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1

USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE A thesis submitted deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide on crystalline silicon and anodized aluminum substrates. A homemade ALD system is used with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water as precursors to deposit uniform aluminum oxide

Belanger, David P.

3

Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

5

Biocompatibility of atomic layer-deposited alumina thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These results sug- gest that patterning a substrate with hydrophilic and hydro- phobic groups can control cell and excellent dielectric properties for bio- micro electro mechanical systems (Bio-MEMS) in sensors, actuators of atomic layer-deposited (ALD) alumina (Al2O3) and hydro- phobic coatings. While these coatings

George, Steven M.

6

Atomic layer deposited protective coatings for micro-electromechanical systems$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic layer deposited protective coatings for micro-electromechanical systems$ Nils D. Hoivika of thin-®lm materials to protect MEMS devices from electrical breakdown, mechanical wear and stiction. Electrostatic testing of the coated MEMS cantilever beams revealed that the ALD Al2O3 ®lms prevented electrical

George, Steven M.

7

Growth mode evolution of hafnium oxide by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HfO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using tetrakis-ethylmethylamido hafnium and H{sub 2}O as precursors on silicon by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The morphology and microstructures at different ALD cycles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Based on the heightheight correlation function and power spectral density function, quantitative analysis of surface morphologies was performed. Three characteristic dimensions (?{sub 1}, ?{sub 2}, and ?{sub 3}) corresponding to three surface structures, islands, local and global fluctuations, were identified. The evolution of ALD growth mode at range of the three critical scales was investigated, respectively. It suggests the transformation of growth mode from quasi two-dimensional layer-by-layer to three-dimensional island for global fluctuations.

Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan, E-mail: madayan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Xu, Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi'an University of Arts and Science, Xi'an 710065, Shaanxi (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Atomic layer deposition of W on nanoporous carbon aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the authors demonstrate the ability to apply precise conformal W coatings onto all surfaces of nanoporouscarbon aerogels using atomic layer deposition(ALD). The resulting material has a filamentous structure in which the W completely encapsulates the carbon aerogel strands. The material mass increases nonlinearly with W coating achieving a tenfold increase following ten ALD cycles. The aerogel surface area increases by nearly a factor of 2 after ten W ALD cycles. This conformal metalcoating of extremely high aspect ratio nanoporous materials by ALD represents a unique route to forming metal functionalized high surface area materials.

J. W. Elam; J. A. Libera; M. J. Pellin; A. V. Zinovev; J. P. Greene; J. A. Nolen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Silicon Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by NREL at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about atomic layer deposition for...

11

Channel cracks in atomic-layer and molecular-layer deposited multilayer thin film coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin film coatings produced by atomic layer deposition have been shown to be an effective permeation barrier. The primary failure mode of such coatings under tensile loads is the propagation of channel cracks that penetrate vertically into the coating films. Recently, multi-layer structures that combine the metal oxide material with relatively soft polymeric layers produced by molecular layer deposition have been proposed to create composite thin films with desired properties, including potentially enhanced resistance to fracture. In this paper, we study the effects of layer geometry and material properties on the critical strain for channel crack propagation in the multi-layer composite films. Using finite element simulations and a thin-film fracture mechanics formalism, we show that if the fracture energy of the polymeric layer is lower than that of the metal oxide layer, the channel crack tends to penetrate through the entire composite film, and dividing the metal oxide and polymeric materials into thinner layers leads to a smaller critical strain. However, if the fracture energy of the polymeric material is high so that cracks only run through the metal oxide layers, more layers can result in a larger critical strain. For intermediate fracture energy of the polymer material, we developed a design map that identifies the optimal structure for given fracture energies and thicknesses of the metal oxide and polymeric layers. These results can facilitate the design of mechanically robust permeation barriers, an important component for the development of flexible electronics.

Long, Rong, E-mail: rlongmech@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G8 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Dunn, Martin L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 138682 (Singapore)

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fabrication of inverted opal ZnO photonic crystals by atomic layer deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fabrication of inverted opal ZnO photonic crystals by atomic layer deposition M. Scharrer, X. Wu, A method to fabricate so-called "inverted opal" structures which have the long-range order, high filling into opal or inverted opal backbones.3,5,13,14 Recently, atomic layer deposition ALD has been pro- posed

Cao, Hui

13

Application of Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum to Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum to Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ... (4, 5, 8-10) Therefore, the electrode material requires particular attention in the development and optimization of low-temperature SOFCs. ... Enormous Plasmonic Enhancement and Suppressed Quenching of Luminescence from Nanoscale ZnO Films by Uniformly Dispersed Atomic-Layer-Deposited Platinum with Optimized Spacer Thickness ...

Xirong Jiang; Hong Huang; Friedrich B. Prinz; Stacey F. Bent

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

14

Exergy Analysis of Atomic Layer Deposition for Al2O3 Nano-film Preparation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper exergy analysis is applied on Atomic Layer Deposition...2O3...thin film to analyze the utilization and losses of exergy in ALD system. The exergies associated with ... work flow are calculated. Base...

Fenfen Wang; Tao Li; Hong-Chao Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Atomic layer deposition-based functionalization of materials for medical and environmental health applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...implantable sensor membranes and water purification membranes. Atomic layer deposition...of nanoporous membranes for water purification. As mentioned earlier, many...have potential applications in water purification. Human epithelial keratinocyte...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Heteroepitaxy of group IV-VI nitrides by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heteroepitaxial growth of selected group IV-VI nitrides on various orientations of sapphire (?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is demonstrated using atomic layer deposition. High quality, epitaxial films are produced at significantly lower temperatures than required by conventional deposition methods. Characterization of electrical and superconducting properties of epitaxial films reveals a reduced room temperature resistivity and increased residual resistance ratio for films deposited on sapphire compared to polycrystalline samples deposited concurrently on fused quartz substrates.

Klug, Jeffrey A., E-mail: jklug@anl.gov; Groll, Nickolas R.; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Becker, Nicholas G.; Cao, Chaoyue; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Weimer, Matthew S. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

Atomic Layer Deposition of Uniform Metal Coatings on Highly Porous Aerogel Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic Layer Deposition of Uniform Metal Coatings on Highly Porous Aerogel Substrates ... Figure 1 Bright-field transmission electron micrographs of the (a) uncoated and (b) W-coated alumina aerogel (6 ALD cycles), and the (c) uncoated and (b) W-coated germania aerogel (6 ALD cycles). ... For the alumina aerogel, the coating consists of crystalline W nanoparticles, ?2 nm in diameter, uniformly deposited on the surfaces of the nanoleaflets (Figure 1b). ...

Theodore F. Baumann; Juergen Biener; Yinmin M. Wang; Sergei O. Kucheyev; Erik J. Nelson; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.; Jeffrey W. Elam; Michael J. Pellin; Alex V. Hamza

2006-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

18

ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR to those measured on reference cells passivated by an aluminum-annealed thermal SiO2, while those of the Al of aluminum ox- ide (Al2O3) grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) pro- vide an excellent level of sur

19

Fermi level de-pinning of aluminium contacts to n-type germanium using thin atomic layer deposited layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermi-level pinning of aluminium on n-type germanium (n-Ge) was reduced by insertion of a thin interfacial dielectric by atomic layer deposition. The barrier height for aluminium contacts on n-Ge was reduced from 0.7?eV to a value of 0.28?eV for a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfacial layer (?2.8?nm). For diodes with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfacial layer, the contact resistance started to increase for layer thicknesses above 2.8?nm. For diodes with a HfO{sub 2} interfacial layer, the barrier height was also reduced but the contact resistance increased dramatically for layer thicknesses above 1.5?nm.

Gajula, D. R., E-mail: dgajula01@qub.ac.uk; Baine, P.; Armstrong, B. M.; McNeill, D. W. [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen's University Belfast, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)] [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen's University Belfast, Ashby Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Modreanu, M.; Hurley, P. K. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)] [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Inorganic Hollow Nanotube Aerogels by Atomic Layer Deposition onto Native Nanocellulose Templates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First we show a preparation method for titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and aluminum oxide nanotube aerogels based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) on biological nanofibrillar aerogel templates, that is, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), also called microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulose. ... Inorganic layer thickness data (S1), larger SEM micrographs of single nanocellulose fibrils (S2), several samples demonstrating differences in preparation methods (S3, S4) and different coatings (S5?S7), XRD data for a TiO2 nanotube film (S8). ... Fabrication of Transparent-Conducting-Oxide-Coated Inverse Opals as Mesostructured Architectures for Electrocatalysis Applications: A Case Study with NiO ...

Juuso T. Korhonen; Panu Hiekkataipale; Jari Malm; Maarit Karppinen; Olli Ikkala; Robin H. A. Ras

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multi-density layer structure as a moisture permeation barrier deposited by radio frequency remote plasma atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition have been used for thin film encapsulation of organic light emitting diode. In this study, a multi-density layer structure consisting of two Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with different densities are deposited with different deposition conditions of O{sub 2} plasma reactant time. This structure improves moisture permeation barrier characteristics, as confirmed by a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) test. The lowest WVTR of the multi-density layer structure was 4.7 10{sup ?5} gm{sup ?2} day{sup ?1}, which is one order of magnitude less than WVTR for the reference single-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. This improvement is attributed to the location mismatch of paths for atmospheric gases, such as O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, in the film due to different densities in the layers. This mechanism is analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection, and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results confirmed that the multi-density layer structure exhibits very good characteristics as an encapsulation layer via location mismatch of paths for H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} between the two layers.

Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Ham, Giyul; Shin, Seokyoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Thermodynamic properties and interfacial layer characteristics of HfO{sub 2} thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties and interfacial characteristics of HfO{sub 2} thin films that were deposited by the direct plasma atomic layer deposition (DPALD) method are investigated. The as-deposited HfO{sub 2} films that were deposited by the DPALD method show crystallization of the HfO{sub 2} layers, which initiates at approximately the 35th cycle (about 2.8 nm) of the DPALD process. Medium-energy ion scattering analysis reveals that the direct O{sub 2} plasma causes a compositional change in the interfacial layer as the process progresses. With an increase in the number of process cycles, the Si content decreases and the O content increases at that position, so that the HfO{sub 2}-like Hf-silicate layer is formed on top of the interfacial layer. The enhanced physical reactivity of the oxygen ions in the direct plasma and the Hf-silicate layer may be the driving forces that accelerate the early crystallization of the HfO{sub 2} layer in the DPALD process in the as-deposited state.

