevant to muonic catalyzed fusion, and if there are found an adequate number of muons in the 2s state then we plan to measure precision energies. The second effort was to develop plans for kaonic atoms at the kaon factory. We also completed analyses from the experiments with pionic atoms at LAMPF.

Kunselman, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS IN THE STANDARD ATOMIC WEIGHTS TABLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (or longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular element has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of 'these constants' for use in various chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was the most stable, i.e., the one with the longest known half-life. In their 1973 Report, the Commission noted that the users of the main Table of Atomic Weights were dissatisfied with the omission of values for some elements in that Table and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for the radioactive elements into the main Table. In their 1983 Report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to five or more figure accuracy, without prior knowledge of the sample involved. These elements were again listed in the Atomic Weights Table with no further information, i.e., with no mass number or atomic weight value. For the elements, which have no stable characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on the half-lives and the relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest for those elements have been evaluated. The values of the half-lives with their uncertainties are listed in the table. The uncertainties are given for the last digit quoted of the half-life and are given in parentheses. A half-life entry for the Table having a value and an uncertainty of 7 {+-} 3 is listed in the half-life column as 7 (3). The criteria to include data in this Table, is to be the same as it has been for over sixty years. It is the same criteria, which are used for all data that are evaluated for inclusion in the Standard Table of Atomic Weights. If a report of data is published in a peer-reviewed journal, that data is evaluated and considered for inclusion in the appropriate table of the biennial report of the Atomic Weights Commission. As better data becomes available in the future, the information that is contained in either of the Tables of Standard Atomic Weights or in the Table of Radioactive Elements may be modified. It should be noted that the appearance of any datum in the Table of the Radioactive Elements is merely for the purposes of calculating an atomic mass value for any sample of a radioactive material, which might have a variety of isotopic compositions and it has no implication as to the priority for claiming discovery of a given element and is not intended to. The atomic mass values have been taken primarily from the 2003 Atomic Mass Table. Mass values for those radioisotopes that do not appear in the 2003 Atomic mass Table have been taken from preliminary data of the Atomic Mass Data Center. Most of the quoted half-lives.

Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center. Summary: ... Atomic Spectroscopy Data Webpage. End Date: ongoing. Lead Organizational Unit: physlab. Contact. ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

Instrument Series: Microscopy Atom Probe The LEAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Atom Probe The LEAP ® 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first- ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical imaging studies of low electrical conductivity materials, such as ceramics, semiconductors and oxides. The LEAP capability is assisting EMSL's efforts to further scientific advancements in interface analysis and microstructural characterization, providing a new tool for understanding the relationship between the nanoscale structure of materials and their macroscopic properties. Research Applications Geochemistry - Studying chemical processes that compose rocks and soils has long been used to determine matter cycles and transport in the environment, which supports critical EMSL research in areas including bioremediation.

91

Atomic magnetometer  

SciTech Connect

An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Physical Model Explaining the Periodic Pattern of the Chemical Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental organizing principle resulting in the periodic table is the nuclear charge. Arranging the chemical elements in an increasing atomic number order, a symmetry pattern known as the Periodic Table is detectable. The correlation between nuclear charge and the Periodic System of the Chemical Elements (PSCE) indicates that the symmetry emerges from the nucleus. Nuclear symmetry can only be developed if the positions of the nucleons are preserved. Thus the phase of the nucleus must be solid where the positions of the nucleons are preserved in a lattice. A lattice model, representing the protons and the neutrons by equal spheres and arranging them alternately in a face centered cubic structure forming a double tetrahedron, is able to reproduce all of the properties of the nucleus including the quantum numbers and the periodicity of the elements. Using this nuclear structure model, an attempt is made here to give a physical explanation for the periodicity of the chemical elements.

Jozsef Garai

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

SRD Numbering System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SRD 108, Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data, Online-Free. ... SRD 121, Fundamental Physical Constants-Latest 2010 Values of the ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the International Atomic Energy...

95

An Alternate Graphical Representation of Periodic table of Chemical Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodic table of chemical elements symbolizes an elegant graphical representation of symmetry at atomic level and provides an overview on arrangement of electrons. It started merely as tabular representation of chemical elements, later got strengthened with quantum mechanical description of atomic structure and recent studies have revealed that periodic table can be formulated using SO(4,2)* SU(2) group. IUPAC, the governing body in Chemistry, doesn't approve any periodic table as a standard periodic table. The only specific recommendation provided by IUPAC is that the periodic table should follow the 1 to 18 group numbering. In this technical paper, we describe a new graphical representation of periodic table, referred as 'Circular form of Periodic table'. The advantages of circular form of periodic table over other representations are discussed along with a brief discussion on history of periodic tables.

Mohd Abubakr

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

CHEMICAL EFFECTS OF PHOTONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN THE PROPYL BROMIDES  

SciTech Connect

When nuclear reactions occur in atoms in molecules chemical changes follow as a result of the recoil of the product atoms. The nature of these chemical changes was studied intensively for a number of systems but in most cases the magnitude of the recoil energy was about the same. In the present studies use was made of a much greater recoil energy than that normally used. The reaction Br( gamma ,n)Br* gives a recoil bromine atom with an energy of the order of 10/sup 5/ ev, compared to 10/sup 2/ ev for the product of the Br(n, gamma )Br* reaction which is ususlly used. The chemical nature of the products resulting when the propyl bromides were irradiated with neutrons and 70-Mev gamma rays was studied by established techniques. It is possible to differentiate between the reactions which occur while the recoiling bromine atom still is highly energetic, or hot,'' and those which occur after it has been slowed down to thermal energies. The products of the hot reactions show little dependence on the intial recoil energy. In the case of the thermal reactions, the higher energy recoil produces a greater number of products which are different from the original molecules. This can be attributed to the presence of a higher concentration of free radical fragments which are produced in slowing down the higher energy recoiling atom. These fragments combine with the radioactive bromine after it has reached thermal energies to form a greater variety and amount of new products. (auth)

Richardson, A.E.; Voigt, A.F.

1956-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Optical Nanofibers for Manipulating and Probing Single-Atom Fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate how optical nanofibers can be used to manipulate and probe single-atom fluorescence. We show that fluorescence photons from a very small number of atoms, average atom number of less than 0.1, around the nanofiber can readily be observed through single-mode optical fiber under resonant laser irradiation. We show also that optical nanofibers enable us to probe the van der Waals interaction between atoms and surface with high precision by observing the fluorescence excitation spectrum.

K. P. Nayak; P. N. Melentiev; M. Morinaga; Fam Le Kien; V. I. Balykin; K. Hakuta

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fast Access to Distributed Atomic Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study efficient and robust implementations of an atomic read-write data structure over an asynchronous distributed message-passing system made of reader and writer processes, as well as a number of servers implementing the data structure. We determine ... Keywords: Byzantine failures, atomic registers, distributed algorithms, fault-tolerance, shared-memory emulations, time-complexity

Partha Dutta; Rachid Guerraoui; Ron R. Levy; Marko Vukoli?

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Chemical leukoderma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion  

SciTech Connect

We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics CSD: Research: Chemical Physics CSD: Research Programs: Chemical Physics LBL Logo A-Z CSD Research Highlights CSD Directory Chemical Sciences Division A-Z Index Phone Book Search Berkeley Lab INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH PROGRAMS Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences Catalytic Science Chemical Physics The Glenn T. Seaborg Center (GTSC) STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD > Research Programs > Chemical Physics The Chemical Physics Program of the Chemical Science Division of LBNL is concerned with the development of both experimental and theoretical methodologies for studying molecular structure and dynamical processes at the most fundamental level, and with the application of these to specific

103

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production, etc) * Physical Processes (Biomass treatments: Bio-Energy with CCS (BECCS), Biomass Pyrolysis) * Chemical Techniques (Mineral Sequestration, etc) CO 2 Re-used ...

105

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001808 Novel Oxygen Carriers For Coal-Fueled Chemical Looping Combustion Western Kentucky University Presenter: Dr. Yan Cao Institute for Combustion Science and...

106

Gaussian random number generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid generation of high quality Gaussian random numbers is a key capability for simulations across a wide range of disciplines. Advances in computing have brought the power to conduct simulations with very large numbers of random numbers and with it, ... Keywords: Gaussian, Random numbers, normal, simulation

David B. Thomas; Wayne Luk; Philip H.W. Leong; John D. Villasenor

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Arithmetic Aspects of Atomic Structures Charles L. Fefferman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atoms. The problems encountered in this pro­ cess were numerous, and the quest for an understanding. It is responsible for the relevance of number theoretic terms in the atomic energy series, but goes beyond what one­ opments which have the common target of understanding atomic densities in rigorous terms. Among

Seco, Luis A.

108

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

109

Creation and recovery of a W(111) single atom gas field ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten single atom tips have been prepared from a single crystal W(111) oriented wire using the chemical assisted field evaporation and etching method. Etching to a single atom tip occurs through a symmetric structure and leads to a predictable last atom unlike etching with polycrystalline tips. The single atom tip formation procedure is shown in an atom by atom removal process. Rebuilds of single atom tips occur on the same crystalline axis as the original tip such that ion emission emanates along a fixed direction for all tip rebuilds. This preparation method could be utilized and developed to prepare single atom tips for ion source development.

Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Urban, Radovan [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Wolkow, Robert A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada)

2012-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Universe Adventure - Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matter and Atoms Matter and Atoms Richard Feynman "If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that...all things are made of atoms." -Richard P. Feynman, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics All is atoms Matter is made of atoms, and atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Everything in the Universe is made of matter. Though matter exists in many different forms, each form is made out of the same basic constituents: small particles called atoms. Atoms themselves are made of smaller particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.

111

Reading Comprehension - Atomic History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic History Atomic History A Greek philosopher named Democritus said that all atoms are small, hard particles. He thought that atoms were made of a single material formed into different shapes and sizes. The word " _________ element compound mixture atom " is derived from the Greek word "atomos" which means "not able to be divided." In 1803, John Dalton, a school teacher, proposed his atomic theory. Dalton's theory states that elements (substances composed of only one type of _________ molecules ions atom ) combine in certain proportions to form _________ compounds atoms mixtures elements . In 1897, a British scientist named J. J. Thomson experimented with a cathode-ray tube which had a positively charged plate. The plate attracted negatively charged particles that we now call _________ protons neutrons

112

AtomicNuclear Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTML_PAGES HTML_PAGES This AtomicNuclearProperties page is under intermittent development. Suggestions and comments are welcome. Please report errors. Chemical elements: For entries in red, a pull-down menu permits selection of the physical state. Cryogenic liquid densties are at the boiling point at 1 atm. 0n 1Ps 1H 2He 3Li 4Be 5B 6C 7N 8O 9F 10Ne 11Na 12Mg 13Al 14Si 15P 16S 17Cl 18Ar 19K 20Ca 21Sc 22Ti 23V 24Cr 25Mn 26Fe 27Co 28Ni 29Cu 30Zn 31Ga 32Ge 33As 34Se 35Br 36Kr 37Rb 38Sr 39Y 40Zr 41Nb 42Mo 43Tc 44Ru 45Rh 46Pd 47Ag 48Cd 49In 50Sn 51Sb 52Te 53I 54Xe 55Cs 56Ba 57La 72Hf 73Ta 74W 75Re 76Os 77Ir 78Pt 79Au 80Hg 81Tl 82Pb 83Bi 84Po 85At 86Rn 87Fr 88Ra 89Ac 104Rf 105Db 106Sg 107Bh 108Hs 109Mt 110Ds 111Rg 112 113 114 115 116 mt 118

113

Atomic and Molecular Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DG, * SRD 105 Physic Laboratory's Elemental ... Nuclear Physics SRD 144 Atomic Weights & ... Physical Constants SRD 121 Fundamental Physical ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Atomizing nozzle and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vorburger, SL Tan, NG Orji, J. Fu, “Interlaboratory Comparison of Traceable Atomic Force Microscope Pitch Measurements,” SPIE Proceedings Vol. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Quantum Random Number Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... trusted beacon of random numbers. You could conduct secure auctions, or certify randomized audits of data. One of the most ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

118

Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Atom-photon entanglement generation and distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend an earlier model by Law {\\it et al.} \\cite{law} for a cavity QED based single-photon-gun to atom-photon entanglement generation and distribution. We illuminate the importance of a small critical atom number on the fidelity of the proposed operation in the strong coupling limit. Our result points to a promisingly high purity and efficiency using currently available cavity QED parameters, and sheds new light on constructing quantum computing and communication devices with trapped atoms and high Q optical cavities.

B. Sun; M. S. Chapman; L. You

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Questions and Answers - How many atoms are in the human head?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is there a way to tell how manyatoms are in an object? Is there a way to tell how many<br>atoms are in an object? Previous Question (Is there a way to tell how many atoms are in an object?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many atoms are in the human body?) How many atoms arein the human body? How many atoms are in the human head? We can calculate the number of atoms in your head if we know the density and a constant called Avogadro's number. This is really just an estimate, but it's going to be a good one. The equation is fairly simple. The number of atoms of ANY substance in a volume is: # of atoms = N * (density) * volume / (Molecular Weight). N is a constant called Avogadro's number and its equal to 6.022*1023 atoms/mole. It can also be molecules per mole. In the above formula density

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATOMS ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission Richard G. Hewlett and lack M. Roll With a Foreword by Richard S. Kirkendall and an Essay on Sources by Roger M. Anders University of California Press Berkeley Los Angeles London Published 1989 by the University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California University of California Press, Ltd. London, England Prepared by the Atomic Energy Commission; work made for hire. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hewlett, Richard G. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961. (California studies in the history of science) Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Nuclear energy-United States-History. 2. U.S. Atomic Energy Commission-History. 3. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.

122

Chemical properties of the heavier actinides and transactinides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical properties of each of the elements 99 (Es) through 105 are reviewed and their properties correlated with the electronic structure expected for 5f and 6d elements. A major feature of the heavier actinides, which differentiates them from the comparable lanthanides, is the increasing stability of the divalent oxidation state with increasing atomic number. The divalent oxidation state first becomes observable in the anhydrous halides of californium and increases in stability through the series to nobelium, where this valency becomes predominant in aqueous solution. In comparison with the analogous 4f electrons, the 5f electrons in the latter part of the series are more tightly bound. Thus, there is a lowering of the 5f energy levels with respect to the Fermi level as the atomic number increases. The metallic state of the heavier actinides has not been investigated except from the viewpoint of the relative volatility among members of the series. In aqueous solutions, ions of these elements behave as a normal trivalent actinides and lanthanides (except for nobelium). Their ionic radii decrease with increasing nuclear charge which is moderated because of increased screening of the outer 6p electrons by the 5f electrons. The actinide series of elements is completed with the element lawrencium (Lr) in which the electronic configuration is 5f/sup 14/7s/sup 2/7p. From Mendeleev's periodicity and Dirac-Fock calculations, the next group of elements is expected to be a d-transition series corresponding to the elements Hf through Hg. The chemical properties of elements 104 and 105 only have been studied and they indeed appear to show the properties expected of eka-Hf and eka-Ta. However, their nuclear lifetimes are so short and so few atoms can be produced that a rich variety of chemical information is probably unobtainable.

Hulet, E.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Atomic Spectroscopy: An Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 60. A. de-Shalit and I. Talmi, Nuclear Shell Theory (Academic, New York, 1963). ... CE Moore, Atomic Energy Levels, Natl. Stand. Ref. ...

124

NIST Atomic Spectra Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ground states and ionization energies of atoms ... the US Department of Energy, by the ... SRDP), and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cold Atoms News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the first time caused a gas of atoms ... mysterious data in ultracold gases of rubidium ... Material May Demonstrate Long-Sought 'Liquid' Magnetic State ...

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Harnessed Atom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased,...

127

Atomic Collapse Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collapse State Observed Aided by Simulations, Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 |...

