Sample records for atomic number chemical

  1. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  2. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  3. Distribution Category: Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic, Molecular, and Chemical Physics (UC-411) ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, TIlinois 60439 ANLI APSILS-151 RESULTS OF DESIGN CALCULATIONS FOR THE...

  4. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  5. Chemical factors influencing selenium atomization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren, Mary Sue

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomization. (August 1980) Mary Sue Buren, B, S. , Angelo State University Chairman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. Thomas M. Vickrey Selenium in an acid1c matrix was analyzed using graphite furnace atom1c absorption with Zeeman-effect background correct1on.... Nickel(II} and lanthanum( III) were introduced as matrix modifiers to determine their effect on interferences 1n selenium atom1zation. In add1tion to matr1x mod1ficat1on, surface coating the graphite furnace with z1rconium and tantalum salts was also...

  6. atomic number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  7. atomic mass number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  8. atomic number electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  9. atomic number range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  10. atomic number density: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We study atom-atom correlations and relative...

  11. THE NEW ELEMENT CALIFORNIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 98)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the chemical homologs of europium (No. 63)~ gadolinium (Nooterbium-gadolinium-europium. The comparison is based in part

  12. atomic number materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atomic number materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atomic number fluctuations in a...

  13. THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 97) Stanley G. Thompson, Albert Ghiorso, and Glenn T.Rev Eventually 5 S • G. Thompson, Physo Revo 76, 319 (1949)0~'Street, Ghiorso, and Thompson, unpublished work. UCRL-669

  14. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching. Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching. Abstract: We describe a solid state Br atom source for...

  15. Laboratory Chemical Hygiene Plan Building and Room Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    1 Laboratory Chemical Hygiene Plan Building and Room Numbers: Engineering Research Building 1125 or other Person in Charge: Paul G. Evans Phone: (608) 265-6773 Email: evans@engr.wisc.edu Chemical Hygiene. It is also available online at http://xray.engr.wisc.edu/resources/chemical_hygiene_plan_8-08.pdf

  16. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  17. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adsorbed in a zirconium oxide nanobowl. The brown atoms are surface oxygen and the coral atoms are zirconium. Carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms of fructose molecules are...

  18. Sub-Poissonian atom number fluctuations using light-assisted collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. R. P. Sortais; A. Fuhrmanek; R. Bourgain; A. Browaeys

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate experimentally the number statistics of a mesoscopic ensemble of cold atoms in a microscopic dipole trap loaded from a magneto-optical trap, and find that the atom number fluctuations are reduced with respect to a Poisson distribution due to light-assisted two-body collisions. For numbers of atoms N>2, we measure a reduction factor (Fano factor) of 0.72+/-0.07, which differs from 1 by more than 4 standard deviations. We analyze this fact by a general stochastic model describing the competition between the loading of the trap from a reservoir of cold atoms and multi-atom losses, which leads to a master equation. Applied to our experimental regime, this model indicates an asymptotic value of 3/4 for the Fano factor at large N and in steady state. We thus show that we have reached the ultimate level of reduction in number fluctuations in our system.

  19. CHEMICAL REDUCTION OF REFRACTORY OXIDES BY ATOMIC HYDROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by thermal energy atanic hydrogen has been investigated by00 2 is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with A1 0 2 3 isof redudng AlP3 by atomic hydrogen can he ohtained from the

  20. Volume 33, number 2 OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS May 1980 THE PROCESS OF ENERGY TRANSFER BETWEENEXCITED SODIUM ATOMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud Jr., Carlos R.

    Volume 33, number 2 OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS May 1980 THE PROCESS OF ENERGY TRANSFER BETWEENEXCITED SODIUM ATOMS J. KRASINSKI, T. STACEWICZ Institute of Experimental Physics WarsawUniversity, 00681 Warsaw,Poland(nX) denotes the sodium atom in one of the higher excited states. The energy difference AE is supplied

  1. Institute for Atom-efficient Chemical Transformations trifold...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of theoretical insights at the atomic level, providing guidance in the discovery of new catalytic materials. Selectivity of formic acid decomposition to CO 2 as a function of...

  2. Extended Coherence Time with Atom-Number Squeezed Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Li; Ari K. Tuchman; Hui-Chun Chien; Mark A. Kasevich

    2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherence properties of Bose-Einstein condensates offer the potential for improved interferometric phase contrast. However, decoherence effects due to the mean-field interaction shorten the coherence time, thus limiting potential sensitivity. In this work, we demonstrate increased coherence times with number squeezed states in an optical lattice using the decay of Bloch oscillations to probe the coherence time. We extend coherence times by a factor of 2 over those expected with coherent state BEC interferometry. We observe quantitative agreement with theory both for the degree of initial number squeezing as well as for prolonged coherence times.

  3. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marshall Name Christopher L. Marshall Institution Argonne National Laboratory Department Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Areas of Focus Characterization & Catalytic...

  4. Cavity Nonlinear Optics at Low Photon Numbers from Collective Atomic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhadeep Gupta; Kevin L. Moore; Kater W. Murch; Dan M. Stamper-Kurn

    2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on Kerr nonlinearity and dispersive optical bistability of a Fabry-Perot optical resonator due to the displacement of ultracold atoms trapped within. In the driven resonator, such collective motion is induced by optical forces acting upon up to $10^5$ $^{87}$Rb atoms prepared in the lowest band of a one-dimensional intracavity optical lattice. The longevity of atomic motional coherence allows for strongly nonlinear optics at extremely low cavity photon numbers, as demonstrated by the observation of both branches of optical bistability at photon numbers below unity.

  5. MODELING THE ATOMIC-TO-MOLECULAR TRANSITION AND CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TURBULENT STAR-FORMING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offner, Stella S. R. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Bisbas, Thomas G.; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6B (United Kingdom); Bell, Tom A., E-mail: stella.offner@yale.edu [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemistry code for modeling photodissociation regions (PDRs), to post-process hydrodynamic simulations of turbulent, star-forming clouds. We focus on the transition from atomic to molecular gas, with specific attention to the formation and distribution of H, C{sup +}, C, H{sub 2}, and CO. First, we demonstrate that the details of the cloud chemistry and our conclusions are insensitive to the simulation spatial resolution, to the resolution at the cloud edge, and to the ray angular resolution. We then investigate the effect of geometry and simulation parameters on chemical abundances and find weak dependence on cloud morphology as dictated by gravity and turbulent Mach number. For a uniform external radiation field, we find similar distributions to those derived using a one-dimensional PDR code. However, we demonstrate that a three-dimensional treatment is necessary for a spatially varying external field, and we caution against using one-dimensional treatments for non-symmetric problems. We compare our results with the work of Glover et al., who self-consistently followed the time evolution of molecule formation in hydrodynamic simulations using a reduced chemical network. In general, we find good agreement with this in situ approach for C and CO abundances. However, the temperature and H{sub 2} abundances are discrepant in the boundary regions (A{sub v} {<=} 5), which is due to the different number of rays used by the two approaches.

  6. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provides links to each partner's participating organizations. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Center for Nanoscale Materials Energy Systems...

  7. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor and Michel Boudart Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been elected a Member of the National...

  8. COMBUSTION DRIVEN ATOMIC FLUORINE GENERATORS FOR DF CHEMICAL LASERS Abstract -Conventional high pressure corabustors delivering atomic fluorine for DF chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    compositions assuming frozen isentropic expansion and with or without heat losses in the combustor. The values production at good overall laser power. 1. INTRODUCTION Available references describing combustors for also reactants. Solid propellant com- high production of F atom by thermal equilibrium positions such as NF

  9. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  10. absorber-materials atomic numbers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorber-materials atomic numbers First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Characterization of...

  11. Temperature and number evolution of cold cesium atoms inside a glass cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, J Q; Wang, S G; Wang, Z B; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an experimental study on the temperature and number evolution of the cold cesium atoms diffusively cooled inside a wall-coated glass cell by measuring the absorption profile of the 62S1/2 (F=4)-62P3/2 (F'=5) transition line with a weak probe laser in the evolution process. We found that the temperature of the cold atoms first gradually decreases from 16 mK to 9 mK, and then rapidly increases. A theoretical model of the number evolution is built, which includes the temperature of the cold atoms and the fraction p of the cold cesium atoms elastically reflected by the cell wall. The theoretical model is consistent with the experimental result very well, and the fraction p is obtained to be (0.58 +/- 0.03), which reveals that the cold cesium atoms are not all heated to the ambient temperature by a single collision with the cell wall.

  12. PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 4 APRIL 1983 Atomic final-state interactions in tritium decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Roy

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 4 APRIL 1983 Atomic final-state interactions in tritium decay R of the ejected P ray with the bound atomic e1ectron in the P decay of a tritium atom. The excited state probabi1 effects are expected to be more pro- nounced, but not, to our knowledge, for tritium. The interaction

  13. Quark number density at imaginary chemical potential and its extrapolation to large real chemical potential by the effective model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junichi Takahashi; Junpei Sugano; Masahiro Ishii; Hiroaki Kouno; Masanobu Yahiro

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate quark number densities at imaginary chemical potential by lattice QCD with clover-improved two-flavor Wilson fermion. The quark number densities are extrapolated to the small real chemical potential region by assuming some function forms. The extrapolated quark number densities are consistent with those calculated at real chemical potential with the Taylor expansion method for the reweighting factors. In order to study the large real chemical potential region, we use the two-phase model consisting of the quantum hadrodynamics model for the hadron phase and the entanglement-PNJL model for the quark phase. The quantum hadrodynamics model is constructed to reproduce nuclear saturation properties, while the entanglement-PNJL model reproduces well lattice QCD data for the order parameters such as the Polyakov loop, the thermodynamic quantities and the screening masses. Then, we calculate the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and explore the hadron-quark phase transition with the two-phase model.

  14. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  15. Volume$3, number 3 CHEMICAL. PHYSICS LETTERS 1 Februrf 1978 INTERACTION OF METHANOL WITH RUTHENIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Volume$3, number 3 CHEMICAL. PHYSICS LETTERS 1 Februrf 1978 INTERACTION OF METHANOL WITH RUTHENIUM of methanol with a clean methods. Methanol dissociates upon adsorption at 300 K and yields Ha(g) and chemisorbed CO as the domiwt

  16. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  17. Volume 156,number I CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 March 1989 PHOTOFRAGMENT ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Volume 156,number I CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 24 March 1989 PHOTOFRAGMENT ANGULAR DISTRIBUTIONS FROMJKM) eigenstate. For a proper analysis of the subsequent gas-gas or gas-surface collision experiments) photofragments, which are detected via a 2 + 1 REMPI process at the same wavelength used to cause

  18. Construction of Oscillating Chemical Register Machines on Binary Numbers using Mass-Action Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    of computation for controlling continuous species concentrations enhances the applicability of both modelling of three natural numbers illustrates the practicability of the design. 1 Introduction For more than 20 lead to error-prone computations [13]. We introduce a mod- ular design principle for pure chemical

  19. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  20. average atom model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (chemical potential, average ionic charge, free electron density, bound and continuum wave-functions and occupation numbers) are obtained from the average-atom model. The...

  1. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization probing of H atoms and CH3 radicals in a hot lament chemical vapour deposition reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    - lished route for forming polycrystalline diamond ®lms, which are ®nding ever increasing roles reactor used for diamond chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Parameters varied include the hydrocarbon (CH4 to reinforce the consensus view that H atom production during diamond CVD in a hot ®lament reactor arises

  2. Volume191,number6 CHEMICALPHYSICSLETTERS 17April 1992 The magnetic hyperpolarizability anisotropy of the neon atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helgaker, Trygve

    diamagneticcontributions. 1. Introduction Numerous measurements have recently been car- ried out for atoms and small to multiply At/ given in au by 4.400× 10 -2°. For static and uniform electric and magnetic fields F and B susceptibility, and AZ its change due to the additionally applied electric field. This equation has been

  3. Atomic and Molecular Quantum Theory Course Number: C561 13 Theory of Operators: II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    Number: C561 (d) Does this make sense? The classical definition of the poten- tial energy is the energy on clearly.) (c) Does this definition make sense? ^A |l is another vector. You could call it |m if you like" product of two vectors is a number. Hence the definition in Eq. (13.1) makes sense. (If these arguments

  4. Chemical Bonding: The Classical Description sharing or transferring electrons between atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    new arrangements of electrons with lower total potential energy than isolated atoms covalent ionic, actinides, metal, non-metal, semi-metal #12;IONIZATION ENERGY : a measure of the stability of the electron Existence of the SHELLExistence of the SHELL 3.2 Ionization Energies and the Shell Model of Atom #12

  5. Chemical Sputtering and Surface Damage of Graphite by Low Energy Atomic and Molecular Hydrogen and Deuterium Projectiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Fred W [ORNL; Zhang, Hengda [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Krause, Herbert F [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental methane production yields for H+, H2+, and H3+ ions incident on ATJ graphite in the energy range 10-250 eV/H. Below about 60 eV/H, the molecular H species give higher methane yields/H when compared with isovelocity H+. The results are interpreted by considering the differences of the maximum binary collision energy transfer in the ejection of chemical sputtering products associated with undissociated molecules and incident atomic ions, using the same analysis as developed by Yao et al. (PRL 81, 550(1998)) in comparing sputtering of Au by isovelocity N+ and N2+ ions. For both D and H atomic and molecular projectiles, the yields/atom coalesce onto a single curve below projectile energies of approximately 60 eV/atom, when plotted as function of maximum energy transfer, under the assumption that the incident molecular species are undissociated when ejecting the hydrocarbon chemical sputtering product. Raman spectroscopy of a graphite sample exposed to high fluences of D+ and D3+ beams at high and low energies, confirmed the expectation that, according to this argument, there should also be more surface damage by incident molecular species than by isovelocity atomic ions. The two high-energy beam-exposed spots showed similar damage, while the low-energy molecular-beam- exposed spot showed slightly more damage than the corresponding D+ beam exposed spot.

  6. Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

  7. An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of the transition-metal particles and onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, carbon atom attachment to the growing. Carbon nanotubes are generally processed by laser ablation of carbon rods e.g. [7], a direct current arc

  8. Volume 152, number 4,s CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 18 November 1988 NON-INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT OF AXIAL ELECTRIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Volume 152, number 4,s CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 18 November 1988 NON-INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT OF AXIAL pertur- bations by sheath accumulation. Non-intrusive mea- surements of the electric fields through for the non- perturbative measurement of the axial electric fields in glow discharges. The A `n, + X I&+ (4

  9. Chemical and displacement atomic pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions recovered by anomalous x-ray scattering in Fe-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shaffer, L.B. [Anderson Univ., Anderson, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-range pair correlations of atoms in crystalline solid solutions consist of both chemical and displacement correlations. Measurement of these pair correlations is fundamental to understanding the properties of solid solutions. We discuss anomalous scattering techniques which have provided an important advance in our ability to recover these pair correlations and to model the local atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions of Fe-Ni alloys.

  10. Atomic data for S II—toward better diagnostics of chemical evolution in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisielius, Romas; Bogdanovich, Pavel [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 (Lithuania); Kulkarni, Varsha P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Ferland, Gary J.; Lykins, Matt L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption-line spectroscopy is a powerful tool used to estimate element abundances in both the nearby and distant universe. The accuracy of the abundances thus derived is naturally limited by the accuracy of the atomic data assumed for the spectral lines. We have recently started a project to perform new extensive atomic data calculations used for optical/UV spectral lines in the plasma modeling code Cloudy using state of the art quantal calculations. Here, we demonstrate our approach by focussing on S II, an ion used to estimate metallicities for Milky Way interstellar clouds as well as distant damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorber galaxies detected in the spectra of quasars and gamma-ray bursts. We report new extensive calculations of a large number of energy levels of S II, and the line strengths of the resulting radiative transitions. Our calculations are based on the configuration interaction approach within a numerical Hartree-Fock framework, and utilize both non-relativistic and quasirelativistic one-electron radial orbitals. The results of these new atomic calculations are then incorporated into Cloudy and applied to a lab plasma, and a typical DLA, for illustrative purposes. The new results imply relatively modest changes (?0.04 dex) to the metallicities estimated from S II in past studies. These results will be readily applicable to other studies of S II in the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 25, NO. 13, PAGES 2345-2348, JULY 1, 1998 High Rayleigh number thermo-chemical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    thermo-chemical models of a dense boundary layer in D Nancy L. Montague, Louise H. Kellogg Department of thermo-chemical convection in 2-D with a Rayleigh number of 107 , we investigate the dy- namic thermal models). Hence a thermo-chemical boundary layer at the CMB may account for the temperature

  12. Volume 171,number I,2 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 27 July 1990 High temperature optical dephasing mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    ,11,13,19,20,24-261. This is the time regime where tunnelling two-level systems (TLS) control the dynamics [27,28]. The TLS model the power law is observed. Dephasing data on a number of systems above z 5 K are fit well to a model times are identical and individual decays at the same temperature from the two systems

  13. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas [NCSU] [NCSU

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  14. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

  15. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    .1063/1.3475506 Direct observation of electron emission site on boron-doped polycrystalline diamond thin films using or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force

  16. Volume 170, number 5,6 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 20 July 1990 Nature of the red emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    in the chemical oxygen iodine laser system Ruiping Huang `, Rong Zhang ' and Richard N. Zare Deparfmenfof at 703 nm is observed when a heated metal wire is placed downstream of an O,( `A& generator used in the chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) system. The O2(`4) isproduced by bubbling Cl, through an alkaline

  17. Volume 177, number 2 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 15 February 1991 Cu titration of tilted CO on a MO( 110) surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    to the surface normal. Upon subsequent deposition of = 0.9 ML Cu at 95 Kfollowed by heating, infrared, in a weakening of the C-O bond [ l-41. The tilted CO can either dissociate into atomic C and 0 upon heating to z) surface. In this Letter, we present the results of studies on tilted CO on MO( 110) using infrared

  18. Mechanistic study of dielectric chemical mechanical polishing by spectral and scaling analysis of atomic force microscope images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhoff, M.L.

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal oxide and PETEOS oxide surfaces, polished on an IPEC 472 with different combinations of polish pad, slurry, and polishing conditions, were studied with ex situ atomic force microscopy. The post polish surfaces were analyzed qualitatively by visual inspection and quantitatively by spectral and scaling analyses. Spectral and scaling analyses gave consistent interpretations of morphology evolution. Polishing with either a fixed abrasive pad or alumina-based slurry occurred via a mechanism for which asperities are removed and recesses are filled. A sputtering-type mechanism may contribute to material removal when polishing with silica- or ceria-based slurries.

  19. ChBE 3130 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II (required course) Note: This course was previously numbered 3110

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    of the heat of mixing, volume, and entropy changes on processing of idea and real mixtures. (Student outcomes equilibrium. Fugacity and activity coefficients. Multi-reaction equilibrium. Prerequisites: Chemical Process of a pure component non-ideal gas and of pure liquids and solids under high pressure. (Student outcomes a, e

  20. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  1. Super-Resolution Optical Imaging of Biomass Chemical-Spatial Structure: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-410

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective for this project is to characterize and develop new methods to visualize the chemical spatial structure of biomass at varying stages of the biomass degradation processes in situ during the process.