Kim, Inhoe; Kuk, Seoungwoo; Kim, Seokhoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Cho, M.-H.; Chung, K.-B. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Atomic Layer Deposition of TiO2 on Aerogel Templates: New Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition was employed to coat the aerogel template conformally with various thicknesses of TiO2 with subnanometer precision. ... The TiO2-coated aerogel membranes were incorporated as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells. ...

Thomas W. Hamann; Alex B. F. Martinson; Jeffrey W. Elam; Michael J. Pellin; Joseph T. Hupp

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

24

Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M. [Eastman Kodak Company, 1999 Lake Avenue, Rochester, New York 14650-2022 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Growth mechanism of atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide: A density functional theory approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition of zinc oxide (ZnO) using diethylzinc (DEZ) and water is studied using density functional theory. The reaction pathways between the precursors and ZnO surface sites are discussed. Both reactions proceed by the formation of intermediate complexes on the surface. The Gibbs free energy of the formation of these complexes is positive at temperatures above ?120?C and ?200?C for DEZ and water half-reactions, respectively. Spectroscopic ellipsometry results show that the growth per cycle changes at approximately the same temperatures.

Afshar, Amir; Cadien, Kenneth C., E-mail: kcadien@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

Property transformation of graphene with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited directly by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are deposited directly onto graphene by H{sub 2}O-based atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the films are pinhole-free and continuously cover the graphene surface. The growth process of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films does not introduce any detective defects in graphene, suppresses the hysteresis effect and tunes the graphene doping to n-type. The self-cleaning of ALD growth process, together with the physically absorbed H{sub 2}O and oxygen-deficient ALD environment consumes OH{sup ?} bonds, suppresses the p-doping of graphene, shifts Dirac point to negative gate bias and enhances the electron mobility.

Zheng, Li; Cao, Duo; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh-cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Dashen [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

Atomic layer deposition of ZnO on ultralow-density nanoporous silica aerogel monoliths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on atomic layer deposition of an ? 2 -nm-thick ZnO layer on the inner surface of ultralow-density ( ? 0.5 % of the full density) nanoporoussilica aerogel monoliths with an extremely large effective aspect ratio of ? 10 5 (defined as the ratio of the monolith thickness to the average pore size). The resultant monoliths are formed by amorphous- SiO 2 core/wurtzite-ZnO shell nanoparticles which are randomly oriented and interconnected into an open-cell network with an apparent density of ? 3 % and a surface area of ? 10 0 m 2 g ? 1 . Secondary ion mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging reveal excellent uniformity and crystallinity of ZnO coating. Oxygen K -edge and Zn L 3 -edge soft x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy shows broadened O p - as well as Zn s - and d -projected densities of states in the conduction band.

S. O. Kucheyev; J. Biener; Y. M. Wang; T. F. Baumann; K. J. Wu; T. van Buuren; A. V. Hamza; J. H. Satcher Jr.; J. W. Elam; M. J. Pellin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al2O3 using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al2O3 penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al2O3 coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?C as compared with 175?C for uncoated CNC aerogels an improvement of over 100?C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

Jungk, John Michael (University of Minnesota); Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M. (University of Colorado); Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W. (University of Minnesota)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Functionalization for Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum Electrocatalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

Dameron, A. A.; Pylypenko, S.; Bult, J. B.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Bochert, C.; Leong, G. J.; Frisco, S. L.; Simpson, L.; Dinh, H. N.; Pivovar, B.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.110.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of 2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

Lau, W. S., E-mail: liuweicheng@zju.edu.cn; Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H. [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, J. [Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Luo, J. K. [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB (United Kingdom)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Impact of titanium addition on film characteristics of HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics deposited by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of 8-to 45-at. % Ti on physical and electrical characteristics of atomic-layer-deposited and annealed hafnium dioxide was studied using vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray reflectometry. The role of Ti addition on the electrical performance is investigated using molybdenum (Mo)-gated capacitors. The film density decreases with increasing Ti addition. Ti addition stabilizes the amorphous phase of HfO{sub 2}, resulting in amorphous films as deposited. After a high-temperature annealing, the films transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline phase. Orthorhombic Hf-Ti-O peaks are detected in polycrystalline films containing 33-at. % or higher Ti content. As Ti content is decreased, monoclinic HfO{sub 2} becomes the predominant microstructure. No TiSi is formed at the dielectric/Si interface, indicating films with good thermal stability. The band gap of Hf-Ti-O was found to be lower than that of HfO{sub 2}. Well-behaved capacitance-voltage and leakage current density-voltage characteristics were obtained for Hf-Ti-O. However, an increased leakage current density was observed with Ti addition. The data from capacitance-voltage stressing indicate a smaller flatband voltage (V{sub fb}) shift in the HfO{sub 2} films with low Ti content when compared with the HfO{sub 2} films. This indicates less charge trapping with a small amount of Ti addition.

Triyoso, D.H.; Hegde, R.I.; Zollner, S.; Ramon, M.E.; Kalpat, S.; Gregory, R.; Wang, X.-D.; Jiang, J.; Raymond, M.; Rai, R.; Werho, D.; Roan, D.; White, B.E. Jr.; Tobin, P.J. [Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratory, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78721 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10?wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300?C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Paper deacidification and UV protection using ZnO atomic layer deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid degradation of cellulosic paper in archival books periodicals and historic documents is a serious and widespread problem. Using acidic page samples from ?40 year old books we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) ZnO can adjust and controllably neutralize the paper acid content. The paper samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with recognized Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) test standards. The average pH of the starting paper was 3.7??0.4 and 4.4??0.1 as determined using the TAPPI surface probe and cold water extraction methods respectively. After 50 ALD ZnO cycles the same tests on the coated paper produced an average pH of 7.39??0.08 and 7.3??0.4 respectively. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the cellulose structure remained intact during ALD. Additional tests of recently printed newspaper samples coated with ALD ZnO also show that ALD can effectively prevent paper discoloration and embrittlement caused by UV sunlight photoexposure. While there are many known methods for paper preservation including others using diethyl zinc the control afforded by ALD provides attractive advantages over other known approaches for preservation of archival paper and other natural fibrous materials.

C. A. Hanson; C. J. Oldham; G. N. Parsons

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Barrier performance optimization of atomic layer deposited diffusion barriers for organic light emitting diodes using x-ray reflectivity investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of O{sub 3} pulse duration for encapsulation of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with ultra thin inorganic atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers is demonstrated for deposition temperatures of 50 C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements show that O{sub 3} pulse durations longer than 15?s produce dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Correspondingly, black spot growth is not observed in OLEDs encapsulated with such layers during 91 days of aging under ambient conditions. This implies that XRR can be used as a tool for process optimization of OLED encapsulation layers leading to devices with long lifetimes.

Singh, Aarti, E-mail: aarti.singh@namlab.com; Schrder, Uwe [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany)] [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Klumbies, Hannes; Mller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl [Dresden Innovation Center Energy Efficiency, Institut fr Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitt Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Dresden Innovation Center Energy Efficiency, Institut fr Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitt Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Geidel, Marion; Knaut, Martin; Hobach, Christoph; Albert, Matthias [Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universitt Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universitt Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany) [Nanoelectronics Materials Laboratory NaMLab gGmbH, Nthnitzer Str. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Semiconductor and Microsystems Technology, Technische Universitt Dresden, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

Waterless TiO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition using titanium tetrachloride and titanium tetraisopropoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The surface chemistry for TiO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD) typically utilizes water or other oxidants that can oxidize underlying substrates such as magnetic disks or semiconductors. To avoid this oxidation, waterless or oxidant-free surface chemistry can be used that involves titanium halides and titanium alkoxides. In this study, waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD was accomplished using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). In situ transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were employed to study the surface species and the reactions during waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD. At low temperatures between 125 and 225??C, the FTIR absorbance spectra revealed that the isopropoxide species remained on the surface after TTIP exposures. The TiCl{sub 4} exposures then removed the isopropoxide species and deposited additional titanium species. At high temperatures between 250 and 300??C, the isopropoxide species were converted to hydroxyl species by ?-hydride elimination. The observation of propene gaseous reaction product by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) confirmed the ?-hydride elimination reaction pathway. The TiCl{sub 4} exposures then easily reacted with the hydroxyl species. QMS studies also observed the 2-chloropropane and HCl gaseous reaction products and monitored the self-limiting nature of the TTIP reaction. Additional studies examined the waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD growth at low and high temperature. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements observed growth rates of ?3?ng/cm{sup 2} at a low temperature of 150??C. Much higher growth rates of ?15?ng/cm{sup 2} were measured at a higher temperature of 250??C under similar reaction conditions. X-ray reflectivity analysis measured a growth rate of 0.55 0.05?/cycle at 250??C. X-ray photoelectron depth-profile studies showed that the TiO{sub 2} films contained low Cl concentrations <1 at. %. This waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD process using TiCl{sub 4} and TTIP should be valuable to prevent substrate oxidation during TiO{sub 2} ALD on oxygen-sensitive substrates.

Anderson, Virginia R.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Abdulagatov, Aziz I. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Gibbs, Zachary M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); George, Steven M., E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427. (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Efficient, air-stable colloidal quantum dot solar cells encapsulated using atomic layer deposition of a nanolaminate barrier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition was used to encapsulate colloidal quantum dot solar cells. A nanolaminate layer consisting of alternating alumina and zirconia films provided a robust gas permeation barrier which prevented device performance degradation over a period of multiple weeks. Unencapsulated cells stored in ambient and nitrogen environments demonstrated significant performance losses over the same period. The encapsulated cell also exhibited stable performance under constant simulated solar illumination without filtration of harsh ultraviolet photons. This monolithically integrated thin film encapsulation method is promising for roll-to-roll processed high efficiency nanocrystal solar cells.

Ip, Alexander H.; Labelle, Andr J.; Sargent, Edward H., E-mail: ted.sargent@utoronto.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Bipolar resistive switching characteristics of low temperature grown ZnO thin films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZnO films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) have been used to investigate resistive memory behavior. The bipolar resistance switching properties were observed in the Al/PEALD-ZnO/Pt devices. The resistance ratio for the high and low resistance states (HRS/LRS) is more than 10{sup 3}, better than ZnO devices deposited by other methods. The dominant conduction mechanisms of HRS and LRS are trap-controlled space charge limited current and Ohmic behavior, respectively. The resistive switching behavior is induced upon the formation/disruption of conducting filaments. This study demonstrated that the PEALD-ZnO films have better properties for the application in 3D resistance random access memory.