128

Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

129

Definition: Chemical energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy energy Energy stored in chemical bonds between atoms within molecules. When a chemical reaction occurs, the chemical energy within a molecule can increase or that energy can be released into its surroundings as another form of energy (e.g., heat or light). Fuel combustion is example of the conversion of chemical energy to another form of energy.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In chemistry, Chemical energy is the potential of a chemical substance to undergo a transformation through a chemical reaction or, to transform other chemical substances. Examples include batteries and light bulbs and cells etc. Breaking or making of chemical bonds involves energy, which may be either absorbed or evolved from a chemical system Energy that can be released (or absorbed) because of a reaction between a set of

130

Saturation of fidelity in the atom-optics kicked rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the quantum fidelity is accessible to cold atom experiments for a large class of evolutions in periodical potentials, properly taking into account the experimental initial conditions of the atomic ensemble. We prove analytically that, at the fundamental quantum resonances of the atom-optics kicked rotor, the fidelity saturates at a constant, time-independent value after a small number of kicks. The latter saturation arises from the bulk of the atomic ensemble, whilst for the resonantly accelerated atoms the fidelity is predicted to decay slowly according to a power law.

Sandro Wimberger; Andreas Buchleitner

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor concept for deep space exploration Research directions Weapons chemistry and nuclear performance Radiological, nuclear, and chemical signatures Energy production,...

132

Number | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number More Documents & Publications Analysis of Open Office of Inspector General Recommendations, OAS-L-08-07 Policy and International Affairs (WFP) Open Government Plan 2.0...

133

Expected Frobenius numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that for large instances the order of magnitude of the expected Frobenius number is (up to a constant depending only on the dimension) given by its lower bound.

Aliev, Iskander; Hinrichs, Aicke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Report number codes  

SciTech Connect

This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Forecast of Standard Atomic Weights for the Mononuclidic Elements – 2011  

SciTech Connect

In this short report, I will provide an early warning about potential changes to the standard atomic weight values for the twenty mononuclidic and the so-called pseudo-mononuclidic ({sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa) chemical elements due to the estimated changes in the mass values to be published in the next Atomic Mass Tables within the next two years. There have been many new measurements of atomic masses, since the last published Atomic Mass Table. The Atomic Mass Data Center has released an unpublished version of the present status of the atomic mass values as a private communication. We can not update the Standard Atomic Weight Table at this time based on these unpublished values but we can anticipate how many changes are probably going to be expected in the next few years on the basis of the forthcoming publication of the Atomic Mass Table. I will briefly discuss the procedures that the Atomic Weights Commission used in deriving the recommended Standard Atomic Weight values and their uncertainties from the atomic mass values. I will also discuss some concern raised about a proposed change in the definition of the mole. The definition of the mole is now connected directly to the mass of a {sup 12}C isotope (which is defined as 12 exactly) and to the kilogram. A change in the definition of the mole will probably impact the mass of {sup 12}C.

Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

Oliver, Douglas L.

137

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

Kim, Duck O.

138

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

139

Using Fractional Numbers of . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the design parameters in closed queueing networks is Np, the number of customers of class p. It has been assumed that Np must be an integer. However, integer choices will usually not achieve the target throughput for each class simultaneously. We use Mean Value Analysis with the Schweitzer-Bard approximation and nonlinear programming to determine the value of Np needed to achieve the production targets exactly, although the values of Np may be fractional. We interpret these values to represent the average number of customers of each class in the network. We implement a control rule to achieve these averages and verify our approach through simulation.

Rajan Suri; Rahul Shinde; Mary Vernon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project DE-FE0001808 Novel Oxygen Carriers For Coal-Fueled Chemical Looping Combustion Western Kentucky University Presenter: Dr. Yan Cao Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology February 25, 2011 Project Participants * PIs: Dr. Wei-Ping Pan Dr. Yan Cao * Students: Ms. Wen Ying (Master student) Mr. Andy Wang (Undergraduate student) Mr. Yanwen Cui (Master student) Introduction (limit - 1 slide) * Background on the project * Anticipated benefits Solid Oxygen Carriers 1. Commercially accepted kinetics - coupling and potential uncoupling (free oxygen) 2. Thermal Stability, Lower degradation, and Lower Attrition loss 3. Favored thermodynamics for pure CO 2 4. Opportunity to release of free oxygen for improvement of process kinetics;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chern numbers hiding in time-of-flight images  

SciTech Connect

We present a technique for detecting topological invariants--Chern numbers--from time-of-flight images of ultracold atoms. We show that the Chern numbers of integer quantum Hall states of lattice fermions leave their fingerprints in the atoms' momentum distribution. We analytically demonstrate that the number of local maxima in the momentum distribution is equal to the Chern number in two limiting cases, for large hopping anisotropy and in the continuum limit. In addition, our numerical simulations beyond these two limits show that these local maxima persist for a range of parameters. Thus, an everyday observable in cold atom experiments can serve as a useful tool to characterize and visualize quantum states with nontrivial topology.

Zhao Erhai; Satija, Indubala I. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Bray-Ali, Noah; Williams, Carl J.; Spielman, I. B. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

A number of organizations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buying power to purchase green power. The city of Chicago has formed an alliance with 47 other local installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green to competition, the city of Chicago and 47 other local government agencies formed the Local Government Power

143

Disjunctive Rado numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If L1 and L2 are linear equations, then the disjunctive Rado number of the set {L1, L2} is the least integer n, provided that it exists, such that for every 2-coloring of ... Keywords: Rado, Ramsey, Schur, disjunctive

Brenda Johnson; Daniel Schaal

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Areawide chemical contamination  

SciTech Connect

Nine case histories illustrate the mounting problems owing to chemical contamination that often extends beyond the workplace into the community. The effects include not only carcinogenesis and teratogenesis, so much in the public's mind, but also severe neurological and gonadal disabilities immediately after exposure. Recognition of causal relationships is often made by astute clinicians. The experience of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in studying Japanese survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki serves as a model for future studies of communities exposed to unusual environmental contamination.

Miller, R.W.

1981-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

Questions and Answers - How many neutrons can you add to an atom without it  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is it possible for an element to emitmore than one kind of radiation? Is it possible for an element to emit<br>more than one kind of radiation? Previous Question (Is it possible for an element to emit more than one kind of radiation?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Are nitrogen, arsenic, and tantalum radioactive?) Are nitrogen, arsenic, andtantalum radioactive? How many neutrons can you add to an atom without it getting unbalanced? The number of neutrons that an atom can carry is dependent on what it is. Some will become unstable with only one extra or one less neutron while others can hold or lose many extra. It varies from atom to atom and also within atoms. Take a look at a Periodic Table. The atomic number is the number of protons in that atom. If you change the number of protons the atom becomes

146

Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Chemical microsensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

Li, DeQuan (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Utility of atomic kicked-rotor interferometers for precision measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate a proposed scheme to use an atomic {delta}-kicked rotor resonance for high-precision measurements of accelerations and the photon recoil frequency. Although the technique offers rapid scaling of the measurement sensitivity with pulse number, it also features a high sensitivity to initial atomic momentum. We find that for realistic atom sources, the momentum sensitivity significantly limits the achievable precision. We consider several different variations on the technique, but find similar limitations in all cases.

Horne, R. A.; Leonard, R. H.; Sackett, C. A. [Physics Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic .... What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

150

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers...

152

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential...

153

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers...

154

Chemical Sciences Division: Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION TO CSD NATIONAL FACILITIES & CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley CSD Directory A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Rebecca Abergel CSD Project Scientist; The Glenn T. Seaborg Center. Musahid Ahmed CSD Staff Scientist, Chemical Physics Program/Chemical Dynamics Beamline Publications Richard A. Andersen Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Senior Faculty Scientist, The Glenn T. Seaborg Center Publications John Arnold Professor of Chemistry, UC Berkeley; CSD Faculty Scientist, Catalytic Science Program Publications B Ali Belkacem CSD Deputy and Senior Staff Scientist; Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program Leader

155

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

156

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

157

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

158

general_atomics.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

former former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level. The General Atomics site is in the center of Torrey Mesa Science Center, a 304-acre industrial

159

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Discussions between DOE and General Atomics led to an agreed cost-sharing and no-fee arrangement for the decontamination and site...

160

Sharing the atom bomb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shaken by the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and fearful that the American atomic monopoly would spark an arms race, Dean Acheson led a push in 1946 to place the bomb-indeed, all atomic energy-under international control. But as the memories of wartime collaboration faded, relations between the superpowers grew increasingly tense, and the confrontational atmosphere undid his proposal. Had Acheson succeeded, the Cold War might not have been. 2 figs.

Chace, J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

Huxford, Theodore J. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Atomizing nozzle and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions  

SciTech Connect

A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

Tr?bert, E

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Bend, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Questions and Answers - How do atoms form?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Biggest and smallest atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Does gravity affect atoms?) Does gravity affect atoms? How do atoms form? The current view is that...

169

Questions and Answers - Can you crush atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does gravity affect atoms? Previous Question (Does gravity affect atoms?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Parts and weights of atoms?) Parts and weights of atoms?...

170

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

Provancher, William

171

Finite Neutrosophic Complex Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this book for the first time the authors introduce the notion of real neutrosophic complex numbers. Further the new notion of finite complex modulo integers is defined. For every $C(Z_n)$ the complex modulo integer $i_F$ is such that $2F_i = n - 1$. Several algebraic structures on $C(Z_n)$ are introduced and studied. Further the notion of complex neutrosophic modulo integers is introduced. Vector spaces and linear algebras are constructed using these neutrosophic complex modulo integers.

W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Peaceful Uses of the Atom and Atoms for Peace  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Peaceful Uses of the Atom Peaceful Uses of the Atom Fermi and Atoms for Peace · Understanding the Atom · Seaborg · Teller Atoms for Peace Atoms for Peace + 50 - Conference, October 22, 2003 Celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Eisenhower's "Atoms for Peace" speech to the UN General Assembly Atoms for Peace (video 12:00 Minutes) Atoms for Peace Address given by Dwight D. Eisenhower before the General Assembly of the United Nations, New York City, December 8, 1953 Documents: Atomic Power in Space: A History A history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States from the mid-1950s through 1982; interplanetary space exploration successes and achievements have been made possible by this technology. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

173

Questions and Answers - How many atoms would it take to create a ton?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there in the world? there in the world? Previous Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Could you please explain density?) Could you please explain density? How many atoms would it take to create a ton? There's a lot more to this question than first appears. There are many types of atoms and each of them has its own mass, so the answer varies depending on which atom you are talking about. Since even a tiny bit of matter has many atoms, it has become customary to use the unit "mole" to signify a standard number of atoms, namely, it is Avogadro's number which (almost) equals 6*1023, or 600,000 billion billon. If you look up the periodic table of elements, one of the numbers usually listed is the atomic mass which is the mass (in grams) of one mole of those atoms. Let's use

174

Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

176

KPA Activity Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

177

NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center. ... Responds to user requests for data, literature references, and technical information. ...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Lesson 3- Atoms and Isotopes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

You’ve probably heard people refer to nuclear energy as “atomic energy.” Why? Nuclear energy is the energy that is stored in the bonds of atoms, inside the nucleus. Nuclear power plants are designed to capture this energy as heat and convert it to electricity. This lesson looks closely at what atoms are and how atoms store energy.

179

Chemical Activation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Activation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Adsorption Milton R. Smith, Jr., 1 Edward W. Bittner, 1 Wei Shi, 1, 2 J. Karl Johnson, 1, 2 and Bradley C....

180

Quantum Theory of Fast Chemical Reactions  

SciTech Connect

The aims of the research under this grant were to develop a theoretical understanding and predictive abiility for a variety of processes occurring in the gas phase. These included bimolecular chemical exchange reactions, photodissociation, predissociation resonances, unimolecular reactions and recombination reactions. In general we assumed a knowledge, from quantum chemistry, of the interactions of the atoms and molecular fragments involved. Our focus was primarily on the accurate (quantum) dynamics of small molecular systems. This has been important for many reactions related to combustion and atmospheric chemistry involving light atom transfer reactions and, for example, resonances in dissociation and recombination reactions. The rates of such reactions, as functions of temperature, internal states, and radiation (light), are fundamental for generating models of overall combustion processes. A number of new approaches to these problems were developed inclluding the use of discrete variable representations (DVR's) for evaluating rate constants with the flux-flux correlation approach, finite range approaches to exact quantum scattering calculations, energy selected basis representations, transition state wave packet approaches and improved semiclassical approaches. These (and others) were applied to a number of reactive systems and molecular systems of interest including (many years ago) the isotopic H + H2 exchange reactions, the H2 + OH (and H + H2O) systems, Ozone resonances, van der Waals molecule reactions, etc. A total of 7 graduate students, and 5 post-doctoral Research Associates were supported, at least in part, under this grant and seven papers were published with a total of 10 external collaborators. The majority of the 36 publications under this grant were supported entirely by DOE.

John C. Light

2007-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

1992-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Eugene, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

former General former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level.

184

Combined effects of atomic radiation and other agents in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and possible application of fuzzy theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The survivors of atomic bombings and those who visited Hiroshima and Nagasaki immediately after the atomic bombing could have been subjected to many other possible noxious effects in addition to atomic radiation. Various toxic substances must have been ... Keywords: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, atomic bombing, dose-effects relationships, fuzzy relation, hybrid numbers, lethal dose, radiation effects

Yasushi Nishiwaki; Hiroshi Matsuoka

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

“Hard probes” of strongly-interacting atomic gases  

SciTech Connect

We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

Nishida, Yusuke [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effect of Temperature on NOx Reduction by Nitrogen Atom Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical reduction of NO{sub x} can be accomplished by injection of nitrogen atoms into the diesel engine exhaust stream. The nitrogen atoms can be generated from a separate stream of pure N{sub 2} by means of plasma jets or non-thermal plasma reactors. This paper examines the effect of exhaust temperature on the NO{sub x} reduction efficiency that can be achieved by nitrogen atom injection. It is shown that to achieve a high NO{sub x} reduction efficiency at a reasonable power consumption penalty, the exhaust temperature needs to be 100 C or less.

Penetrante, B

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

189

Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

190

Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

191

California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

192

California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

193

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

194

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

195

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

196

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

197

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

198

Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

199

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

200

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

202

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

203

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

204

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

205

Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

206

Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

207

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

208

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

209

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

210

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

211

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

212

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

213

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

214

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

215

Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

216

Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

217

Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

218

Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

219

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

220

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

222

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

223

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

224

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

225

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

226

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

227

Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

228

Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

229

Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

230

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

231

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

232

Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

233

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

234

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

235

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

236

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

237

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

238

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

239

New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's...

240

Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

242

JILA Researchers Discover Atomic Clock Can Simulate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Artist's conception of interactions among atoms in JILA's strontium atomic clock during a quantum simulation experiment. ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fast transport, atom sample splitting, and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays of optical microtraps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two-dimensional arrays of optical micro-traps created by microoptical elements present a versatile and scalable architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation, and the manipulation of ultra-cold quantum gases. In this article, we demonstrate advanced capabilities of this approach by introducing novel techniques and functionalities as well as the combined operation of previously separately implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more than one trap separation, examine the capabilities of rapid atom transport provided by acousto-optical beam steering, and analyze the adiabaticity limit for atom transport in these configurations. We implement a spatial light modulator with 8-bit transmission control for the per-site adjustment of the trap depth and the number of atoms loaded. We combine single-site addressing, trap depth control, and atom transport in one configuration for demonstrating the splitting of atom ensembles with variable ratio at predefined register sites. Finally, we use controlled sub-poissonian preparation of single trapped atoms from such an ensemble to show that our approach allows for the implementation of a continuous supply of single-atom qubits with high fidelity. These novel implementations and their combined operation significantly extend available techniques for the dynamical and reconfigurable manipulation of ultracold atoms in dipole traps.