  2. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 7 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 AUGUST 2001 Regular Wave Propagation Out of Noise in Chemical Active Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    , the intrinsic spatiotemporal regularities of any such wave propagation phenomena. Here, contrarily, we provideVOLUME 87, NUMBER 7 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 AUGUST 2001 Regular Wave Propagation Out of Noise in Chemical Active Media S. Alonso,1,2,* I. Sendiña-Nadal,3 V. Pérez-Muñuzuri,3 J. M

  3. THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    group terbium-gadolinium-europium. UCItL~669 Page 27 em y Smterbium-gadolinium-europium, in their elution from a highgadolinium and gadolinium-europium. With regard to the group

  4. Classification of fossil fuels according to structural-chemical characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; G.S. Golovin; S.G. Gagarin [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of a set of linear equations that relate the amount of major elements n{sub E} (E = C, H, O, N, S) in the organic matter of fossil fuels to structural characteristics, such as the number of cycles R, the number of atoms n{sub E}, the number of mutual chemical bonds, the degree of unsaturation of the structure {delta}, and the extent of its reduction B, a structural-chemical classification of fossil coals that is closely related to the parameters of the industrial-genetic classification (GOST 25543-88) is proposed. Structural-chemical classification diagrams are constructed for power-generating coals of Russia; coking coals; and coals designed for nonfuel purposes including the manufacture of adsorbents, synthetic liquid fuel, ion exchangers, thermal graphite, and carbon-graphite materials.

  5. 29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29Counting Atoms in a Molecule The complex molecule Propanal was discovered in a dense interstellar is the ratio of carbon atoms to hydrogen atoms in propanal? Problem 4 - If the mass of a hydrogen atom of a propanal molecule in AMUs? Problem 5 - What is the complete chemical formula for propanal? C3 H __ O

  6. The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 81, October 2003 913 n recent years, the static mixer has been adopted for a large number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Ajay K.

    , the static mixer has been adopted for a large number of blending and dispersion operations. Static mixers process industry. Static mixers offer attractive features such as closed-loop operation, and no moving geometry. A typical inlet geometry to the static mixer is the centerline injector as depicted schematically

  7. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    bonds, 2 to 10 ev). The methods that have revealed this richness and order of medium- and high-energy, mass spectrometry. While hot-atom studies overcome the energy limitations of thermochemical methods energies of a few electron volts. Most studies of chemical kinetics made by traditional thermochemical

  8. VOLUME 76, NUMBER 24 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 10 JUNE 1996 Observation of Atomic Wannier-Stark Ladders in an Accelerating Optical Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Wannier-Stark Ladders in an Accelerating Optical Potential S. R. Wilkinson, C. F. Bharucha, K. W. Madison.50.Vk, 71.70.Ej Motion of ultracold atoms in optical lattices formed by interfering beams of light has-resonant optical lattices, where the internal atomic structure plays an important role, and a wide range

  9. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 26 P HY S I CA L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 JUNE 1999 LaserDriven Atomic Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and by the wind force Fw caused by the reflection of conduction electrons from these atoms. Since F d usually, as schematically depicted in Fig. 1, by exerting on it the wind force Fw , due to the absorption of electron are driven by the direct force F d due to the external field that is locally modified at the atomic site

  10. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 26 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 JUNE 1999 Laser-Driven Atomic Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the direct force Fd due to the external field that is locally modified at the atomic site, and by the wind in Fig. 1, by exerting on it the wind force Fw, due to the absorption of electron momenta. The direct force Fw caused by the reflection of conduction electrons from these atoms. Since Fd usually dominates

  11. Quantum transport in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chih-Chun Chien; Sebastiano Peotta; Massimiliano Di Ventra

    2015-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultracold atoms confined by engineered magnetic or optical potentials are ideal systems for studying phenomena otherwise difficult to realize or probe in the solid state because their atomic interaction strength, number of species, density, and geometry can be independently controlled. This review focuses on quantum transport phenomena in atomic gases that mirror and oftentimes either better elucidate or show fundamental differences with those observed in mesoscopic and nanoscopic systems. We discuss significant progress in performing transport experiments in atomic gases, contrast similarities and differences between transport in cold atoms and in condensed matter systems, and survey inspiring theoretical predictions that are difficult to verify in conventional setups. These results further demonstrate the versatility offered by atomic systems in the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and their promise for novel applications.

  12. Chaotic Behaviour of Atomic Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yilmaz; G. Hacibekiroglu; E. Bolcal; Y. Polatoglu

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors of this paper studied Schrodinger wave equation to investiagate the chaotic behavior of atomic energy levels in relation with three quantum numbers n, l, m by means of derived inequality. It could give rise to the siplitting of atomic spectral lines. Keywords: Chaos, Schrodinger wave equation, atomic energy levels

  13. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  14. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    What do we mean by a chemical element? A chemical element is matter, all of whose atoms are alike in having the same positive charge on the nucleus and the same number of extra-nuclear electrons. As we shall see in the following elemental review, the origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having an origin in antiquity, other elements having been discovered within the past few hundred years and still others have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements since these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature.

  15. Detection of transient fluorine atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loge, G.W.; Nereson, N.; Fry, H.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A KrF eximer laser with a fluence of 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ was used to photolyze either uranium hexafluoride or molecular fluorine, yielding a transient number density of fluorine atoms. The rise and decay of the atomic fluorine density was observed by transient absorption of a 25-..mu..m Pb-salt diode laser. To prevent the diode laser wavelength from drifting out of resonance with the atomic fluorine line, part of the beam was split off and sent through a microwave discharge fluorine atom cell. This allowed a wavelength modulation-feedback technique to be used to lock the diode laser wavelength onto the atomic line. The remaining diode laser beam was made collinear with the eximer laser beam using a LiF window with a 45/sup 0/ angle of incidence to reflect the infrared beam while transmitting most of the uv beam. Using this setup along with a transient digitizer to average between 100 and 200 transient absorption profiles, fluorine atom number densities on the order of 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ in a 1.7 m pathlength were detected. The signals observed were about a factor of two less than expected from known photolysis and atomic fluorine absorption cross-sections. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Measuring Atomic Properties with an Atom Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Tony David

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two experiments are presented which measure atomic properties using an atom interferometer. The interferometer splits the sodium de Broglie wave into two paths,

  17. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 17 JANUARY 2000 Beyond Optical Molasses: 3D Raman Sideband Cooling of Atomic Cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    . The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even [1]. Although other techniques, such as evaporative cooling [2], velocity-selective coherent Molasses: 3D Raman Sideband Cooling of Atomic Cesium to High Phase-Space Density Andrew J. Kerman, Vladan

  18. VOLUME 74, NUMBER 26 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 26 JUNE 1995 Evaporative Cooling of Sodium Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    which allow the cooling of atoms to temperatures below the recoil limit. Optical techniques and trap loss due to ex- cited state collisions [5]. The technique of forced evapora- tive cooling relies of different cooling and trapping techniques involving lasers and mag- netic fields we were able to obtain

  19. VOLUME 81, NUMBER 18 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 2 NOVEMBER 1998 Bose-Einstein Condensation of Atomic Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Thomas C.

    of the confinement cell [4]. In order to create the colder samples necessary for further progress toward BEC, our group sug- gested [5] and demonstrated [6] wall-free confinement and evaporative cooling. Evaporative cooling made it pos- sible to cool alkali metal atoms below the laser cooling limit and to achieve BEC

  20. VOLUME 76, NUMBER 8 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 19 FEBRUARY 1996 Compliance Measurements of Confined Polystyrene Solutions by Atomic Force Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Chemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada H3A 2K6 4 Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-1096 (Received 16 August 1995) The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) as a local probe for elastohydrodynamic lubrication is discussed. Compliances are measured with a modified

  1. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Laser Cooling of Atoms, Ions, or Molecules by Coherent Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    and is accompanied by strong heating due to force fluctuations [5]. In this Letter, we point out a general optical, and for strongly coupled single atoms heating has been observed recently [10]. In contrast to previous proposals-frequency beam coupling to all transitions simulta- neously is prevented by the requirement for Doppler cool- ing

  2. atom molecular mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planetary model of the hydrogen atom (see figure below) Bohr began with a Newtonian analysis Rioux, Frank 10 Atomic and Molecular Quantum Theory Course Number: C561 1 Now, Why do...

  3. Atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  4. Chemical & Engineering News Serving the chemical, life sciences and laboratory worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical & Engineering News Serving the chemical, life sciences and laboratory worlds Awards Home of Catalysis Science & Technology (Probationary). Chemical & Engineering Or Petroleum Chemistry February 1, 2010 Volume 88, Number 5 p. 42 Sponsored by the George A. Olah Endowment

  5. Chemical structure of vanadium-based contact formation on n-AlN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pookpanratana, S.; France, R.; Blum, M.; Bell, A.; Bar, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Zhang, Y.; Hofmann, T.; Fuchs, O.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J. D.; Mulcahy, S.; Moustakas, T. D.; Heske, Clemens

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the chemical interaction between a Au/V/Al/V layer structure and n-type AlN epilayers using soft x-ray photoemission, x-ray emission spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. To understand the complex processes involved in this multicomponent system, we have studied the interface before and after a rapid thermal annealing step. We find the formation of a number of chemical phases at the interface, including VN, metallic vanadium, aluminum oxide, and metallic gold. An interaction mechanism for metal contact formation on the entire n-(Al,Ga)N system is proposed.

  6. Atomic Cascade in Muonic and Hadronic Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Jensen; V. P. Popov; V. N. Pomerantsev

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The atomic cascade in $\\mu^- p$ and $\\pi^- p$ atoms has been studied with the improved version of the extended cascade model in which new quantum mechanical calculations of the differential and integral cross sections of the elastic scattering, Stark transitions and Coulomb de-excitation have been included for the principal quantum number values $n\\le 8$ and the relative energies $E \\ge 0.01$ eV. The $X$-ray yields and kinetic energy distributions are compared with the experimental data.

  7. atomic clusters rb12: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tamas Terlaky NUMBER Neumaier, Arnold 3 Formation of atomic tritium clusters and condensates CERN Preprints Summary: We present an extensive study of the static and dynamic...

  8. atomic clusters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tamas Terlaky NUMBER Neumaier, Arnold 3 Formation of atomic tritium clusters and condensates CERN Preprints Summary: We present an extensive study of the static and dynamic...

  9. VOLUME 75, NUMBER 22 PH YS ICAL REVIEW LETTERS 27 NovEMBER 1995 Resolved-Sideband Raman Cooling of a Bound Atom to the 3D Zero-Point Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Christopher

    D. Cooling to the zero-point energy appears to be a crucial prerequisite for future experiments) it will be important in future planned experiments. For example, once the ion is cooled to the n = 0 state, it shouldVOLUME 75, NUMBER 22 PH YS ICAL REVIEW LETTERS 27 NovEMBER 1995 Resolved-Sideband Raman Cooling

  10. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series On the trail of the Chimera The Atom the Chimera is still elusive. 1. Thomas F. Kelly and David J. Larson. Ann Rev. Materials Res 42 (2012) 1. 2

  11. Permanent Home Number: Residential Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

  12. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

  13. Classical Helium Atom with Radiation Reaction G. Camelio,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carati, Andrea

    Classical Helium Atom with Radiation Reaction G. Camelio,1 A. Carati,2 and L. Galgani2 1) Universit November 2011) We study a classical model of Helium atom in which, in addition to the Coulomb forces be singular with respect to that of Lebesgue. PACS numbers: 05.45.-a, 41.60.-m Keywords: classical Helium atom

  14. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundr...

  15. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry is carried out using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. Drop size and size distribution are measured using the laser diffraction technique. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. We also found that the atomized drop size, represented by the mass median diameter (MMD) can be described by the wave mechanism-based models in terms of three non-dimensional groups, namely, slurry-to-air mass ratio, the Weber number, and the Ohnesorge number. 11 refs.

  16. atom-atom collisions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Safronova, Marianna 3 Atom-atom correlations in colliding Bose-Einstein condensates Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We analyze atom-atom correlations in the s-wave...

  17. Chemical Hygiene Plan For University of Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Chemical Hygiene Plan For University of Florida Laboratories This is a site specific Chemical Hygiene Plan for: Laboratory or Room number(s): Building: Principal Investigator/Lab Manager: Department Reviewed August 2007 Revised August 2007 #12;2 I. Introduction This Chemical Hygiene Plan has been

  18. Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental thorium uranium Relativeabundance(Si=106)Relative Abundance in the Sun · non-uniform trend G302.protons 90 234Th 145 #12;5 Alpha Decay - Loss of He Atom · Decay of Uranium-238 to Thorium-234 G302

  19. Atomic-vapor-laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief history of the scientific considerations leading to the development of laser isotope separation (LIS) processes. The close relationship of LIS to the broader field of laser-induced chemical processes is evaluated in terms of physical criteria to achieve an efficient production process. Atomic-vapor LIS processes under development at Livermore are reviwed. 8 figures.

  20. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

  1. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

  2. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  3. Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

  4. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change Number

  5. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  6. Atomic swelling upon compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Dolmatov; J. L. King

    2012-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen atom under the pressure of a spherical penetrable confinement potential of a decreasing radius $r_{0}$ is explored, as a case study. A novel counter-intuitive effect of atomic swelling rather than shrinking with decreasing $r_{0}$ is unraveled, when $r_{0}$ reaches, and remains smaller than, a certain critical value. Upon swelling, the size of the atom is shown to increase by an order of magnitude, or more, compared to the size of the free atom. Examples of changes of photoabsorption properties of confined hydrogen atom upon its swelling are uncovered and demonstrated.

  7. Machine Learning for Quantum Mechanical Properties of Atoms in Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupp, Matthias; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce machine learning models of quantum mechanical observables of atoms in molecules. Instant out-of-sample predictions for proton and carbon nuclear chemical shifts, atomic core level excitations, and forces on atoms reach accuracies on par with density functional theory reference. Locality is exploited within non-linear regression via local atom-centered coordinate systems. The approach is validated on a diverse set of 9k small organic molecules. Linear scaling is demonstrated for saturated polymers with up to sub-mesoscale lengths.

  8. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  9. Forecast of Standard Atomic Weights for the Mononuclidic Elements – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.; Holden, N.; Holden,N.E.

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this short report, I will provide an early warning about potential changes to the standard atomic weight values for the twenty mononuclidic and the so-called pseudo-mononuclidic ({sup 232}Th and {sup 231}Pa) chemical elements due to the estimated changes in the mass values to be published in the next Atomic Mass Tables within the next two years. There have been many new measurements of atomic masses, since the last published Atomic Mass Table. The Atomic Mass Data Center has released an unpublished version of the present status of the atomic mass values as a private communication. We can not update the Standard Atomic Weight Table at this time based on these unpublished values but we can anticipate how many changes are probably going to be expected in the next few years on the basis of the forthcoming publication of the Atomic Mass Table. I will briefly discuss the procedures that the Atomic Weights Commission used in deriving the recommended Standard Atomic Weight values and their uncertainties from the atomic mass values. I will also discuss some concern raised about a proposed change in the definition of the mole. The definition of the mole is now connected directly to the mass of a {sup 12}C isotope (which is defined as 12 exactly) and to the kilogram. A change in the definition of the mole will probably impact the mass of {sup 12}C.

  10. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  11. Prediction of effective atomic number (Z) for laminated shielding material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarder, Md. Maksudur Rahaman

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (&?/P)=3. 103E-2 (P/P)=5. 951E-2 (P, ?/P)=2. 603 E-2 (&/P)=6. 803E-2 P', ?/P)=3. 654E-2 3. 0 (&/P)=3. 968E-2 (&, ?/P)=2. 281E-2 (4/P)=3. 616E-2 (P, ?/P)=2, 042E 2 (P/P)=4. 200E-2 (&??/P)=2. 322E-2 25 35 30 25 20 N 15 10 ~ffe w ~2fe w ~3... fe w ~4fe w ~5fe w 0 0 4 mfp 10 Fig. 5a. Z?fr for two-layered shields (Zf&Z2) as a function of mfp 90 80 70 4D ~2w pb 3D ~3w pb 20 ~4w pb 10 ~6w pb 0 0 2 4 6 8 1D m fp Fig. 5. b. Z, fr for two-layered shields (Zf&Z2) as a function...

  12. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  13. Prediction of effective atomic number (Z) for laminated shielding material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarder, Md. Maksudur Rahaman

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (&?/P)=3. 103E-2 (P/P)=5. 951E-2 (P, ?/P)=2. 603 E-2 (&/P)=6. 803E-2 P', ?/P)=3. 654E-2 3. 0 (&/P)=3. 968E-2 (&, ?/P)=2. 281E-2 (4/P)=3. 616E-2 (P, ?/P)=2, 042E 2 (P/P)=4. 200E-2 (&??/P)=2. 322E-2 25 35 30 25 20 N 15 10 ~ffe w ~2fe w ~3... fe w ~4fe w ~5fe w 0 0 4 mfp 10 Fig. 5a. Z?fr for two-layered shields (Zf&Z2) as a function of mfp 90 80 70 4D ~2w pb 3D ~3w pb 20 ~4w pb 10 ~6w pb 0 0 2 4 6 8 1D m fp Fig. 5. b. Z, fr for two-layered shields (Zf&Z2) as a function...

  14. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  15. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  16. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krssig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H....

  17. Unique Solutions to Hartree-Fock Equations for Closed Shell Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Griesemer; F. Hantsch

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the problem of uniqueness of solutions to the Hartree and Hartree-Fock equations of atoms. We show, for example, that the Hartree-Fock ground state of a closed shell atom is unique provided the atomic number $Z$ is sufficiently large compared to the number $N$ of electrons. More specifically, a two-electron atom with atomic number $Z\\geq 35$ has a unique Hartree-Fock ground state given by two orbitals with opposite spins and identical spatial wave functions. This statement is wrong for some $Z>1$, which exhibits a phase segregation.

  18. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  19. Efimov physics in bosonic atom-trimer scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deltuva, A. [Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bosonic atom-trimer scattering is studied in the unitary limit using momentum-space equations for four-particle transition operators. The impact of the Efimov effect on the atom-trimer scattering observables is explored, and a number of universal relations is established. Positions and widths of tetramer resonances are determined. The trimer relaxation rate constant is calculated.

  20. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  1. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  2. Producing and Detecting Correlated atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph I. Westbrook; Martijn Schellekens; Aurélien Perrin; Valentina Krachmalnicoff; Jose Carlos Viana Gomes; Jean-Baptiste Trebbia; Jérôme Estève; Hong Chang; Isabelle Bouchoule; Denis Boiron; Alain Aspect; Tom Jeltes; John McNamara; Wim Hogervorst; Wim Vassen

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss experiments to produce and detect atom correlations in a degenerate or nearly degenerate gas of neutral atoms. First we treat the atomic analog of the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment, in which atom correlations result simply from interference effects without any atom interactions.We have performed this experiment for both bosons and fermions. Next we show how atom interactions produce correlated atoms using the atomic analog of spontaneous four-wavemixing. Finally, we briefly mention experiments on a one dimensional gas on an atom chip in which correlation effects due to both interference and interactions have been observed.

  3. 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyer, Sylvia Teresse

    Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of ...

  4. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  5. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  6. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

    2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  7. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  8. Atomic mass compilation 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

  9. “Hard probes” of strongly-interacting atomic gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishida, Yusuke [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

  10. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2008-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  11. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  12. Chemical binding energies of point defects in palladium doped with hydrogen and d impurities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1001 Chemical binding energies of point defects in palladium doped with hydrogen and d impurities C calculate the chemical binding energy of a pair of hydrogen atoms in palladium within the infinite dilution] it is often assumed that the dominant contribution to the interaction energy between hydrogen atoms

  13. Characteristics of cooperative spontaneous radiation with applications to atom microscopy and coherent XUV radiation generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Juntao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    quicker than single atom decay, with a decay rate proportional to N(?/R)2, where N is the atom numbers, R is the size of the atom cloud, and ? is the wavelength. We call it Markovian regime because the sytem does not persist memory effect. The other regime...

  14. New charge radius relations for atomic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. H. Sun; Y. Lu; J. P. Peng; C. Y. Liu; Y. M. Zhao

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the charge radii of neighboring atomic nuclei, independent of atomic number and charge, follow remarkably very simple relations, despite the fact that atomic nuclei are complex finite many-body systems governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. These relations can be understood within the picture of independent-particle motion and by assuming neighboring nuclei having similar pattern in the charge density distribution. A root-mean-square (rms) deviation of 0.0078 fm is obtained between the predictions in these relations and the experimental values, i.e., a comparable precision as modern experimental techniques. Such high accuracy relations are very useful to check the consistence of nuclear charge radius surface and moreover to predict unknown nuclear charge radii, while large deviations from experimental data is seen to reveal the appearance of nuclear shape transition or coexsitence.