Zhang Jian; Yang Hui; Zhang Qilong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Dong Shurong [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Luo, J. K. [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute of Material Research and Innovation, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom)

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

Wang, Han; Fu, Kan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

Hydrogen Production via Chemical Looping Redox Cycles Using Atomic Layer Deposition-Synthesized Iron Oxide and Cobalt Ferrites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production via Chemical Looping Redox Cycles Using Atomic Layer Deposition-Synthesized Iron Oxide and Cobalt Ferrites ... Unlike solution and line-of-sight methods used to synthesize metal-substituted ferrites, including solution combustion synthesis,(6) aerial oxidation of aqueous suspensions,(5) sol?gel process,(8) laser molecular beam epitaxy,(21) sputtering,(22) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD),(23) ALD can produce conformal thin films on porous materials. ... The drop in peak H2 production rate is accompanied by a ?55% decrease in the total amount of H2 produced (see Table 1) and a similar decrease in the time required to achieve 95% conversion, suggesting a loss of accessible iron in this material. ...

Jonathan R. Scheffe; Mark D. Allendorf; Eric N. Coker; Benjamin W. Jacobs; Anthony H. McDaniel; Alan W. Weimer

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide films using plasma-activated triisopropylsilane as a precursor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process was developed as a growth technique of SiO{sub 2} thin films using a plasma-activated triisopropylsilane [TIPS, ((iPr){sub 3}SiH)] precursor. TIPS was activated by an argon plasma at the precursor injection stage of the process. Using the activated TIPS, it was possible to control the growth rate per cycle of the deposited films by adjusting the plasma ignition time. The PEALD technique allowed deposition of SiO{sub 2} films at temperatures as low as 50?C without carbon impurities. In addition, films obtained with plasma ignition times of 3?s and 10?s had similar values of root-mean-square surface roughness. In order to evaluate the suitability of TIPS as a precursor for low-temperature deposition of SiO{sub 2} films, the vapor pressure of TIPS was measured. The thermal stability and the reactivity of the gas-phase TIPS with respect to water vapor were also investigated by analyzing the intensity changes of the CH and SiH peaks in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of TIPS.

Jeon, Ki-Moon [Vacuum Center, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dae Jeon University, Daejeon 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Su [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dae Jeon University, Daejeon 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Ju-Young [Vacuum Center, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Nano and Bio Surface Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Lee, Sang [Center of Nanomaterials Characterization, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Nano Science, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sang-Woo, E-mail: swkang@kriss.re.kr [Vacuum Center, Division of Industrial Metrology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon 305-340, South Korea and Department of Advanced Device Technology, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effective work function of Pt, Pd, and Re on atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Platinum and Pd show a significant difference in work function on SiO{sub 2} and high-K materials (HfO{sub 2}). The effective metal work functions for Pd, Pt, and Re on atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2}, which are different from the vacuum work function and important for device threshold voltage control, are measured by the C-V method. The difference is attributed to the dipoles at the metal/HfO{sub 2} interface, which is a result of charge transfer across the interface. Moreover, the extracted charge neutrality level and screening parameter are correlated with the phase development, film stoichiometry, and density of interface states at the metal/high-K interface.

Gu Diefeng; Dey, Sandwip K.; Majhi, Prashant [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-6006 (United States) and Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States); Planar CMOS Scaling, SEMATECH, Austin, Texas 78741 (United States)

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

44

In situ study of HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition on InP(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interfacial chemistry of the native oxide and chemically treated InP samples during atomic layer deposition (ALD) HfO{sub 2} growth at 250 Degree-Sign C has been studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The In-oxide concentration is seen to gradually decrease on the native oxide and acid etched samples. No significant changes of the P-oxide concentrations are detected, while the P-oxides chemical states are seen to change gradually during the initial cycles of ALD on the native oxide and the chemically treated samples. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment strongly decreases In-oxide and P-oxide concentrations prior to ALD and maintains low concentrations during the ALD process.

Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Schottky barrier source-gated ZnO thin film transistors by low temperature atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have fabricated ZnO source-gated thin film transistors (SGTFTs) with a buried TiW source Schottky barrier and a top gate contact. The ZnO active channel and thin high-? HfO{sub 2} dielectric utilized are both grown by atomic layer deposition at temperatures less than 130?C, and their material and electronic properties are characterized. These SGTFTs demonstrate enhancement-mode operation with a threshold voltage of 0.91?V, electron mobility of 3.9 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}, and low subthreshold swing of 192?mV/decade. The devices also exhibit a unique combination of high breakdown voltages (>20?V) with low output conductances.

Ma, Alex M.; Gupta, Manisha; Shoute, Gem; Tsui, Ying Y.; Barlage, Douglas W., E-mail: barlage@ualberta.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Afshar, Amir; Cadien, Kenneth C. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Surface Reactivity of Copper Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on Metal Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions by using ainside an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with X-rayand under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) condition, hence atomically

MA, QIANG

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Synthesis of Pt?Pd Core?Shell Nanostructures by Atomic Layer Deposition: Application in Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation to Propylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to synthesize supported Pt?Pd bimetallic particles in the 1 to 2 nm range. The metal loading and composition of the supported Pt?Pd nanoparticles were controlled by varying the deposition temperature and by applying ALD metal oxide coatings to modify the support surface chemistry. Highresolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed monodispersed Pt?Pd nanoparticles on ALD Al2O3 - and TiO2 -modi?ed SiO2 gel. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the bimetallic nanoparticles have a stable Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the most stable surface con?guration for the Pt? Pd alloys in an H2 environment has a Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. In comparison to their monometallic counterparts, the small Pt?Pd bimetallic core?shell nanoparticles exhibited higher activity in propane oxidative dehydrogenation as compared to their physical mixture.

Lei, Y.; Liu, Bin; Lu, Junling; Lobo-Lapidus, Rodrigo J.; Wu, Tianpin; Feng, Hao; Xia, Xiaoxing; Mane, Anil U.; Libera, Joseph A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Elam, J. W.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Highly Conformal Thin Films of Tungsten Nitride Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition from a Novel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) deposition temperatures under 350 °C (due to the thermal instability of low-k materials); (8) good growth, and electrically conducting. All of the films showed good adhesion to the substrates, were acid-resistant, and did resistivity than aluminum, 1.7 versus 2.7 µ-cm, respectively (bulk values). This property of copper enables

49

Atomic-layer deposition of wear-resistant coatings for microelectromechanical devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of microelectromechanical aluminum and water. Deposition is carried out in a viscous flow reactor at 1 Torr and 168 °C, with N2 as a carrier gas. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that films are uniform

George, Steven M.

50

Comparative band alignment of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics on gallium nitride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, HfO{sub 2} films, and HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} stacked structures were deposited on n-type, Ga-face, GaN wafers using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD). The wafers were first treated with a wet-chemical clean to remove organics and an in-situ combined H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma at 650 Degree-Sign C to remove residual carbon contamination, resulting in a clean, oxygen-terminated surface. This cleaning process produced slightly upward band bending of 0.1 eV. Additional 650 Degree-Sign C annealing after plasma cleaning increased the upward band bending by 0.2 eV. After the initial clean, high-k oxide films were deposited using oxygen PEALD at 140 Degree-Sign C. The valence band and conduction band offsets (VBOs and CBOs) of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN and HfO{sub 2}/GaN structures were deduced from in-situ x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS and UPS). The valence band offsets were determined to be 1.8 and 1.4 eV, while the deduced conduction band offsets were 1.3 and 1.0 eV, respectively. These values are compared with the theoretical calculations based on the electron affinity model and charge neutrality level model. Moreover, subsequent annealing had little effect on these offsets; however, the GaN band bending did change depending on the annealing and processing. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was investigated as an interfacial passivation layer (IPL), which, as results suggest, may lead to improved stability, performance, and reliability of HfO{sub 2}/IPL/GaN structures. The VBOs were {approx}0.1 and 1.3 eV, while the deduced CBOs were 0.6 and 1.1 eV for HfO{sub 2} with respect to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GaN, respectively.

Yang Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Zhu Chiyu; England, Chris; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A quantum chemical study of ZrO2 atomic layer deposition growth reactions on the SiO2 surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum chemical study of ZrO2 atomic layer deposition growth reactions on the SiO2 surface Department, Ford Research Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48121, USA c Department of Chemistry to replace silicon oxide (SiO2) as the gate dielectric for future generation metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS

Garfunkel, Eric

52

Atomic Layer Deposition Preparation of Pd Nanoparticles on a Porous Carbon Support for Alcohol Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ALD-prepared catalyst was characterized by atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) (ICP-AES, Varian Liberty series II), X-ray diffraction, (XRD) (PanAnalytical XPert Pro), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (SSX-100), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (Tecnai 12 Bio Twin with LaB6 gun at 120 kV), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) (JEOL JSM-7500FA). ... CNB-E project through the Multidisciplinary Institute of Digitalization and Energy (MIDE) program and Academy of Finland are acknowledged for financial support. ...

Emma Rikkinen; Annukka Santasalo-Aarnio; Sanna Airaksinen; Maryam Borghei; Ville Viitanen; Jani Sainio; Esko I. Kauppinen; Tanja Kallio; A. Outi I. Krause

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Highly efficient flexible inverted organic solar cells using atomic layer deposited ZnO as electron selective layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advancements, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells (OSCs) has been improved with PCE more than 4% was demonstrated.7 However,Cs2CO3 exhibitsdeliquescencewhichaffects severely a PCE of 3.09%.14 Hau et al. adopted spin-coated ZnO nanoparticles as the electron selective layer

54

Deposition of TiN and HfO{sub 2} in a commercial 200 mm remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe a remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor (Oxford Instruments FlexAL trade mark sign ) that includes an inductively coupled plasma source and a load lock capable of handling substrates up to 200 mm in diameter. The deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) is described for the combination of the metal-halide precursor TiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma and the combination of the metallorganic precursor Hf[N(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4} and O{sub 2} plasma, respectively. The influence of the plasma exposure time and substrate temperature has been studied and compositional, structural, and electrical properties are reported. TiN films with a low Cl impurity content were obtained at 350 deg. C at a growth rate of 0.35 A /cycle with an electrical resistivity as low as 150 {mu}{omega} cm. Carbon-free (detection limit <2 at. %) HfO{sub 2} films were obtained at a growth rate of 1.0 A /cycle at 290 deg. C. The thickness and resisitivity nonuniformity was <5% for the TiN and the thickness uniformality was <2% for the HfO{sub 2} films as determined over 200 mm wafers.