Malte Schlosser; Jens Kruse; Christian Gierl; Stephan Teichmann; Sascha Tichelmann; Gerhard Birkl

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Radiolabelling of chemicals. [Chemical additives used in geothermal operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Labeling of chemical additives with radioactive isotopes can solve numerous problems in geothermal operations. The physical and chemical behavior of many chemicals slated for geothermal operations can be studied with the required detail at the extremely low concentration of the commercially available (non-labeled) compounds. The problems of labeling and the basics of these radioactively labeled chemicals are described in this report. Conclusions of this study are: (1) chemicals labeled with radioactive isotopes can be used to investigate the chemical and physical behavior of chemical additives used in geothermal operations. The high detection limits make this technology superior to conventional analytical and monitoring methods; (2) severe difficulties exist for utilizing of radioactively labeled chemicals in geothermal operations. The labeling itself can cause technical problems. Another host of problems is caused by the reluctance of chemical manufacturers to release the necessary proprietary information on their chemicals required for proper labeling; and (3) previous attempts to manufacture radioactively labeled flocculants and to utilize them in a geothermal operation were prematurely abandoned for a number of reasons.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Robotic location of underground chemical sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes current progress in a project to develop robotic systems for locating underground chemical sources. There are a number of economic and humanitarian applications for this technology. Finding unexploded ordinance, land mines, and sources ... Keywords: Chemical diffusion, Chemical source location, De-mining, Robotics

R. Andrew Russell

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ZAPP: Z-pinch atomic physics program  

SciTech Connect

High-density and high-temperature plasmas have been produced in a z-pinch with a hollow gas puff. A number of interesting atomic-physics phenomena occur in these plasmas and some of these phenomena provide important diagnostic information for characterizing the plasmas. We have been interested in collisions of high-energy electrons with highly stripped ions in these plasmas. Such collisions may produce a population inversion which could result in stimulated emission in the x-ray regime.

Reed, K.

1983-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chemical Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

Francesca Matteucci

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of ...

Ceyer, Sylvia Teresse

250

Shape coexistence in atomic nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shape coexistence in nuclei appears to be unique in the realm of finite many-body quantum systems. It differs from the various geometrical arrangements that sometimes occur in a molecule in that in a molecule the various arrangements are of the widely separated atomic nuclei. In nuclei the various ''arrangements'' of nucleons involve (sets of) energy eigenstates with different electric quadrupole properties such as moments and transition rates, and different distributions of proton pairs and neutron pairs with respect to their Fermi energies. Sometimes two such structures will ''invert'' as a function of the nucleon number, resulting in a sudden and dramatic change in ground-state properties in neighboring isotopes and isotones. In the first part of this review the theoretical status of coexistence in nuclei is summarized. Two approaches, namely, microscopic shell-model descriptions and mean-field descriptions, are emphasized. The second part of this review presents systematic data, for both even- and odd-mass nuclei, selected to illustrate the various ways in which coexistence is observed in nuclei. The last part of this review looks to future developments and the issue of the universality of coexistence in nuclei. Surprises continue to be discovered. With the major advances in reaching to extremes of proton-neutron number, and the anticipated new ''rare isotope beam'' facilities, guidelines for search and discovery are discussed.

Heyde, Kris; Wood, John L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Number: 305 Most Dangerous Vehicles ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... top> Number: 314 Marine Vegetation Description: Commercial harvesting of marine vegetation such as algae, seaweed and ...

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

252

Tenth Atomic Physics Program workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains short papers and abstracts on the following main topics: Ion-atom collision theory; laser physics; spectroscopy of atoms; spectroscopy of ions; and high velocity collisions.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nuclear effects in atomic transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

Pálffy, Adriana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Atomic Devices and Instrumentation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2001 and 2005, demonstrated an atomic clock physics package with ... magnetometers for magnetic anomaly detection, nuclear magnetic resonance ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Atom-Based Dimensional Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Awarded a five year, three phase DARPA contract to conduct collaborative research in atomically precise positioning, patterning and metrology ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

256

Chemical Sciences Division: Research: Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs Programs The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of Berkeley Laboratory's basic research divisions. The CSD is composed of individual research groups that conduct research in the areas of chemical physics and the dynamics of chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of transient species, electron spectroscopy, surface chemistry and catalysis, electrochemistry, chemistry of the actinide elements and their relationship to environmental issues, and atomic physics. The division's 28 principal investigators, many of whom are on the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, direct the individual research projects and the work of 6 staff scientists, 41 postdoctoral researchers, and 75 graduate students. Our research staff continues to achieve fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients using both state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methods. In addition, the division supports a strong effort in heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis.

257

Questions and Answers - How do I find the number of protons, electrons and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Could you please explain density? Could you please explain density? Previous Question (Could you please explain density?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many protons, neutrons, and electrons are in an atom?) How many protons, neutrons,and electrons are in an atom? How many protons, electrons and neutrons are in an atom of krypton, carbon, oxygen, neon, silver, gold, etc...? To find the number of protons, electrons and neutrons in an atom, just follow these easy steps: Step 1 - Gather Information The first thing you will need to do is find some information about your element. Go to the Periodic Table of Elements and click on your element. If it makes things easier, you can select your element from an alphabetical listing. Use the Table of Elements to find your element's atomic number and atomic

258

A new local concept of chemical potential and chemical hardness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The definition of local hardness by the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the electron density has raised several questions, and its applicability as the local counterpart of chemical hardness has proved to be limited to (globally) hard molecules. Here, we propose that instead of defining a local hardness from the chemical potential in the above way, first a local chemical potential should be defined from the ground-state energy by its derivative with respect to the electron density, from which then the corresponding local hardness can be gained just as the hardness is obtained from the chemical potential - namely, by a simple differentiation with respect to the electron number. In this way, one does not neglect potentially important terms in the local hardness expression.

Gal, Tamas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in...

260

CHANGE OF NAME TIAA Annuity Number CREF Annuity Number TIAA Policy Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHANGE OF NAME TIAA Annuity Number CREF Annuity Number TIAA Policy Number Social Security Number and only use black or dark blue ink. Return this form to: TIAA-CREF P.O. Box 1264 Charlotte, NC 28201 NOTE City State Zip Code For TIAA-CREF USE ONLY Accepted -- Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association

Snider, Barry B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NIST: Phys. Lab. Brochure; Atomic Physics Div.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ultra-cold atoms and investigate atom optics for innovative instrumentation. Measure and analyze spectra of highly ionized atoms for fusion energy ...

262

Quantum kinetic theory model of a continuous atom laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the feasible limits for realising a continuously evaporated atom laser with high-temperature sources. A plausible scheme for realising a truly continuous atom laser is to outcouple atoms from a partially condensed Bose gas, whilst continuously reloading the system with non-condensed thermal atoms and performing evaporative cooling. Here we use quantum kinetic theory to model this system and estimate feasible limits for the operation of such a scheme. For sufficiently high temperatures, the figure of merit for the source is shown to be the phase-space flux. The dominant process limiting the usage of sources with low phase-space flux is the three-body loss of the condensed gas. We conclude that certain double-magneto-optical trap (MOT) sources may produce substantial mean condensate numbers through continuous evaporation, and provide an atom laser source with a narrow linewidth and reasonable flux.

G. R. Dennis; Matthew J. Davis; J. J. Hope

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

John J. Cowan; James E. Lawler; Christopher Sneden; E. A. Den Hartog; Jason Collier

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

264

Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

265

Local atomic structure in disordered and nanocrystalline catalytic materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power of the atomic pair density function method to study the local atomic structure of dispersed materials is discussed for three examples (I) supercapacitor hydrous ruthenia, (II) electroctalyst platinum-iron phosphate and (III) nanoparticle gold catalyst. Hydrous ruthenia appears to be amorphous, but was found to be nanocomposite with RuO{sub 2} nanocrystals supporting electronic and hydrous boundaries protonic conductivity. A platinum-iron phosphate electrocatalyst, that exhibits activity for the oxygen reduction reaction has platinum in a non-metallic state. In catalysts comprised of gold nanoparticles supported on TiO{sub 2}, atomic correlations in the second atomic shell were observed suggesting interaction with the support that could modify gold chemical activity.

Dmowski, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Egami, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Swider-Lyons, K. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Distribution of Ramsey Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the number of integers in the interval [0,x] that are non-trivial Ramsey numbers r(k,n) (3 order of magnitude (x ln x)**(1/2).

Clark, Lane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Atomic data for fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.) [eds.; Barnett, C.F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Chemi-Ionization Processes in Slow Collisions of Rydberg Atoms with Ground State Atoms: Mechanism and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article the history and the current state of research of the chemiionization processes in atom-Rydberg atom collisions is presented. The principal assumptions of the model of such processes based on the dipole resonance mechanism, as well as the problems of stochastic ionization in atom-Rydberg atom collisions, are exposed. The properties of the collision kinetics in atom beams of various types used in contemporary experimentations are briefly described. Results of the calculation of the chemi-ionization rate coefficients are given and discussed for the range of the principal quantum number values 5 chemi-ionization processes in astrophysical and laboratory low-temperature plasmas, and the contemporary methods of their investigation are described. Also the directions of further research of chemi-ionization processes are discussed in this article.

Mihajlov, A A; Ignjatovic, Lj M; Klyucharev, A N; 10.1007/s10876-011-0438-7

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Chemical Processing Department monthly report, July 1958  

SciTech Connect

The July, 1958 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

1958-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Dynamic Space of General Relativity in Second Atomization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The notion that the geometry of our space-time is not only a static background but can be physically dynamic is well established in general relativity. Geometry can be described as shaped by the presence of matter, where such shaping manifests itself as gravitational force. We consider here probabilistic or atomistic models of such space-time, in which the active geometry emerges from a statistical distribution of 'atoms'. Such atoms are not to be confused with their chemical counterparts, however the shift of perspective obtained in analyzing a gas via its molecules rather than its bulk properties is analogous to this "second atomization". In this atomization, space-time itself (i.e. the meter and the second) is effectively atomized, so the atoms themselves must exist in a 'subspace'. Here we build a simple model of such a space-time from the ground up, establishing a route for more complete theories, and enabling a review of recent work. We first introduce the motivation behind statistical interpretations and atomism, and look at applications to the realm of dynamic space-time theories. We then consider models of kinetic media in subspace compatible with our understanding of light. From the equations governing the propagation of light in subspace we can build a metric geometry, describing the dynamic and physical space-time of general relativity. Finally, implications of the theory on current frontiers of general relativity including cosmology, black holes, and quantum gravity are discussed.

Lukas A. Saul

2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

273

Questions and Answers - Does gravity affect atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Answers Main Index Next Question (Can you crush atoms?) Can you crush atoms? Does gravity affect atoms? Gravity affects atoms the same way it affects all other matter. Every...

274

Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic ...

Cronin, Alexander D.

275

Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994  

SciTech Connect

The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Direct Observation of Sub-Poissonian Number Statistics in a Degenerate Bose Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the direct observation of sub-Poissonian number fluctuation for a degenerate Bose gas confined in an optical trap. Reduction of number fluctuations below the Poissonian limit is observed for average numbers that range from 300 to 60 atoms.

C. -S. Chuu; F. Schreck; T. P. Meyrath; J. L. Hanssen; G. N. Price; M. G. Raizen

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

Magnetometry with entangled atomic samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theory for the estimation of a scalar or a vector magnetic field by its influence on an ensemble of trapped spin polarized atoms. The atoms interact off-resonantly with a continuous laser field, and the measurement of the polarization rotation of the probe light, induced by the dispersive atom-light coupling, leads to spin-squeezing of the atomic sample which enables an estimate of the magnetic field which is more precise than that expected from standard counting statistics. For polarized light and polarized atoms, a description of the non-classical components of the collective spin angular momentum for the atoms and the collective Stokes vectors of the light-field in terms of effective gaussian position and momentum variables is practically exact. The gaussian formalism describes the dynamics of the system very effectively and accounts explicitly for the back-action on the atoms due to measurement and for the estimate of the magnetic field. Multi-component magnetic fields are estimated by the measurement of suitably chosen atomic observables and precision and efficiency is gained by dividing the atomic gas in two or more samples which are entangled by the dispersive atom-light interaction.

Vivi Petersen; Lars Bojer Madsen; Klaus Molmer

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

279

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

NIST - Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra Bibliographic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in this database are from Bibliography on Atomic Energy Levels and ... references to atomic transition probabilities, line intensities, or broadening. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Questions and Answers - What are the components of an atom? How much does  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Can you crush atoms? Can you crush atoms? Previous Question (Can you crush atoms?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Atoms without neutrons?) Atoms without neutrons? What are the components of an atom? How much does each atom weigh? The answer to both your questions are tucked away in one of coolest charts anyone has ever thought up. Around 100 years ago this very organized sort of guy named Dimitri Ivanovich Mendeleyev put the names and properties of all the chemicals he knew onto cards. He then tried arranging them in a way that made sense in a sort of Chemist's game of Solitaire. The resulting chart, called The Periodic Table of Elements, has contributed probably more than anything else to our understanding of matter. When you begin studying the Periodic table in school, pay close attention. There is a tremendous

282

188 NOTICES OF THE AMS VOLUME 44, NUMBER 2 Noticesof the American Mathematical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotblat is a nuclear physicist who left the Manhattan Project in Decem- ber 1944 when it was discovered that the Germans were not working on an atomic bomb. For a number of Manhattan Project physicists, fear

Rojas, J. Maurice

283

Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

284

Atomic total energies: Atomic Ref.Data Elec Struc Cal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These tables contain the atomic total energies and orbital eigenvalues, for the ground electronic configuration of the elements H ... Definition of format ...

285

Atomic total energies: Atomic Ref. Data Elec. Struc. Cal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These tables contain the atomic total energies and orbital eigenvalues, for the ground electronic configuration of the elements H ... Definition of format ...

286

Excursions in Chemical Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009). [118] F. A. Cotton, Chemical Applications of GroupExcursions in Chemical Dynamics by Shervin Fatehi AFall 2010 Excursions in Chemical Dynamics Copyright 2010 by

Fatehi, Shervin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of silica and polymer supported catalysts for the production of fine chemicals .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalysis is an important field of study in chemical engineering and chemistry due to its application in a vast number of chemical transformations. Traditionally, catalysts… (more)

Shiels, Rebecca Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Frank K. Pittman, Director, bivisioa of Waste &&gement and s- portation, Headquarters j CONTAMItUTED RX-AEC-OWNED OR LEASED FACILITIES' This memorandum responds to your TWX certain information on the above subject. the documentation necessary to answer your available due to the records disposal vailing at the time of release or From records that are available and from disc&ions with most familiar with the transfer operations, &have the current radiological conditibn of transferred property is adequate under present standards. The following tabulations follow the format suggested in your TWX and are grouped to an operations or contract r+ponsibility. A,I Ex-AEC Storage Sites - I r:/ National Stockpile Site '(NSS) and OperatEonal

289

NIST Atomic Spectra Bibliographic Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Atomic Energy Levels Data Center and Data Center on ... Reference Data Program (SRDP) and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

290

Atomic Devices and Instrumentation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ten millionths of a second over the course of one day, and are paving the way for atomic-level timekeeping in portable, battery-operated systems ...