  15. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Deltuva

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  16. Universal bosonic tetramers of dimer-atom-atom structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deltuva, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unstable four-boson states having an approximate dimer-atom-atom structure are studied using momentum-space integral equations for the four-particle transition operators. For a given Efimov trimer the universal properties of the lowest associated tetramer are determined. The impact of this tetramer on the atom-trimer and dimer-dimer collisions is analyzed. The reliability of the three-body dimer-atom-atom model is studied.

  17. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  18. Chemical Applications of Electrohydraulic Cavitation for Hazardous Waste Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M. R.

    CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF ELECTROHVDRAULIC CAVITATION FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTROL MICHAEL R. HOFFMANN, PROFESSOR, CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, PASADENA, CA 91125 Abstract We have been investigating the fundamental chemistry..., production of hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen atoms, hydrogen peroxide and aquated electrons. The chemical changes of compounds in water pulsed with these different sources of power are induced in part by the violent collapse of cavitation bubbles...

  19. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centers Newsletter Editorial Board photo of Natalie Ray Natalie Ray, an IACT graduate student from Northwestern University who is working with Peter Stair on Synthesis, has been...

  20. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    set-up and synchrotron X-ray data acquisition with particular focus on high energy X-ray scattering techniques, data processing, and development of algorithms for...

  1. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - IACT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas: Reaction Mechanisms Controlled Active Metals Materials Synthesis woodchips, pellets, and logs as examples of biomass that can be converted to fuels. Woodchips, pellets,...

  2. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Controlled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Problem Many heterogeneous catalysts are inappropriate for conversion of biomass and hydrogen (H2) production in aqueous media, and the structural features of catalysts that...

  3. atomic layer chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ... Baugher,...

  4. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofuels, transportation, energy efficiency, electricity storage and transmission, clean coal and carbon capture and sequestration, and nuclear energy. EFRC Brochure (PDF 1.7MB...

  5. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - Reaction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    separately. While the simultaneous processing of all carbohydrates, such as in gasification or pyrolysis, offers the potential for simplicity of operation, the fractionation...

  6. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  7. Computer Simulation of Atoms Nuclei Structure Using Information Coefficients of Proportionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest research of the proportionality of atomic weights of chemical elements made it possible to obtain 3 x 3 matrices for the calculation of information coefficients of proportionality Ip that can be used for 3D modeling of the structure of atom nucleus. The results of computer simulation show high potential of nucleus structure research for the characterization of their chemical and physical properties.

  8. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES Thematerials | Center forChemical

  9. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  10. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  11. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  12. Atom Probe Tomography | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is important to accurately describe ion-solid... Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN. Atomistic structures of high-energy ion irradiated GaN have been examined using...

  13. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

  14. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.) [comps.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 2 contains the data base in tabular format. There are two sections, the first with records on nondrug substances, and the second with records on drugs. Chemicals in each section are arranged alphabetically by CAS preferred name, CAS registry number, formula, atomic weight, melting point, boiling point, and vapor pressure. Tissues are listed alphabetically with exposure route, analytical method, number of cases, range, and mean - when available in the source document. A variety of information may also be included that is pertinent to the range and mean as well as experimental design, demography, health effects, pathology, morphology, and toxicity. Review articles are included in the data base; however, no data have been extracted from such documents because the original research articles are included.

  15. Systematic approach for chemical reactivity evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldeeb, Abdulrehman Ahmed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , to measure thermal reactivity of chemical systems. Studying all the various reaction pathways experimentally however is very expensive and time consuming. Therefore, it is essential to employ simplified screening tools and other methods to reduce the number...

  16. Local atomic structure in disordered and nanocrystalline catalytic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmowski, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Egami, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Swider-Lyons, K. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power of the atomic pair density function method to study the local atomic structure of dispersed materials is discussed for three examples (I) supercapacitor hydrous ruthenia, (II) electroctalyst platinum-iron phosphate and (III) nanoparticle gold catalyst. Hydrous ruthenia appears to be amorphous, but was found to be nanocomposite with RuO{sub 2} nanocrystals supporting electronic and hydrous boundaries protonic conductivity. A platinum-iron phosphate electrocatalyst, that exhibits activity for the oxygen reduction reaction has platinum in a non-metallic state. In catalysts comprised of gold nanoparticles supported on TiO{sub 2}, atomic correlations in the second atomic shell were observed suggesting interaction with the support that could modify gold chemical activity.

  17. Collective Light Emission of a Finite Size Atomic Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashem Zoubi

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative properties of collective electronic states in a one dimensional atomic chain are investigated. Radiative corrections are included with emphasize put on the effect of the chain size through the dependence on both the number of atoms and the lattice constant. The damping rates of collective states are calculated in considering radiative effects for different values of the lattice constant relative to the atomic transition wave length. Especially the symmetric state damping rate as a function of the number of the atoms is derived. The emission pattern off a finite linear chain is also presented. The results can be adopted for any chain of active material, e.g., a chain of semiconductor quantum dots or organic molecules on a linear matrix.

  18. UVM chemical use planning form.docx; 2012 Version 4 Page 1 of 6 Risk Management & Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    :________________________________ Chemical labels with hazard warnings REMINDER : All lab personnel must be aware of locations of safety. Hazard Identification: a) Identify the Hazardous Chemical or Hazard Group: 1. List chemical name and CAS number if a single chemical is covered by this form: Chemical name: CAS number 2. Or, identify the hazard

  19. Atom-by-atom nucleation and growth of graphene nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Atom-by-atom nucleation and growth of graphene nanopores Christopher J. Russoa,b and J. A February 17, 2012 (received for review December 9, 2011) Graphene is an ideal thin membrane substrate structures in graphene with atomic preci- sion. It consists of inducing defect nucleation centers with ener

  20. Rydberg Atoms Ionisation by Microwave Field and Electromagnetic Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kaulakys; G. Vilutis

    1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple theory of the Rydberg atoms ionisation by electromagnetic pulses and microwave field is presented. The analysis is based on the scale transformation which reduces the number of parameters and reveals the functional dependencies of the processes. It is shown that the observed ionisation of Rydberg atoms by subpicosecond electromagnetic pulses scale classically. The threshold electric field required to ionise a Rydberg state may be simply evaluated in the photonic basis approach for the quantum dynamics or from the multiphoton ionisation theory.

  1. Atomic phenomena in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following chapters are included: (1) the plasma environment, (2) perturbations of atomic structure, (3) perturbations of atomic collisions, (4) formation of spectral lines, and (5) dielectronic recombination. (MOW)

  2. Influence of nature of central metal atom in tetrapyrrole pigments on triplet state deactivation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapinus, E.I.; Staryi, V.P.; Dilung, I.I.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse photolysis method has been used to study the absorption spectra and kinetics of deactivation of triplet molecules of tetra-4-tert-butylphthalocyanine, meso-tetraphenylporphine, and their metal derivatives in degassed liquid toluene solutions. The position of the triplet-triplet absorption maximum is only very slightly dependent on the nature of the central atom. The lifetime tau of the triplet molecules of the phthalocyanines, in contrast to the porphyrins, decreases with increasing atomic number of the central atom. The lifetime tau of triplet molecules of the phthalocyanines, in contrast to the porphines, becomes shorter as the atomic number of the central atom increases. The inner heavy atom influence the magnitude of tau for the diphthalocyanines less than for the monophthalocyanines; this is related to the smaller degree of overlapping of the electron shells of the metal atom and the ligand in the case of the diphthalocyanines.

  3. Inversion symmetry breaking of atomic bound states in strong and short laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stooß, Veit; Ott, Christian; Blättermann, Alexander; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In any atomic species, the spherically symmetric potential originating from the charged nucleus results in fundamental symmetry properties governing the structure of atomic states and transition rules between them. If atoms are exposed to external electric fields, these properties are modified giving rise to energy shifts such as the AC Stark-effect in varying fields and, contrary to this in a constant (DC) electric field for high enough field strengths, the breaking of the atomic symmetry which causes fundamental changes in the atom's properties. This has already been observed for atomic Rydberg states with high principal quantum numbers. Here, we report on the observation of symmetry breaking effects in Helium atoms for states with principal quantum number n=2 utilizing strong visible laser fields. These findings were enabled by temporally resolving the dynamics better than the sub-optical cycle of the applied laser field, utilizing the method of attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS). We ident...

  4. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Corbin1 , Niklas Dellby1 , Matthew F. Murfitt1 , Christopher S. Own1 , Zoltan S. Szilagyi1 , Mark P

  5. Nuclear lattice model and the electronic configuration of the chemical elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozsef Garai

    2015-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental organizing principle resulting in the periodic table is the nuclear charge. Arranging the chemical elements in an increasing atomic number order, a symmetry pattern known as the Periodic Table is detectable. The correlation between nuclear charge and the Periodic System of the Chemical Elements (PSCE) indicates that the symmetry emerges from the nucleus. Nuclear symmetry can only exist if the relative positions of the nucleons in the nucleus are invariant. Pauli exclusion principle can also be interpreted as the nucleons should occupy a lattice position. Based on symmetry and other indicatives face centered cubic arrangement have been proposed for the nuclear lattice. A lattice model, representing the protons and the neutrons by equal spheres and arranging them alternately in a face centered cubic structure forming a double tetrahedron, is able to reproduce all of the properties of the nucleus including the quantum numbers and the periodicity of the elements. Based on the geometry of the nuclear structure it is shown that when a new 'layer' of the nuclear structure starts then the distance between the first proton in the new layer and the charge center of the nucleus is smaller than the distance of the proton, which completed the preceding 'layer'. Thus a new valence electron shell should start to develop when the nuclear structure is expanded. The expansion of the double tetrahedron FCC nuclear lattice model offers a feasible physical explanation how the nucleus affects the electronic configuration of the chemical elements depicted by the periodic table.

  6. atoms: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory...

  7. Collective cavity quantum electrodynamics with multiple atomic levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Arnold; M. P. Baden; M. D. Barrett

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the transmission spectra of ultracold rubidium atoms coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity. Under weak probing with pi-polarized light, the linear response of the system is that of a collective spin with multiple levels coupled to a single mode of the cavity. By varying the atom number, we change the collective coupling of the system. We observe the change in transmission spectra when going from a regime where the collective coupling is much smaller than the separation of the atomic levels to a regime where both are of comparable size. The observations are in good agreement with a reduced model we developed for our system.

  8. A perturbative treatment for the energy levels of neutral atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sameer M. Ikhdair; Ramazan Sever

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy levels of neutral atoms have been re-examined by applying an alternative perturbative scheme in solving the Schrodinger equation for the Yukawa potential model with a modified screening parameter. The predicted shell binding energies are found to be quite accurate over the entire range of the atomic number $Z$ up to 84 and compare very well with those obtained within the framework of hyper-virial-Pade scheme and the method of shifted large-N expansion. It is observed that the new perturbative method may also be applied to the other areas of atomic physics.

  9. Ultracold atoms in a cavity mediated double-well system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas Larson; Jani-Petri Martikainen

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study ground-state properties and dynamics of a dilute ultracold atomic gas in a double well potential. The Gaussian barrier separating the two wells derives from the interaction between the atoms and a quantized field of a driven Fabry-Perot cavity. Due to intrinsic atom-field nonlinearity, several novel phenomena arise being the focus of this work. For the ground state, there is a critical pumping amplitude in which the atoms self-organize and the intra cavity field amplitude drastically increases. In the dynamical analysis, we show that the Josephson oscillations depend strongly on the atomic density and may be greatly suppressed within certain regimes, reminiscent of self-trapping of Bose-Einstein condensates in double-well setups. This pseudo self-trapping effect is studied within a mean-field treatment valid for large atom numbers. For small numbers of atoms, we consider the analogous many-body problem and demonstrate a collapse-revival structure in the Josephson oscillations.

  10. Calibration of a single atom detector for atomic micro chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Stibor; S. Kraft; T. Campey; D. Komma; A. Günther; J. Fortágh; C. J. Vale; H. Rubinsztein-Dunlop; C. Zimmermann

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally investigate a scheme for detecting single atoms magnetically trapped on an atom chip. The detector is based on the photoionization of atoms and the subsequent detection of the generated ions. We describe the characterization of the ion detector with emphasis on its calibration via the correlation of ions with simultaneously generated electrons. A detection efficiency of 47.8% (+-2.6%) is measured, which is useful for single atom detection, and close to the limit allowing atom counting with sub-Poissonian uncertainty.

  11. A microfabricated atomic clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knappe, Svenja; Shah, Vishal; Schwindt, Peter D.D.; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John; Liew, Li-Anne; Moreland, John [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States); Electromagnetics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3328 (United States)

    2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication techniques usually applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are used to reduce the size and operating power of the core physics assembly of an atomic clock. With a volume of 9.5 mm{sup 3}, a fractional frequency instability of 2.5x10{sup -10} at 1 s of integration, and dissipating less than 75 mW of power, the device has the potential to bring atomically precise timing to hand-held, battery-operated devices. In addition, the design and fabrication process allows for wafer-level assembly of the structures, enabling low-cost mass-production of thousands of identical units with the same process sequence, and easy integration with other electronics.

  12. Delay in Atomic Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheifets, A. S. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-4030 (United States); Ivanov, I. A. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence ns and np subshells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the apparent 'time zero' when the photoelectron leaves the atom. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the 2s and 2p subshells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [Science 328, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than half of the measured time delay of 21{+-}5 as. We argue that the extreme ultraviolet pulse alone cannot produce such a large time delay and it is the streaking IR field that is most likely responsible for this effect.

  13. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  14. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  15. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  16. Atoms in Flight: The Remarkable Connections between Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic physics and hadron physics are both based on Yang Mills gauge theory; in fact, quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics provide important insight into the theory of hadrons in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of light-front relativistic equations of motion which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The renormalization scale for the running coupling, which is unambiguously set in QED, leads to a method for setting the renormalization scale in QCD. The production of atoms in flight provides a method for computing the formation of hadrons at the amplitude level. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, and light-front quantization have equal utility for atomic physics, especially in the relativistic domain. I also present a new perspective for understanding the contributions to the cosmological constant from QED and QCD.

  17. Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Alexander D.

    Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic ...

  18. Probing thermoelectric transport with cold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles Grenier; Corinna Kollath; Antoine Georges

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose experimental protocols to reveal thermoelectric and thermal effects in the transport properties of ultracold fermionic atoms, using the two-terminal setup recently realized at ETH. We show in particular that, for two reservoirs having equal particle numbers but different temperatures initially, the observation of a transient particle number imbalance during equilibration is a direct evidence of thermoelectric (off-diagonal) transport coefficients. This is a time-dependent analogue of the Seebeck effect, and a corresponding analogue of the Peltier effect can be proposed. We reveal that in addition to the thermoelectric coupling of the constriction a thermoelectric coupling also arises due to the finite dilatation coefficient of the reservoirs. We present a theoretical analysis of the protocols, and assess their feasibility by estimating the corresponding temperature and particle number imbalances in realistic current experimental conditions.

  19. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  20. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department through processing for improving their performance for engineering applications · Use and develop with usable ­ Chemical ­ Electronic ­ Optical ­ Magnetic ­ Transport, thermal and mechanical properties

  1. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

  2. Research in the chemical sciences: Summaries of FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary book is published annually on research supported by DOE`s Division of Chemical Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Research in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced batteries is arranged according to national laboratories, offsite institutions, and small businesses. Goal is to add to the knowledge base on which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. The special facilities used in DOE laboratories are described. Indexes are provided (topics, institution, investigator).

  3. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederalAshley BoyleAn overhead viewAtom-split it

  4. VOLUME 75, NUMBER 22 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 27 NOVEMBER 1995 Resolved-Sideband Raman Cooling of a Bound Atom to the 3D Zero-Point Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cooling to the zero-point energy appears to be a crucial prerequisite for future experiments) it will be important in future planned experiments. For example, once the ion is cooled to the n 0 state, it should-Sideband Raman Cooling of a Bound Atom to the 3D Zero-Point Energy C. Monroe, D. M. Meekhof, B. E. King, S. R

  5. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  6. chemical analysis | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions....

  7. Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

  8. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

  9. Cross sections for atomic displacements in solids by fast positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oen, Ordean S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mott series has been used to calculate the cross section for atomic displacements produced in elastic collisions between relativistic positrons and atomic nuclei. The Kinchin and Pease displacement model was used. Several elements spanning the atomic table were treated using positron energies ranging from threshold to several tens of MeV. The results are compared with previous calculations for relativistic electrons. It is found that for the same energy and atomic number the positron cross sections are always smaller (up to a factor of 5 or more). It is also found that the McKinley-Fesbach formula which is frequently used in radiation damage analysis is even less reliable for positrons than for electrons. 9 refs.

  10. Density functional theory investigation of 3d, 4d, and 5d 13-atom metal clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piotrowski, Mauricio J.; Piquini, Paulo; Da Silva, Juarez L. F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria 97105-900, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Cx. Postal 369, Sao Carlos 13560-970, SP (Brazil)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The knowledge of the atomic structure of clusters composed by few atoms is a basic prerequisite to obtain insights into the mechanisms that determine their chemical and physical properties as a function of diameter, shape, surface termination, as well as to understand the mechanism of bulk formation. Due to the wide use of metal systems in our modern life, the accurate determination of the properties of 3d, 4d, and 5d metal clusters poses a huge problem for nanoscience. In this work, we report a density functional theory study of the atomic structure, binding energies, effective coordination numbers, average bond lengths, and magnetic properties of the 3d, 4d, and 5d metal (30 elements) clusters containing 13 atoms, M{sub 13}. First, a set of lowest-energy local minimum structures (as supported by vibrational analysis) were obtained by combining high-temperature first-principles molecular-dynamics simulation, structure crossover, and the selection of five well-known M{sub 13} structures. Several new lower energy configurations were identified, e.g., Pd{sub 13}, W{sub 13}, Pt{sub 13}, etc., and previous known structures were confirmed by our calculations. Furthermore, the following trends were identified: (i) compact icosahedral-like forms at the beginning of each metal series, more opened structures such as hexagonal bilayerlike and double simple-cubic layers at the middle of each metal series, and structures with an increasing effective coordination number occur for large d states occupation. (ii) For Au{sub 13}, we found that spin-orbit coupling favors the three-dimensional (3D) structures, i.e., a 3D structure is about 0.10 eV lower in energy than the lowest energy known two-dimensional configuration. (iii) The magnetic exchange interactions play an important role for particular systems such as Fe, Cr, and Mn. (iv) The analysis of the binding energy and average bond lengths show a paraboliclike shape as a function of the occupation of the d states and hence, most of the properties can be explained by the chemistry picture of occupation of the bonding and antibonding states.

  11. Ruthenium / aerogel nanocomposits via Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biener, J; Baumann, T F; Wang, Y; Nelson, E J; Kucheyev, S O; Hamza, A V; Kemell, M; Ritala, M; Leskela, M

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general approach to prepare metal/aerogel nanocomposites via template directed atomic layer deposition (ALD). In particular, we used a Ru ALD process consisting of alternating exposures to bis(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (RuCp{sub 2}) and air at 350 C to deposit metallic Ru nanoparticles on the internal surfaces of carbon and silica aerogels. The process does not affect the morphology of the aerogel template and offers excellent control over metal loading by simply adjusting the number of ALD cycles. We also discuss the limitations of our ALD approach, and suggest ways to overcome these.