Heil, S. B. S.; Hemmen, J. L. van; Hodson, C. J.; Singh, N.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Roozeboom, F.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Yatton BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Band offsets of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition technique on hydrogenated diamond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-k oxide insulators (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) have been deposited on a single crystalline hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) epilayer by an atomic layer deposition technique at temperature as low as 120 Degree-Sign C. Interfacial electronic band structures are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on core-level binding energies and valence band maximum values, valence band offsets are found to be 2.9 {+-} 0.2 and 2.6 {+-} 0.2 eV for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions, respectively. Band gaps of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} have been determined to be 7.2 {+-} 0.2 and 5.4 {+-} 0.2 eV by measuring O 1s energy loss spectra, respectively. Both the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions are concluded to be type-II staggered band configurations with conduction band offsets of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 and 2.7 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Surface modification of Au/TiO2 catalysts by SiO2 via atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized for the surface engineering of metallic nanoparticles to tame their sintering problems and catalytic activities. We chose the surface modification of gold nanocatalysts as an example to demonstrate the concept of this ALD-based approach. Herein, an active Au/TiO{sub 2} catalyst was modified by amorphous SiO{sub 2} via ALD, and the samples were characterized by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), scanning (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (TEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetry/differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), and the catalytic activities in CO oxidation and H{sub 2} oxidation were tested with respect to the pretreatment temperature and SiO{sub 2} content. A significant sintering resistance and changes in catalytic activities were observed. The difference between the SiO{sub 2}/Au/TiO{sub 2} samples prepared by gas-phase ALD and solution-phase chemical grafting was discussed.

Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Tunneling spectroscopy of superconducting MoN and NbTiN grown by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tunneling spectroscopy study is presented of superconducting MoN and Nb{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}N thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The films exhibited a superconducting gap of 2?meV and 2.4?meV, respectively, with a corresponding critical temperature of 11.5?K and 13.4?K, among the highest reported T{sub c} values achieved by the ALD technique. Tunnel junctions were obtained using a mechanical contact method with a Au tip. While the native oxides of these films provided poor tunnel barriers, high quality tunnel junctions with low zero bias conductance (below ?10%) were obtained using an artificial tunnel barrier of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the film's surface grown ex situ by ALD. We find a large critical current density on the order of 4??10{sup 6}?A/cm{sup 2} at T?=?0.8T{sub c} for a 60?nm MoN film and demonstrate conformal coating capabilities of ALD onto high aspect ratio geometries. These results suggest that the ALD technique offers significant promise for thin film superconducting device applications.

Groll, Nickolas R., E-mail: ngroll@anl.gov; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Claus, Helmut; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: proslier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cao, Chaoyue; Becker, Nicholas G.; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Altin, Serdar [Fen Edebiyat Fakultesi, Fizik Bolumu, Inonu Universitesi, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} oxide film on epitaxial (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge layers were grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by in situ growth process using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. The band alignment properties of atomic layer hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) film deposited on crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v} values of HfO{sub 2} relative to (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge orientations were 2.8 eV, 2.28 eV, and 2.5 eV, respectively. Using XPS data, variation in valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub V}(100)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(110)Ge, was obtained related to Ge orientation. Also, the conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c} relation, {Delta}E{sub c}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(100)Ge related to Ge orientations was obtained using the measured bandgap of HfO{sub 2} on each orientation and with the Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters for carrier confinement would offer an important guidance to design Ge-based p- and n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor for low-power application.

Hudait, Mantu K.; Zhu Yan [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Plasma Processing for Crystallization and Densification of Atomic Layer Deposition BaTiO3 Thin Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We adopted an ultrathin blocking layer of PEALD Al2O3 (10 cycles, 1 nm in thickness) for the leakage current suppression between BTO (5 nm) and Si substrate (Figure S2). ... For Al2O3 deposition, we used the plasma-enhanced ALD reactor (FlexAl) by Oxford Instruments. ...

Jihwan An; Takane Usui; Manca Logar; Joonsuk Park; Dickson Thian; Sam Kim; Kihyun Kim; Fritz B. Prinz

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

60

In Situ Reaction Mechanism Studies on Atomic Layer Deposition of AlxSiyOz from Trimethylaluminium, Hexakis(ethylamino)disilane, and Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Reaction Mechanism Studies on Atomic Layer Deposition of AlxSiyOz from Trimethylaluminium, Hexakis(ethylamino)disilane, and Water ... The hexakis(ethylamino)disilane Si2(NHEt)6 precursor, also known as AHEAD, exhibits a high ALD growth rate (1 /cycle) with ozone as the oxygen source at temperatures ranging from 150 to 300 C,(28) thus appearing as a serious candidate for ALD of silicon oxide. ...

Yoann Tomczak; Kjell Knapas; Suvi Haukka; Marianna Kemell; Mikko Heikkil; Marcel Ceccato; Markku Leskel; Mikko Ritala

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reduction of native oxides on InAs by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin high-{kappa} oxide films on InAs, formed by atomic layer deposition, are the key to achieve high-speed metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. We have studied the native oxide and the interface between InAs and 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} layers using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Both films lead to a strong oxide reduction, obtaining less than 10% of the native As-oxides and between 10% and 50% of the native In-oxides, depending on the deposition temperature. The ratio of native In- to As-oxides is determined to be 2:1. The exact composition and the influence of different oxidation states and suboxides is discussed in detail.

Timm, R.; Fian, A.; Hjort, M.; Thelander, C.; Lind, E.; Andersen, J. N.; Wernersson, L.-E.; Mikkelsen, A. [Department of Physics, Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22 100 Lund (Sweden)

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

In Situ Synchrotron Based X-ray Fluorescence and Scattering Measurements During Atomic Layer Deposition: Initial Growth of HfO2 on Si and Ge Substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial growth of HfO{sub 2} was studied by means of synchrotron based in situ x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). HfO{sub 2} was deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and H{sub 2}O on both oxidized and H-terminated Si and Ge surfaces. XRF quantifies the amount of deposited material during each ALD cycle and shows an inhibition period on H-terminated substrates. No inhibition period is observed on oxidized substrates. The evolution of film roughness was monitored using GISAXS. A correlation is found between the inhibition period and the onset of surface roughness.

K Devloo-Casier; J Dendooven; K Ludwig; G Lekens; J DHaen; C Detavernier

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Highly transparent low capacitance plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-HfO{sub 2} tunnel junction engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of metallic single electron transistor (SET) depends on the downscaling and the electrical properties of its tunnel junctions. These tunnel junctions should insure high tunnel current levels, low thermionic current, and low capacitance. The authors use atomic layer deposition to fabricate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} thin layers. Tunnel barrier engineering allows the achievement of low capacitance Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} tunnel junctions using optimized annealing and plasma exposure conditions. Different stacks were designed and fabricated to increase the transparency of the tunnel junction while minimizing thermionic current. This tunnel junction is meant to be integrated in SET to enhance its electrical properties (e.g., operating temperature, I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio)

El Hajjam, Khalil, E-mail: khalil.el-hajjam@insa-lyon.fr [INL, INSA, UMR CNRS 5270, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex, France and Institut Interdisciplinaire d'Innovation Technologique (3IT), Universit de Sherbrooke, 3000 Boulevard Universit, Sherbrooke, J1K OA5, Qubec (Canada); Baboux, Nicolas; Calmon, Francis [INL, INSA, UMR CNRS 5270, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Souifi, Abdelkader [Laboratoire Nanotechnologies Nanosystmes (LN2)-CNRS UMI-3463, Universit de Sherbrooke, 3000 Boulevard Universit, Sherbrooke, J1K OA5, Qubec (Canada); Poncelet, Olivier; Francis, Laurent A. [ICTEAM, ELEN, UCL, Place du Levant 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Ecoffey, Serge; Drouin, Dominique [Laboratoire Nanotechnologies Nanosystmes (LN2)-CNRS UMI-3463, Universit de Sherbrooke, 3000 Boulevard Universit, Sherbrooke, J1K OA5, Qubec, Canada and Institut Interdisciplinaire d'Innovation Technologique (3IT), Universit de Sherbrooke, 3000 Boulevard Universit, Sherbrooke, J1K OA5, Qubec (Canada)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Interface effect on dielectric constant of HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminate films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of the interface between Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} sublayers on the dielectric constant was investigated in HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminate films deposited using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. After annealing at 700 deg. C, the dielectric constants of the nanolaminate films with a sublayer thickness of 40 A ring or greater were the same as the calculated values for a series of capacitors consisting of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and monoclinic or tetragonal HfO{sub 2}. As the sublayer thickness was reduced to 10 A, the dielectric constant increased up to 17.7 because a thin Hf-O-Al mixture layer, of which the number increases drastically in the nanolaminate films with thin sublayers, is formed at the interface.

Park, Pan Kwi; Cha, Eun-Soo; Kang, Sang-Won [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Synchrotron radiation photoemission study of interfacial electronic structure of HfO{sub 2} on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As(001)-4??2 from atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of a passivating layer on a In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As(001)-4??2 surface by atomic-layer deposition of tetrakis[ethylmethylamino]Hafnium (TEMAHf)) followed by the water pulse was investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission. The Hf atoms maintain four-fold coordination, both after the initial TEMAHf deposition and the subsequent water pulse. The Hf atoms initially bond to the As dangling bonds of the surface As atom located on the edges of the raised ridges. One EMA ligand is removed in this process. Subsequent water exposure substitutes OH ligand for one or more remaining EMA ligands. These in turn react with TEMAHf to form Hf-O-Hf bonds allowing the hafnium oxides to grow. The surface In atoms on the terrace of the raised ridges were partially removed, but none bonded of the precursor atoms. Correlations between the interfacial electronic structure and the electric performance are discussed.