291

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The program in atomic spectroscopy at NIST provides accurate reference data on spectral lines and energy levels for a wide variety of important ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Technical Highlights Atomic Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physics Division is to develop and apply atomic physics research methods ... community, and to produce and critically compile physical reference data ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

293

Questions and Answers - How many atoms are in the human body?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

head? head? Previous Question (How many atoms are in the human head?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) How many atoms arethere in the world? How many atoms are in the human body? Answer 1 Would you settle for a whole bunch? I didn't think so. The number of atoms in one person is almost too big to write out. But fortunately there's a shorthand system, called scientific notation, that we use instead for writing really BIG or really SMALL numbers. Since huge numbers are generally just estimates anyway, we just use the first few numbers, followed by a code that tells you how many zeros would follow if you wrote it all out. Ok, here it goes. Hydrogen, oxygen and carbon make up about 99% of the average human. I'm going to cheat a little and leave out the other

294

Dynamic virtual credit card numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theft of stored credit card information is an increasing threat to e-commerce.We propose a dynamic virtual credit card number scheme that reduces the damage caused by stolen credit card numbers. A user can use an existing credit card account to generate ... Keywords: credit card theft, e-commerce

Ian Molloy; Jiangtao Li; Ninghui Li

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference  

SciTech Connect

The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

Todd Martinez

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fractional quantum Hall states of few bosonic atoms in geometric gauge fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We employ the exact diagonalization method to analyze the possibility of generating strongly correlated states in two-dimensional clouds of ultracold bosonic atoms which are subjected to a geometric gauge field created by coupling two internal atomic states to a laser beam. Tuning the gauge field strength, the system undergoes stepwise transitions between different ground states, which we describe by analytical trial wave functions, amongst them the Pfaffian, the Laughlin, and a Laughlin quasiparticle many-body state. The adiabatic following of the center of mass movement by the lowest energy dressed internal state, is lost by the mixing of the second internal state. This mixture can be controlled by the intensity of the laser field. The non-adiabaticity is inherent to the considered setup, and is shown to play the role of circular asymmetry. We study its influence on the properties of the ground state of the system. Its main effect is to reduce the overlap of the numerical solutions with the analytical trial expressions by occupying states with higher angular momentum. Thus, we propose generalized wave functions arising from the Laughlin and Pfaffian wave function by including components, where extra Jastrow factors appear, while preserving important features of these states. We analyze quasihole excitations over the Laughlin and generalized Laughlin states, and show that they possess effective fractional charge and obey anyonic statistics. Finally, we study the energy gap over the Laughlin state as the number of particles is increased keeping the chemical potential fixed. The gap is found to decrease as the number of particles is increased, indicating that the observability of the Laughlin state is restricted to a small number of particles.

B. Juliá-Díaz; T. Graß; N. Barberán; M. Lewenstein

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb member of the project, to draft a report about its activities. Smyth completed the report in the summer, in a censored version. On August 11, 1945, five days after the Allies dropped the first nuclear bomb on Japan

Landweber, Laura

298

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATOMIC LAW  

SciTech Connect

Since a uniform federal statute hss not been passed in the German Federal Republic, the development of atomic law has centered around the formation of the Federal Ministry for Atomic Affairs, appeal to the German Commission, and the enactment of temporary laws in several of the states. (J.S.R.)

Fischerhof, H.

1958-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981  

SciTech Connect

Part 2 contains the data base in tabular format. There are two sections, the first with records on nondrug substances, and the second with records on drugs. Chemicals in each section are arranged alphabetically by CAS preferred name, CAS registry number, formula, atomic weight, melting point, boiling point, and vapor pressure. Tissues are listed alphabetically with exposure route, analytical method, number of cases, range, and mean - when available in the source document. A variety of information may also be included that is pertinent to the range and mean as well as experimental design, demography, health effects, pathology, morphology, and toxicity. Review articles are included in the data base; however, no data have been extracted from such documents because the original research articles are included.

Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.) [comps.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Laser Probing of Neutron-Rich Nuclei in Light Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron-rich 6He and 8He isotopes exhibit an exotic nuclear structure that consists of a tightly bound 4He-like core with additional neutrons orbiting at a relatively large distance, forming a halo. Recent experimental efforts have succeeded in laser trapping and cooling these short-lived, rare helium atoms, and have measured the atomic isotope shifts along the 4He-6He-8He chain by performing laser spectroscopy on individual trapped atoms. Meanwhile, the few-electron atomic structure theory, including relativistic and QED corrections, has reached a comparable degree of accuracy in the calculation of the isotope shifts. In parallel efforts, also by measuring atomic isotope shifts, the nuclear charge radii of lithium and beryllium isotopes have been studied. The techniques employed were resonance ionization spectroscopy on neutral, thermal lithium atoms and collinear laser spectroscopy on beryllium ions. Combining advances in both atomic theory and laser spectroscopy, the charge radii of these light halo nuclei have now been determined for the first time independent of nuclear structure models. The results are compared with the values predicted by a number of nuclear structure calculations, and are used to guide our understanding of the nuclear forces in the extremely neutron-rich environment.

Z. -T. Lu; P. Mueller; G. W. F. Drake; W. Noertershaeuser; Steven C. Pieper; Z. -C. Yan

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Quantization of the Atom plus Attempting to Answer Heilbron & Kuhn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea of atoms is old but X-rays provided the first probe into the physical atom. Photographs of X-ray scattering from crystals -Laue spots- were the first visual proof for the physical existence of atoms arranged in a perfect geometric pattern. Thereby conclusively established the stability and physical reality of atoms. The Braggs developed Laue technique to study atoms. Moseley applied (Bragg) X-ray spectroscopy to determine the nuclear charge number of Rutherford atom. We argue that Bohr also at Manchester and contemporary of Moseley likely was inspired by Laue discovery to get busy with the mechanics of the nuclear atom. Roentgens discovery was awarded the first Nobel prize ever in 1901, Laue was honored in 1914, the Braggs in 1915, making Lawrence Bragg then at 25 the youngest ever. Eleven of the cited authors (Bohr himself included) in the trilogy (but not Nicholson the most cited), were later recognized by ten Noble prize awards, seven Laureates in physics and four in chemistry. The ensuing synergy...

Jeong, Yeuncheol; Datta, Timir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences The goal of the program is to understand the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules using photons and ions as probes. The current program is focussed on studying inner-shell photo-ionization and photo-excitation of atoms and molecules, molecular orientation effects in slow collisions, slowing and cooling molecules, and X-ray photo-excitation of laser-dressed atoms. The experimental and theoretical efforts are designed to break new ground and to provide basic knowledge that is central to the programmatic goals of the Department of Energy (DOE). Unique LBNL facilities such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ECR ion sources at the 88-inch cyclotron, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) are

303

Spectral Emission of Moving Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2006-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Chemical kinetics models for semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect

Chemical reactions in the gas-phase and on surfaces are important in the deposition and etching of materials for microelectronic applications. A general software framework for describing homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics utilizing the Chemkin suite of codes is presented. Experimental, theoretical and modeling approaches to developing chemical reaction mechanisms are discussed. A number of TCAD application modules for simulating the chemically reacting flow in deposition and etching reactors have been developed and are also described.

Coltrin, M.E.; Creighton, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meeks, E.; Grcar, J.F.; Houf, W.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Kee, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

306

Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

Anticipating the atom: popular perceptions of atomic power before Hiroshima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Before Hiroshima made the Bomb an object of popular concern, possible implications and applications of atomic physics had been discussed in the public forum. The new science of X-rays and radium promised the possibilities of unlimited energy and the transmutation of elements in the two decades leading up to World War 1. During the twenties, as scientific method struggled to keep pace with atomic theory, discussion centered on the feasibility of atomic disintegration as an energy source and the many uses of radium. The 1927 case of the New Jersey Radium Dial Painters, who sued their employers for compensation after contracting radium poisoning, revealed a dark side to the new science, that, along with the development of artificial radioactive isotopes by the Jollot-Curies in Paris, and, in Italy, Enrico Fenni's neutron bombardment experiments, sobered attitudes toward the ever-increasing probability of atomic power. When Otto Hahn finally split the atom in 1938, it opened the way to the practical industrial use of atomic fission, and stimulated a flurry of newspaper and magazine articles before World War 11 brought about censorship. Popular entertainment through 1945 reflects the extent to which atomic power had entered the public awareness. Atomic themes and motifs appeared in English language fiction as early as 1895, as did discussions of the social implications of the new science. Such popular culture imagery, including motion pictures and comic book superheroes, that presented the atom to mass audiences provide insight into the popular perceptions at the time, and to the shaping of attitudes toward the Bomb after Hiroshima.

d'Emal, Jacques-Andre Christian

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World-Class Industry ­ Oil and Gas Exploration & Recovery ­ Heavy Oil & Bitumen ­ Natural Gas, Coal Bed ­ Oil & Gas Engineering General Department Information ­ Faculty & Student Numbers ­ Scholarships, Labs of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering 4 Our Programs Chemical Engineering Biomedical Specialization Oil and Gas

Calgary, University of

309

California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Residential

310

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of Coal Water Slurries (CWS). Final report, September 1, 1991--July 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to understand the effect of low shear, high shear rheology, viscoelastic, and extensional properties on the atomization of CWS. In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays were determined at various air-to-CWS ratios using a Malvern 2600 particle size analyzer and a Delavan Solid Cone Atomizing Nozzle. Solids-loading, coal particle size distributions, and chemical additives were varied in order to determine the significant properties that influence CWS atomization. A correlation of the mass mean droplet size with high shear, viscoelastic and extensional behaviors were made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on CWS atomization.

Ohene, F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Manhattan Project: Adventures Inside the Atom  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM General Electric, National Archives (1948) Resources > Library Below is Adventures Inside the Atom, a comic book history of nuclear energy that was produced in 1948 by the General Electric Company. Scroll down to view the full-size images of each page. This publication was produced at the request of the the Assistant Manager for Public Education, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Atomic Energy Commission. It is reproduced here via the National Archives. Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 1 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 2 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 3 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 4 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 5 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 6 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 7 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 8 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 9

312

In-situ control system for atomization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

313

In-situ control system for atomization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Figliola, Richard S. (Central, SC); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation on the Bioavailability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation of contaminants in the terrestrial environment is greatly affected by a number of chemical factors and processes its fate, transport, and bioavailability. Traditionally, chemical extraction techniques have been

Sparks, Donald L.

316

Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides ...  

Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products United States Patent. Patent Number: 7,049,446: Issued: May 23, 2006:

317

Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture The Ohio State University (OSU) Project Number: FE0012136 Project Description The...

318

Chemical Engineering & Processing Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Novel Filter Material Could Cut Natural Gas Refining Costs. calcium atoms in iron-based crystals replaced with praseodymium ...

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Questions and Answers - Does an atom smasher really smash atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an accelerator? is an accelerator? Previous Question (What is an accelerator?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Where and how do you get your electrons for your accelerator?) Where and how do you get yourelectrons for your accelerator? Does an atom smasher really smash atoms? Well, yes, they do, but we now prefer to call them by their less aggression-centered name, "particle harmony disrupters." Of course some atom smashers do much more smashing than others. We use electrons in our accelerator to study the nucleus of an atom. Remember that electrons are negative, as are the electrons surrounding the target. Since like charged particles repel each other, our particles have to have enough energy to blast through that electron cloud to get to the nucleus. The electrons then

320

Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities  

SciTech Connect

We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Optimized U-MOT for experiments with ultracold atoms near surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an integrated wire-based magnetooptical trap for the simplified trapping and cooling of large numbers of neutral atoms near material surfaces. With a modified U-shaped current-carrying Cu structure we collect $>3\\times 10^8$ $^{87}$Rb atoms in a mirror MOT without using quadrupole coils. These atoms are subsequently loaded to a Z-wire trap where they are evaporatively cooled to a Bose-Einstein condensate close to the surface.

S. Wildermuth; P. Krüger; C. Becker; M. Brajdic; S. Haupt; A. Kasper; R. Folman; J. Schmiedmayer

2003-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

Labushev, Mikhail M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

Mikhail M. Labushev

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

METHOD OF RECOVERING TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS OF AN ATOMIC NUMBER BELOW 95  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The concentration of neptanium or plutonium by two carrier precipitation steps with identical carriers but using (after dissolution of the first carrier in nitric acid) a reduced quantity of carrier for the second precipitation is discussed. Carriers suitable are uranium(IV) hypophosphate, uranium(IV) pyrophosphate, uranium(IV) oxalate, thorium oxalate, thorium citrate, thorium tartrate, thorium sulfide, and uranium(IV) sulfide.

Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Stochastic Low Reynolds Number Swimmers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As technological advances allow us to fabricate smaller autonomous self-propelled devices, it is clear that at some point directed propulsion could not come from pre-specified deterministic periodic deformation of the swimmer's body and we need to develop strategies to extract a net directed motion from a series of random transitions in the conformation space of the swimmer. We present a theoretical formulation to describe the "stochastic motor" that drives the motion of low Reynolds number swimmers based on this concept, and use it to study the propulsion of a simple low Reynolds number swimmer, namely, the three-sphere swimmer model. When the detailed-balanced is broken and the motor is driven out of equilibrium, it can propel the swimmer in the required direction. The formulation can be used to study optimal design strategies for molecular-scale low Reynolds number swimmers.

Ramin Golestanian; Armand Ajdari

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

327

Physical and chemical sensor technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing emphasis on envirorunental issues, waste reduction, and improved efficiency for industrial processes has mandated the development of new chemical and physical sensors for field or in-plant use. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a number of technologies for sensing physical and chemical properties. Table 1 gives some examples of several sensors. that have been developed recently for environmental, industrial, commercial or government applications. Physical sensors of pressure, temperature, acceleration, acoustic vibration spectra, and ionizing radiation have been developed. Sensors developed at LLNL for chemical species include inorganic solvents, heavy metal ions`, and gaseous atoms and compounds. Primary sensing technologies we have employed have been based on optical fibers, semiconductor optical or radiation detectors, electrochemical activity, micromachined electromechanical (MEMs) structures, or chemical separation technologies. The complexities of these sensor systems range from single detectors to more advanced micro-instruments on-a-chip. For many of the sensors we have developed the necessary intelligent electronic support systems for both local and remote sensing applications. Each of these sensor technologies are briefly described in the remaining sections of this paper.

Balch, J.W.; Ciarlo, D.; Folta, J.; Glass, R.; Hagans, K.; Milanovich, F.; Sheem, S.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic energies of a few electron volts. Most studies of chemical kinetics made by traditional thermochemical. It is obvious that while some methods of theoretical chemical kinetics (for instance, "absolute" rate theory

Zare, Richard N.

329

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

producing uranium for the Mo"hz,t,a, Projec, can best be qwtcd Irom the Smyth official report - Atomic Energy - . ' .: CCL, + NaCl - ."-l Figure 6. apparatus used in electrcdytic...

330

Single artificial-atom lasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-state superconducting circuits are versatile systems in which quantum states can be engineered and controlled. Recent progress in this area has opened up exciting possibilities for exploring fundamental physics as well as applications in quantum information technology; in a series of experiments it was shown that such circuits can be exploited to generate quantum optical phenomena, by designing superconducting elements as artificial atoms that are coupled coherently to the photon field of a resonator. Here we demonstrate a lasing effect with a single artificial atom - a Josephson-junction charge qubit - embedded in a superconducting resonator. We make use of one of the properties of solid-state artificial atoms, namely that they are strongly and controllably coupled to the resonator modes. The device is essentially different from existing lasers and masers; one and the same artificial atom excited by current injection produces many photons.

O. Astafiev; K. Inomata; A. O. Niskanen; T. Yamamoto; Yu. A. Pashkin; Y. Nakamura; J. S. Tsai

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

u. S. Atomic Energy Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

October 31, 1949 Manager of Operations u. S. Atomic Energy Commission R. 0. Box 30, Ansonia Station New York ES, N. Y. MATERIALS 5+k& hJf Reference: SK:BL Attention: Mr. R. J....

332

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - About CSE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for Electrical Energy Storage: Tailored Interfaces Computational Postdoctoral Fellowships Contact Us CSE Intranet About CSE Director Emilio Brunel Director Emilio Bunel The Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division (CSE) is a science-based research, development, and early-stage engineering organization that conducts both fundamental and applied research using experimental, theoretical, and computational approaches. CSE research and development is distinguished by the development and application of fundamental understanding to yield transformational solutions that address issues of scientific and technological importance to

333

Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Laser induced chemical reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division of theINFRARED LASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

Orel, Ann E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Undergraduate Catalog Phone Numbers & Address  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interest Research Exemption Programs 11 ReglsJrationPeriod III 6 Group (WashPIRG) 14 Faculty Number 9 State NaUonal Guard ' . , Full-Time Student Requirements __'_ 9 Service and Research Credit 10 Tuition notice. All announcements in the Time Schedule are subject to change without notice and do not constitute

Kelly, Scott David

337

MOTOR POOL RESERVATIONS Reservation Number:_______________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MOTOR POOL RESERVATIONS Reservation Number:_______________ Evanston campus: Chicago campus: 2020: 312/503-9243 E-mail: motor-pool@northwestern.edu E-mail: motor-pool@northwestern.edu Hours: 8:00 a reservations require the "Organization Authorization for University Vehicles" form to be faxed to Motor Pool

Shull, Kenneth R.