  12. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  13. Big Bang Day : The Great Big Particle Adventure - 1. Atom

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this series, comedian and physicist Ben Miller asks the CERN scientists what they hope to find. The notion of atoms dates back to Greek philosophers who sought a natural mechanical explanation of the Universe, as opposed to a divine one. The existence what we call chemical atoms, the constituents of all we see around us, wasn't proved until a hundred years ago, but almost simultaneously it was realised these weren't the indivisible constituents the Greeks envisaged. Much of the story of physics since then has been the ever-deeper probing of matter until, at the end of the 20th century, a complete list of fundamental ingredients had been identified, apart from one, the much discussed Higgs particle. In this programme, Ben finds out why this last particle is so pivotal, not just to atomic theory, but to our very existence - and how hopeful the scientists are of proving its existence.

  14. Precision physics of simple atoms: QED tests, nuclear structure and fundamental constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savely G. Karshenboim

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum electrodynamics is the first successful and still the most successful quantum field theory. Simple atoms, being essentially QED systems, allow highly accurate theoretical predictions. Because of their simple spectra, such atoms have been also efficiently studied experimentally frequently offering the most precisely measured quantities. Our review is devoted to comparison of theory and experiment in the field of precision physics of light simple atoms. In particular, we consider the Lamb shift in the hydrogen atom, the hyperfine structure in hydrogen, deuterium, helium-3 ion, muonium and positronium, as well as a number of other transitions in positronium. Additionally to a spectrum of unperturbed atoms, we consider annihilation decay of positronium and the g factor of bound particles in various two-body atoms. Special attention is paid to the uncertainty of the QED calculations due to the uncalculated higher-order corrections and effects of the nuclear structure. We also discuss applications of simple atoms to determination of several fundamental constants.

  15. Guidance Document Reactive Chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    showers and chillers. Health Hazards: The reactive chemicals are grouped primarily because of the physical

  16. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  17. Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M. L. Martina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M at absolute zero, (TAE0) of benzene, C6H6, was computed fully ab initio by means of W2h theory as 1306.6 kcal for systems the size of benzene, chemically accurate molecular atomization energies can be obtained from fully

  18. Change in atomic coordination in a heavily deformed metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y. [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Schumacher, G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Riesemeier, H. [Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Banhart, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Technische Universität Berlin, Materials Science and Technology, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The local structure around Ni and La atoms in Al{sub 85}Ni{sub 10}La{sub 5} amorphous powder after ball milling was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A continuous decrease in coordination number of Ni and La as a function of milling time was observed, while the nearest neighbour distance and the mean square atomic displacement did not change, pointing at the creation of free volume around the Ni and La atoms. These structural changes resemble those of a liquid upon temperature increase. The results are described by a shear band model in which the coordination numbers of Ni and La are different within and outside a shear band.

  19. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Universite Paris 13, Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430-Villetaneuse (France); Bocvarski, V. [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 - Belgrade-Zemun (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 {mu}m for He*, 1.2 {mu}m for Ne*, 0.87 {mu}m for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2{mu}m-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to ''vdW-Zeeman'' transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.

  20. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  1. Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

  2. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

  3. Atomic Spectroscopy Planck's constant: h 6.62608 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    m sec := Conversion factors: nm 10 9- m:= pm 10 12- m:= aJ 10 18- joule:= Energy of a photon: Ephoton h= hc = Energy of the hydrogen atom: where n is a quantum number and can have integer values undergoes a transition from a higher to a lower energy state. Energy conservation requires Eatom initial

  4. Multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnad, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of hypergeometric 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for weighted Hurwitz numbers is extended to multispecies families. Both the enumerative geometrical significance of multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers as weighted enumerations of branched coverings of the Riemann sphere and their combinatorial significance in terms of weighted paths in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ are derived. The particular case of multispecies quantum weighted Hurwitz numbers is studied in detail.

  5. Curvature and Tachibana numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, Sergey E [Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to define the rth Tachibana number t{sub r} of an n-dimensional compact oriented Riemannian manifold as the dimension of the space of conformally Killing r-forms, for r=1,2,...,n-1. We also describe properties of these numbers, by analogy with properties of the Betti numbers b{sub r} of a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  6. Cavity optomechanical coupling assisted by an atomic gas Z. R. Gong,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nori, Franco

    . P. Sun,1,2 and Franco Nori2,3,4 1 Institute of Theoretical Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences lowering the temperature of the mirror 1­3 . A key variable in previous designs is the number of pho- tons, with the atoms assuming an initial Bose-Einstein con- densate distribution, such an atomic condensate would act

  7. Bogoliubov theory and bosonic atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phan Thanh Nam

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the Bogoliubov variational principle in a mathematical framework similar to the generalized Hartree-Fock theory. Then we analyze the Bogoliubov theory for bosonic atoms in details. We discuss heuristically why the Bogoliubov energy should give the first correction to the leading energy of large bosonic atoms.

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proslier, Th.; Ha, Y.; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Ciovati, G.; Kneissel, P.; Reece, C.; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Gurevich, A.; /Natl. High Mag. Field Lab.; Cooley, L.; Wu, G.; /Fermilab; Pellin, M.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: (1) results from ALD coated cavities and coupons, (2) new evidence from point contact tunneling (PCT) showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, (3) a study of high pressure rinsing damage on niobium samples.

  10. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

  11. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  12. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Zheng-Johansson

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  13. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  14. Definitions Numbered Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Definitions · Numbered Space ­ a single space marked with a number and reserved for a single permit 24/7 · Unnumbered Space ­ a space which can be used by any customer allowed to park in that lot. High Low Average Question 4: If I buy a staff permit for an UNNUMBERED* space in a non-gated surface

  15. Graphene oxide sheets, the chemical exfoliation product of graphite powders and precursor for the bulk production of graphene based materials, are found to be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    #12;Graphene oxide sheets, the chemical exfoliation product of graphite powders and precursor), is the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powders that was first synthesized over a cen atomic layer of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms (Fig. 1a). In 2004, it was isolated by mechanical exfoliation

  16. Anticipating the atom: popular perceptions of atomic power before Hiroshima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d'Emal, Jacques-Andre Christian

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before Hiroshima made the Bomb an object of popular concern, possible implications and applications of atomic physics had been discussed in the public forum. The new science of X-rays and radium promised the possibilities of unlimited energy...

  17. atomization atomic absorption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in vacuum. The...

  18. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using cyclic Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S., E-mail: oehrlein@umd.edu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Bruce, Robert L.; Engelmann, Sebastian; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors demonstrate atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} using a steady-state Ar plasma, periodic injection of a defined number of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} molecules, and synchronized plasma-based Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. C{sub 4}F{sub 8} injection enables control of the deposited fluorocarbon (FC) layer thickness in the one to several Ångstrom range and chemical modification of the SiO{sub 2} surface. For low energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment conditions, the physical sputter rate of SiO{sub 2} vanishes, whereas SiO{sub 2} can be etched when FC reactants are present at the surface. The authors have measured for the first time the temporal variation of the chemically enhanced etch rate of SiO{sub 2} for Ar{sup +} ion energies below 30?eV as a function of fluorocarbon surface coverage. This approach enables controlled removal of Ångstrom-thick SiO{sub 2} layers. Our results demonstrate that development of atomic layer etching processes even for complex materials is feasible.

  19. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  20. Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

  1. Helium in Chemically Peculiar Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Leone

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of deriving the helium abundances in chemically peculiar stars, the importance of assuming a correct helium abundance has been investigated for determining the effective temperature and gravity of main sequence B-type stars, making full use of the present capability of reproducing their helium lines. Even if the flux distribution of main sequence B-type stars appears to depend only on the effective temperature for any helium abundance, the effective temperature, gravity and helium abundance have to be determined simultaneously by matching the Balmer line profiles. New MULTI NLTE calculations, performed adopting ATLAS9 model atmospheres and updated helium atomic parameters, reproduce most of the observed equivalent widths of neutral helium lines for main sequence B-type stars and they make us confident of the possibility to correctly derive the helium abundance in chemically peculiar stars. An application of previous methods to the helium rich star HD 37017 shows that helium could be stratified in the magnetic pole regions, as expected in the framework of the diffusion theory in the presence of mass loss.

  2. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction on Multifunctional Pd Catalysts. Heterogeneous Catalysis on Atomically Dispersed Supported Metals: CO2 Reduction...

  3. Spectroscopy of barium atoms in liquid and solid helium matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.; Moroshkin, P.; Weis, A. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 3, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exhaustive overview of optical absorption and laser-induced fluorescence lines of Ba atoms in liquid and solid helium matrices in visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. Due to the increased density of isolated atoms, we have found a large number of spectral lines that were not observed in condensed helium matrices before. We have also measured the lifetimes of metastable states. The lowest {sup 3}D{sub 1} metastable state has lifetime of 2.6 s and can be used as an intermediate state in two-step excitations of high-lying states. Various matrix-induced radiationless population transfer channels have been identified.

  4. and Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    is constructing a new building that will house the Department of Chemical Engineering and the DepartmentBiological and Chemical Engineering Building #12;2 Biological and Chemical Engineering Building sta and Engineering Quad, the new building will be part of a neighborhood of four buildings that house a community

  5. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuo Shibata; Shin-ichi Sasa

    1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  6. Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Chemical Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, we educate students in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering, giving them.Va. Department of Chemical Engineering benefit from a modern academic curriculum and state

  7. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  8. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  9. Recent Progress in ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    , cold gas experiments 2. How to make a BEC out of fermions 3. Recent Progress: Controlling Interaction (Feshbach Resonance) 4. From BCS to BEC: Rotating trap and spin- polarized condensates. 5. Future research and Einstein What is Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)? #12;300 K to 1 mK 109 atoms 1 mK to 1 mK 108 106 atoms

  10. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Sancho

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multiparticle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.

  11. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  12. Observation of suppression of light scattering induced by dipole-dipole interactions in a cold atomic ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pellegrino; R. Bourgain; S. Jennewein; Y. R. P. Sortais; S. D. Jenkins; J. Ruostekoski; A. Browaeys

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the emergence of collective scattering in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions when we illuminate a cold cloud of rubidium atoms with a near-resonant and weak intensity laser. The size of the atomic sample is comparable to the wavelength of light. When we gradually increase the atom number from 1 to 450, we observe a broadening of the line, a small red shift and, consistently with these, a strong suppression of the scattered light with respect to the noninteracting atom case. Numerical simulations, which include the internal atomic level structure, agree with the data.

  13. PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    PHYSICS DIVISION CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 2008 Prepared by _________________________________________________ T. Mullen Physics Division Chemical Hygiene Officer Reviewed by ___________________________________________________ J. Woodring Site Chemical Hygiene Officer Approved

  14. Material Safety Data Sheet Ashland Chemical Co. Date Prepared: 01/06/98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Material Safety Data Sheet Ashland Chemical Co. Date Prepared: 01/06/98 Date Printed: 06/23/99 MSDS General or Generic ID: BLEND Company Emergency Telephone Number: Ashland Chemical Co. 1-800-ASHLAND (1

  15. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  16. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  17. Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering June 2014 #12;Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 POLICY.......................................................................................... 2 2.1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER

  18. Magnetic fields, spots and weather in chemically peculiar stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Kochukhov

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    New observational techniques and sophisticated modelling methods has led to dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the interplay between the surface magnetism, atomic diffusion and atmospheric dynamics in chemically peculiar stars. Magnetic Doppler images, constructed using spectropolarimetric observations of Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters, reveal the presence of small-scale field topologies. Abundance Doppler mapping has been perfected to the level where distributions of many different chemical elements can be deduced self-consistently for one star. The inferred chemical spot structures are diverse and do not always trace underlying magnetic field geometry. Moreover, horizontal chemical inhomogeneities are discovered in non-magnetic CP stars and evolving chemical spots are observed for the first time in the bright mercury-manganese star alpha And. These results show that in addition to magnetic fields, another important non-magnetic structure formation mechanism acts in CP stars.

  19. Rapid automatic NCS identification using heavy-atom substructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid algorithm for identifying NCS in heavy-atom sites is described. An important component of a fully automated system for structure solution and phase improvement through density modification is a capability for identification of non-crystallographic symmetry as early in the process as possible. Algorithms exist for finding NCS in heavy-atom sites, but currently require of the order of N{sup 5} comparisons to be made, where N is the number of sites to be examined, including crystallographically related locations. A method described here based on considering only sets of sites that have common interatomic distances reduces the computational time by several orders of magnitude. Additionally, searches for proper symmetry allow the identification of NCS in cases where only one heavy atom is present per NCS copy.

  20. Highly Hazardous Chemicals and Chemical Spills EPA Compliance Fact Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Highly Hazardous Chemicals and Chemical Spills EPA Compliance Fact Sheet Vanderbilt Environmental.safety.vanderbilt.edu HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WASTES Certain chemical wastes must be handled by special procedures due to their highly hazardous nature. These chemicals include expired isopropyl and ethyl ethers (these chemicals

  1. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Emphasis in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, materials, energy

  2. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    · ChemicalEngineering (Nanotechnology) Bachelor of Science 131 units · ChemicalEngineering(Petroleum38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

  3. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Polymers38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

  4. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, S.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  5. Accelerometer using atomic waves for space applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of a dilute gas of trapped atoms in a single quantum state [18, 19, 20 of such devices in the field of navigation, surveying and analysis of earth structures. Matter-wave interferometry that the use of Bose-Einstein condensed atoms will bring the science of atom optics, and in particular atom

  6. A number of organizations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green Technology shown here. CityofChicago Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy SOLAR TODAY Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy by Lori A. Bird and Edward A. Holt #12;November/December 2002 35 Power

  7. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  8. Quantum Electrodynamics of Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Ballesteros; Jérémy Faupin; Jürg Fröhlich; Baptiste Schubnel

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple model of an atom interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field is studied. The atom has a finite mass $m$, finitely many excited states and an electric dipole moment, $\\vec{d}_0 = -\\lambda_{0} \\vec{d}$, where $\\| d^{i}\\| = 1,$ $ i=1,2,3,$ and $\\lambda_0$ is proportional to the elementary electric charge. The interaction of the atom with the radiation field is described with the help of the Ritz Hamiltonian, $-\\vec{d}_0\\cdot \\vec{E}$, where $\\vec{E}$ is the electric field, cut off at large frequencies. A mathematical study of the Lamb shift, the decay channels and the life times of the excited states of the atom is presented. It is rigorously proven that these quantities are analytic functions of the momentum $\\vec{p}$ of the atom and of the coupling constant $\\lambda_0$, provided $|\\vec{p}| < mc$ and $| \\Im\\vec{p} |$ and $| \\lambda_{0} |$ are sufficiently small. The proof relies on a somewhat novel inductive construction involving a sequence of `smooth Feshbach-Schur maps' applied to a complex dilatation of the original Hamiltonian, which yields an algorithm for the calculation of resonance energies that converges super-exponentially fast.

  9. Robust model-based fault diagnosis for chemical process systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajaraman, Srinivasan

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fault detection and diagnosis have gained central importance in the chemical process industries over the past decade. This is due to several reasons, one of them being that copious amount of data is available from a large number of sensors...

  10. ISSN 1463-9076 Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellago, Christoph

    Hou etal. Graphene-based electrochemical energy conversion and storage: fuel cells, supercapacitorsISSN 1463-9076 Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics www.rsc.org/pccp Volume 13 | Number 34 | 14

  11. Hydrogen atom on curved noncommutative space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Kupriyanov

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the hydrogen atom spectrum on curved noncommutative space defined by the commutation relations $\\left[ \\hat {x}^{i},\\hat{x}^{j}\\right] =i\\theta\\hat{\\omega}^{ij}\\left( \\hat {x}\\right) $, where $\\theta$ is the parameter of noncommutativity. The external antisymmetric field which determines the noncommutativity is chosen as $\\omega^{ij}(x) =\\varepsilon^{ijk}{x}_{k}f\\left( {x_i}x^{i}\\right) $. In this case the rotational symmetry of the system is conserved, preserving the degeneracy of the energy spectrum. The contribution of the noncommutativity appears as a correction to the fine structure. The corresponding nonlocality is calculated: $\\Delta x\\Delta y \\geq \\frac{\\theta^2}{4} |m\\langle f^2\\rangle| $, where $m$ is a magnetic quantum number.

  12. Degeneracy Breaking of Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agung Trisetyarso; Pantur Silaban

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The three dimensional rotation group, SO(3), is a symmetry group of the normal hydrogen atom. Each reducible representation of this group can be associated with a degenerate energy level. If this atom is placed in an external magnetic field, the interaction between the orbital magnetic moment with this field will lead to a symmetry breaking where the symmetry group of the atom is a new group distinct from the SO(3) group. This phenomenon describes the normal Zeeman effect, where a degenerate energy level splits into several new energy levels. It is explicitly shown that each of the new energy levels can be associated with an irreducible representation of the new symmetry group.

  13. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  14. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  15. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  16. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Falcone, Roger

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  17. EMSL - chemical analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical-analysis en Microstructure and Cs Behavior of Ba-Doped Aluminosilicate Pollucite Irradiated with F+ Ions. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  18. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  19. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  20. Atomic force microscope with combined FTIR-Raman spectroscopy having a micro thermal analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Samuel D. (Aiken, SC); Fondeur, Fernando F. (North Augusta, SC)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope is provided that includes a micro thermal analyzer with a tip. The micro thermal analyzer is configured for obtaining topographical data from a sample. A raman spectrometer is included and is configured for use in obtaining chemical data from the sample.

  1. Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, possesses many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, possesses many excellent chemical species onto the graphene plane offers an effective route to alter and engineer the properties of graphene. NSF-supported researchers have demonstrated that graphene covered dilutely with covalently bonded

  2. Nanoplasmonic Lattices for Ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gullans; T. Tiecke; D. E. Chang; J. Feist; J. D. Thompson; J. I. Cirac; P. Zoller; M. D. Lukin

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use sub-wavelength confinement of light associated with the near field of plasmonic systems to create nanoscale optical lattices for ultracold atoms. Our approach combines the unique coherence properties of isolated atoms with the sub-wavelength manipulation and strong light-matter interaction associated with nano-plasmonic systems. It allows one to considerably increase the energy scales in the realization of Hubbard models and to engineer effective long-range interactions in coherent and dissipative many-body dynamics. Realistic imperfections and potential applications are discussed.

  3. Cohort-level brain mapping: learning cognitive atoms to single out specialized regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cohort-level brain mapping: learning cognitive atoms to single out specialized regions G. Varoquaux, France Abstract. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies map the human brain by testing specialized brain regions and networks. The number of functional networks extracted is limited by the number

  4. Chemical Enrichment at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snigdha Das; Pushpa Khare

    1998-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tried to understand the recent observations related to metallicity in Ly $\\alpha$ forest clouds in the framework of the two component model suggested by Chiba & Nath (1997). We find that even if the mini-halos were chemically enriched by an earlier generation of stars, to have [C/H] $\\simeq$ -2.5, the number of C IV lines with column density $>10^{12} cm^{-2}$, contributed by the mini-halos, at the redshift of 3, would be only about 10% of the total number of lines, for a chemical enrichment rate of $(1+z)^{-3}$ in the galaxies. Recently reported absence of heavy element lines associated with most of the Ly $\\alpha$ lines with H I column density between $10^{13.5} cm^{-2}$ and $10^{14} cm^{-2}$ by Lu et al (1998), if correct, gives an upper limit on [C/H]=-3.7, not only in the mini-halos, but also in the outer parts of galactic halos. This is consistent with the results of numerical simulations, according to which, the chemical elements associated with the Ly $\\alpha$ clouds are formed in situ in clouds, rather than in an earlier generation of stars. However, the mean value of $7 \\times 10^{-3}$ for the column density ratio of C IV and H I, determined by Cowie and Songaila (1998) for low Lyman alpha optical depths, implies an abundance of [C/H] =-2.5 in mini-halos as well as in most of the region in galactic halos, presumably enriched by an earlier generation of stars. The redshift and column density distribution of C IV has been shown to be in reasonable agreement with the observations.