Pi, T. W., E-mail: pi@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: gkwer@verizon.net, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Lin, T. D.; Chang, Y. C.; Hong, M., E-mail: pi@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: gkwer@verizon.net, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lin, H. Y.; Kwo, J., E-mail: pi@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: gkwer@verizon.net, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wertheim, G. K., E-mail: pi@nsrrc.org.tw, E-mail: gkwer@verizon.net, E-mail: raynien@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhong@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Woodland Consulting, 175 Woodland Ave., Morristown, New Jersey 07960 (United States)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

Metal deposition using seed layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1??0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175300?C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

In situ study of the role of substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependence of the self cleaning effect of the substrate oxides on substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} on various chemically treated and native oxide InP (100) substrates is investigated using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The removal of In-oxide is found to be more efficient at higher ALD temperatures. The P oxidation states on native oxide and acid etched samples are seen to change, with the total P-oxide concentration remaining constant, after 10 cycles of ALD HfO{sub 2} at different temperatures. An (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} S treatment is seen to effectively remove native oxides and passivate the InP surfaces independent of substrate temperature studied (200 C, 250 C and 300 C) before and after the ALD process. Density functional theory modeling provides insight into the mechanism of the changes in the P-oxide chemical states.

Dong, H.; Santosh, K.C.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; McDonnell, S.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Time-resolved surface infrared spectroscopy during atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposition of titanium dioxide using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water vapor is studied by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) with a time resolution of 120?ms. At 190?C and 240?C, a decrease in the absorption from adsorbed TDMAT is observed without any evidence of an adsorbed product. Ex situ measurements indicate that this behavior is not associated with an increase in the impurity concentration or a dramatic change in the growth rate. A desorbing decomposition product is consistent with these observations. RAIRS also indicates that dehydroxylation of the growth surface occurs only among one type of surface hydroxyl groups. Molecular water is observed to remain on the surface and participates in reactions even at a relatively high temperature (110?C) and with long purge times (30?s)

Sperling, Brent A., E-mail: brent.sperling@nist.gov; Hoang, John; Kimes, William A.; Maslar, James E. [Chemical Sciences Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Stop 8320, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8320 (United States); Steffens, Kristen L. [Biomolecular Measurement Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Stop 8362, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8362 (United States); Nguyen, Nhan V. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Stop 8120, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8120 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on germanium-tin (GeSn) and impact of wet chemical surface pre-treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GeSn is quickly emerging as a potential candidate for high performance Si-compatible transistor technology. Fabrication of high-? gate stacks on GeSn with good interface properties is essential for realizing high performance field effect transistors based on this material system. We demonstrate an effective surface passivation scheme for n-Ge{sub 0.97}Sn{sub 0.03} alloy using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The effect of pre-ALD wet chemical surface treatment is analyzed and shown to be critical in obtaining a good quality interface between GeSn and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Using proper surface pre-treatment, mid-gap trap density for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GeSn interface of the order of 10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?2} has been achieved.

Gupta, Suyog, E-mail: suyog@stanford.edu; Chen, Robert; Harris, James S.; Saraswat, Krishna C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

72

L{sub g}?=?100?nm In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As quantum well metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with atomic layer deposited beryllium oxide as interfacial layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we have fabricated nanometer-scale channel length quantum-well (QW) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) incorporating beryllium oxide (BeO) as an interfacial layer. BeO has high thermal stability, excellent electrical insulating characteristics, and a large band-gap, which make it an attractive candidate for use as a gate dielectric in making MOSFETs. BeO can also act as a good diffusion barrier to oxygen owing to its small atomic bonding length. In this work, we have fabricated In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As MOS capacitors with BeO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and compared their electrical characteristics. As interface passivation layer, BeO/HfO{sub 2} bilayer gate stack presented effective oxide thickness less 1 nm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As QW MOSFETs with a BeO/HfO{sub 2} dielectric, showing a sub-threshold slope of 100?mV/dec, and a transconductance (g{sub m,max}) of 1.1 mS/?m, while displaying low values of gate leakage current. These results highlight the potential of atomic layer deposited BeO for use as a gate dielectric or interface passivation layer for IIIV MOSFETs at the 7?nm technology node and/or beyond.

Koh, D., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kwon, H. M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.-W., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org; Veksler, D.; Gilmer, D.; Kirsch, P. D. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kim, D.-H. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Malta, New York 12020 (United States); Hudnall, Todd W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, 78666 (United States); Bielawski, Christopher W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Maszara, W. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States); Banerjee, S. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom layer scale Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DistributedSpatially Distributed Experimentation toExperimentation to Summary: properties Significance Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely sought for its atomic-scale...

74

Atomic layer deposition of Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} as a work function material in metal gate MOS devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As advanced silicon semiconductor devices are transitioning from planar to 3D structures, new materials and processes are needed to control the device characteristics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} films using hafnium chloride and trimethylaluminum precursors was combined with postdeposition anneals and ALD liners to control the device characteristics in high-k metal-gate devices. Combinatorial process methods and technologies were employed for rapid electrical and materials characterization of various materials stacks. The effective work function in metaloxidesemiconductor capacitor devices with the Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} layer coupled with an ALD HfO{sub 2} dielectric was quantified to be mid-gap at ?4.6?eV. Thus, Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} is a promising metal gate work function material that allows for the tuning of device threshold voltages (V{sub th}) for anticipated multi-V{sub th} integrated circuit devices.

Lee, Albert, E-mail: alee@intermolecular.com; Fuchigami, Nobi; Pisharoty, Divya; Hong, Zhendong; Haywood, Ed; Joshi, Amol; Mujumdar, Salil; Bodke, Ashish; Karlsson, Olov [Intermolecular, 3011 North First Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Kim, Hoon; Choi, Kisik [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Technology Research Group, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12309 (United States); Besser, Paul [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, 1050 East Arques, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on epitaxial (110)Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The band alignment properties of atomic layer HfO{sub 2} film deposited on epitaxial (110)Ge, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy exhibited a sharp interface between the (110)Ge epilayer and the HfO{sub 2} film. The measured valence band offset value of HfO{sub 2} relative to (110)Ge was 2.28 {+-} 0.05 eV. The extracted conduction band offset value was 2.66 {+-} 0.1 eV using the bandgaps of HfO{sub 2} of 5.61 eV and Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters and the interface chemical properties of HfO{sub 2}/(110)Ge system are of tremendous importance for the design of future high hole mobility and low-power Ge-based metal-oxide transistor devices.

Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Genesis and evolution of surface species during Pt atomic layer deposition on oxide supports characterized by in-situ XAFS analysis and water-gas shift reaction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Platinum atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} was employed to prepare high loadings of uniform-sized, 1-2 nm Pt nanoparticles on high surface area Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and SrTiO{sub 3} supports. X-ray absorption fine structure was utilized to monitor the changes in the Pt species during each step of the synthesis. The temperature, precursor exposure time, treatment gas, and number of ALD cycles were found to affect the Pt particle size and density. Lower-temperature MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorption yielded smaller particles due to reduced thermal decomposition. A 300 C air treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to PtO. In subsequent ALD cycles, the MeCpPtMe{sub 3} reduces the PtO to metallic Pt in the ratio of one precursor molecule per PtO. A 200 C H{sub 2} treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to the formation of 1-2 nm, metallic Pt nanoparticles. During subsequent ALD cycles, MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorbs on the support, which, upon reduction, yields additional Pt nanoparticles with a minimal increase in size of the previously formed nanoparticles. The catalysts produced by ALD had identical water-gas shift reaction rates and reaction kinetics to those of Pt catalysts prepared by standard solution methods. ALD synthesis of catalytic nanoparticles is an attractive method for preparing novel model and practical catalysts.

Setthapun, W.; Williams, W.; Kim, S.; Feng, H.; Elam, J.; Rabuffetti, F.; Poeppelmeier, K.; Stair, P.; Stach, E.; Ribeiro, F.; Miller, J.; Marshall, C.; Northwestern Univ.; Purdue Univ.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

As-Received, Ozone Cleaned and Ar+ Sputtered Surfaces of Hafnium Oxide Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition and Studied by XPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization was performed on 47 nm thick hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films grown by atomic layer deposition using TEMA-Hf/H{sub 2}O at 250 C substrate temperature. HfO{sub 2} is currently being studied as a possible replacement for Silicon Oxide (SiO{sub 2}) as a gate dielectric in electronics transistors. XPS spectra were collected on a Physical Electronics Quantum 2000 Scanning ESCA Microprobe using a monochromatic Al K{sub a} X-ray (1486.7 eV) excitation source. The sample was analyzed under the following conditions: as received, after UV irradiation for five minutes, and after sputter cleaning with 2 kV Ar{sup +} ions for 180 seconds. Survey scans showed carbon, oxygen, and hafnium as the major species in the film, while the only minor species of argon and carbide was detected after sputtering. Adventitious carbon initially composed approximately 18.6 AT% of the surface, but after UV cleaning it was reduced to 2.4 AT%. This demonstrated that that the majority of carbon was due to adventitious carbon. However, after 2 kV Ar{sup +} sputtering there was still only trace amounts of carbon at {approx}1 AT%, Some of this trace carbon is now in the form of a carbide due to the interaction with Ar{sup +} used for sputter cleaning. Furthermore, the stoiciometric ratio of oxygen and hafnium is consistent with a high quality HfO{sub 2} film.

Engelhard, Mark H.; Herman, Jacob A.; Wallace, Robert; Baer, Donald R.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effects of N{sub 2} remote plasma nitridation on the structural and electrical characteristics of the HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics grown using remote plasma atomic layer deposition methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of remote plasma atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on Si, which has a very thin SiO{sub 2} interlayer with and without remote plasma nitridation (RPN), have been investigated. Small amounts of N atoms were successfully incorporated by RPN pretreatment, in which the dominant emission species were excited atomic nitrogen (N{sup *}) and excited molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}{sup *}), into a very thin SiO{sub 2} interlayer for the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film. The thin ({approx}1.5 nm) intermediate layer containing nitrogen, which was prepared by sequential O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} remote plasma treatment of the Si substrate, can effectively suppress growth of the unintentional interface layer. In addition, it enhances the thermal stability and the resistance to oxygen diffusion during rapid thermal annealing. The HfO{sub 2} film containing the remote plasma nitrided SiO{sub 2} interlayer annealed at 800 deg. C showed a lower equivalent oxide thickness of {approx}1.89 nm and a lower leakage current density (3.78x10{sup -7} A cm{sup -2} at |V{sub G}-V{sub FB}|=2 V) compared to a non-nitrided sample of the same physical thickness. Also, we compared the characteristics of HfO{sub 2} films annealed in two different ambient environments, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}.