338

Transition from LEDCOP to ATOMIC  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the development of the ATOMIC code, a new low to mid Z opacity code, which will replace the current Los Alamos low Z opacity code LEDCOP. The ATOMIC code is based on the FINE code, long used by the Los Alamos group for spectral comparisons in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and for non-LTE calculations, both utilizing the extensive databases from the atomic physics suite of codes based on the work of R.D. Cowan. Many of the plasma physics packages in LEDCOP, such as line broadening and free-free absorption, are being transferred to the new ATOMIC code. A new equation of state (EOS) model is being developed to allow higher density calculations than were possible with either the FINE or LEDCOP codes. Extensive modernization for both ATOMIC and the atomic physics code suites, including conversion to Fortran 90 and parallelization, are underway to speed up the calculations and to allow the use of expanded databases for both the LTE opacity tables and the non-LTE calculations. Future plans for the code will be outlined, including considerations for new generation opacity tables.

Magee, N. H. (Norman H.); Abdallah, J. (Joseph); Colgan, J. (James); Hakel, P. (Peter); Kilcrease, D. P. (David P.); Mazevet, S. (Stephane); Sherrill, M. E. (Manolo E.); Fontes, C. J. (Christopher J.); Zhang, H. (Honglin)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Atomic Physics Division 1999 - Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lying Rydberg states constitute a "frozen" Rydberg gas. ... of atom interactions in cold atomic gases and Bose ... or optical fields and tight confinement of ...

340

Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics with Ultracold Atoms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Wechselwirkung ultrakalter Atome mit der Mode eines optischen Resonators hoher Gu?te. Die Atome sind dabei in einem periodischen… (more)

Habibian, Hessam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (Redirected from International Atomic Energy Agency) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Atomic Energy Agency Name International Atomic Energy Agency Address PO Box 100, 1400 Place Vienna, Austria Number of employees 1001-5000 Year founded 1957 Phone number (+431) 2600-0 Coordinates 48.2°, 16.35° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.2,"lon":16.35,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Catalysis & Energy Conversion -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations iact logo Argonne National Laboratory along with its academic partners has established an Energy Frontier Research Center, the Institute for Atom-efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) whose focus is to advance the science of catalysis for the efficient conversion of energy resources into usable forms. IACT is one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers that DOE has established in the United States. IACT is a partnership among world-class scientists at Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using a multidisciplinary approach involving integrated catalyst synthesis, advanced characterization, catalytic experimentation, and computation, IACT is addressing key

343

Exhibitor: MURLIN CHEMICAL INC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Murlin Chemical, Inc. manufactures Bone Ash at its plant located in West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, USA. Established in 1978, Murlin Chemical supplies ...

344

Research in the chemical sciences: Summaries of FY 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This summary book is published annually on research supported by DOE`s Division of Chemical Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Research in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced batteries is arranged according to national laboratories, offsite institutions, and small businesses. Goal is to add to the knowledge base on which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. The special facilities used in DOE laboratories are described. Indexes are provided (topics, institution, investigator).

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752 Rosslyn, VA 22209

346

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752

347

Chemical Safety Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

348

Exotic atoms and leptonic conservations. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major 1989 efforts have been on two aspects of experiments at TRIUMF. One effort was production of muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium into a vacuum. The study includes rates relevant to muon-catalyzed fusion, and if there are found an adequate number of muons in the 2-S state, then precision energies will be measured. The second effort was to develop plans for kaonic atoms at the kaon factory. In addition, analyses from the experiments with pionic atoms at LAMPF were completed.

Kunselman, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chapter 13. Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemical reactions. · Only gases, for which the kinetic theory of Chapter 4 is applicable, are consideredChapter 13. Chemical Kinetics #12;· Why do some chemical reactions proceed with lighting speed when the way in which molecules combine to form products? · All of these questions involve chemical kinetics

Ihee, Hyotcherl

351

and Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological and Chemical Engineering Building #12;2 Biological and Chemical Engineering Building sta is constructing a new building that will house the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department and Chemical Engineering Building will provide critically needed space for innovators in multiple disciplines

Prinz, Friedrich B.

352

Chemical Sciences Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Development of Measurements and Standards for Biofuels; Chemical Metrology in Support of the US Hydrogen Infrastructure; ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

NIST: Atomic Spectros. - Spectral Continuum Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy: home page. 21. Spectral Continuum Radiation. Hydrogenic Species. Precise quantum-mechanical ...

354

SCHROEDINGER'S CAT IN AN ATOMIC CAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov SCHROEDINGER'S CAT IN AN ATOMIC CAGE. They ... conditions. Schroedinger cat states are extremely fragile. Any ...

355

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

356

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Radiation carcinogenesis was first noted in studies of individuals with occupational or therapeutic exposure to radiation. Data from long-term follow-up studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have greatly enhanced our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis. This book presents current results obtained from epidemiological studies and pathological studies on cancer among atomic bomb survivors. It includes a description of the dosimetry system which is currently being revised. Although many of the details about radiation carcinogenesis remain unknown or uncertain, it is clear that the incidence of radiation-induced cancer among atomic bomb survivors continues unabated 40 years after exposure. Recent increases in occupational and environmental exposure to radiation together with the need for a thorough review of radiation protection standards have led to increased recognition of the importance of research on radiation carcinogenesis and risk assessment.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Degeneracy Breaking of Hydrogen Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The three dimensional rotation group, SO(3), is a symmetry group of the normal hydrogen atom. Each reducible representation of this group can be associated with a degenerate energy level. If this atom is placed in an external magnetic field, the interaction between the orbital magnetic moment with this field will lead to a symmetry breaking where the symmetry group of the atom is a new group distinct from the SO(3) group. This phenomenon describes the normal Zeeman effect, where a degenerate energy level splits into several new energy levels. It is explicitly shown that each of the new energy levels can be associated with an irreducible representation of the new symmetry group.

Agung Trisetyarso; Pantur Silaban

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Questions and Answers - How many atoms are there in the world?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

body? body? Previous Question (How many atoms are in the human body?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (How many atoms would it take to create a ton?) How many atoms wouldit take to create a ton? How many atoms are there in the world? The quick answer is: more than you can count! But we can get an estimate of the number of atoms in the earth by first knowing what its mass is. The mass of an object is a measure of how much material the object has. The mass of the earth is 5.98*1027 grams. That's the scientific way to write a large number that has a lot of zeros. We can write the mass of the earth with all the zeros like this: 5,980,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 grams Below is a table that shows the breakdown of the fractional amount of the

359

Fundamental Chemical Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3) atomic and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, (4) gas metrology, (5 ... that control or affect the separation process in liquid chromatography stationary ...

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

Chemical Formula Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For example, when this option is not checked a search on H2 will match species containing deuterium and tritium atoms. ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Atomic structure and magnetic properties of Fe1-xCox alloys  

SciTech Connect

Using genetic algorithm with first-principle calculations, we searched for low-energy crystal structures of Fe1?xCox alloys. We found that Fe1?xCox alloys are highly configurationally degenerate with many additional off-stoichiometric stable structures to the well-known B2 structure. The average magnetic moment of Fe atom increases with concentration of Co in the alloy, while that of Co atom is almost constant, which are consistent with experiments and earlier studies. The magnetic moment of Fe atom is strongly dependent on the number of Co nearest neighbor and it increases with this number.

Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Ji, Min; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Harmon, Bruce; Ho, Kai-Ming

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

363

Ionization of Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied an ionization of alkali-metal Rydberg atoms by blackbody radiation (BBR). The results of the theoretical calculations of ionization rates of Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs Rydberg atoms are presented. Calculations have been performed for nS, nP and nD states which are commonly used in a variety of experiments, at principal quantum numbers n=8-65 and at the three ambient temperatures of 77, 300 and 600 K. A peculiarity of our calculations is that we take into account the contributions of BBR-induced redistribution of population between Rydberg states prior to photoionization and field ionization by extraction electric field pulses. The obtained results show that these phenomena affect both the magnitude of measured ionization rates and shapes of their dependences on n. A Cooper minimum for BBR-induced transitions between bound Rydberg states of Li has been found. The calculated ionization rates are compared with our earlier measurements of BBR-induced ionization rates of Na nS and nD Rydberg states with ...

Beterov, I I; Ryabtsev, I I; Entin, V M; Ekers, A; Bezuglov, N N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Supercomputers and atomic physics data  

SciTech Connect

The advent of the supercomputer has dramatically increased the possibilities for generating and using massive amounts of detailed fine structure atomic physics data. Size, speed, and software have made calculations which were impossible just a few years ago into a reality. Further technological advances make future possibilities seem endless. The cornerstone atomic structure codes of R.D. Cowan have been adapted into a single code CATS for use on Los Alamos supercomputers. We provide a brief overview of the problem; and report a sample CATS calculation using configuration interaction to calculate collision and oscillator strengths for over 300,000 transitions in neutral nitrogen. We also discuss future supercomputer needs. 2 refs.

Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Atomic Molecular and Optical Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Atomic Molecular and Optical Science Atomic Molecular and Optical Science Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Atomic Molecular and Optical Science Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This research area supports theory and experiments to understand structural and dynamical properties of atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. The research emphasizes the fundamental interactions of these systems with photons and electrons to characterize and control their behavior. These efforts aim to develop accurate quantum mechanical descriptions of properties and dynamical processes of atoms, molecules, and nanoscale

366

T Plant, Chemical Separation Building | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manhattan Project » Signature Manhattan Project » Signature Facilities » T Plant, Chemical Separation Building T Plant, Chemical Separation Building Photos of T-plant's construction and T-Plant's Chemical Separation Building Photos of T-plant's construction and T-Plant's Chemical Separation Building Completed in December 1944, T Plant was the world's first large-scale plutonium separation facility. Only about one atom in every 4,000 within the uranium slugs was converted to plutonium in the three Hanford production reactors, and these atoms had to be separated from the remaining uranium and other fission products that had been created. The highly radioactive uranium slugs were dropped into water pools behind the piles and then moved by remote-controlled rail cars to a storage facility five miles away. When short-lived radioactivity had sufficiently

367

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities. 3 figs.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.S.; Balsavich, J.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Coherent manipulation of atomic qubits in optical micropotentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally demonstrate the coherent manipulation of atomic states in far-detuned dipole traps and registers of dipole traps based on two-dimensional arrays of microlenses. By applying Rabi, Ramsey, and spin-echo techniques, we systematically investigate the dephasing mechanisms and determine the coherence time. Simultaneous Ramsey measurements in up to 16 dipole traps are performed and proves the scalability of our approach. This represents an important step in the application of scalable registers of atomic qubits for quantum information processing. In addition, this system can serve as the basis for novel atomic clocks making use of the parallel operation of a large number of individual clocks each remaining separately addressable.

A. Lengwenus; J. Kruse; M. Volk; W. Ertmer; G. Birkl

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library is a widely used tool for random number generation on high-performance computing platforms. ...

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

371

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

372

Control Measure Title Reference Number *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exhaustive search for emissions reductions to use in meeting federal Clean Air Act requirements for this 2008 PM2.5 Plan. Chapter 6 details the District’s process for developing control measures for reducing emissions of primary PM2.5 and PM2.5 precursors. This Appendix presents the product of this process: a master list of all candidate control measure ideas identified and evaluated for this plan. After assembling Appendix I, the District then screened the candidate measures into several categories: high priority measures to be implemented in the years immediately following plan adoption; measures that might be implemented in future years to allow for expected technology development; and those measures that require further study to identify when they could be implemented and what reductions they could achieve. Candidate control measure descriptions in Appendix I have the following major components:! Title and Number

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ERNSTMORITZARNDTUNIVERSITAT Absolute number density and kinetic analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma-chemical reactions. Therefore, from the analysis of their kinetics, one can learn more about of the technical applications, many plasma­chemical processes within the discharges as well as mechanisms determines all electron induced plasma-chemical processes and hence influences the kinetics of species

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

374

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Chemicals--Safety measures. 3. Hazardous wastes. I. National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Prudent) produced two major reports on laboratory safety and laboratory waste disposal: Prudent Practices Nanomaterials, 77 4.G Biohazards, 79 4.H Hazards from Radioactivity, 79 5 Management of Chemicals 83 5.A

Tai, Yu-Chong

375

Chemical Reference Data Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Reference Data Group. Welcome. The Chemical Reference Data Group compiles, evaluates, correlates and measures ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dynamical polarization in pionic atoms  

SciTech Connect

Dynamical nuclear polarization occurs in pionic atoms when a nuclear excitation of appropriate multipolarity is nearly degenerate with de-excitation of a pion atomic level. This phenomenon has been studied in several nuclei, one goal being to test the pion optical potential for pion atomic states normally ''hidden'' because of pion absorption. We find that, in addition to Coulomb mixing of the atomic and nuclear levels, strong interaction mixing and nuclear excitations above the lowest collective quadrupole mode are important for understanding the experimental results. All cases except /sup 110/Pd can then be understood. For /sup 110/Pd, additional nuclear structure information is needed to determine whether or not the conventional pion optical potential will suffice again. We discuss the sensitivity of dynamical polarization measurements to the parameters of the optical potential and to various aspects of nuclear structure. In particular, we find that pionic /sup 150/Sm provides a test of the interacting boson model and that the difference in neutron and proton radii predicted by Hartree-Fock calculations affects the mixing appreciably.

Dubach, J.F.; Moniz, E.J.; Nixon, G.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Lesson 6- Atoms to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most power plants make electricity by boiling water to make steam that turns a turbine. A nuclear power plant works this way, too. At a nuclear power plant, splitting atoms produce the heat to boil the water. This lesson covers inside the reactor, fission control and electricity generation.

378

Aerodynamic effects on fuel spray characteristics: Air-assist atomizer  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented on the internal structure of a kerosene fuel spray, generated with an air-assist type nozzle. Effects of atomization air flow rate and combustion air swirl on droplet transport processes have been investigated. Spatially-resolved measurements have been obtained on mean droplet size, number density and velocity, at different combustion air swirl and atomization air flow rates. An ensemble light scattering technique, based on measurement of the polarization ratio, and laser velocimetry have been used for these measurements. The results indicate that as atomization air flow rate increases, the spray becomes confined to a narrower spray angle; in addition, mean droplet size decreases and number density increases significantly along the spray centerline. Larger droplets are found generally on the spray boundary, and smaller ones near the spray centerline. In all cases, there is a gradual increase in mean droplet size along the spray centerline with axial distance. Under burning conditions the flame plume becomes short and intense, with fewer droplets penetrating through the flame envelope. Combustion air swirl and atomization air have a significant effect on the transport of droplets and on combustion characteristics of spray flames. 20 refs., 9 figs.

Presser, C.; Semerjian, H.G.; Gupta, A.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Navy Navy United States Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory Committee Chairman, Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. Harvard University John T. Conway Consolidated Edison Company Lauchlin M. Currie Carmel, California A. Hunter Dupree Brown University Ernest R. May Harvard University Robert P. Multhauf Smithsonian Institution Nuclear Navy 1946-1962 Richard G. Hewlett and Francis Duncan The University of Chicago Press Chicago and London The University of Chicago Press Chicago 60637 The University of Chicago Press Ltd., London Published 1974 Printed in the United States of America International Standard Book Number: 0-226-33219-5 Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 74-5726 RICHARD G. HEWLETT is chief historian of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. He is coauthor, with Oscar E.

380

Magneto-Optical Cooling of Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power and reduced complexity.