  5. Magnetic property of transition metal-Si atomic line on silicon ?3 grain boundary: A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yong-Hua, E-mail: lyhua@shu.edu.cn; Guo, Shu-Kuan; Ma, Zhong-Quan; Qu, Guo-Hui; Shi, Ting-Ting; Xia, Qin [Department of Physics, SHU-Solar Energy R and D Laboratory, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Gong, Xin-Gao [Physics Department, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wei, Su-Huai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of different 3d transition metal-Si atomic lines on silicon ?3 (112) grain boundary, which can be formed through grain boundary segregation. We find that (i) Fe atoms occupy the substitutional sites at the grain boundary and form an Fe-Si atomic line, but the interaction between the Fe atoms is antiferromagnetic. (ii) The ferromagnetic stability increases with the atomic number of the transition metals and Co-Si atomic line is more stable in the ferromagnetic phase and shows a semimetallic behavior. We suggest that this special TM-Si atomic line formed by thermodynamically favorable transition metal segregation on Si grain boundary could be used in design of spin-dependent quantum devices.

  6. Steady-state superradiance with alkaline earth atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Meiser; M. J. Holland

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth-alkaline-like atoms with ultra-narrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements

  7. Edge Transport in 2D Cold Atom Optical Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. W. Scarola; S. Das Sarma

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the observable response of edge currents in two dimensional cold atom optical lattices. As an example we use Gutzwiller mean-field theory to relate persistent edge currents surrounding a Mott insulator in a slowly rotating trapped Bose-Hubbard system to time of flight measurements. We briefly discuss an application, the detection of Chern number using edge currents of a topologically ordered optical lattice insulator.

  8. Controlling single and few-layer graphene crystals growth in a solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Shinde, Sachin M.; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Center for Fostering Young and Innovative Researchers, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8555 (Japan)

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we reveal the growth process of single and few-layer graphene crystals in the solid carbon source based chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Nucleation and growth of graphene crystals on a polycrystalline Cu foil are significantly affected by the injection of carbon atoms with pyrolysis rate of the carbon source. We observe micron length ribbons like growth front as well as saturated growth edges of graphene crystals depending on growth conditions. Controlling the pyrolysis rate of carbon source, monolayer and few-layer crystals and corresponding continuous films are obtained. In a controlled process, we observed growth of large monolayer graphene crystals, which interconnect and merge together to form a continuous film. On the other hand, adlayer growth is observed with an increased pyrolysis rate, resulting few-layer graphene crystal structure and merged continuous film. The understanding of monolayer and few-layer crystals growth in the developed CVD process can be significant to grow graphene with controlled layer numbers.

  9. An ultra-bright atom laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bolpasi; N. K. Efremidis; M. J. Morrissey; P. Condylis; D. Sahagun; M. Baker; W. von Klitzing

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel, ultra-bright atom-laser and ultra-cold thermal atom beam. Using rf-radiation we strongly couple the magnetic hyperfine levels of 87Rb atoms in a magnetically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. At low rf-frequencies gravity opens a small hole in the trapping potenital and a well collimated, extremely bright atom laser emerges from just below the condensate. As opposed to traditional atom lasers based on weak coupling, this technique allows us to outcouple atoms at an arbitrarily large rate. We demonstrate an increase in flux per atom in the BEC by a factor of sixteen compared to the brightest quasi-continuous atom laser. Furthermore, we produce by two orders of magnitude the coldest thermal atom beam to date (200 nK).

  10. Quark Number Susceptibility with Finite Quark Mass in Holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyung-il Kim; Youngman Kim; Shingo Takeuchi; Takuya Tsukioka

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a finite quark mass on the quark number susceptibility in the framework of holographic QCD. We work in a bottom-up model with a deformed AdS black hole and D3/D7 model to calculate the quark number susceptibility at finite temperature with/without a finite quark chemical potential. As expected the finite quark mass suppresses the quark number susceptibility. We find that at high temperatures $T\\ge 600$ MeV the quark number susceptibility of light quarks and heavy quarks are almost equal in the bottom-up model. This indicates that the heavy quark like charm contribution to thermodynamics of a QCD-like system may start to become significant at temperatures $T\\sim 600$ MeV. In D3/D7 model, we focus on the competition between the quark chemical potential, which enhances the quark number susceptibility, and the quark mass that suppresses the susceptibility. We observe that depending on the relative values of the quark mass and the quark chemical potential, the quark number susceptibility shows a diverging or converging behavior. We also calculate the chiral susceptibility in D3/D7 model to support the observation made with the quark number susceptibility.

  11. Platform Chemicals from an Oilseed Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tupy, Mike; Schrodi Yann

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The US chemical industry is $460 billion in size where a $150 billion segment of which is non-oxygenated chemicals that is sourced today via petroleum but is addressable by a renewable feedstock if one considers a more chemically reduced feedstock such as vegetable oils. Vegetable oil, due to its chemical functionality, provides a largely untapped opportunity as a renewable chemical source to replace petroleum-derived chemicals and produce platform chemicals unavailable today. This project examined the fertile intersection between the rich building blocks provided by vegetable oils and the enhanced chemical modification capability provided by metathesis chemistry. The technology advanced in this study is the process of ethylene cross-metathesis (referred to as ethenolysis) with vegetable oil and vegetable oil derivatives to manufacture the platform-chemical 9-decenoic acid (or 9DA) and olefin co-products. The project team meet its goals of demonstrating improved catalyst efficiencies of several multiples, deepening the mechanistic understanding of metathesis, synthesis and screening of dozens of new catalysts, designing and modeling commercial processes, and estimating production costs. One demonstrable result of the study was a step change improvement in catalyst turnover number in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate as reported here. We met our key measurable of producing 100 lbs of 9DA at the pilot-scale, which demonstrated ability to scale-up ethenolysis. DOE Project funding had significant positive impact on development of metathetically modified vegetable oils more broadly as the Cargill/Materia partnership, that was able to initiate primarily due to DOE funding, has succeeded in commercializing products, validating metathesis as a platform technology, and expanding a diverse products portfolio in high value and in large volume markets. Opportunities have expanded and business development has gained considerable momentum and enabled further expansion of the Materia/Cargill relationship. This project exceeded expectations and is having immediate impact on DOE success by replacing petroleum products with renewables in a large volume application today.

  12. CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY ABBREVIATION CHEMICAL NAME HAZARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Corrosive - base LiCl Lithium chloride Harmful MeOH Methanol Flammable #12;CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY Irritant destain Methanol,acetic acid,H2O Flammable, Corrosive - acid DI H2O Deionized water DCM FeCl3 Iron(III) chloride Corrosive - acid FeSO4 Iron(II) sulfate Toxic H2O Water HCl Hydrochloric

  13. The adsorption of selected chemical compounds on soil clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, William Leroy

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by such chemical compounds and atomic wastes might be a potent weapon in time of war. Also, such contaminants are adding to the numerous local problems in this country during time of peace, and there is every indication that the problems will increase in magni...- tude in the future, Analogous problems exist with detergent wastes, atomic wastes, factory and industrial wastes, and the widespread uses of insecticides and fungicides. The various high adsorbing soil-clays may provide an answer, or at least a...

  14. ELECTRONIC SPUTTERING: FROM ATOMIC PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    ELECTRONIC SPUTTERING: FROM ATOMIC PHYSICS TO CONTINUUM MECHANICS Ejection of simple and complex molecules from surfaces probes the response of condensed matter to electronic excitations and has and Engineering Physics at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Bo Sundqvist holds the Chair in Ion

  15. Photoabsorption by Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, Steven T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of photoabsorption by atoms and ions is presented. Specifically, examples of near-chaotic behavior in photoionization of positive ions, low-energy manifestations of nondipole effects, high-energy breakdown of the single particle picture and new phenomenology uncovered in the inner-shell photoabsorption by negative ions are discussed.

  16. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  17. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSR Key Number Retrieval Pease

  18. Realization of a superconducting atom chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Nirrengarten; Angie Qarry; Cédric Roux; Andreas Emmert; Gilles Nogues; Michel Brune; Jean-Michel Raimond; Serge Haroche

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have trapped rubidium atoms in the magnetic field produced by a superconducting atom chip operated at liquid Helium temperatures. Up to $8.2\\cdot 10^5$ atoms are held in a Ioffe-Pritchard trap at a distance of 440 $\\mu$m from the chip surface, with a temperature of 40 $\\mu$K. The trap lifetime reaches 115 s at low atomic densities. These results open the way to the exploration of atom--surface interactions and coherent atomic transport in a superconducting environment, whose properties are radically different from normal metals at room temperature.

  19. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  20. Remote atom entanglement in a fiber-connected three-atom system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo Yan-Qing; Chen Jing; Song He-Shan

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An Ising-type atom-atom interaction is obtained in a fiber-connected three-atom system. The interaction is effective when $\\Delta\\approx \\gamma _{0}\\gg g$. The preparations of remote two-atom and three-atom entanglement governed by this interaction are discussed in specific parameters region. The overall two-atom entanglement is very small because of the existence of the third atom. However, the three-atom entanglement can reach a maximum very close to 1.

  1. Adjoint design sensitivity analysis of reduced atomic systems using generalized Langevin equation for lattice structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Min-Geun; Jang, Hong-Lae [National Creative Research Initiatives Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design and Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Creative Research Initiatives Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design and Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seonho, E-mail: secho@snu.ac.kr [National Creative Research Initiatives Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design and Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Creative Research Initiatives Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design and Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient adjoint design sensitivity analysis method is developed for reduced atomic systems. A reduced atomic system and the adjoint system are constructed in a locally confined region, utilizing generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for periodic lattice structures. Due to the translational symmetry of lattice structures, the size of time history kernel function that accounts for the boundary effects of the reduced atomic systems could be reduced to a single atom’s degrees of freedom. For the problems of highly nonlinear design variables, the finite difference method is impractical for its inefficiency and inaccuracy. However, the adjoint method is very efficient regardless of the number of design variables since one additional time integration is required for the adjoint GLE. Through numerical examples, the derived adjoint sensitivity turns out to be accurate and efficient through the comparison with finite difference sensitivity.

  2. Grant Application Package CFDA Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Grant Application Package CFDA Number: Opportunity Title: Offering Agency: Agency Contact: Opportunity Open Date: Opportunity Close Date: CFDA Description: Opportunity Number: Competition ID

  3. Grant Title: KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION CONFERENCE GRANTS PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT Funding Opportunity Number: CFDA Number(s) -93.243; Funding Opportunity Number -OA-08-002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: CFDA Number(s) - 93.243; Funding Opportunity Number - OA-08-002. Agency/Department: Department

  4. Quantum Optical Coherence: Applications in Photon Switching, Control of Spontaneous Emission and Atom Localization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shuai

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2 The combined cavity-cold atoms system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.3 Controllable optical bistability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2...-cold-atoms system . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 The cavity photon numbers as a function of the input pump along the cavity axis. For (a) ? (c), the parameters are N = 4.8 × 104, U˜0 = 0.25, ?˜c = 1.2 × 103, ?˜ = 0.4 × 103, and (a) ?˜? = 0, (b) ?˜? = 0.1, (c) ?˜? = 0...

  5. Gravitational Corrections to the Energy-Levels of a Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen-Hua Zhao; Yu-Xiao Liu; Xi-Guo Li

    2007-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The first order perturbations of the energy levels of a hydrogen atom in central internal gravitational field are investigated. The internal gravitational field is produced by the mass of the atomic nucleus. The energy shifts are calculated for the relativistic 1S, 2S, 2P, 3S, 3P, 3D, 4S and 4P levels with Schwarzschild metric. The calculated results show that the gravitational corrections are sensitive to the total angular momentum quantum number.

  6. Quantum Optical Coherence: Applications in Photon Switching, Control of Spontaneous Emission and Atom Localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shuai

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2 The combined cavity-cold atoms system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.3 Controllable optical bistability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2...-cold-atoms system . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 The cavity photon numbers as a function of the input pump along the cavity axis. For (a) ? (c), the parameters are N = 4.8 × 104, U˜0 = 0.25, ?˜c = 1.2 × 103, ?˜ = 0.4 × 103, and (a) ?˜? = 0, (b) ?˜? = 0.1, (c) ?˜? = 0...

  7. Role of atomic collisions in fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, D.E.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

  8. Preliminary steps to the Atomic Energy Commission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program to the newly created Atomic Energy Commission. He had succeeded in ending the war, but the transition to peacetime use of atomic energy was not something the Army was...

  9. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  10. atomic kitteni lauljatar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory...

  11. atoms barrasiye barhamkoneshhaye: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory...

  12. atomic mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Negative *) Atomic composition Graham, Nick 3 Prospects in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry CERN Preprints Summary: Tendencies in five main branches of atomic spectrometry...

  13. Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

  14. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction Reaction. Atomic Ordering Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity of Nanoalloys for Oxygen Reduction...

  15. Information recycling beam-splitters for atom-interferometry with enhanced sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Haine

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme to significantly enhance the sensitivity of atom-interferometry performed with Bose-Einstein condensates. When a two-photon Raman transition is used to split the condensate into two modes, some information about the number of atoms in one of the modes is transferred to one of the optical modes. We introduce a simple model to describe this process, and find that by processing this information in an appropriate way, the sensitivity of atom interferometry can be enhanced by more than a factor of 10 for realistic parameters.

  16. The use of atomic level stress to characterize the structure of irradiated iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egami, Takeshi [ORNL] [ORNL; Ojha, Madhusudan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nicholson, Donald M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu [ORNL] [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Bala [ORNL] [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviour of irradiated material near a primary knock on atom immediately after impact is of great importance for designing reactor materials. Currently, molecular dynamics simulations with classical force fields provide the foundation for understanding the resulting cascade. However, modern density functional calculations can now treat large enough numbers of atoms that they can provide additional details of the magnetic and electronic nature of irradiated samples. In this paper we calculate from first principles the atomic level stresses for an instantaneous configuration following the initiation of a low energy cascade in iron.

  17. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

  18. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  19. Riso Report No. Danish Atomic Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagiellonski Institute of Physics Krakow, Poland and P. A. Lindgård Mogensen The Danish Atomic EnergyfM O o 8- OL '·O c/i Riso Report No. Danish Atomic Energy Commission Research Establishment Riso/t on exchangefrom: Library, Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Risd, Roskilde, Denmark #12;May, 1966 Ris6 Report No

  20. Driven Ratchets for Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renzoni, F

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brownian motors, or ratchets, are devices which "rectify" Brownian motion, i.e. they can generate a current of particles out of unbiased fluctuations. The ratchet effect is a very general phenomenon which applies to a wide range of physical systems, and indeed ratchets have been realized with a variety of solid state devices, with optical trap setups as well as with synthetic molecules and granular gases. The present article reviews recent experimental realizations of ac driven ratchets with cold atoms in driven optical lattices. This is quite an unusual system for a Brownian motor as there is no a real thermal bath, and both the periodic potential for the atoms and the fluctuations are determined by laser fields. Such a system allowed us to realize experimentally rocking and gating ratchets, and to precisely investigate the relationship between symmetry and transport in these ratchets, both for the case of periodic and quasiperiodic driving.

  1. Driven Ratchets for Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Renzoni

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Brownian motors, or ratchets, are devices which "rectify" Brownian motion, i.e. they can generate a current of particles out of unbiased fluctuations. The ratchet effect is a very general phenomenon which applies to a wide range of physical systems, and indeed ratchets have been realized with a variety of solid state devices, with optical trap setups as well as with synthetic molecules and granular gases. The present article reviews recent experimental realizations of ac driven ratchets with cold atoms in driven optical lattices. This is quite an unusual system for a Brownian motor as there is no a real thermal bath, and both the periodic potential for the atoms and the fluctuations are determined by laser fields. Such a system allowed us to realize experimentally rocking and gating ratchets, and to precisely investigate the relationship between symmetry and transport in these ratchets, both for the case of periodic and quasiperiodic driving.

  2. The official version of this document will only be maintained online. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    The official version of this document will only be maintained online. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN be maintained online. PURDUE UNIVERSITY Chemical Hygiene Plan and Hazardous Materials Safety Manual Laboratory Specific Plan This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan specific to the following areas: Building(s): Room Number

  3. ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

  4. The Future of Atomic Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  5. OscilloscopeMOM packetReadingNumber msg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    ReadingNumber; // shared variable #11: // uint8_t lock = 0; #12: TOS_Msg msg;// shared variable #13: taskvoid task4; #29: pack >channel = 1; #30: pack >sourceMoteID = TOS_LOCAL_ADDRESS; #31: if (call SendMsg.send(TOS result_t SendMsg.sendDone(TOS_MsgPtr sent, result_t success) { #53: // atomic lock = 0; /* notify

  6. The Common Elements of Atomic and Hadronic Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley J. Brodsky

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic physics and hadronic physics are both governed by the Yang Mills gauge theory Lagrangian; in fact, Abelian quantum electrodynamics can be regarded as the zero-color limit of quantum chromodynamics. I review a number of areas where the techniques of atomic physics can provide important insight into hadronic eigenstates in QCD. For example, the Dirac-Coulomb equation, which predicts the spectroscopy and structure of hydrogenic atoms, has an analog in hadron physics in the form of frame-independent light-front relativistic equations of motion consistent with light-front holography which give a remarkable first approximation to the spectroscopy, dynamics, and structure of light hadrons. The production of antihydrogen in flight can provide important insight into the dynamics of hadron production in QCD at the amplitude level. The renormalization scale for the running coupling is unambiguously set in QED; an analogous procedure sets the renormalization scales in QCD, leading to scheme-independent scale-fixed predictions. Conversely, many techniques which have been developed for hadron physics, such as scaling laws, evolution equations, the quark-interchange process and light-front quantization have important applicants for atomic physics and photon science, especially in the relativistic domain.

  7. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  8. Gauge invariant hydrogen atom Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei-Min Sun; Xiang-Song Chen; Xiao-Fu Lu; Fan Wang

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a classical external electromagnetic field, there is an apparent puzzle that the matrix element of the canonical momentum and Hamiltonian operators is gauge dependent. A resolution to this puzzle is recently provided by us in [2]. Based on the separation of the electromagnetic potential into pure gauge and gauge invariant parts, we have proposed a new set of momentum and Hamiltonian operators which satisfy both the requirement of gauge invariance and the relevant commutation relations. In this paper we report a check for the case of the hydrogen atom problem: Starting from the Hamiltonian of the coupled electron, proton and electromagnetic field, under the infinite proton mass approximation, we derive the gauge invariant hydrogen atom Hamiltonian and verify explicitly that this Hamiltonian is different from the Dirac Hamiltonian, which is the time translation generator of the system. The gauge invariant Hamiltonian is the energy operator, whose eigenvalue is the energy of the hydrogen atom. It is generally time-dependent. In this case, one can solve the energy eigenvalue equation at any specific instant of time. It is shown that the energy eigenvalues are gauge independent, and by suitably choosing the phase factor of the time-dependent eigenfunction, one can ensure that the time-dependent eigenfunction satisfies the Dirac equation.