Choi, Jihoon; Kim, Seokhoon; Kim, Jinwoo; Kang, Hyunseok; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Bae, Choelhwyi [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic transport in atomically thin layered materials has been a burgeoning field of study since the discovery of isolated single layer graphene in 2004. Graphene, a semi-metal, has a unique gapless Dirac-like band ...

Baugher, Britton William Herbert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Realization of high-quality HfO{sub 2} on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As by in-situ atomic-layer-deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High {kappa} dielectric of HfAlO/HfO{sub 2} was an in-situ atomic-layer-deposited directly on molecular beam epitaxy grown In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As surface without using pre-treatments or interfacial passivation layers, where HfAlO (HfO{sub 2}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {approx} 4:1) with high re-crystallization temperature was employed as the top oxide layer. The HfAlO ({approx}4.5 nm)/HfO{sub 2} (0.8 nm)/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As metal oxide semiconductor capacitors have exhibited an oxide/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As interface free of arsenic-related defective bonding, thermodynamic stability at 800 deg. C, and low leakage current densities of <10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} at {+-}1 MV/cm. The interfacial trap density (D{sub it}) spectra in absence of mid-gap peaks were obtained by temperature-dependent capacitance and conductance with D{sub it}'s of 2-3 x 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} below and 6-12 x 10{sup 11} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} above the mid-gap of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, respectively. An equivalent oxide thickness of less than 1 nm has been achieved by reducing the HfAlO thickness to {approx}2.7 nm with the same initial HfO{sub 2} thickness of {approx}0.8 nm.

Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Huang, M. L.; Lee, W. C. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nano-soldering to single atomic layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

Girit, Caglar O. (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effective passivation of In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As by HfO{sub 2} surpassing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via in-situ atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High {kappa} gate dielectrics of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on molecular beam epitaxy-grown In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As pristine surface using in-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) without any surface treatment or passivation layer. The ALD-HfO{sub 2}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface showed notable reduction in the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}), deduced from quasi-static capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage (G-V) at room temperature and 100 Degree-Sign C. More significantly, the midgap peak commonly observed in the D{sub it}(E) of ALD-oxides/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As is now greatly diminished. The midgap D{sub it} value decreases from {>=}15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {approx}2-4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-HfO{sub 2}. Further, thermal stability at 850 Degree-Sign C was achieved in the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As, whereas C-V characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As degraded after the high temperature annealing. From in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectra, the AsO{sub x}, which is not the oxidized state from the native oxide, but is an induced state from adsorption of trimethylaluminum and H{sub 2}O, was found at the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface, while that was not detected at the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface.

Chang, Y. H.; Chiang, T. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Liu, Y. T.; Lin, H. Y.; Huang, M. L.; Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pi, T. W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Environmental Performance Characterization of Atomic Layer Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature can only save 3~5% of total energy consumption.all invariable, the total energy consumption, Q, is directlyLabview program. The total energy consumption of the circuit

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment Ankur Agarwala Department plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having

Kushner, Mark

86

Atom Nano-lithography with Multi-layer Light Masks: Particle Optics Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the focusing of atoms by multiple layers of standing light waves in the context of atom lithography. In particular, atomic localization by a double-layer light mask is examined using the optimal squeezing approach. Operation of the focusing setup is analyzed both in the paraxial approximation and in the regime of nonlinear spatial squeezing for the thin-thin as well as thin-thick atom lens combinations. It is shown that the optimized double light mask may considerably reduce the imaging problems, improve the quality of focusing and enhance the contrast ratio of the deposited structures.

R. Arun; I. Sh. Averbukh; T. Pfau

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

Molecular Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

They were fabricated by compressing a CNT aerogel produced as an output from a chemical vapor deposition furnace. ... The CNT3 specimens may be harder in general to coat due to their smaller diameter in comparison to the other materials. ... (1) Data tables for mechanical test results parallel and perpendicular to the CNT sheet orientation; (2) additional SEM and TEM images of coated CNT materials; (3) additional EDS spectra of MLD coatings on CNTs, and comparison to Al2O3 ALD coating on CNTs. ...

Joseph J. Brown; Robert A. Hall; Paul E. Kladitis; Steven M. George; Victor M. Bright

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

88

Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase Ag/Ag2O deposition...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Atomic oxygen flux determined by mixed-phase AgAg2O deposition. Abstract: The flux of atomic oxygen generated in a...

89

Deposition of thin silicon layers on transferred large area graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical vapor deposition of Si onto transferred graphene is investigated. At elevated temperatures, Si nucleates preferably on wrinkles and multilayer graphene islands. In some cases, however, Si can be quasi-selectively grown only on the monolayer graphene regions while the multilayer islands remain uncovered. Experimental insights and ab initio calculations show that variations in the removal efficiency of carbon residuals after the transfer process can be responsible for this behavior. Low-temperature Si seed layer results in improved wetting and enables homogeneous growth. This is an important step towards realization of electronic devices in which graphene is embedded between two Si layers.

Lupina, Grzegorz, E-mail: lupina@ihp-microelectronics.com; Kitzmann, Julia; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Dabrowski, Jarek; Wolff, Andre; Mehr, Wolfgang [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)] [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Atomic Layer-by-Layer Thermoelectric Conversion in Topological Insulator Bismuth/Antimony Tellurides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hot carrier conduction near the Fermi energy (EF) through the band states or other localized statesAtomic Layer-by-Layer Thermoelectric Conversion in Topological Insulator Bismuth Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Material design for direct heat-to-electricity conversion with substantial

Jo, Moon-Ho

91

Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Spectroscopic Study of Band Offsets and Interface Self-cleaning by Atomic Layer Deposited HfO2 on In0.53Ga0.47As and In0.52Al0.48As  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Spectroscopic (SRPES) study was conducted to (a) investigate the surface chemistry of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As post chemical and thermal treatments, (b) construct band diagram and (c) investigate the interface property of HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As. Dilute HCl and HF etch remove native oxides on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.47}As, whereas in-situ vacuum annealing removes surface arsenic pile-up. After the atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2}, native oxides were considerably reduced compared to that in as-received epi-layers, strongly suggesting the self-clean mechanism. Valence and conduction band offsets are measured to be 3.37 {+-} 0.1eV, 1.80 {+-} 0.3eV for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and 3.00 {+-} 0.1eV, 1.47 {+-} 0.3eV for In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.47}As, respectively.

Kobayashi, Masaharu; /SLAC, SSRL; Chen, P.T.; Sun, Y.; Goel, N.; Majhi, P.; Garner, M; Tsai, W.; Pianetta, P.; Nishi, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Recrystallization of amorphous silicon deposited on ultra thin microcrystalline silicon layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study reports on a method to reduce the thermal crystallization time and temperature of amorphous silicon films by initially depositing an ultra thin {micro}c-Si:H seed layer. After rapid thermal annealing (RTA), films were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, reflection high energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and dark and photocurrent. The results show that the microcrystalline particles in the seed layer act as nucleation centers, promoting crystallization of a-Si:H at lower temperatures and at shorter times, compared to a-Si:H films deposited without any seed layer. Additionally, it was found that the seed layer affects the orientation of the crystallized films. The dark current increases abruptly over 4 orders of magnitude in the first 15 second anneal, then decreases as the time increases, and tends to saturate. The photocurrent has an opposite behavior. These transport results can be understood in terms of a change in defect density and band gap shrinkage.

Wang, F.; Wolfe, D.; Lucovsky, G.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Plasma atomic layer etching using conventional plasma equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decrease in feature sizes in microelectronics fabrication will soon require plasma etching processes having atomic layer resolution. The basis of plasma atomic layer etching (PALE) is forming a layer of passivation that allows the underlying substrate material to be etched with lower activation energy than in the absence of the passivation. The subsequent removal of the passivation with carefully tailored activation energy then removes a single layer of the underlying material. If these goals are met, the process is self-limiting. A challenge of PALE is the high cost of specialized equipment and slow processing speed. In this work, results from a computational investigation of PALE will be discussed with the goal of demonstrating the potential of using conventional plasma etching equipment having acceptable processing speeds. Results will be discussed using inductively coupled and magnetically enhanced capacitively coupled plasmas in which nonsinusoidal waveforms are used to regulate ion energies to optimize the passivation and etch steps. This strategy may also enable the use of a single gas mixture, as opposed to changing gas mixtures between steps.

Agarwal, Ankur; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cobalt cluster-assembled thin films deposited by low energy cluster beam deposition: Structural and magnetic investigations of deposited layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cobalt cluster-assembled thin films were deposited on amorphous-carbon-coated copper grids and on silicon substrates at room temperature by low energy cluster beam deposition. Characterizations using high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal randomly stacked agglomerates of 9-11 nm diameter, which are themselves composed of small 3.6 nm diameter fcc cobalt clusters. The films are ferromagnetic up to room temperature and above, which implies that the clusters are exchange coupled. The approach to saturation is analyzed within the random anisotropy model. The values of the exchange coefficient A and the anisotropy constant K then derived are discussed. The temperature dependence of the coercivity below 100 K is discussed in terms of thermal activation effects. All results indicate that the fundamental entity governing the magnetic behaviors is constituted by the 9-11 nm diameter agglomerates rather than by the clusters themselves.

Dumas-Bouchiat, F.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Rossignol, F.; Champeaux, C.; Trolliard, G.; Catherinot, A.; Givord, D. [Centre de Projet Films Minces et Microdispositifs pour Telecommunications, SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, ENSCI, 47 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87065 Limoges Cedex (France); Centre de Projet Films Minces et Microdispositifs pour Telecommunications, SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Centre de Projet Films Minces et Microdispositifs pour Telecommunications, SPCTS, UMR CNRS 6638, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Laboratoire Louis Neel, UPR CNRS 5051, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

CO-CATALYTIC ABSORPTION LAYERS FOR CONTROLLED LASER-INDUCED CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF CARBON NANOTUBES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of co-catalytic layer structures for controlled laser-induced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes is established, in which a thin Ta support layer chemically aids the initial Fe catalyst reduction. This enables a significant...