Raizen, Mark G; Rochester, Simon; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

Weisheit, J.C.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

382

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

383

Asteroseismology of chemically peculiar stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsational variability is observed in several types of main sequence stars with anomalous chemical abundances. In this contribution I summarize the relationship between pulsations and chemical peculiarities, giving special emphasis to rapid oscillations in magnetic Ap stars. These magneto-acoustic pulsators provide unique opportunities to study the interaction of pulsations, chemical inhomogeneities, and strong magnetic fields. Time-series monitoring of rapidly oscillating Ap stars using high-resolution spectrometers at large telescopes and ultra-precise space photometry has led to a number of important breakthroughs in our understanding of these interesting objects. Interpretation of the roAp frequency spectra has allowed constraining fundamental stellar parameters and probing poorly known properties of the stellar interiors. At the same time, investigation of the pulsational wave propagation in chemically stratified atmospheres of roAp stars has been used as a novel asteroseismic tool to study pulsations as a function of atmospheric height and to map in detail the horizontal structure of the magnetically-distorted p-modes.

O. Kochukhov

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of ChemicalD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description of chemical engineering: "chemical engineers seek to understand, manipulate, and control the molecular basis

Collins, Gary S.

385

Chemical Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... spectroscopy. Ultrafast lasers are used to … more. >> see all Chemical Physics programs and projects ... *. Bookmark and Share. ...

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Chemical Sciences Division - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD Chemical Sciences Division CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Research Areas Research Highlights Organization Contacts Publications Awards Employment...

387

Chemical biology drug discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords Chemical biology drug discovery high-throughput screening protein ligands proteases novel chemical and biochemical methods for the identification and optimization of protein ligands us of pro- tein ligands. Results of this research are translated into protein-specific, chemical probes

SchĂĽler, Axel

388

Chemical engineering Research !!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical engineering Research !! www.chemeng.lth.se Updated August 2012 #12;WWT Fermentation University/Faculty of Engineering-LTH/Department of Chemical Engineering Membrane Group Ann-Sofi Jönsson More research projects. #12;Lund University/Faculty of Engineering-LTH/Department of Chemical Engineering

389

Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites Finite Zeolites The Layer . . . Holes University (Brigitte Servatius -- WPI) #12;Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites. Chemical Zeolites · crystalline solid · units: Si + 4O Si O O O O · two covalent bonds per oxygen #12

Servatius, Brigitte

390

CHEMICAL AND PAPER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAFETY HANDBOOK For CHEMICAL AND PAPER ENGINEERING 2010-2011 #12;Page 1 Safety Guidelines Department of Chemical and Paper Engineering Miami University - Oxford, Ohio 45056 The following safety and Laboratory Coordinator Responsibilities III. Emergency Procedures IV. Chemical Storage V. Routine

Dollar, Anna

391

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 VIII. Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IX. Hazardous Waste: Hazardous Chemicals Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Appendix B: Means of Lab Waste Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Appendix C: Where to put specific wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Appendix D

Elowitz, Michael

392

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I(S.0 -01: I(S.0 -01: SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCEWSE Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 70, "Special Nuclear Material Regulations," o. license is hereby issued authorizing the licensee to receive and possess the special nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear material for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below; and to transfer such material to persons' authorized to receive it in accordance with the regulations in said Port. This license shall be deemed to contain the conditions specified in Section 70.32(a) of said regulations, and is subject to all applicable rules, regtdations, and orders of the Atomic Energy Commission now or hereafter in

393

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Geometric description of chemical reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the formalism of Geometrothermodynamics to describe chemical reactions in the context of equilibrium thermodynamics. Any chemical reaction in a closed system is shown to be described by a geodesic in a $2-$dimensional manifold that can be interpreted as the equilibrium space of the reaction. We first show this in the particular cases of a reaction with only two species corresponding to either two ideal gases or two van der Waals gases. We then consider the case of a reaction with an arbitrary number of species. The initial equilibrium state of the geodesic is determined by the initial conditions of the reaction. The final equilibrium state, which follows from a thermodynamic analysis of the reaction, is shown to correspond to a coordinate singularity of the thermodynamic metric which describes the equilibrium manifold.

Hernando Quevedo; Diego Tapias

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Future of Atomic Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

Fermi, E.

1946-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

Role of atomic collisions in fusion  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

Post, D.E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Summary of uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... element. This "H92 - 3/5CL" value is 1.09 e/atom for uranium or 0.002 e/atom for Z = 6 (ie, 40 % of the dipole correction). ...

398

Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 m/s, any gas in equilibrium (other than spin-polarized atomic hydro- ... lattice-trapped atoms, a physical picture with the simplicity and power of the ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - Past News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics of the American Physical Society (DAMOP) in ... and Determination of Relative Nuclear Charge Radius.". ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene under Tensile Loading · Atomistic Predictions of Age Hardening in Al-Cu Alloys.

403

NIST Atomic Physics Division 2000 - Technical Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Astrophysical Quantities," a handbook widely used ... and single-atom chemistry, where controlled ... understanding of fundamental processes occurring ...

404

Stable Isotope Enrichment by Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Exchange, and Distillation  

SciTech Connect

Applications of stable isotopes in medicine are becoming more widespread. This has resulted from the increased availability and reduced cost of these isotopes and the improved reliability and sensitivity of detection techniques such as carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Isotopes are used in compounds labeled with either the stable isotope itself, such as carbon-13 and oxygen-18, or with the radioactive isotope that can be produced by irradiating the stable isotope, such as the irradiation of xenon-124 to produce iodine-125. As the demand for stable isotopes increases, larger scale production facilities will be justifiable. The increased size of production facilities should result in yet lower unit selling prices. A large number of methods has been suggested for the separation of stable isotopes. This paper concerns itself with four methods which have proven extremely useful for the separation of the isotopes of low and medium atomic weight elements. The four processes discussed are gas phase thermal diffusion, liquid phase thermal diffusion, chemical exchange, and distillation.

Schwind, Dr. Roger A.; Rutherford, Dr. William M.

1973-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Renewable Identification Numbers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Identification Numbers RIN Format EPA uses the following format to determine RINs for each physical gallon of

406

Reference Number PCR Kit Name Manufacturer Kit ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Reference Number PCR Kit Name Manufacturer Kit Description 1 Profiler Life Technologies AmpFlSTR® Profiler® (Part number 403038) ...

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM TO THE EUROCHEMIC COMPANY, MOL, BELGIUM  

SciTech Connect

The United States Atomic Energy Commission program of assistance to the European Company for the Chemical Processing of Irradiated Fuels ("Eurochemic"), Mol, Belgium, is presented. Included are: background, formation, purpose, and structure of the Company; basic design considerations and a brief description of the proposed plant; present status of the and a list of participating organizations and members. (auth)

Shank, E.M.

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Collisionally Induced Atomic Clock Shifts and Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts and blackbody radiation effects for atomic clock transitions using a density matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Results for a finite temperature ${}^{87}$Sr ${}^1S_0$ ($F = 9/2$) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

Y. B. Band; I. Osherov

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - People - Fundamental Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Interactions Fundamental Interactions Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Linda Young, Argonne Distinguished Fellow and Group Leader phone: 630/252-8878, fax: 630/252-6210, e-mail: young@anl.gov Ph.D., Chemical Physics, University of California, Berkeley Ultrafast x-ray and laser science Strong-field control of x-ray processes Atomic and molecular behavior in strong-electromagnetic fields Precision measurements in atom traps Robert W. Dunford, Physicist phone: 630/252-4052, fax: 630/252-2864, email: dunford@anl.gov Ph.D., Physics, University of Michigan Experimental atomic physics Elliot Kanter, Physicist phone: 630/252-4050, fax: 630/252-2864, e-mail: kanter@anl.gov Bertold Krässig, Physicist phone 630/252-9230, fax 630/252-6210, e-mail kraessig@anl.gov Ph.D. / Dr. Rer. Nat., Physics, University of Freiburg, Germany

410

Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks Referencesfor a class of nonlinear chemical equations. SIAM J. Appl.to persistence analysis in chemical reaction networks. In:

Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. , Ed. , Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. J. Chem.Łd. Amer/can Chemical Society. Easlon. PA. 18042. Vol. Lof Laboratory Safety. the Chemical Rubber Company Cleveland.

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Theoretical atomic collision physics. Final report, July 1, 1987-- June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of research activities supported by the most recent grant to the theoretical atomic collision physics program at Rice University. For this most recent 3-year grant, the focus has been the study of excitation and charge-transfer in atom-atom and ion-atom collisions. Emphasis has been placed on low-velocity collision processes involving initially excited atoms, including ``low Rydberg`` atoms. Two particular objectives of this research were to examine the dependence of state-changing collision cross sections and other observables on the orientation and alignment of the initial excited orbitals and to look for ``intracollisional interference`` effects, speculated to arise from spatially separated interactions during a collision involving a highly excited atom. A number of radiative and non-radiative charge transfer studies involving ground-state atoms and ions were continued from the previous grant period. Several unanticipated personnel changes prevented execution of some of the proposed research, including the studies of collisions involving negative ions and electron-attaching atoms and the development of new theoretical techniques for handling the ``strong coupling`` regime. These remain challenging and fundamentally important research topics. Research highlights briefly described in the report deal with: spherical and non-spherical low-Rydberg atom collisions; alignment effects in collisions of Na(3p) with He{sup +} ions; near-resonant electron capture at very low energies; ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions, including electron capture; and low- energy processes involving collisions of H{sup +} with He, Na, and K atoms. The report also lists publications since 1991 reporting on the grant work.

Walters, G.K.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactive chemicals are presented widely in the chemical and petrochemical process industry. Their chemical reactivity hazards have posed a significant challenge to the industries of manufacturing, storage and transportation. The accidents due to reactive chemicals have caused tremendous loss of properties and lives, and damages to the environment. In this research, three classes of reactive chemicals (unsaturated hydrocarbons, self-reacting chemicals, energetic materials) were evaluated through theoretical and experimental methods. Methylcyclopentadiene (MCP) and Hydroxylamine (HA) are selected as representatives of unsaturated hydrocarbons and self-reacting chemicals, respectively. Chemical reactivity of MCP, including isomerization, dimerization, and oxidation, is investigated by computational chemistry methods and empirical thermodynamic–energy correlation. Density functional and ab initio methods are used to search the initial thermal decomposition steps of HA, including unimolecular and bimolecular pathways. In addition, solvent effects are also examined using water cluster methods and Polarizable Continuum Models (PCM) for aqueous solution of HA. The thermal stability of a basic energetic material, Nitroethane, is investigated through both theoretical and experimental methods. Density functional methods are employed to explore the initial decomposition pathways, followed by developing detailed reaction networks. Experiments with a batch reactor and in situ GC are designed to analyze the distribution of reaction products and verify reaction mechanisms. Overall kinetic model is also built from calorimetric experiments using an Automated Pressure Tracking Adiabatic Calorimeter (APTAC). Finally, a general evaluation approach is developed for a wide range of reactive chemicals. An index of thermal risk is proposed as a preliminary risk assessment to screen reactive chemicals. Correlations are also developed between reactivity parameters, such as onset temperature, activation energy, and adiabatic time to maximum rate based on a limited number, 37 sets, of Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) data. The research shows broad applications in developing reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. The methodology of reaction modeling in combination with molecular modeling can also be used to study other reactive chemical systems.

Wang, Qingsheng

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same  

SciTech Connect

A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

416

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New...

417

Pages that link to "Atomic City, Idaho" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Atomic City, Idaho" Atomic City, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: Atomic City,...

418

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 2.1 Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom Atomic;Chapter 3 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 3.1 Atomic Structure: relates the # of protons and neutrons of intercepts 2 2 1 Reduction not necessary Enclosure (221) #12;Chapter 12 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key

Grunlan, Melissa A.

419

Ultrafast effective multi-level atom method for primordial hydrogen recombination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmological hydrogen recombination has recently been the subject of renewed attention because of its importance for predicting the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. It has become clear that it is necessary to account for a large number n >~ 100 of energy shells of the hydrogen atom, separately following the angular momentum substates in order to obtain sufficiently accurate recombination histories. However, the multi-level atom codes that follow the populations of all these levels are computationally expensive, limiting recent analyses to only a few points in parameter space. In this paper, we present a new method for solving the multi-level atom recombination problem, which splits the problem into a computationally expensive atomic physics component that is independent of the cosmology, and an ultrafast cosmological evolution component. The atomic physics component follows the network of bound-bound and bound-free transitions among excited states and computes the resulting effectiv...

Ali-Haďmoud, Yacine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Atomic Energy Commission By Alice Buck  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atomic Energy Atomic Energy Commission By Alice Buck July 1983 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Office of the Executive Secretariat Office of History and Heritage Resources 1 Introduction Almost a year after World War II ended, Congress established the United States Atomic Energy Commission to foster and control the peacetime development of atomic science and technology. Reflecting America's postwar optimism, Congress declared that atomic energy should be employed not only in the Nation's defense, but also to promote world peace, improve the public welfare, and strengthen free competition in private

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

422

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - General Atomics (GA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

general-atomics-ga General general-atomics-ga General Atomics en The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" http://www.pppl.gov/node/1132

American Fusion News Category: 
atomics-ga">General Atomics (GA)
423

Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom.  

SciTech Connect

Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally. Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub J} can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

Hu, S.-M.; Lu, Z.-T.; Yan, Z.-C.; Physics; Univ. of Science and Technology of China; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of New Brunswick

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Test of the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a bosonic gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a trapped bosonic gas can be made observable. Application of continuous feedback control of the center of mass of the atomic cloud is shown to generate oscillations of the spatial extension of the cloud, whose amplitude can be directly used as a characterization of atom-atom correlations. Feedback parameters can be chosen such that the violation of a Schwarz inequality for atom-atom correlations can be tested at noise levels much higher than the standard quantum limit.

D. Ivanov; S. Wallentowitz

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Monitoring atom-atom entanglement and decoherence in a solvable tripartite open system in cavity QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve exactly the dynamics of two strongly-driven two-level atoms resonantly coupled to a dissipative cavity field mode. Starting with the cavity field vacuum state, we show that the entanglement of the atom-atom subsystem cannot be created or increased. On the other hand, when the atoms are initially entangled the atomic Hilbert space divides into two subspaces. One of them is decoherence free so that the initial atomic entanglement remains available for applications, even in presence of a low enough atomic decay rate. In the other subspace a measure of entanglement, decoherence, and also purity, are described by a similar functional behavior that can be monitored by joint atomic measurements. Furthermore, we show the possible generation of Schr\\"odinger-cat-like states for the whole system in the transient regime, as well as of entanglement for the cavity field and the atom-atom subsystems conditioned by measurements on the complementary subsystem.

Bina, Matteo; Lulli, Alfredo; Solano, Enrique

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Chemical evolution STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline Absorption Chemical evolution STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES 8. Absorption; chemical evolution Piet Piet van der Kruit, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute Absorption; chemical evolution #12;Outline Absorption Chemical evolution Outline Absorption Holmberg's analysis Analysis of Disney et al. Edge

Kruit, Piet van der

427

Atomic Physics Aspects of a Relativistic Nuclear Collider  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Atomic collision cross sections involving bare uranium nuclei are large at relativistic energies and will affect the design and operation of a relativistic nuclear collider (RNC). The most significant may be production of electron-positron pairs and muon pairs ({approx} 10{sup 8} per sec. and 2000 per sec. respectively for a 100 GeV/nucleon collider with a luminosity of 10{sup 27} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}). Although the pair production is a direct measure of the luminosity it is also a large source of background and capture of an electron from the pair by one of the nuclei will result in the loss of the ion. Another important loss mechanism is Coulomb excitation of the giant nuclear dipole and giant nuclear quadrupole resonances. Storing and colliding bare and highly-stripped uranium opens up new possibilities for novel atomic physics experiments and an alternate approach for present experiments. As examples, the use of a collider for experiments to study spontaneous decay of the super-critical state (both positron production and x-ray production) of quasi-atoms of atomic number Z > 172, and a storage-ring measurement of the ground state hyperfine structure of hydrogen like thallium as a test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) are discussed.