  9. NAAP Hydrogen Atom 1/9 The Hydrogen Atom Student Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Name: NAAP ­ Hydrogen Atom 1/9 The Hydrogen Atom ­ Student Guide Background Material Carefully read and the Quantum model represent the Hydrogen atom. In some cases they both describe things in the same way frequency, smaller energy, and the same velocity through space as a blue photon". #12;NAAP ­Hydrogen Atom 2

  10. Fast transport, atom sample splitting and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkl, Gerhard

    Fast transport, atom sample splitting and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation and the manipulation of ultra-cold implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator-based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more

  11. Optomechanical Rydberg-atom excitation via dynamic Casimir-Polder coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauro Antezza; Caterina Braggio; Giovanni Carugno; Antonio Noto; Roberto Passante; Lucia Rizzuto; Giuseppe Ruoso; Salvatore Spagnolo

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the optomechanical coupling of a oscillating effective mirror with a Rydberg atomic gas, mediated by the dynamical atom-mirror Casimir-Polder force. This coupling may produce a near-field resonant atomic excitation whose probability scales as $\\propto (d^2\\;a\\;n^4\\;t)^2/z_0^8$, where $z_0$ is the average atom-surface distance, $d$ the atomic dipole moment, $a$ the mirror's effective oscillation amplitude, $n$ the initial principal quantum number, and $t$ the time. We propose an experimental configuration to realize this system with a cold atom gas trapped at a distance $\\sim 2\\cdot10 \\, \\mu$m from a semiconductor substrate, whose dielectric constant is periodically driven by an external laser pulse, hence realizing en effective mechanical mirror motion due to the periodic change of the substrate from transparent to reflecting. For a parabolic gas shape, this effect is predicted to excite about $\\sim 10^2$ atoms of a dilute gas of $10^3$ trapped Rydberg atoms with $n=75$ after about $0.5 \\,\\mu \\mbox{s}$, hence high enough to be detected in typical Rydberg gas experimental conditions.

  12. Ultrafast probing of ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buenermann, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg; Neumark, Daniel M. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Haxton, Daniel J.; Gessner, Oliver [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ejection dynamics of Rydberg atoms and molecular fragments from electronically excited helium nanodroplets are studied with time-resolved extreme ultraviolet ion imaging spectroscopy. At excitation energies of 23.6 {+-} 0.2 eV, Rydberg atoms in n= 3 and n= 4 states are ejected on different time scales and with significantly different kinetic energy distributions. Specifically, n= 3 Rydberg atoms are ejected with kinetic energies as high as 0.85 eV, but their appearance is delayed by approximately 200 fs. In contrast, n= 4 Rydberg atoms appear within the time resolution of the experiment with considerably lower kinetic energies. Major features in the Rydberg atom kinetic energy distributions for both principal quantum numbers can be described within a simple elastic scattering model of localized perturbed atomic Rydberg atoms that are expelled from the droplet due to their repulsive interaction with the surrounding helium bath. Time-dependent kinetic energy distributions of He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 3}{sup +} ions are presented that support the formation of molecular ions in an indirect droplet ionization process and the ejection of neutral Rydberg dimers on a similar time scale as the n= 3 Rydberg atoms.

  13. Designing frequency-dependent relaxation rates and Lamb shift for a giant artificial atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Frisk Kockum; Per Delsing; Göran Johansson

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In traditional quantum optics, where the interaction between atoms and light at optical frequencies is studied, the atoms can be approximated as point-like when compared to the wavelength of light. So far, this relation has also been true for artificial atoms made out of superconducting circuits or quantum dots, interacting with microwave radiation. However, recent and ongoing experiments using surface acoustic waves show that a single artificial atom can be coupled to a bosonic field at several points wavelengths apart. Here, we theoretically study this type of system. We find that the multiple coupling points give rise to a frequency dependence in the coupling strength between the atom and its environment, and also in the Lamb shift of the atom. The frequency dependence is given by the discrete Fourier transform of the coupling point coordinates and can therefore be designed. We discuss a number of possible applications for this phenomenon, including tunable coupling, single-atom lasing, and other effects that can be achieved by designing the relative coupling strengths of different transitions in a multi-level atom.

  14. The concrete theory of numbers: initial numbers and wonderful properties of numbers repunit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Tarasov

    2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work initial numbers and repunit numbers have been studied. All numbers have been considered in a decimal notation. The problem of simplicity of initial numbers has been studied. Interesting properties of numbers repunit are proved: $gcd(R_a, R_b) = R_{gcd(a,b)}$; $R_{ab}/(R_aR_b)$ is an integer only if $gcd(a,b) = 1$, where $a\\geq1$, $b\\geq1$ are integers. Dividers of numbers repunit, are researched by a degree of prime number.

  15. Ultracold Atoms: How Quantum Field Theory Invaded Atomic Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold Atoms: How Quantum

  16. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susanne Pielawa; Luiz Davidovich; David Vitali; Giovanna Morigi

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  17. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielawa, Susanne; Vitali, David; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  18. atomic recoil laser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic Recoil Laser Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We formulate a wave atom optics theory of the Collective Atomic Recoil Laser, where the atomic center-of-mass motion...

  19. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals chemicals result from the direct or indirect actions of humans. Build- ing materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  20. Appendix H. Chemicals Appendix H. Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals chemicals result from the direct or indirect actions of humans. Build- ing materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  1. PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    phenomena in nature and technology. The chemical engineer leverages knowledge of molecular processes across1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School faculty

  2. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Bhardwaj, Sunil [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy); Sincrotone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14, km 163.4, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  3. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D.J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a new capability for stereoscopically imaging the magnetosphere. By imaging the charge exchange neutral atoms over a broad energy range (1 < E , {approximately} 100 keV) using two identical instruments on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS will enable the 3-dimensional visualization and the resolution of large scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. These observations will provide a leap ahead in the understanding of the global aspects of the terrestrial magnetosphere and directly address a number of critical issues in the ``Sun-Earth Connections`` science theme of the NASA Office of Space Science.

  4. Quantum insulating states of F=2 cold atoms in optical lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Zhou; Gordon W. Semenoff

    2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter we study various spin correlated insulating states of F=2 cold atoms in optical lattices. We find that the effective spin exchange interaction due to virtual hopping contains an {\\em octopole} coupling between two neighboring lattice sites. Depending on scattering lengths and numbers of particles per site the ground states are either rotationally invariant dimer or trimer Mott insulators or insulating states with various spin orders. Three spin ordered insulating phases are ferromagnetic, cyclic and nematic Mott insulators. We estimate the phase boundaries for states with different numbers of atoms per lattice site.

  5. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  6. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  7. General Atomics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/Puesta en Marcha,Geary,GenSelfandAtomics

  8. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G-31 Fluorocarbonhydrocarbons, and (3) fluorocarbon solvents. However, aHigh Hazard Chemicals Fluorocarbon Solvents Fluorocarbon

  9. November 2006 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    .0 DEPARTMENTAL SAFETY MANAGEMENT 4.1 CHEMISTRY SAFETY COMMITTEE 4.2 TRAINING 4.3 CHEMICAL SAFETY PROTOCOLS 4.2 CHEMICAL HAZARD INFORMATION 6.3 CHEMICAL STORAGE IN LABORATORIES 6.4 WORKING WITH PARTICULARLY HAZARDOUS PROCEDURES 6.8 CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL 6.9 COMPRESSED GASES 6.10 CRYOGENIC LIQUIDS #12;November 2006 3 6

  10. Course Number: 7/8129 Course Title: Environmental Sampling and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    environmental health concern; collect, analyze, interpret, manage and present data; demonstrate technical1 Course Number: 7/8129 Course Title: Environmental Sampling and Analysis The University of Memphis for measuring environmental chemical and biological contaminants. We will primarily examine sampling

  11. Data Compression with Prime Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

  12. Atoms can be divided into three categories: polar, non-polar and hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei-Lin You

    2010-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the time of Rutherford 1911) physicists and chemists commonly believed that with no electric field, the nucleus of an atom is at the centre of the electron cloud, atoms do not have permanent electric dipole moment (EDM), so that there is no polar atom in nature. In the fact, the idea is untested hypothesis. After ten years of intense research, our experiments showed that atoms can be divided into three categories: polar, non-polar and hydrogen atom. Alkali atoms are all polar atoms. The EDM of a Sodium, Potassium, Rubidium and Cesium atom in the ground state have been obtained as follows: d(Na)=1.28*10 to-8 power e.cm; d(K)=1.58*10 to-8 power e.cm; d(Rb)=1.70 *10 to-8 power e.cm; d(Cs)=1.86*10 to-8 power e.cm. All kind of atoms are non-polar atoms except for alkali and hydrogen atoms. Hydrogen atom is quite distinct from the others. The ground state in hydrogen is non-polar atom(d=0) but the excited state is polar atom, for example, the first excited state has a large EDM: d(H)=3ea=1.59*10 to-8 power e.cm (a is Bohr radius).

  13. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  14. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  15. Large atom number Bose-Einstein condensate machines Erik W. Streed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torii, Yoshio

    , getting a BEC is easy: you simply cool down the gas until the critical phase-space density is reached approaches use variations of a vapor cell magneto- optical trap MOT , in a double MOT configuration, surface sodium BEC set

  16. Chemically Reactive Working Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Capture and Transport of Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for Power Generation Argonne National Laboratory Award Number: CPS25657 | April 15, 2013 | Brotzman * Thermodynamic and...

  17. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  18. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  19. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hough, Paul V. C. (Port Jefferson, NY); Wang, Chengpu (Upton, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  20. Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jarvinen

    2005-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

  1. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ten-Ming, E-mail: tmw@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  2. Static atomic displacements in crystalline solid solution alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.; Sparks, C.; Robertson, J.L.; Epperson, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jiang, Xiaogang [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic size differences induce static displacements from an average alloy lattice and play an important role in controlling alloy phase stability and properties. Details of this, however, are difficult to study, as chemical order and displacements are strongly interrelated and static displacements are hard to measure. Diffuse x-ray scattering with tunable-synchrotron radiation can now measure element- specific static displacements with an accuracy of {+-}0.1 pm and can simultaneously measure local chemical order out to 20 shells or more. Ideal alloys for this are those that have previously been the most intractable: alloys with small Z contrast, alloys with only local order and alloys with small size differences. The combination of precise characterization of local chemical order and precise measurement of static displacement provides new information that challenges existing alloy models. This paper reports on an ongoing systematic study of static displacements in the Fe/Ni/Cr alloys and compares the observed static displacements to these predicted by current theories. Availability of more brilliant 3rd generation hard x-ray sources will greatly enhance these measurements.

  3. Primary cosmic ray chemical composition in the energy region around 10**16 eV investigated by means of gamma-hadron families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maia Kalmakhelidze; Nina Roinishvili; Manana Svanidze

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary Cosmic Ray Chemical Composition is investigated in energy region close to 10**16 eV. Studies are based on comparisons of gamma-hadron families observed by Pamir and Pamir-Chacaltaya Collaboration, with families generated by means of quasi-scaling model MC0. It is shown, that all characteristics of observed families, including their intensity, are in a very good agreement with simulated event properties at the normal chemical composition and are in disagreement at heavy dominant compositions. Code CORSICA with VENUS and DPM models also contradicts with experimental data of families. One- and multi-dimensional methods of recognition of Fe-like families is worked up and approved. They are based on family characteristics sensitive to atomic number of induced nuclei and are not correlated between each others. It is shown that the fraction of Fe-like families is consistent with the normal chemical composition and strongly contradicts to heavy dominant ones. The success of MC0 model, in description of families properties, is due to large inelasticity coefficient of soft interactions at superhigh energies.

  4. Effect of chemical order on the magnetic and electronic properties of epitaxial off-stoichiometry F e x S i 1 - x thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karel, J.; Juraszek, J.; Minar, J.; Bordel, C.; Stone, K. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Hu, J.; Wu, R. Q.; Ebert, H.; Kortright, J. B.; Hellman, F.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Off-stoichiometry, epitaxial FexSi1-x thin films (0.5chemical order, even far from stoichiometry. Theoretical calculations show the magnetic moment is strongly enhanced in the fully chemically disordered A2 phase, while both theoretical and experimental results show that the magnetization is nearly the same in the B2 and D0? phases, meaning partial chemical disorder does not influence the magnetism. The dependencies of the magnetic moments are directly and nonlinearly linked to the number of Si atoms, primarily nearest neighbor but also to a lesser extent (up to 10%) next nearest neighbor, surrounding Fe, explaining the similarities between B2 and D0? and the strong enhancement for the A2 structure. The calculated electronic density of states shows many similarities in both structure and spin polarization between the D0? and B2 structures, while the A2 structure exhibits disorder broadening and a reduced spin polarization.

  5. Phases of Atom-Molecule Vortex Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, S. J.; Bigelow, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Park, Q-Han [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study ground state vortex configurations in a rotating atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. It is found that the coherent coupling between the atomic and molecular condensates can render a pairing of atomic and molecular vortices into a composite structure that resembles a carbon dioxide molecule. Structural phase transitions of vortex lattices are also explored through different physical parameters including the rotational frequency of the system.

  6. Method for enhanced atomization of liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Richard E. (27121 Puerta del Oro, Mission Viejo, CA 92691); White, Jerome R. (44755 Wyandotte, Hemet, CA 92544)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process for atomizing a slurry or liquid process stream in which a slurry or liquid is passed through a nozzle to provide a primary atomized process stream, an improvement which comprises subjecting the liquid or slurry process stream to microwave energy as the liquid or slurry process stream exits the nozzle, wherein sufficient microwave heating is provided to flash vaporize the primary atomized process stream.

  7. Generating Entanglement between Atomic Spins with Low-Noise Probing of an Optical Cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Kevin C; Greve, Graham P; Thompson, James K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic projection noise limits the ultimate precision of all atomic sensors, including clocks, inertial sensors, magnetometers, etc. The independent quantum collapse of $N$ atoms into a definite state (for example spin up or down) leads to an uncertainty $\\Delta \\theta_{SQL}=1/\\sqrt{N}$ in the estimate of the quantum phase accumulated during a Ramsey sequence or its many generalizations. This phase uncertainty is referred to as the standard quantum limit. Creating quantum entanglement between the $N$ atoms can allow the atoms to partially cancel each other's quantum noise, leading to reduced noise in the phase estimate below the standard quantum limit. Recent experiments have demonstrated up to $10$~dB of phase noise reduction relative to the SQL by making collective spin measurements. This is achieved by trapping laser-cooled Rb atoms in an optical cavity and precisely measuring the shift of the cavity resonance frequency by an amount that depends on the number of atoms in spin up. Detecting the probe light ...

  8. Generating Entanglement between Atomic Spins with Low-Noise Probing of an Optical Cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin C. Cox; Joshua M. Weiner; Graham P. Greve; James K. Thompson

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic projection noise limits the ultimate precision of all atomic sensors, including clocks, inertial sensors, magnetometers, etc. The independent quantum collapse of $N$ atoms into a definite state (for example spin up or down) leads to an uncertainty $\\Delta \\theta_{SQL}=1/\\sqrt{N}$ in the estimate of the quantum phase accumulated during a Ramsey sequence or its many generalizations. This phase uncertainty is referred to as the standard quantum limit. Creating quantum entanglement between the $N$ atoms can allow the atoms to partially cancel each other's quantum noise, leading to reduced noise in the phase estimate below the standard quantum limit. Recent experiments have demonstrated up to $10$~dB of phase noise reduction relative to the SQL by making collective spin measurements. This is achieved by trapping laser-cooled Rb atoms in an optical cavity and precisely measuring the shift of the cavity resonance frequency by an amount that depends on the number of atoms in spin up. Detecting the probe light with high total efficiency reduces excess classical and quantum back-action of the probe. Here we discuss recent progress and a technique for reducing the relative frequency noise between the probe light and the optical cavity, a key requirement for further advances.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  10. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  11. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  12. Chemical and Biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    - nology fields where they can test the side effects of antibiotics or develop agricultural chemicals clean drinking water to a village in Kenya, a country experiencing its worst drought in 20 years," said and three collab- orating institutions to improve the manufacture of pharmaceutical, food, and agricultural

  13. Preparation of a high concentration of lithium-7 atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelener, B. B., E-mail: bobozel@mail.ru; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Manykin, E. A. [National Research Nuclear University “Moscow Engineering Physics Institute,” (Russian Federation); Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is aimed at obtaining high concentration of optically cooled lithium-7 atoms for preparing strongly interacting ultracold plasma and Rydberg matter. A special setup has been constructed, in which two high-power semiconductor lasers are used to cool lithium-7 atoms in a magneto-optical trap. At an optimum detuning of the cooling laser frequency and a magnetic field gradient of 35 G/cm, the concentration of ultracold lithium-7 atoms reaches about 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?3}. Additional independent information about the concentration and number of ultracold lithium-7 atoms on different sublevels of the ground state was obtained by using of an additional probing laser.

  14. Quantum-interference-initiated superradiant and subradiant emission from entangled atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegner, R. [Institut fuer Optik, Information und Photonik, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Zanthier, J. von [Institut fuer Optik, Information und Photonik, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the radiative characteristics of emission from a system of entangled atoms which can have a relative distance larger than the emission wavelength. We develop a quantum multipath interference approach which explains both super- and subradiance though the entangled states have zero dipole moment. We derive a formula for the radiated intensity in terms of different interfering pathways. We further show how the interferences lead to directional emission from atoms prepared in symmetric W states. As a byproduct of our work we show how Dicke's classic result can be understood in terms of interfering pathways. In contrast to the previous works on ensembles of atoms, we focus on finite numbers of atoms prepared in well characterized states.

  15. CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Westinghouse Atomic 1 U.S. Department of Energy Interim Residual Contamination and Waste Control Guidelines for bormerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) d Remote...

  16. Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' By Jared Sagoff * December 4, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Like snowflakes, nanoparticles come in a wide variety of shapes and...

  17. Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Atomic Energy and Nuclear Materials section of the Tennessee Code covers all of the regulations, licenses, permits, siting requirements, and practices relevant to a nuclear energy development. ...

  18. Classical and Quantum Chaos in Atom Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhan Saif

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of an atom with an electromagnetic field is discussed in the presence of a time periodic external modulating force. It is explained that a control on atom by electromagnetic fields helps to design the quantum analog of classical optical systems. In these atom optical systems chaos may appear at the onset of external fields. The classical and quantum chaotic dynamics is discussed, in particular in an atom optics Fermi accelerator. It is found that the quantum dynamics exhibits dynamical localization and quantum recurrences.

  19. United States Atomic Energy Commission formed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    weapons problem, the United States worked to establish its own formal organization. The transition from military civilian control of nuclear energy was defined in the Atomic...

  20. Remote preparation of an atomic quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjamin Rosenfeld; Stefan Berner; Juergen Volz; Markus Weber; Harald Weinfurter

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and quantum communication. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped 87Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  1. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  2. Subwavelength Transportation of Light with Atomic Resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Siu-Tat; Jo, Gyu-Boong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and investigate a new type of optical waveguide made by an array of atoms without involving conventional Bragg scattering or total internal reflection. A finite chain of atoms collectively coupled through their intrinsic resonance supports a propagating mode with minimal radiative loss when the array spacing $a$ is around 0.6$\\lambda_0/2\\pi$ where $\\lambda_0$ is the wavelength of the nearly resonant optical transition. We find that the transportation is robust with respect to position fluctuation and remains possible when the atoms are placed on a circle. Our result paves the way to implement the subwavelength transportation of light in integrated optical circuits with cold atoms.

  3. Magnetic Charge of the Stark States of Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Pradhan

    2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is conjectured that Stark states of excited hydrogen atom posses magnetic charge for which the quantum mechanical operator is $${\\cal G}_{op} = {e\\over \\hbar} (\\vec\\sigma\\cdot\\vec A)$$ where $\\vec A$ is the Runge-Lenz vector. The expectation value $g$ of this operator for Stark states is found to be $$ g = e(n_1-n_2)$$ which obeys a Dirac-Saha type quantization formula $${eg\\over c} = (n_1-n_2)\\alpha$$ where $\\alpha$ is the fine structure constant and $n_1$ and $n_2$ are parabolic quantum numbers. An experimental arrangement is outlined to test this conjecture.