Michaelis, F.B.; Weatherup, R.S.; Bayer, B.C.; Bock, M.C.D; Sugime, H.; Caneva, S.; Robertson, J.; Baumberg, J.J.; Hofmann, S.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Delta-doping of boron atoms by photoexcited chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron delta-doped structures in Si crystals were fabricated by means of photoexcited chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Core electronic excitation with high-energy photons ranging from vacuum ultraviolet to soft x rays decomposes B{sub 2}H{sub 6} molecules into fragments. Combined with in situ monitoring by spectroscopic ellipsometry, limited number of boron hydrides can be delivered onto a Si(100) surface by using the incubation period before the formation of a solid boron film. The boron-covered surface is subsequently embedded in a Si cap layer by Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} photo-excited CVD. The crystallinity of the Si cap layer depended on its thickness and the substrate temperature. The evaluation of the boron depth profile by secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed that boron atoms were confined within the delta-doped layer at a concentration of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} with a full width at half maximum of less than 9 nm, while the epitaxial growth of a 130-nm-thick Si cap layer was sustained at 420 deg. C.

Akazawa, Housei [NTT Microsystem Integration Laboratories, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Homogeneous, dual layer, solid state, thin film deposition for structural and/or electrochemical characteristics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solid state, thin film, electrochemical devices (10) and methods of making the same are disclosed. An exemplary device 10 includes at least one electrode (14) and an electrolyte (16) deposited on the electrode (14). The electrolyte (16) includes at least two homogenous layers of discrete physical properties. The two homogenous layers comprise a first dense layer (15) and a second porous layer (16).

Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Li, Wenming

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

Integrated Sustainability Analysis of Atomic Layer Deposition for Microelectronics Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring, etc. The total energy consumption of the ALDof 42.7% of the total energy consumption; pumping duringwhich is 32.8% of total energy consumption; the electronics

Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Silicon Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

100

Atomic Layer Deposition for Stabilization of Amorphous Silicon Anodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Functional Nano-Structures Using Atomic Layer Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For the effective operation of a solar cell with a high conversion between solar energy and electrical energy two physical processes have to be optimised: the generation of charge carriers via the absorption of incident photons; and the separation and transport... of the exciton into free charge carriers. (C) The free charge carriers are transported to the macroscopic electrodes to drive an external load. Two main figures of merit exist for excitonic solar cells: the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and the external...

Salgrd Cunha, Pedro

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Atomic Layer Deposition of Insulating Hafnium and Zirconium Nitrides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

author. E-mail: gordon@chemistry.harvard.edu. (1) Toth, L. E. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides homoleptic tetrakis(dialkylamido)- metal(IV) complexes and ammonia at low substrate temperatures (150-250 °C). The precursor vapors were alternately pulsed into a heated reactor, yielding 1.15-1.20 ? of metal nitride film

103

Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

Sullivan, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Friedmann, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel field emitter device is disclosed for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials. 8 figs.

Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

RANDOM DEPOSITION MODEL OF CDS LAYER IN CDS/CDTE THINFILM SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THESIS RANDOM DEPOSITION MODEL OF CDS LAYER IN CDS/CDTE THIN­FILM SOLAR CELLS Submitted by Lei Chen LAYER IN CDS/CDTE THIN­FILM SOLAR CELLS BE AC- CEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE MODEL OF CDS LAYER IN CDS/CDTE THIN­FILM SOLAR CELLS Thin­film solar cells are developing dramatically

Sites, James R.

106

Direct atomic-scale observation of layer-by-layer oxide growth during magnesium oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic-scale oxide growth dynamics are directly revealed by in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy during the oxidation of Mg surface. The oxidation process is characterized by the layer-by-layer growth of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanocrystal via the adatom process. Consistently, the nucleated MgO crystals exhibit faceted surface morphology as enclosed by (200) lattice planes. It is believed that the relatively lower surface energies of (200) lattice planes should play important roles, governing the growth mechanism. These results facilitate the understanding of the nanoscale oxide growth mechanism that will have an important impact on the development of magnesium or magnesium alloys with improved resistance to oxidation.

Zheng, He; Wu, Shujing; Sheng, Huaping; Liu, Chun; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Zhou, Zhichao; Zhao, Dongshan, E-mail: wang@whu.edu.cn, E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn; Wang, Jianbo, E-mail: wang@whu.edu.cn, E-mail: dszhao@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Center for Electron Microscopy and MOE Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhao, Xingzhong [School of Physics and Technology, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic layer graphene Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

graphene Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atomic layer graphene Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Graphite Handout Graphite is a...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic layer epitaxy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the surface of the grown MnSi layer. On the atomic scale, scanning... Epitaxial growth of silicide layers on Si substrates has attracted much attention due to their...

109

Surface diffusion coefficient of Au atoms on single layer graphene grown on Cu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 5?nm thick Au film was deposited on single layer graphene sheets grown on Cu. By thermal processes, the dewetting phenomenon of the Au film on the graphene was induced so to form Au nanoparticles. The mean radius, surface-to-surface distance, and surface density evolution of the nanoparticles on the graphene sheets as a function of the annealing temperature were quantified by scanning electron microscopy analyses. These quantitative data were analyzed within the classical mean-field nucleation theory so to obtain the temperature-dependent Au atoms surface diffusion coefficient on graphene: D{sub S}(T)=[(8.20.6)10{sup ?8}]exp[?(0.310.02(eV)/(at) )/kT]?cm{sup 2}/s.

Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Cacciato, G.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia-Universit di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania, Italy and MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Single- and few-layer graphene by ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition on nickel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) process is used to fabricate graphene based films consisting of one to several graphene layers across their area. Polycrystalline Ni thin films are used and the graphene ...

Reina Ceeco, Alfonso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

VHF plasma deposition of {mu}c-Si p-layer materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microcrystalline silicon ({micro}c-Si) p-layers have been widely used in amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cell research and manufacturing to achieve record high solar cell efficiency. In order to further improve the solar cell performance and achieve wider parameter windows for the process conditions, the authors studied the deposition of high quality {micro}c-Si p-layer material using a very high frequency (VHF) plasma enhanced CVD process. A design of experiment (DOE) approach was used for the exploration and optimization of deposition parameters. The usage of DOE leads to a quick optimization of the deposition process within a short time frame. In addition, by using a modified VHF deposition process, they have improved the solar cell blue response which leads to a 6--10% improvement in the solar cell efficiency. Such an improvement is likely due to an improved microcrystalline formation in the p-layer.

Deng, X.; Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, S.R.; Hoffman, K.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Atomic-level investigation of the growth of Si/Ge by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Si and Ge films can be prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by chemical vapor deposition using disilane and digermane as source gases. These gases offer a high sticking probability, and are suitable for atomic layer epitaxy. Using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we have examined the surface processes associated with the heteroepitaxial growth of Ge/Si. The measured surface-induced shifts and chemical shifts of the Si 2p and Ge 3d core levels allow us to identify the surface species and to determine the surface chemical composition, and this information is correlated with the atomic features observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Issues related to precursor dissociation, attachment to dangling bonds, diffusion, surface segregation, growth morphology, and pyrolytic reaction pathways will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

Lin, D. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China); Miller, T.; Chiang, T. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Atomic Layer Deposition Functionalized Composite SOFC Cathode La0.6Sr0.4Fe0.8Co0.2O3-? -Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9: Enhanced Long-Term Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(10, 12-16) Since the ORR activity of an AMO3 perovskite cathode is critically determined by the atomic structure (e.g., electronic configuration) and composition (e.g., cation concentration and oxygen nonstoichiometry) on the surface,(17-21) a complete coverage of the passive and insulating SrO(s) layer over the cathode surface would easily block the ORR-active sites for effective charge-transfer. ... (LSCF-6428) cathodes incorporating Ce0.8Sm0.2O1.9 cathode-electrolyte interlayers, was assessed. ... The material requirements for this particular application are discussed together with a study of some conductive oxides as candidate materials for protection layers on stainless steel substrates. ...

Yunhui Gong; Rajankumar L. Patel; Xinhua Liang; Diego Palacio; Xueyan Song; John B. Goodenough; Kevin Huang

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

114

The perfect atom sandwich requires an extra layer > EMC2 News...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

By Anne Ju Yuefeng Nie The left figure demonstrates why the first double layer of strontium oxide is missing when growing a Ruddlesden-Popper oxide thin film. Titanium atoms...

115

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes M Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of various nanotube surface and edge reactions (e.g. adsorption of hydrocarbons and hydrogen onto the surface

Grujicic, Mica

116

Modeling the Early Stages of Thin Film Formation by Energetic Atom Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used for surface modification and thin film production purposes. These processes use a high vacuum-beam deposition, in which a cluster of atoms is ionized and accelerated to- ward a substrate. Upon impact, Aerospace and Nuclear En- gineering Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los An- geles, CA

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

117

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Detecting sub-glacial aquifers in the north polar layered deposits with Mars Express/MARSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water ice cap and underlying dusty-ice polar layered deposits or PLD) via melting from ice insulation into the polar ice mass is modeled to determine the capability of the instrument to locate sub-glacial aquifers will investigate the effect of ice reflective and conductive losses on the radar-detection of subsurface aquifers

Gurnett, Donald A.

119

Selective mining of multiple-layer lignite deposits. A fuzzy approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the development and the application of a fuzzy expert system for the evaluation of the exploitable reserves of multiple-layer lignite deposits, mined by continuous surface methods, is presented. The exploitable reserves are determined decisively ... Keywords: Expert, Exploitable, Fuzzy, Lignite, Mining, Reserves, System

Michael Galetakis; Anthoula Vasiliou

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Selective mining of multiple-layer lignite deposits. A fuzzy approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the development and the application of a fuzzy expert system for the evaluation of the exploitable reserves of multiple-layer lignite deposits, mined by continuous surface methods, is presented. The exploitable reserves are determined decisively by the structure of these deposits, as well as by the limitations of the used mining systems. In practice, thin layers of lignite and interbedded waste layers are grouped under specified assumptions regarding thickness and ash content, to form the exploitable blocks. Moreover, the decision for excavating such a block is made under subjective constraints of different importance, or by using uncertain data. Advances in fuzzy inference systems (FIS) have provided a new approach to the evaluation of multiple-layer lignite deposits. FIS have the ability to handle imprecise, incomplete or linguistically ambiguous information and incorporate them into decision-making processes. In the developed FIS (Mamdani type) new linguistic variables, related to working conditions, operators experience and production were involved. The FIS was used for the estimation of the exploitable reserves of the Southern Field lignite deposit, located in the area of Ptolemais (Greece).