Gould, R.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An atomic view of surface diffusion on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of surface diffusion and cluster nucleation by field ion microscopy have provided a considerable amount of physical insight concerning the fundamental interactions that control dynamical processes on surfaces. The investigations rely not only on the FIM`s ability to resolve and track individual atoms on a surface, but also its ability to manipulate the number of adatoms and the size of clusters by the process of field desorption. Results of the investigations are surprising. Whereas metal atom diffusion was once thought to be a simple hopping process, FIM experiments have revealed new mechanisms for atom transport. Whereas cluster nucleation was once thought to be an aggregation process dependent only upon pairwise interactions between atoms, FIM investigations have shown that long-range and many body interactions can make non-negligible contributions to the overall process. By providing a brief overview of the experimental methods used in FIM surface diffusion studies and discussing a few selected applications, I hope to have conveyed some of the rich history as well as the current excitement associated with FIM investigations of dynamical processes on surfaces.

Kellogg, G.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Regularized perturbative series for the ionization potential of atomic ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study N-electron atoms with nuclear charge Z. It is well known that, in the cationic (Z > N) high-Z region, the atom behaves as a weakly interacting system. The anionic (Z < N) regime, on the other hand, is characterized by an instability threshold at $Z \\lesssim N-1$ below which the atom spontaneously emits an electron. We construct a regularized perturbative series (RPS) for the ionization potential of ions in an isoelectronic sequence that exactly reproduces both, the large Z and the Z near $Z_c$ limits. The large-Z expansion coefficients are analytically computed from perturbation theory, whereas the slope of the energy curve at Z=N-1 is computed from a kind of zero-range forces theory that uses as input the electron affinity and the covalent radius of the neutral atom with N-1 electrons. Relativistic effects at the level of first-order perturbation theory in the one-particle Hamiltonian are considered. Our RPS results are compared with numbers from the NIST database.

Gil, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences -- National Research Council. The atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) sciences represent a broad and diverse field in which much of the research is carried out by small groups. These groups generally have not operated in concert with each other and, prior to the establishment of CAMOS, there was no single committee or organization that accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general public health of the field as a whole. CAMOS has accepted this responsibility and currently provides a focus for the AMO community that is unique and essential. The membership of CAMOS is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include atomic physics, molecular science, and optics. A special effort has been made to include a balanced representation from the three subfields. (A roster is attached.) CAMOS has conducted a number of studies related to the health of atomic and molecular science and is well prepared to response to requests for studies on specific issues. This report brief reviews the committee work of progress.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Chemistry of the heaviest elements--one atom at a time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In keeping with the goal of the Viewpoint series of the Journal of Chemical Education, this article gives a 75-year perspective of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, including a 50-year retrospective view of past developments, a summary of current research achievements and applications, and some predictions about exciting, new developments that might be envisioned within the next 25 years. A historical perspective of the importance of chemical separations in the discoveries of the transuranium elements from neptunium (Z=93) through mendelevium (Z=101) is given. The development of techniques for studying the chemical properties of mendelevium and still heavier elements on the basis of measuring the radioactive decay of a single atom (''atom-at-a-time'' chemistry) and combining the results of many separate experiments is reviewed. The influence of relativistic effects (expected to increase as Z{sup 2}) on chemical properties is discussed. The results from recent atom-at-a-time studies of the chemistry of the heaviest elements through seaborgium (Z=106) are summarized and show that their properties cannot be readily predicted based on simple extrapolation from the properties of their lighter homologues in the periodic table. The prospects for extending chemical studies to still heavier elements than seaborgium are considered and appear promising.

Hoffman, Darleane C.; Lee, Diana M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemical Structure and Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2154-3 2154-3 UC-400 Annual Report 2000 Chemical Structure and Dynamics Steven D. Colson, Associate Director Robin S. McDowell, Program Manager and the Staff of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program April 2001 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Contents Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report 1. Introduction Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program......................................................... 1-3 2. Reaction Mechanisms at Liquid Interfaces Structure and Reactivity of Ice Surfaces and Interfaces G. A. Kimmel, Z. Dohnálek, K. P. Stevenson, R. S. Smith,

433

Local chemical and topological order in Al?Tb and its role in controlling nanocrystal formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How the chemical and topological short- to medium-range order develops in Al-Tb glass and its ultimate effect on the control of the high number density of face-centered-cubic-Al (fcc-Al) nuclei during devitrification are described. A combined study using high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy and fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) was conducted in order to resolve the local structure in amorphous Al90Tb10. Reverse Monte Carlo simulations and Voronoi tessellation analysis based on HEXRD experiments revealed a high coordination of Al around Tb atoms in both liquid and amorphous states. APT results show Al-rich and Al-depleted regions within the as-quenched alloy. A network structure of Tb-rich clusters divides the matrix into nanoscale regions where Al-rich clusters are isolated. It is this finely divided network which allows the amorphous structure to form. Al-rich regions are the locus for fcc-Al crystallization, which occurs before the intermetallic crystallization. FEM reveals medium-range ordered regions {approx}2 nm in diameter, consistent with fcc-Al and trigonal-like Al{sub 3}Tb crystal structures. We propose that the high coordination of Al around Tb limits diffusion in the intermetallic network, allowing for the isolated Al-rich regions to form at high density. These regions are responsible for the extremely high density of Al nanocrystal nuclei.

Kalay, Y.E.; Kalay, I.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Voyles, P.M.; Kramer, M.J. (METU-Turkey); (Cankaya); (Ames); (UCSB); (UW)

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING CORROSION TESTING  

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Corrosion Testing 3 Background: Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Process Treatment Tank Deposition Tank 3000 gpm Mixers Oxalic ...

435

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Plan m Chemical$torase Guidelines Chemical Is Incompatible llll i With ii Hydrocarbons (such as butane, propane,

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Manhattan Project: Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES (1890s-1939) Events A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 Philosophers of Ancient Greece reasoned that all matter in the universe must be composed of fundamental, unchangeable, and indivisible objects, which they called "atoma" ("ατoµα"). The exact nature of these atoms remained elusive, however, despite centuries of attempts by alchemists to create a "philosopher's stone" that could transmute atoms of lead to gold, prove the Greeks wrong, and make its inventors Modern model of an atom very rich. It was only in the late 1890s and the early twentieth-century that this view of a solid atom, bouncing around the universe like a billiard ball, was replaced by an atom that resembled more a miniature solar system, its electrons orbiting around a small nucleus. Explorations into the nature of the atom from 1919 to 1932 confirmed this new model, especially with Ernest Rutherford's 1919 success in finally transmuting an atom of one substance into another and with James Chadwick's 1932 discovery of the elusive final basic particle of the atom, the neutron. From 1932 to 1938, scientists around the world learned a great deal more about atoms, primarily by bombarding the nuclei of atoms and using a variety of particle accelerators. In 1938, word came from Berlin of the most startling result of them all: the nucleus of an atom could actually be split in two, or "fissioned." This breakthrough was quickly confirmed in the United States and elsewhere. According to the theories of Albert Einstein, the fission of an atom should result in a release of energy. An "atomic bomb" was now no longer just science fiction -- it was a distinct possibility.

437

Single-atom and two-atom Ramsey interferometry with quantized fields  

SciTech Connect

Implications of field quantization on Ramsey interferometry are discussed and general conditions for the occurrence of interference are obtained. Interferences do not occur if the fields in two Ramsey zones have a precise number of photons. However, in this case we show how an analog of Hanbury-Brown Twiss photon-photon correlation interferometry can be used to discern a variety of interference effects as the two independent Ramsey zones get entangled by the passage of the first atom. Interferences are restored by working with fields at a single-photon level. Generation of entangled states including states such as vertical bar 2,0>+e{sup i{theta}} vertical bar 0,2> is discussed.

Agarwal, G.S.; Pathak, P.K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Scully, M.O. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Evaluation of the potential to upgrade the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 to higher output energies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted output energy of the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 is given for various numbers of preamplifier stages and for various small signal gains in each stage. Additional possibilities for further increasing the output energy are given.

Riley, M.E.; Palmer, R.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The use of atomic level stress to characterize the structure of irradiated iron  

SciTech Connect

The behaviour of irradiated material near a primary knock on atom immediately after impact is of great importance for designing reactor materials. Currently, molecular dynamics simulations with classical force fields provide the foundation for understanding the resulting cascade. However, modern density functional calculations can now treat large enough numbers of atoms that they can provide additional details of the magnetic and electronic nature of irradiated samples. In this paper we calculate from first principles the atomic level stresses for an instantaneous configuration following the initiation of a low energy cascade in iron.

Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Ojha, Madhusudan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nicholson, Donald M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Bala [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Topological Mott insulators of ultracold atomic mixtures induced by interactions in one-dimensional optical superlattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present exactly solvable examples that topological Mott insulators can emerge from topologically trivial states due to strong interactions between atoms for atomic mixtures trapped in one-dimensional optical superlattice systems. The topological Mott insulating state is characterized by nonzero Chern number and appears in the strongly interacting limit as long as the total band filling factor is an integer, which is not sensitive to the filling of each component. The topological nature of the Mott phase can be revealed by observing the density profile of the trapped system. Our results can be also generalized to the multi-component atomic systems.

Zhihao Xu; Shu Chen

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Chemical Testing of Textiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Testing of Textiles is edited by Qinguo Fan and covers more subjects than the title implies. These subjects include fiber and yarn identification, ...

442

American Chemical Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. American Chemical Society (ACS). Purpose: Air and water mediate chemistry on Earth. ... Related Project(s): ACS. Details: ...

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Apparatus for chemical synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chemical Sciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME logo Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley Chemical Sciences Division imagemap...

445

Chemical Name Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Enter a chemical species name or pattern: (eg, methane, *2-hexene); Select the desired units for thermodynamic data: SI calorie-based; ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Brookhaven Chemical Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Physics While the field of physics generally strives to find compact and universal explanations for how the components of our universe interact, chemistry is traditionally...

448

The chemical composition of the Orion star forming region: stars, gas and dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a summary of main results from the studies performed in the series of papers "The chemical composition of the Orion star forming region". We reinvestigate the chemical composition of B-type stars in the Orion OB1 association by means of state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere codes, atomic models and techniques, and compare the resulting abundances with those obtained from the emission line spectra of the Orion nebula (M42), and recent determinations of the Solar chemical composition.

Simón-Díaz, S; Przybilla, N; Stasi?ska, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Atomic Energy Agency Name International Atomic Energy Agency Address PO Box 100, 1400 Place Vienna, Austria Number of employees 1001-5000 Year founded 1957 Phone number (+431) 2600-0 Coordinates 48.2°, 16.35° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.2,"lon":16.35,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Mr. Robert Muller, Manager General Chemical Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S 1997 S 1997 Mr. Robert Muller, Manager General Chemical Corporation 6300 Philadelphia Pike Claymont, Delaware 19703 Dear Mr. Muller: As you may know, the Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear development to determine whether they need to be cleaned up and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. Mr. D. T. Murphy of Allied Chemical Corporation, Delaware Valley Works in Marcus Hook, was notified on October 2, 1979, that the former Allied site in North Claymont had been identified as one such site, as a result of research and development work and small pilot-scale operations conducted there during

451

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Fundamental Interactions -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential energy surface potential energy surface A potential energy surface for the reaction of CH and N2. comparison of experimental data Comparison of experimental and theoretical rate data for the reaction of OH and C3H8. Chemical Kinetics An accurate computational model for combustion will require a knowledge of the rates of all relevant chemical reactions over a large range of temperature and pressure. The goal of this subtask is to provide the necessary rates through a combination of direct experimental measurement and theoretical modeling. The experimental component of this subtask involves a combination of complementary techniques based on the use of shock tubes and flow tubes, along with a variety of detection methods, including atomic resonance absorption spectrometry, electronic absorption

452

Bonded Radii and the Contraction of the Electron Density of the Oxygen Atom by Bonded Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The bonded radii for more than 550 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 crystals, determined from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are compared with the effective ionic, ri(M), and crystal radii, rc(M), for metal atoms, M, bonded to O atoms. At odds with the fixed ionic radius of 1.40 Ĺ, assumed for the O atom in the compilation of the ionic radii, the bonded radius for the atom, rb(O), is not fixed but displays a relatively wide range of values as the O atom is progressively polarized by the M-O bonded interactions: as such, rb(O) decreases systematically from 1.40 Ĺ (the Pauling radius of the oxide anion) as bond lengths decrease when bonded to an electropositive atom like sodium, to 0.64 Ĺ (Bragg’s atomic radius of the O atom) when bonded to an electronegative atom like nitrogen. Both rb(M) and rb(O) increase in tandum with the increasing coordination number of the M atom. The bonded radii of the M atoms are highly correlated with both ri(M) and rc(M), but they both depart systematically from rb(M) and become smaller as the electronegativity of the M atom increases and the M-O bond length decreases. The well-developed correlations between both sets of radii and rb(M) testifies to the relative precision of both sets of radii and the fact that both sets are highly correlated the M-O bond 1 lengths. On the other hand, the progressive departure of rb(O) from the fixed ionic radius of the O atom with the increasing electronegativity of the bonded M atom indicates that any compilation of sets of ionic radii, assuming that the radius for the oxygen atom is fixed in value, is problematical and impacts on the accuracy of the resulting sets of ionic and crystal radii thus compiled. The assumption of a fixed O atom radius not only results in a negative ionic radii for several atoms, but it also results in values of rb(M) that are much as ~ 0.6 Ĺ larger than the ri(M) and rc(M) values, respectively, particularly for the more electronegative M atoms. On the other hand, the ionic radii are in closer agreement with rb(M) for the more electropositive atoms. Notwithstanding that ionic radii are typically smaller than bonded radii, particularly for the more electronegative atoms, they have been used with considerable success in understanding and rationalizing problems and properties in crystal chemistry primarily because both ionic and crystal radii are highly correlated on a one-to-one basis with both the bonded radii and the associated M-O bond lengths. The lack of agreement between the effective ionic and crystal radii and the bonded radii for the more shared bonded interactions is ascribed to the progressive increase in the polarization of the O atom by the bonded atoms with a concomitant decrease in its radius, a factor that was neglected in the compilation of ionic and crystal radii for fluorides, oxides, sulfides and nitrides. This accounts for ionic radii for these materials being smaller than the bonded radii for the more electronegative atoms.

Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Chemical Processing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Processing FAQS Chemical Processing FAQS August 2010 STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency Critically analyze system design-basis documentation and related safety documentation to ensure application of the principle of safety in design as described in DOE O 413.3-1 (2006), Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets and associated guides. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph A 3 2 Evaluate DOE facility and program-related chemical processes for safe and efficient process startup, operation, maintenance, and testing, including emergency systems. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph D 5 4 Verify the application of quality assurance, configuration management, and safety requirements to chemical

454

Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

M. Jarvinen

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ultrafast probing of ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets  

SciTech Connect

The ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets are studied with time-resolved extreme ultraviolet ion imaging spectroscopy. At excitation energies of 23.6 {+-} 0.2 eV, Rydberg atoms in n= 3 and n= 4 states are ejected on different time scales and with significantly different kinetic energy distributions. Specifically, n= 3 Rydberg atoms are ejected with kinetic energies as high as 0.85 eV, but their appearance is delayed by approximately 200 fs. In contrast, n= 4 Rydberg atoms appear within the time resolution of the experiment with considerably lower kinetic energies. Major features in the Rydberg atom kinetic energy distributions for both principal quantum numbers can be described within a simple elastic scattering model of localized perturbed atomic Rydberg atoms that are expelled from the droplet due to their repulsive interaction with the surrounding helium bath. Time-dependent kinetic energy distributions of He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 3}{sup +} ions are presented that support the formation of molecular ions in an indirect droplet ionization process and the ejection of neutral Rydberg dimers on a similar time scale as the n= 3 Rydberg atoms.