  4. Measurement of positive gain on the 1315 nm transition of atomic iodine pumped by O2,,a1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    state I 2 P3/2 . Conventionally, the O2 1 is produced by a liquid chemistry singlet oxygen generator of gain. © 2004 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.1784519] The classic chemical oxygen the metastable excited singlet oxygen molecule, O2 a1 [de- noted O2 1 hereafter], and the iodine atom ground

  5. An N-atom Collective State Atomic Clock with Root-N Fold Increase in Effective Frequency and Root-N Fold Reduction in Fringe Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May E. Kim; Resham Sarkar; Renpeng Fang; Selim M. Shahriar

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a collective state atomic clock with Ramsey fringes narrowed by a factor of $\\sqrt{N}$ compared to a conventional clock, N being the number of non-interacting atoms, without violating the uncertainty relation. This narrowing is explained as being due to interferences among the collective states, representing an effective $\\sqrt{N}$ fold increase in the clock frequency, without entanglement. The detection process, which measures a collective state, can be used to increase the quantum efficiency of detection significantly, yielding a net improvement in stability by as much as a factor of 10.

  6. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  7. CARBON ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, S.J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATOM DISTRIBUTION IN A DUAL PHASE STEEL: AN ATOM PROBE STUDY~4720 1 U.S.A. IntroductioE. Dual Phase steels are currentlymartensite-austenite dual phase steel, although the results

  8. Vibrational Modes of Adsorbed Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LAWRENCE, WR; Allen, Roland E.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of adsorbed atoms. vi rational modes *Present address: S h University of H c ool of Scienc City, Tex. ouston at Clear La ', r e e and Technology Lake City, Clea Lak %. R. wrence and R. E. Allen published). Allen, Phys. Rev. B (to be 2G. P... are about t r Ne on Kr. The d ou he same as fo mode labeled 2V a as large in the f' t X is almost erst (adsorbate) la e od( b t t)l pure surface mod e ayer. The 1H mode at X is a 4, this mode bec m e. Just to the r'right of X in Fig. e ecomes a...

  9. 2012 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 15-20, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwier, Timothy

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At the 2012 Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conference, there will be talks in several broadly defined and partially overlapping areas: ? Intramolecular and single-collision reaction dynamics; ? Photophysics and photochemistry of excited states; ? Clusters, aerosols and solvation; ? Interactions at interfaces; ? Conformations and folding of large molecules; ? Interactions under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure. The theme of the Gordon Research Seminar on Atomic & Molecular Interactions, in keeping with the tradition of the Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference, is far-reaching and involves fundamental research in the gas and condensed phases along with application of these ideas to practical chemical fields. The oral presentations, which will contain a combination of both experiment and theory, will focus on four broad categories: ? Ultrafast Phenomena; ? Excited States, Photoelectrons, and Photoions; ? Chemical Reaction Dynamics; ? Biomolecules and Clusters.

  10. Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

  11. Three-dimensional theory of quantum memories based on {Lambda}-type atomic ensembles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeuthen, Emil; Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Soerensen, Anders S. [QUANTOP, Danish National Research Foundation Center for Quantum Optics, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a three-dimensional theory for quantum memories based on light storage in ensembles of {Lambda}-type atoms, where two long-lived atomic ground states are employed. We consider light storage in an ensemble of finite spatial extent and we show that within the paraxial approximation the Fresnel number of the atomic ensemble and the optical depth are the only important physical parameters determining the quality of the quantum memory. We analyze the influence of these parameters on the storage of light followed by either forward or backward read-out from the quantum memory. We show that for small Fresnel numbers the forward memory provides higher efficiencies, whereas for large Fresnel numbers the backward memory is advantageous. The optimal light modes to store in the memory are presented together with the corresponding spin waves and outcoming light modes. We show that for high optical depths such {Lambda}-type atomic ensembles allow for highly efficient backward and forward memories even for small Fresnel numbers F(greater-or-similar sign)0.1.

  12. On The Method of Precise Calculations Of Energy Levels of Hydrogen-like Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Boikova; Y. N. Tyukhtyaev; R. N. Faustov

    2003-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method for deriving logarithmic corrections in the mass ratio to the S-level of a hydrogen-like atom. With this method, a number of new corrections of this type are calculated analitically for the first time.

  13. Numerical Studies of Collective Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Electron and Cold Atom Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezayi, Edward

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical calculations were carried out to investigate a number of outstanding questions in both two-dimensional electron and cold atom systems. These projects aimed to increase our understanding of the properties of and prospects for non-Abelian states in quantum Hall matter.

  14. Atomization and Sprays 20(4), 297310 (2010) SPLASHING PHENOMENA DURING LIQUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    sound speed in liquid, m/s Tsat saturation temperature of droplet at 1 atm, C F force, N V droplet number (V µ/) tc characteristic spreading time, s Cg sound speed in ambient gas, m/s T temperature, C ClAtomization and Sprays 20(4), 297­310 (2010) SPLASHING PHENOMENA DURING LIQUID DROPLET IMPACT Jie

  15. Trapping and Manipulation of Isolated Atoms Using Nanoscale Plasmonic Structures D. E. Chang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    - and nanopho- tonic structures [8­10] [see Fig. 1(a)]. Alternatively, hybrid quantum systems consisting, heating and decoherence rates acting on the trapped atom. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.123004 PACS numbers: 37.10.Gh, 42.50.Àp, 73.20.Mf, 78.67.Bf Much interest has recently been directed towards hybrid

  16. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    actions of humans. Building materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  17. Appendix G: Chemicals Appendix G: Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    actions of humans. Building materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  18. Appendix H: Chemicals Appendix H: Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    actions of humans. Building materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  19. Appendix B: Chemicals Appendix B: Chemicals B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    such as pharmaceuticals, building materials, housewares, pesticides, and industrial chemicals. Through the use materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people

  20. Excitation of helium atoms in collisions with plasma electrons in an electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate constants are evaluated for excitation of helium atoms in metastable states by electron impact if ionized helium is located in an external electric field and is supported by it, such that a typical electron energy is small compared to the atomic excitation energy. Under these conditions, atomic excitation is determined both by the electron traveling in the space of electron energies toward the excitation threshold and by the subsequent atomic excitation, which is a self-consistent process because it leads to a sharp decrease in the energy distribution function of electrons, which in turn determines the excitation rate. The excitation rate constant is calculated for the regimes of low and high electron densities, and in the last case, it is small compared to the equilibrium rate constant where the Maxwell distribution function is realized including its tail. Quenching of metastable atomic states by electron impact results in excitation of higher excited states, rather than transition to the ground electron state for the electric field strengths under consideration. Therefore, at restricted electron number densities, the rate of emission of resonant photons of the wavelength 58 nm, which results from the transition from the 2{sup 1}P state of the helium atom to the ground state, is close to the excitation rate of metastable atomic states. The efficiency of atomic excitation in ionized helium, i.e., the part of energy of an electric field injected in ionized helium that is spent on atomic excitation, is evaluated. The results exhibit the importance of electron kinetics for an ionized gas located in an electric field.

  1. COOEE bitumen: chemical aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemarchand, Claire A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study chemical aging in "COOEE bitumen" using molecular dynamic simulations. The model bitumen is composed of four realistic molecule types: saturated hydrocarbon, resinous oil, resin, and asphaltene. The aging reaction is modelled by the chemical reaction: "2 resins $\\rightarrow$ 1 asphaltene". Molecular dynamic simulations of four bitumen compositions, obtained by a repeated application of the aging reaction, are performed. The stress autocorrelation function, the fluid structure, the rotational dynamics of the plane aromatic molecules, and the diffusivity of each molecule, are determined for the four different compositions. The aging reaction causes a significant dynamics slowdown, which is correlated to the aggregation of asphaltene molecules in larger and dynamically slower nanoaggregates. Finally, a detailed description of the role of each molecule types in the aggregation and aging processes is given.

  2. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +New York, New

  3. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Doohee (Macungie, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  4. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, D.

    1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  5. Optomechanical Cavity Cooling of an Atomic Ensemble Monika H. Schleier-Smith, Ian D. Leroux, Hao Zhang, Mackenzie A. Van Camp, and Vladan Vuletic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    ­5] is unique among laser cooling techniques in that it is applicable, in principle, to arbitrary scatterersOptomechanical Cavity Cooling of an Atomic Ensemble Monika H. Schleier-Smith, Ian D. Leroux, Hao cooling of a single collective motional mode of an atomic ensemble down to a mean phonon occupation number

  6. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  7. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    More, R.M.

    1982-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described. (MOW)

  8. Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

  9. Photoassociative molecular spectroscopy for atomic radiative lifetimes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    very far apart, in so-called long- range molecular states, their mutual interaction is ruled by plain atomic properties. The high- resolution spectroscopic study of some molecular excited states populated by photoassociation of cold atoms (photoassociative spectroscopy) gives a good illustration of this property

  10. Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10?wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300?°C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

  11. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi (State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

  12. UTCA Project Number Report Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    hazards, case studies, chemical accidents 18. Distribution Statement 19. Security Classif (of this report a variety of studies have been conducted on aspects of major transportation accidents, few have attempted associated with the transport of hazardous materials. While a variety of studies have been conducted on as

  13. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  14. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  15. AGRI-SCIENCE CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    photosynthetic efficiency Improve chemical agronomic and agro-ecological control measures Modelling through translation of chemical biology tools and technologies Control weeds, disease and pests Minimise a platform to steer future research and policy directions. · Encourage external outreach to engage

  16. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive Hazardous or Other Location LBL On-Site Bldgs.hazardous chemicals usedin the laboratory: and (v} The locationhazardous chemicals are present: and. (irl}The location and

  17. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0057 01 Effective: Page 1 of 9 06 Chris Weilandics Signature on file Department ES&H Approval printed name Signature Date Lori Stiegler Signature on file #12;Number: PS-ESH-0057 Revision: 01 Effective: 06/08/12 Page 2 of 9 The only official

  19. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  20. Sagnac interferometry with a single atomic clock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Stevenson; M. Hush; T. Bishop; I. Lesanovsky; T. Fernholz

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically discuss an implementation of a Sagnac interferometer with cold atoms. In contrast to currently existing schemes our protocol does not rely on any free propagation of atoms. Instead it is based on superpositions of fully confined atoms and state-dependent transport along a closed path. Using Ramsey sequences for an atomic clock, the accumulated Sagnac phase is encoded in the resulting population imbalance between two internal (clock) states. Using minimal models for the above protocol we analytically quantify limitations arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. We discuss an actual implementation of the interferometer with adiabatic radio-frequency potentials that is inherently robust against common mode noise as well as phase noise from the reference oscillator.

  1. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI?02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI?02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI?00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI?02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  2. Cotton Harvest-Aid Chemicals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzer, Robert B.; Supak, James

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Application Managing Harvest-Aid Program Secondary Growth Insect Control Care of Equipment Safety with Chemicals Guide for Using Cotton Harvest Aids Defoliants Desiccants Mixtures Plant Regulators-Conditioners 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 6 7 7 COTTON... HARVEST-AID CHEMICALS Robert B. Metzer and James Supak* As the name implies, harvest-aid chemicals pre pare the cotton crop for harvest by reducing foliage and plant moisture that interfere with harvesting operations. Harvest-aid chemicals...

  3. On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Kornyushin

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

  4. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  5. Engineering atom-atom thermal entanglement via two-photon process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Q. Guo; L. Zhou; H. S. Song

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the system that two atoms simultaneously interact with a single-mode thermal field via different couplings and different spontaneous emission rates when two-photon process is involved. It is found that we indeed can employ the different couplings to produce the atom-atom thermal entanglement in two-photon process. The different atomic spontaneous emission rates are also utilizable in generating thermal entanglement. We also investigate the effect of the cavity leakage. To the initial atomic state $|ee> ,$a slight leakage can relieve the restriction of interaction time and we can obtain a large and steady entanglement.

  6. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs____________________19 #12;3 Introduction 12/4/2013 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research University of California at Santa Barbara Spectroscopy Department Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR and EPR

  7. CHEMICAL HYGIENE LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) LAB SPECIFIC INFORMATION & STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPs______________________19 #12;3 Introduction 10/23/09 This is the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) for the Materials Research Department Chemical Hygiene Plan NMR Laboratory Form Version 8/6/98 1. General Laboratory Information

  8. Simulating the formation of massive seed black holes in the early Universe. I: An improved chemical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Simon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct collapse model for the formation of massive seed black holes in the early Universe attempts to explain the observed number density of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at $z \\sim 6$ by assuming that they grow from seeds with masses M > 10000 solar masses that form by the direct collapse of metal-free gas in atomic cooling halos in which H2 cooling is suppressed by a strong extragalactic radiation field. The viability of this model depends on the strength of the radiation field required to suppress H2 cooling, $J_{\\rm crit}$: if this is too large, then too few seeds will form to explain the observed number density of SMBHs. In order to determine $J_{\\rm crit}$ reliably, we need to be able to accurately model the formation and destruction of H2 in gas illuminated by an extremely strong radiation field. In this paper, we use a reaction-based reduction technique to analyze the chemistry of H2 in these conditions, allowing us to identify the key chemical reactions that are responsible for determining the...

  9. Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical & Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the...

  10. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  11. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengio, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) sq root 3x sq root 3R30 sup 0 , H sub 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH sub 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( sq root 3 sq root 3)R30 sup 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H sub 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was esta...

  12. Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

  13. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  14. Scattering properties of dark atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James M. Cline; Zuowei Liu; Guy D. Moore; Wei Xue

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter exists in the form of atoms, analogous to those of the visible world. An important input for understanding the cosmological consequences of dark atoms is their self-scattering. Making use of results from atomic physics for the potentials between hydrogen atoms, we compute the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections for dark atoms. We find an intricate dependence upon the ratio of the dark proton to electron mass, allowing for the possibility to "design" low-energy features in the cross section. Dependences upon other parameters, namely the gauge coupling and reduced mass, scale out of the problem by using atomic units. We derive constraints on the parameter space of dark atoms by demanding that their scattering cross section does not exceed bounds from dark matter halo shapes. We discuss the formation of molecular dark hydrogen in the universe, and determine the analogous constraints on the model when the dark matter is predominantly in molecular form.

  15. Scattering properties of dark atoms and molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, James M; Moore, Guy; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter exists in the form of atoms, analogous to those of the visible world. An important input for understanding the cosmological consequences of dark atoms is their self-scattering. Making use of results from atomic physics for the potentials between hydrogen atoms, we compute the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections for dark atoms. We find an intricate dependence upon the ratio of the dark proton to electron mass, allowing for the possibility to "design" low-energy features in the cross section. Dependences upon other parameters, namely the gauge coupling and reduced mass, scale out of the problem by using atomic units. We derive constraints on the parameter space of dark atoms by demanding that their scattering cross section does not exceed bounds from dark matter halo shapes. We discuss the formation of molecular dark hydrogen in the universe, and determine the analogous constraints on the model when the dark matter is predominantly in ...

  16. Ps-atom scattering at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, I I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pseudopotential for positronium-atom interaction, based on electron-atom and positron-atom phase shifts, is constructed, and the phase shifts for Ps-Kr and Ps-Ar scattering are calculated. This approach allows us to extend the Ps-atom cross sections, obtained previously in the impulse approximation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 243201 (2014)], to energies below the Ps ionization threshold. Although experimental data are not available in this low-energy region, our results describe well the tendency of the measured cross sections to drop with decreasing velocity at $v<1$ a.u. Our results show that the effect of the Ps-atom van der Waals interaction is weak compared to the polarization interaction in electron-atom and positron-atom scattering. As a result, the Ps scattering length for both Ar and Kr is positive, and the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum is not observed for Ps scattering from these targets. This makes Ps scattering quite different from electron scattering in the low-energy region, in contrast to the inter...

  17. Studying coherence in ultra-cold atomic gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis will discuss the study of coherence properties of ultra-cold atomic gases. The atomic systems investigated include a thermal cloud of atoms, a Bose-Einstein condensate and a fermion pair condensate. In each ...

  18. Entropy generation in a chemical reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. N. Miranda

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Entropy generation in a chemical reaction is analyzed without using the general formalism of non-equilibrium thermodynamics at a level adequate for advanced undergraduates. In a first approach to the problem, the phenomenological kinetic equation of an elementary first order reaction is used to show that entropy production is always positive. A second approach assumes that the reaction is near equilibrium to prove that the entropy generated is always greater than zero, without any reference to the kinetics of the reaction. Finally, it is shown that entropy generation is related to fluctuations in the number of particles at equilibrium, i.e. it is associated to a microscopic process.

  19. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  20. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  1. The Jacobi-Stirling Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, George E; Gawronski, Wolfgang; Littlejohn, Lance L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jacobi-Stirling numbers were discovered as a result of a problem involving the spectral theory of powers of the classical second-order Jacobi differential expression. Specifically, these numbers are the coefficients of integral composite powers of the Jacobi expression in Lagrangian symmetric form. Quite remarkably, they share many properties with the classical Stirling numbers of the second kind which, as shown in LW, are the coefficients of integral powers of the Laguerre differential expression. In this paper, we establish several properties of the Jacobi-Stirling numbers and its companions including combinatorial interpretations thereby extending and supplementing known contributions to the literature of Andrews-Littlejohn, Andrews-Gawronski-Littlejohn, Egge, Gelineau-Zeng, and Mongelli.

  2. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  3. Chemical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  4. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  5. Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron,Chemicals

  6. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced Chemical Cleaning

  7. Sandia Energy - Chemical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied & ComputationalBriefChemical

  8. Atom-to-continuum methods for gaining a fundamental understanding of fracture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, David Lynn (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Jones, Reese E.; Moody, Neville Reid; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Belytschko, Ted. (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL); Zhou, Xiao Wang; Lloyd, Jeffrey T. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Oswald, Jay (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL); Delph, Terry J. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA); Kimmer, Christopher J. (Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, IN)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF) project to characterize and understand fracture processes via molecular dynamics modeling and atom-to-continuum methods. Under this aegis we developed new theory and a number of novel techniques to describe the fracture process at the atomic scale. These developments ranged from a material-frame connection between molecular dynamics and continuum mechanics to an atomic level J integral. Each of the developments build upon each other and culminated in a cohesive zone model derived from atomic information and verified at the continuum scale. This report describes an Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF) project to characterize and understand fracture processes via molecular dynamics modeling and atom-to-continuum methods. The effort is predicated on the idea that processes and information at the atomic level are missing in engineering scale simulations of fracture, and, moreover, are necessary for these simulations to be predictive. In this project we developed considerable new theory and a number of novel techniques in order to describe the fracture process at the atomic scale. Chapter 2 gives a detailed account of the material-frame connection between molecular dynamics and continuum mechanics we constructed in order to best use atomic information from solid systems. With this framework, in Chapter 3, we were able to make a direct and elegant extension of the classical J down to simulations on the scale of nanometers with a discrete atomic lattice. The technique was applied to cracks and dislocations with equal success and displayed high fidelity with expectations from continuum theory. Then, as a prelude to extension of the atomic J to finite temperatures, we explored the quasi-harmonic models as efficient and accurate surrogates of atomic lattices undergoing thermo-elastic processes (Chapter 4). With this in hand, in Chapter 5 we provide evidence that, by using the appropriate energy potential, the atomic J integral we developed is calculable and accurate at finite/room temperatures. In Chapter 6, we return in part to the fundamental efforts to connect material behavior at the atomic scale to that of the continuum. In this chapter, we devise theory that predicts the onset of instability characteristic of fracture/failure via atomic simulation. In Chapters 7 and 8, we describe the culmination of the project in connecting atomic information to continuum modeling. In these chapters we show that cohesive zone models are: (a) derivable from molecular dynamics in a robust and systematic way, and (b) when used in the more efficient continuum-level finite element technique provide results that are comparable and well-correlated with the behavior at the atomic-scale. Moreover, we show that use of these same cohesive zone elements is feasible at scales very much larger than that of the lattice. Finally, in Chapter 9 we describe our work in developing the efficient non-reflecting boundary conditions necessary to perform transient fracture and shock simulation with molecular dynamics.

  9. 1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howard, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  10. 1985 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howald, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1985. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  11. Gain narrowing in few-atom systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Savels; Allard P. Mosk; Ad Lagendijk

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a density matrix approach, we study the simplest systems that display both gain and feedback: clusters of 2 to 5 atoms, one of which is pumped. The other atoms supply feedback through multiple scattering of light. We show that, if the atoms are in each other's near-field, the system exhibits large gain narrowing and spectral mode redistribution. The observed phenomena are more pronounced if the feedback is enhanced. Our system is to our knowledge the simplest exactly solvable microscopic system which shows the approach to laser oscillation.

  12. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, Graeme [OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States); Curry, John J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  13. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bouyer; P. Lemonde; M. Ben Dahan; A. Michaud; C. Salomon; J. Dalibard

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  14. The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosling, F.G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  15. 1982 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; McKnight, R.H.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.; Phaneuf, R.A. (comps.)

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1982. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  16. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  17. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  18. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  19. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  20. Interaction of an aluminum atom with a closed subshell metal atom: Spectroscopic analysis of AlZn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Michael D.

    Interaction of an aluminum atom with a closed subshell metal atom: Spectroscopic analysis of Al-block main group element, aluminum, and the 3d series of transi- tion metal atoms. Although the bonding in Al

  1. Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    Chemically-selective imaging of brain structures with CARS microscopy Conor L. Evans1§ , Xiaoyin Xu anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to image brain structure and pathology ex vivo. Although. Definitive diagnosis still requires brain biopsy in a significant number of cases. CARS microscopy

  2. acoustic wave atomization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fluid and acoustic computations, hybrid methodologies still Kohlenbach, Ulrich 12 Propagation of atomic matter waves inside an atom wave guide Quantum Physics (arXiv)...

  3. atomic emission spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a...

  4. atomic photoabsorption process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    individual sites within atom-trap arrays. Cecilia Muldoon; Lukas Brandt; Jian Dong; Dustin Stuart; Edouard Brainis; Matthew Himsworth; Axel Kuhn 2012-03-21 306 Atomic...

  5. Structure of ?-Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases. Structure of -Alumina: Toward The Atomic Level Understanding Of Transition Alumina Phases....

  6. Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful...

  7. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys. Atomic-Structural Synergy for Catalytic CO Oxidation over Palladium-Nickel Nanoalloys....

  8. atomic carbon nanowires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Electron Transport Properties of Atomic Carbon Nanowires between Graphene Electrodes CERN Preprints Summary: Long, stable and free-standing linear atomic...

  9. Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer Reaction, and the Determination of the Bond Isolation, Characterization of an Intermediate in an Oxygen Atom-Transfer...

  10. atom trap trace: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors Physics Websites Summary: An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring...

  11. Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to Automotive Thermoelectric Systems Development Materials, Modules, and Systems: An Atoms to Autos Approach to...

  12. atom interferometry measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bose-condensed atoms . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Bose-Einstein condensates are coherent matter waves, produced by cooling gaseous atomic clouds to ultra-low...

  13. atomic wave packets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistics of atomic populations in output coupled wave packets from Bose-Einstein condensates: Four-wave mixing Physics Websites Summary: Statistics of atomic populations in...

  14. atom interferometry progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bose-condensed atoms . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Bose-Einstein condensates are coherent matter waves, produced by cooling gaseous atomic clouds to ultra-low...

  15. Hydrogen-assisted laser-induced resonant transitions between metastable states of antiprotonic helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketzer, B; Von Egidy, T; Maierl, C; Pohl, R; Eades, John; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T; Kumakura, M; Morita, N; Hayano, R S; Hori, Masaki; Ishikawa, T; Torii, H A; Sugai, I; Horváth, D

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser resonance transitions between normally metastable states of antiprotonic helium atoms were observed making use of state dependent quenching effects caused by small admixtures of \\htwo\\ molecules. By selectively shortening the lifetimes of states with higher principal quantum number $n$ as compared to those of lower $n$, this method for the first time provides access to all initially populated metastable states of \\pbar\\hep\\ atoms. This was demonstrated by observing the transitions $(n,l)=(38,l)\\rightarrow (39,l+1),\\ l=35,36,37$ and $(n,l)=(37,l)\\rightarrow (38,l+1),\\ l=34,35,36$.

  16. Estimation of temporal separation of slow light pulses in atomic vapors by weak measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardeep Kumar; Shubhrangshu Dasgupta

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how two circular polarization components of a linearly polarized pulse, propagating through a coherently driven dilute atomic vapor, can be well resolved in time domain by weak measurement. Slower group velocity of one of the components due to electromagnetically induced transparency leads to a differential group delay between the two components. For low number density, this delay may not be large enough to temporally resolve the two components. We show how this can be enhanced in terms of mean time of arrival of the output pulse through a post-selected polarizer. We demonstrate the idea with all the analytical and numerical results, with a specific example of alkali atoms.

  17. Chemicals for Plant Disease Control at Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ong, Kevin

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    common chemical names and the corresponding chemical name for each active ingredient. Kevin Ong* ?Assistant Professor and Extension Plant Pathologist, The Texas A&M University System Table 1. Plant disease control chemicals. Common name Chemical name 1...

  18. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

  19. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbook, C K; Mehl, M

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbon fuels for advanced combustion engines consist of complex mixtures of hundreds or even thousands of different components. These components can be grouped into a number of chemically distinct classes, consisting of n-paraffins, branched paraffins, cyclic paraffins, olefins, oxygenates, and aromatics. Biodiesel contains its own unique chemical class called methyl esters. The fractional amounts of these chemical classes are quite different in gasoline, diesel fuel, oil-sand derived fuels and bio-derived fuels, which contributes to the very different combustion characteristics of each of these types of combustion systems. The objectives of this project are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  20. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL CHARACTERISATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS: CRITICAL REVIEW OF MOST RECENT ADVANCES. MASS SPECTROMETRIC APPROACHES FOR CHEMICAL...

  1. NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH Chemical Hygiene Plan Division of Occupational Health Chemical Hygiene Plan Evaluation and Record Keeping

  2. Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules Physisorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules Physisorption Chemisorption Surface Bonding Kinetics of Adsorption/Diffusion/Desorption (Scattering Dynamics) #12;Outcomes of Collision Process Rebound (elastically or inelastically) Elastic Scattering Inelastic Scattering Accomodation (thermalizing) Adsorption E V(r) r

  3. Atomic physics: An almost lightless laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuletic, Vladan

    Lasers are often described in terms of a light field circulating in an optical resonator system. Now a laser has been demonstrated in which the field resides primarily in the atomic medium that is used to generate the light.

  4. FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MULTIPOLE POLARIZABILITIES OF ATOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1259 FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MULTIPOLE POLARIZABILITIES OF ATOMIC SYSTEMS S. I. EASA and G. C. SHUKLA et d'helium. Abstract. 2014 A variational calculation for frequency dependent multipole 1978, Classification Physics Abstracts 31.10 The calculation of multipole polarizabilities

  5. Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baugher, Britton William Herbert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ...

  6. Accurate capacitive metrology for atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzeo, Aaron D. (Aaron David), 1979-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents accurate capacitive sensing metrology designed for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) originally developed in the MIT Precision Motion Control Lab. The capacitive measurements use a set of ...

  7. Quantum Structures of the Hydrogen Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Jeknic-Dugic; M. Dugic; A. Francom; M. Arsenijevic

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern quantum theory introduces quantum structures (decompositions into subsystems) as a new discourse that is not fully comparable with the classical-physics counterpart. To this end, so-called Entanglement Relativity appears as a corollary of the universally valid quantum mechanics that can provide for a deeper and more elaborate description of the composite quantum systems. In this paper we employ this new concept to describe the hydrogen atom. We offer a consistent picture of the hydrogen atom as an open quantum system that naturally answers the following important questions: (a) how do the so called "quantum jumps" in atomic excitation and de-excitation occur? and (b) why does the classically and seemingly artificial "center-of-mass + relative degrees of freedom" structure appear as the primarily operable form in most of the experimental reality of atoms?

  8. United Nations Atomic Energy Commission stalls out

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commission would be short-lived and would not result in the desired control of atomic energy. In the wake of the disappointing results of the Moscow meeting, the United States...

  9. Moving closer to the Atomic Energy Commission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in some way. On October 3, 1945 the president addressed Congress on the subject of atomic energy. Here he first mentioned the need for international agreements. Attempts were made...

  10. Quantum micro-mechanics with ultracold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Botter; Daniel Brooks; Subhadeep Gupta; Zhao-Yuan Ma; Kevin L. Moore; Kater W. Murch; Tom P. Purdy; Dan M. Stamper-Kurn

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In many experiments isolated atoms and ions have been inserted into high-finesse optical resonators for the study of fundamental quantum optics and quantum information. Here, we introduce another application of such a system, as the realization of cavity optomechanics where the collective motion of an atomic ensemble serves the role of a moveable optical element in an optical resonator. Compared with other optomechanical systems, such as those incorporating nanofabricated cantilevers or the large cavity mirrors of gravitational observatories, our cold-atom realization offers direct access to the quantum regime. We describe experimental investigations of optomechanical effects, such as the bistability of collective atomic motion and the first quantification of measurement backaction for a macroscopic object, and discuss future directions for this nascent field.

  11. Remote-State Prparation eines einzelnen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    Remote-State Präparation eines einzelnen Atoms Diplomarbeit am Department für Physik der Ludwig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3.3 Remote-State-Präparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.3.4 Zusammenfassung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3 Remote-State-Präparation 31 3.1 Einleitung

  12. Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple electrical circuits are analyzed, and the results show that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decays of atoms. As an illustration of the analogy a two-circuit electrical system...

  13. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  14. Method and apparatus for noble gas atom detection with isotopic selectivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurst, G. Samuel (Oak Ridge, TN); Payne, Marvin G. (Harriman, TN); Chen, Chung-Hsuan (Knoxville, TN); Parks, James E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods of operation are described for determining, with isotopic selectivity, the number of noble gas atoms in a sample. The analysis is conducted within an evacuated chamber which can be isolated by a valve from a vacuum pumping system capable of producing a pressure of 10.sup.-8 Torr. Provision is made to pass pulses of laser beams through the chamber, these pulses having wavelengths appropriate for the resonance ionization of atoms of the noble gas under analysis. A mass filter within the chamber selects ions of a specific isotope of the noble gas, and means are provided to accelerate these selected ions sufficiently for implantation into a target. Specific types of targets are discussed. An electron measuring device produces a signal relatable to the number of ions implanted into the target and thus to the number of atoms of the selected isotope of the noble gas removed from the gas sample. The measurement can be continued until a substantial fraction, or all, of the atoms in the sample have been counted. Furthermore, additional embodiments of the apparatus are described for bunching the atoms of a noble gas for more rapid analysis, and for changing the target for repetitive cycling of the gas in the chamber. The number of repetitions of the cyclic steps depend upon the concentration of the isotope of interest, the separative efficiency of the mass filter, etc. The cycles are continued until a desired selectivity is achieved. Also described are components and a method of operation for a pre-enrichment operation for use when an introduction of a total sample would elevate the pressure within the chamber to levels in excess of those for operation of the mass filter, specifically a quadrupole mass filter. Specific examples of three noble gas isotope analyses are described.

  15. Magnetic Sensitivity and Entanglement Dynamics of the Chemical Compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. K. Kominis

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the quantum limits to the magnetic sensitivity of a new kind of magnetometer based on biochemical reactions. Radical-ion-pair reactions, the biochemical system underlying the chemical compass, are shown to offer a new and unique physical realization of a magnetic field sensor competitive to modern atomic or condensed matter magnetometers. We elaborate on the quantum coherence and entanglement dynamics of this sensor, showing that they provide the physical basis for testing our understanding of the fundamental quantum dynamics of radical-ion-pair reactions.

  16. Chemical bond and entanglement of electrons in the hydrogen molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikos Iliopoulos; Andreas F. Terzis

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate the quantum correlations (in terms of concurrence of indistinguishable electrons) in a prototype molecular system (hydrogen molecule). With the assistance of the standard approximations of the linear combination of atomic orbitals and the con?guration interaction methods we describe the electronic wavefunction of the ground state of the H2 molecule. Moreover, we managed to ?find a rather simple analytic expression for the concurrence (the most used measure of quantum entanglement) of the two electrons when the molecule is in its lowest energy. We have found that concurrence does not really show any relation to the construction of the chemical bond.

  17. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  18. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  19. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  20. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditons. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  1. Method for chemical surface modification of fumed silica particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, A.; Michalske, T.A.; Smith, W.L.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating. 11 figs.

  2. Chemical treatment for silica-containing glass surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grabbe, Alexis (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry Arthur (Bernalillo, NM); Smith, William Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroxylated, silica-containing, glass surfaces are known to be at least partially terminated by strained siloxane rings. According to the invention, a surface of this kind is exposed to a selected silane compound or mixture of silane compounds under reaction-promoting conditions. The ensuing reaction results in opening of the strained siloxane rings, and termination of surface atoms by chemical species, such as organic or organosilicon species, having desirable properties. These species can be chosen to provide qualities such as hydrophobicity, or improved coupling to a polymeric coating.

  3. Hydrogen atom in rotationally invariant noncommutative space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. P. Gnatenko; V. M. Tkachuk

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the noncommutative algebra which is rotationally invariant. The hydrogen atom is studied in a rotationally invariant noncommutative space. We find the corrections to the energy levels of the hydrogen atom up to the second order in the parameter of noncommutativity. The upper bound of the parameter of noncommutativity is estimated on the basis of the experimental results for 1s-2s transition frequency.

  4. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  5. Controlling the Ratchet Effect for Cold Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatole Kenfack; Jiangbin Gong; Arjendu K. Pattanayak

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-order quantum resonances manifested by directed currents have been realized with cold atoms. Here we show that by increasing the strength of an experimentally achievable delta-kicking ratchet potential, quantum resonances of a very high order may naturally emerge and can induce larger ratchet currents than low-order resonances, with the underlying classical limit being fully chaotic. The results offer a means of controlling quantum transport of cold atoms.

  6. ac-driven atomic quantum motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Ponomarev; S. Denisov; P. Hanggi

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We invent an ac-driven quantum motor consisting of two different, interacting ultracold atoms placed into a ring-shaped optical lattice and submerged in a pulsating magnetic field. While the first atom carries a current, the second one serves as a quantum starter. For fixed zero-momentum initial conditions the asymptotic carrier velocity converges to a unique non-zero value. We also demonstrate that this quantum motor performs work against a constant load.

  7. Controlled biosynthesis of odd-chain fuels and chemicals via engineered modular metabolic pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Hsien-Chung

    Microbial systems are being increasingly developed as production hosts for a wide variety of chemical compounds. Broader adoption of microbial synthesis is hampered by a limited number of high-yielding natural pathways for ...

  8. Biomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    | Mechanical | Petroleum Careers in Industrial Engineering Manufacturing, service and retail industries hireBiomedical | Chemical & Biomolecular | Civil & Environmental | Electrical & Computer | Industrial a significant number of industrial engineers. Specific industries include automobile manufacturers, electronics

  9. From Lattice Gauge Theories to Hydrogen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manu Mathur; T. P. Sreeraj

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Using canonical transformations we obtain a complete and most economical realization of the loop or physical Hilbert space of pure $SU(2)_{2+1}$ lattice gauge theory in terms of Wigner coupled Hilbert spaces of hydrogen atoms. One hydrogen atom is assigned to every plaquette of the lattice. The SU(2) gauge theory loop basis states over a plaquette are the bound energy eigenstates $|n l m>$ of the corresponding hydrogen atom. The Wigner couplings of these hydrogen atom energy eigenstates on different plaquettes provide a complete SU(2) gauge theory loop basis on the entire lattice. The loop basis is invariant under simultaneous rotations of all hydrogen atoms. The dual description of this basis diagonalizes all Wilson loop operators and is given in terms of hyperspherical harmonics on the SU(2) group manifold $S^3$. The SU(2) loop dynamics is governed by a "SU(2) spin Hamiltonian" without any gauge fields. The relevance of the hydrogen atom basis and its dynamical symmetry group SO(4,2) in SU(2) loop dynamics in weak coupling continuum limit ($g^2\\rightarrow 0$) is emphasized.

  10. Excess optical quantum noise in atomic sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Novikova; Eugeniy E. Mikhailov; Yanhong Xiao

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced nonlinear optical response of a coherent atomic medium is the basis for many atomic sensors, and their performance is ultimately limited by the quantum fluctuations of the optical read-out. Here we demonstrate that off-resonant interactions can significantly modify the quantum noise of the optical field, even when their effect on the mean signal is negligible. We illustrate this concept by using an atomic magnetometer based on the nonlinear Faraday effect: the rotation of the light polarization is mainly determined by the resonant light-induced spin alignment, which alone does not change the photon statistics of the optical probe. Yet, we found that the minimum noise of output polarization rotation measurements is above the expected shot noise limit. This excess quantum noise is due to off-resonant coupling and grows with atomic density. We also show that the detection scheme can be modified to reduce the measured quantum noise (even below the shot-noise limit) but only at the expense of the reduced rotational sensitivity. These results show the existence of previously unnoticed factors in fundamental limitations in atomic magnetometry and could have impacts in many other atom-light based precision measurements.

  11. Atoms 2014, 2, 157-177; doi:10.3390/atoms2020157 OPEN ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atoms 2014, 2, 157-177; doi:10.3390/atoms2020157 OPEN ACCESS atomsISSN 2218-2004 www]: = ne2 ¯h2 - dt1 t1 - dt2E(t1)·E(t2)ei (t1-t2) (3) where E(t1)·E(t2) = 2 3 0 vf(v)dv max 0 dE(t1

  12. FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND effluents, especially for total suspended and settleable solids, and oil and grease. The relationship between chemical oxygen demand and residue was determined on a limited number of samples from four types

  13. Analysis of the atmospheric distribution, sources, and sinks of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    chemicals based on measurements over the Pacific during TRACE-P H. B. Singh,1 L. J. Salas,1 R. B. Chatfield measurements of a large number of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOC) were carried out in the Pacific of OVOC is comparable to that of methane and far exceeds that of NMHC. A comparison of these data

  14. Molecular Orbital Studies of Titanium Nitride Chemical Vapor Deposition: Imido Dimer Formation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Orbital Studies of Titanium Nitride Chemical Vapor Deposition: Imido Dimer Formation- ization of Ti(NR2)2NH in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of titanium nitride films. This study uses lead to the formation of higher oligomers. Introduction Titanium nitride thin films have a number

  15. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961: Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewlett, Richard G.; Holl, Jack M.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This third volume in the official history of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission covers the years of the Eisenhower Administration.

  16. Ion-beam-induced chemical disorder in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomistic structures of high-energy ion irradiated GaN have been examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Single crystalline GaN substrates were irradiated at cryogenic temperature with 2 MeV Au2+ ions to a fluence of 7.35x1015 Au/cm2. Cross-sectional TEM observations revealed that damaged layers consisting of amorphous and nanocrystalline phases are formed at the surface and buried depth of the as-irradiated GaN substrate. Atomic radial distribution functions of the amorphous/poly-nanocrystalline regions showed that not only heteronuclear Ga-N bonds but also homonuclear Ga-Ga bonds exist within the first coordination shell. It was found that the ratio of heteronuclear-to-homonuclear bonds, i.e., the degree of chemical disorder is different between the surface and buried damaged layers. The alternation of chemical disorder was attributed to the difference in the defect formation processes between these layers.

  17. Chemical heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  18. Report/Product Number(s) DOE/ER/64701 DOE Award/Contract Number(s)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Report/Product Number(s)

  19. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the spectral profiles of HTP-B-diamond, h-BN, and c-BN.diamond differ from those of HTP-B-diamond and the reference

  20. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) – namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.