Buenermann, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg; Neumark, Daniel M. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Haxton, Daniel J.; Gessner, Oliver [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

CTrigger: Exposing Atomicity Violation Bugs from Their Hiding Places  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the two molecules, broken down by atom, helps the user to understand which atoms of the drug and protein

Lu, Shan

457

Monitoring atom-atom entanglement and decoherence in a solvable tripartite open system in cavity QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a fully analytical solution of the dynamics of two strongly-driven atoms resonantly coupled to a dissipative cavity field mode. We show that an initial atom-atom entanglement cannot be increased. In fact, the atomic Hilbert space divides into two subspaces, one of which is decoherence free so that the initial atomic entanglement remains available for applications, even in presence of a low enough atomic decay rate. In the other subspace a measure of entanglement, decoherence, and also purity, are described by a similar functional behavior that can be monitored by joint atomic measurements. Furthermore, we show the possible generation of Schr\\"odinger-cat-like states for the whole system in the transient regime, as well as of entanglement for the cavity field and the atom-atom subsystems conditioned by measurements on the complementary subsystem.

Matteo Bina; Federico Casagrande; Alfredo Lulli; Enrique Solano

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

458

Use of Chemical Pretreatment to Enhance Liquid Waste of Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details unique chemical pretreatment and processing techniques presently used by utilities in their nuclear plant liquid radwaste treatment programs. It presents specific utility experience from a number of plants employing these processing alternatives.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

459

Interaction of a two-level atom with squeezed light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a degenerate parametric oscillator whose cavity contains a two-level atom. Applying the Heisenberg and quantum Langevin equations, we calculate in the bad-cavity limit the mean photon number, the quadrature variance, and the power spectrum for the cavity mode in general and for the signal light and fluorescent light in particular. We also obtain the normalized second-order correlation function for the fluorescent light. We find that the presence of the two-level atom leads to a decrease in the degree of squeezing of the signal light. It so turns out that the fluorescent light is in a squeezed state and the power spectrum consists of a single peak only.

Eyob Alebachew; K. Fesseha

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fast library for number theory: an introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss FLINT (Fast Library for Number Theory), a library to support computations in number theory, including highly optimised routines for polynomial arithmetic and linear algebra in exact rings.

William B. Hart

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Residential" "Sourcekey","NA1501SNM8","NA1508SNM8","NA1509SNM8" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Count)","New Mexico Natural Gas Number of...

462

Stochastic Chemical Reactions in Micro-domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional chemical kinetics may be inappropriate to describe chemical reactions in micro-domains involving only a small number of substrate and reactant molecules. Starting with the stochastic dynamics of the molecules, we derive a master-diffusion equation for the joint probability density of a mobile reactant and the number of bound substrate in a confined domain. We use the equation to calculate the fluctuations in the number of bound substrate molecules as a function of initial reactant distribution. A second model is presented based on a Markov description of the binding and unbinding and on the mean first passage time of a molecule to a small portion of the boundary. These models can be used for the description of noise due to gating of ionic channels by random binding and unbinding of ligands in biological sensor cells, such as olfactory cilia, photo-receptors, hair cells in the cochlea.

D. Holcman; Z. Schuss

2004-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

463

Number: 1 Description: How did the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 80 Description: What part did ITT (International Telephone and Telegraph) and Anaconda Copper play in the ...

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

464

Number: 1 Description: What powers did ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... top> Number: 10 Description: What is one of the major problems with electronic producing turbines (windmills) in California? ...

2002-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process and plan 3 Chemical Cleaning * Oxalic Acid can get tanks clean - Tank 16 set a standard in 1982 - Tanks 5-6 Bulk OA cleaning results under evaluation * However, the downstream flowsheet and financial impacts of handling the spent acid were unacceptable Before After Tank 16 Tank 16 4 Oxalic Acid Flowsheet Impacts Evap Sludge Washing Evap Feed/Drop Tank 8 Wt% Oxalic Acid Neutralization Tank Solids Liquid High oxalate concentration Negligible oxalate concentration * Oxalates from chemical cleaning impact salt processing * A process change was needed Evaporator Saltstone Vaults DWPF Filled Canisters 5 Vision * Eliminate the impacts to the Tank Farm

466

Modelling the chemical evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their chemical issues, as there are element abundances, gradients, and ratios, with observations not only the present-day values are used but also their temporal evolution from the first era of metal enrichment. Here we will provide some insight into basics of chemical evolution models, highlight advancements, and discuss a few applications.

Hensler, Gerhard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Controlling chemical reactions of a single particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The control of chemical reactions is a recurring theme in physics and chemistry. Traditionally, chemical reactions have been investigated by tuning thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature or pressure. More recently, physical methods such as laser or magnetic field control have emerged to provide completely new experimental possibilities, in particular in the realm of cold collisions. The control of reaction pathways is also a critical component to implement molecular quantum information processing. For these undertakings, single particles provide a clean and well-controlled experimental system. Here, we report on the experimental tuning of the exchange reaction rates of a single trapped ion with ultracold neutral atoms by exerting control over both their quantum states. We observe the influence of the hyperfine interaction on chemical reaction rates and branching ratios, and monitor the kinematics of the reaction products. These investigations advance chemistry with single trapped particles towards achieving quantum-limited control of chemical reactions and indicate limits for buffer gas cooling of single ion clocks.

Lothar Ratschbacher; Christoph Zipkes; Carlo Sias; Michael Köhl

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Subgiants as probes of galactic chemical evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical abundances for 23 candidate subgiant stars have been derived with the aim at exploring their usefulness for studies of galactic chemical evolution. High-resolution spectra from ESO CAT-CES and NOT-SOFIN covered 16 different spectral regions in the visible part of the spectrum. Some 200 different atomic and molecular spectral lines have been used for abundance analysis of about 30 elemental species. The wings of strong, pressure-broadened metal lines were used for determination of stellar surface gravities, which have been compared with gravities derived from Hipparcos parallaxes and isochronic masses. Stellar space velocities have been derived from Hipparcos and Simbad data, and ages and masses were derived with recent isochrones. Only 12 of the stars turned out to be subgiants, i.e. on the "horizontal" part of the evolutionary track between the dwarf- and the giant stages. The abundances derived for the subgiants correspond closely to those of dwarf stars. With the possible exceptions of lithium and carbon we find that subgiant stars show no "chemical" traces of post-main-sequence evolution and that they are therefore very useful targets for studies of galactic chemical evolution.

Patrik Thoren; Bengt Edvardsson; Bengt Gustafsson

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Harnessed Atom | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » The Harnessed Atom Services » The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased, and up-to-date information on the roles that energy and nuclear science play in our lives. The curriculum includes essential principles and fundamental concepts of energy science. This teacher's kit is an updated and expanded edition of the acclaimed 1985 Harnessed Atom curriculum from the U.S. Department of Energy. It was developed with extensive input from classroom teachers across the country in pilot test reviews and workshops, as well as technical reviews from scientists and experts at universities, professional societies, and

470

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism res...

Maunz, P; Schuster, I; Syassen, N; Pinkse, P W H; Rempe, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Atomic force microscope: Enhanced sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are a recent development representing the state of the art in measuring ultrafine surface features. Applications are found in such fields of research as biology, microfabrication, material studies, and surface chemistry. Fiber-optic interferometer techniques developed at LLNL offer the potential of improving the vertical resolution of these instruments by up to 2 orders of magnitude. We are attempting to replace the current AFM measurement scheme, which consists of an optical beam deflection approach, with our fiber-optic interferometer scheme, a much more sensitive displacement measurement technique. In performing this research, we hope to accomplish two important goals; (1) to enhance the sensitivity of the AFM, and (2) to achieve important improvements in our fiber-optic interferometer technology.

Davis, D.T.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Volume 52, number 3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 15 December 1977 MULTIPHOTON IONIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

observe the disappearance/appearance of light from the matter-radiation interaction. An alternative, beam species The output from a nitrogen-pumped (~5 pps) tuna- ble dye laser (Molectron Dl-200) crosses

Zare, Richard N.

473

Manhattan Project: Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT (1932-1938) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 M. Stanley Livingston and Ernest O. Lawrence in front of a 27-inch cyclotron, Rad Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 1934. In the 1930s, scientists learned a tremendous amount about the structure of the atom by bombarding it with sub-atomic particles. Ernest O. Lawrence's cyclotron, the Cockroft-Walton machine, and the Van de Graaff generator, developed by Robert J. Van de Graaff at Princeton University, were particle accelerators designed to bombard the nuclei of various elements to disintegrate atoms. Attempts of the early 1930s to split atoms, however, required huge amounts of energy because the first accelerators used proton beams and alpha particles as sources of energy. Since protons and alpha particles are positively charged, they Albert Einstein met substantial resistance from the positively charged target nucleus when they attempted to penetrate atoms. Even high-speed protons and alpha particles scored direct hits on a nucleus only approximately once in a million tries. Most simply passed by the target nucleus. Not surprisingly, Ernest Rutherford, Albert Einstein (right), and Niels Bohr regarded particle bombardment as useful in furthering knowledge of nuclear physics but believed it unlikely to meet public expectations of harnessing the power of the atom for practical purposes anytime in the near future. In a 1933 interview, Rutherford called such expectations "moonshine." Einstein compared particle bombardment with shooting in the dark at scarce birds, while Bohr, the Danish Nobel laureate, agreed that the chances of taming atomic energy were remote.

474

Theory of atomic motion in resonant radiation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic motion in resonant and near resonant electromagnetic radiation is investigated theoretically. The exposition begins with a study of atomic motion in a resonant standing light wave, with a view toward isotope separation by selective photodeflection, and proceeds to the investigation of more general problems of atomic motion in resonant radiation. The body of the work consists of six chapters, each of which was prepared as a manuscript for publication in the open literature.

Cook, R.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method for enhanced atomization of liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for atomizing a slurry or liquid process stream in which a slurry or liquid is passed through a nozzle to provide a primary atomized process stream, an improvement which comprises subjecting the liquid or slurry process stream to microwave energy as the liquid or slurry process stream exits the nozzle, wherein sufficient microwave heating is provided to flash vaporize the primary atomized process stream.

Thompson, Richard E. (27121 Puerta del Oro, Mission Viejo, CA 92691); White, Jerome R. (44755 Wyandotte, Hemet, CA 92544)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical engineering Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor design

Wang, Hai

477

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Enrollment by petition only. CHE 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor

Wang, Hai

478

NIST Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). ... Access the Data. ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Concerns with standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... pair production cross-section in the nuclear field (? n ... upon angle (in f 0 ) and energy (in f ... All general theories make the isolated atom approximation ...

480

Atom Manipulation with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nanostructure from an unknown random collection of atoms without human intervention. ... a set of extensible rules, and allows for error correction. ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic number chemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission - written by Alice L. BuckWashington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, July 1983. 41 pp. 

482

Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atom probe tomography (APT) and analytical transmission .... of a Leaking Type 316 Socket Weld in a Boron Injection Tank Sampling Line.

483

Quantization of Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the atomic and nuclear rest masses. Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

F. A. Gareev; G. F. Gareeva; I. E. Zhidkova

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

484

Prospects for Atomic-Scale Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atomic-scale tomography (AST) may be defined as any technique that ... Initial Age Hardening and Nanostructural Evolution in a Cu-Ni-P Alloy.

485

Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to produce unique single crystals and epitaxial structures that are deposited with atomic-level precision is critical for many applications, such as thermoelectrics,...

486

NIST Unveils Chip-Scale Atomic Clock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 times smaller than any other atomic clock—has ... precise timekeeping in portable, battery-powered devices ... to be operated on batteries) and are ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

487

Schroedinger's Cat in an Atomic Cage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Schroedinger's Cat in an Atomic Cage. ... ``Schroedinger's cat'' soon became a shorthand way to refer to a whole class of superposed states. ...

488

Primary Atomic Frequency Standards at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a set of four quartz oscillators calibrated against the mean solar second [4 ... The cesium oven, operated near 100 C, creates a vapor of atoms that are ...

2001-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

489

NIST Atomic Physics Division 2000 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Although these data are needed for magnetic fusion research, astronomy, and industry, there is ... Physics of Cold, Trapped Gases of Neutral Atoms. ...

490

Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FW96 JR Fuhr and WL Wiese, NIST Atomic Transition Probability Tables, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th ed., DR Lide, ed. CRC ...

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

491

Critically Evaluated Atomic Transition Probabilities for Sulfur ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this new work all ionization stages (except for hydro- genic) are covered. The data are presented in separate tables for each atom and ion. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

492

Platform Chemicals from an Oilseed Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US chemical industry is $460 billion in size where a $150 billion segment of which is non-oxygenated chemicals that is sourced today via petroleum but is addressable by a renewable feedstock if one considers a more chemically reduced feedstock such as vegetable oils. Vegetable oil, due to its chemical functionality, provides a largely untapped opportunity as a renewable chemical source to replace petroleum-derived chemicals and produce platform chemicals unavailable today. This project examined the fertile intersection between the rich building blocks provided by vegetable oils and the enhanced chemical modification capability provided by metathesis chemistry. The technology advanced in this study is the process of ethylene cross-metathesis (referred to as ethenolysis) with vegetable oil and vegetable oil derivatives to manufacture the platform-chemical 9-decenoic acid (or 9DA) and olefin co-products. The project team meet its goals of demonstrating improved catalyst efficiencies of several multiples, deepening the mechanistic understanding of metathesis, synthesis and screening of dozens of new catalysts, designing and modeling commercial processes, and estimating production costs. One demonstrable result of the study was a step change improvement in catalyst turnover number in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate as reported here. We met our key measurable of producing 100 lbs of 9DA at the pilot-scale, which demonstrated ability to scale-up ethenolysis. DOE Project funding had significant positive impact on development of metathetically modified vegetable oils more broadly as the Cargill/Materia partnership, that was able to initiate primarily due to DOE funding, has succeeded in commercializing products, validating metathesis as a platform technology, and expanding a diverse products portfolio in high value and in large volume markets. Opportunities have expanded and business development has gained considerable momentum and enabled further expansion of the Materia/Cargill relationship. This project exceeded expectations and is having immediate impact on DOE success by replacing petroleum products with renewables in a large volume application today.

Tupy, Mike; Schrodi Yann

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

493

Quantum insulating states of F=2 cold atoms in optical lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this Letter we study various spin correlated insulating states of F=2 cold atoms in optical lattices. We find that the effective spin exchange interaction due to virtual hopping contains an {\\em octopole} coupling between two neighboring lattice sites. Depending on scattering lengths and numbers of particles per site the ground states are either rotationally invariant dimer or trimer Mott insulators or insulating states with various spin orders. Three spin ordered insulating phases are ferromagnetic, cyclic and nematic Mott insulators. We estimate the phase boundaries for states with different numbers of atoms per lattice site.

Fei Zhou; Gordon W. Semenoff

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

494

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Nanoscale Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Science Nanoscale Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. The primary goal of the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, is to understand photoconversion processes in nanoscale, excitonic photoconversion systems, such as semiconductor quantum dots, molecular dyes, conjugated molecules and polymers, nanostructured oxides, and carbon nanotubes. Closely associated with this goal are efforts to gain an understanding of how to use chemistry and physical tools to control and maximize the photoconversion process. The innovative chemistry and physics that evolve from these fundamental studies are used on a number of applied projects, maximizing the benefits from these discoveries.

496

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF OLIN MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPORATION Pasadena, Texas  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OLIN MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPORATION OLIN MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPORATION Pasadena, Texas . Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program -- OLIN MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPORATION Pasadena, Texas At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation plant in Pasadena, Texas (see Fig. l), on November 18, 1977, to assess the radio- logical status of those facilities utilized under an Atomic Energy Commission raw materials contract for a period determined to be during the early 1950s. M. S. Davenport, Plant Manager, provided information

497

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

498

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

499

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

500

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...