Michael Galetakis; Anthoula Vasiliou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Atomic absorption monitor for deposition process control of aluminum at 394 nm using frequency-doubled diode laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic absorption monitor for deposition process control of aluminum at 394 nm using frequency November 1995 A monitor for Al vapor density based on atomic absorption AA using a frequency of atomic absorption AA as a monitor for thickness and composition control in physical vapor deposi- tion

Fejer, Martin M.

122

Resuspension of Small Particles from Multilayer Deposits in Turbulent Boundary Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a hybrid stochastic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2012). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. We consider the influence of layer thickness on the resuspension along with the spread of adhesion within layers, and the statistics of non-Gaussian versus Gaussian removal forces including their timescale. Unlike its weak influence on long-term resuspension rates for monolayers, this timescale plays a crucial and influential role in multilayer resuspension. Finally we compare model predictions with those of a large-scale and a mesoscale resuspension test, STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

F. Zhang; M. Reeks; M. Kissane; R. J. Perkins

2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

123

Resuspension of small particles from multilayer deposits in turbulent boundary layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a hybrid kinetic model for the resuspension of micron-size particles from multilayer deposits in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer. The rate of removal of particles from any given layer depends upon the rate of removal of particles from the layer above which acts as a source of uncovering and exposure of particles to the resuspending flow. The primary resuspension rate constant for an individual particle within a layer is based on the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model using non-Gaussian statistics for the aerodynamic removal forces acting on the particles (Zhang et al., 2013). The coupled layer equations that describe multilayer resuspension of all the particles in each layer are based on the generic lattice model of Friess & Yadigaroglu (2001) which is extended here to include the influence of layer coverage and particle size distribution. The model is used to investigate a range of effects, including the influence of layer thickness on resuspension, the spread of inter-particle adhesive forces within layers, Gaussian and non-Gaussian pdfs for the removal forces and the associated timescales. Finally model predictions are compared with data from two resuspension experiments STORM (Castelo et al., 1999) and BISE (Alloul-Marmor, 2002).

F. Zhang; M.W. Reeks; M.P. Kissane; R.J. Perkins

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method of depositing a protective layer over a biaxially textured alloy substrate and composition therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laminate article consists of a substrate and a biaxially textured protective layer over the substrate. The substrate can be biaxially textured and also have reduced magnetism over the magnetism of Ni. The substrate can be selected from the group consisting of nickel, copper, iron, aluminum, silver and alloys containing any of the foregoing. The protective layer can be selected from the group consisting of gold, silver, platinum, palladium, and nickel and alloys containing any of the foregoing. The protective layer is also non-oxidizable under conditions employed to deposit a desired, subsequent oxide buffer layer. Layers of YBCO, CeO.sub.2, YSZ, LaAlO.sub.3, SrTiO.sub.3, Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrRuO.sub.3, LaNiO.sub.3 and La.sub.2 ZrO.sub.3 can be deposited over the protective layer. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Paranthaman, Mariappan (Knoxville, TN); Lee, Dominic F. (Knoxville, TN); Feenstra, Roeland (Knoxville, TN); Norton, David P. (Gainesville, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effect of buffer layer growth temperature on epitaxial GaN films deposited by magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial GaN films were deposited by reactive sputtering of a GaAs target in 100 % nitrogen at 700 deg. C on ZnO buffer layers grown at different substrate temperatures over sapphire substrates. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and the corresponding analysis show that the growth temperature of buffer layers significantly affects the micro-structural parameters of GaN epilayer, such as lateral coherence length, tilt and twist, while the vertical coherence length remains unaffected. The optimum substrate temperature for buffer layer growth has been found to be 300 deg. C. High epitaxial quality GaN film grown on such a buffer layer exhibited micro strain of 1.8x10{sup -4} along with screw and edge type dislocation densities of 7.87x10{sup 9} and 1.16x10{sup 11}, respectively.

Mohanta, P.; Singh, D.; Kumar, R.; Ganguli, T.; Srinivasa, R. S.; Major, S. S. [Center For Research in Nano-Technology and Science (India); Semiconductor Laser Section, RRCAT, Indore-452013 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai - 400076 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gas-phase silicon atom densities in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon atom number density profiles have been measured using laser-induced fluorescence during the chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane. Measurements were obtained in a rotating-disk reactor as a function of silane partial pressure and the amount of hydrogen added to the carrier gas. Absolute number densities were obtained using an atomic absorption technique. Results were compared with calculated density profiles from a model of the coupled fluid flow, gas-phase and surface chemistry for an infinite-radius rotating disk. An analysis of the reaction mechanism showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH{sub 2} is not the dominant source of Si atoms. Profile shapes and positions, and all experimental trends are well matched by the calculations. However, the calculated number density is up to 100 times smaller than measured.

Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Ho, P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Graphene layer growth on silicon substrates with nickel film by pulse arc plasma deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon layer has been grown on a Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate under high vacuum pressure by pulse arc plasma deposition. From the results of Raman spectroscopy for the sample, it is found that graphene was formed by ex-situ annealing of sample grown at room temperature. Furthermore, for the sample grown at high temperature, graphene formation was shown and optimum temperature was around 1000 Degree-Sign C. Transmission electron microscopy observation of the sample suggests that the graphene was grown from step site caused by grain of Ni film. The results show that the pulse arc plasma technique has the possibility for acquiring homogenous graphene layer with controlled layer thickness.

Fujita, K.; Banno, K.; Aryal, H. R.; Egawa, T. [Research Center for Nano-Device and System, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-Ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

CF4 Glow Discharge Modification of CH4 Plasma Polymer Layers Deposited onto Asymmetric Polysulfone Gas Separation Membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post CF4 glow discharge modification of methane plasma polymer layers deposited onto asymmetric polysulfone membranes has been investigated by XPS, FTIR, AFM, and gas permeability measurements. Oxygen and nitrogen gas permeability and permselectivity ...

J. Hopkins; J. P. S. Badyal

1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fe/Si(001) Ferromagnetic Layers: Reactivity, Local Atomic Structure and Magnetism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrathin ferromagnetic Fe layers on Si(001) have recently been synthesized using the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technique, and their structural and magnetic properties, as well as their interface reactivity have been investigated. The study was undertaken as function of the amount of Fe deposited and of substrate temperature. The interface reactivity was characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The surface structure was characterized by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The magnetism was investigated by magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). A higher deposition temperature stabilizes a better surface ordering, but it also enhances Fe and Si interdiffusion and it therefore decreases the magnetism. Despite the rapid disappearance of the long range order with Fe deposition at room temperature, the material exhibits a significant uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. For the Fe deposition performed at high temperature (500 deg. C), a weak ferromagnetism is still observed, with saturation magnetization of about 10% of the value obtained previously. MOKE studies allowed inferring the main properties of the distinct formed layers.

Lungu, G. A.; Costescu, R. M.; Husanu, M. A.; Gheorghe, N. G. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

Disilane-based cyclic deposition/etch of Si, Si:P and Si1?yCy:P layers: II. The CDE features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed innovative cyclic deposition/etch (CDE) processes in order to grow Si, Si:P and Si1yCy:P raised sources and drains (RSDs) on patterned wafers. A Si2H6+PH3+ SiCH6 chemistry was used for the 550C growth steps. Meanwhile, the selective etch of poly-crystalline layers on dielectrics was conducted at 600C with HCl+GeH4. We have first studied the specifics of those isobaric (P = 20 Torr) CDE processes on bulk, blanket Si(001) substrates. CDE-grown Si, Si:P and Si1?yCy(:P) layers were high crystalline quality and smooth, although these also contained 23% of Ge. Due to the preferential incorporation of P atoms in the lattice, the 'apparent' substitutional C content was higher for intrinsic than for in situ phosphorous-doped layers (1.29% versus 1.17% and 1.59% versus 1.47% for the two SiCH6mass-flows probed). The atomic P concentration in our Si1?yCy:P layers was close to 2.6?1020cm?3, versus 2.1?1020cm?3in the Si:P layers. The Si, Si:P and Si1?yCy(:P) thickness deposited in each CDE cycle decreased linearly as the HCl+GeH4etch time increased, with the 'equivalent' etch rate (i.e. the slope of this linear decrease) being lower in intrinsic than in in situ doped layers. Higher C contents resulted in lower 'equivalent' etch rates. A CDE strategy suppressed the surface roughening occurring for high C content, several tens of nm thick Si1?yCy:P layers grown in one step only. We have then calibrated, for 1923nm thick CDE-grown Si, Si:P and Si1?yCy:P RSDs, the HCl+GeH4etch time per step necessary to achieve full selectivity on patterned silicon-on-insulator substrates. Selectivity was obtained for intrinsic Si once 180s etch steps were used. Longer etch times were needed for Si:P and especially Si1?yCy:P (270 and 315s/CDE cycle, respectively). The resulting S/D areas were rather smooth and slightly facetted, but the un-protected poly-Si layers sitting on top of the gate stacks were completely removed with these etch times.

J M Hartmann; V Benevent; J P Barnes; M Veillerot; B Prvitali; P Batude

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

On atomic structure of Ge huts growing on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural models of growing Ge hut clusterspyramids and wedgesare proposed on the basis of data of recent STM investigations of nucleation and growth of Ge huts on the Si(001) surface in the process of molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that extension of a hut base along <110> directions goes non-uniformly during the cluster growth regardless of its shape. Growing pyramids, starting from the second monolayer, pass through cyclic formation of slightly asymmetrical and symmetrical clusters, with symmetrical ones appearing after addition of every fourth monolayer. We suppose that pyramids of symmetrical configurations composed by 2, 6, 10, etc., monolayers over the wetting layer are more stable than asymmetrical ones. This might explain less stability of pyramids in comparison with wedges in dense arrays forming at low temperatures of Ge deposition. Possible nucleation processes of pyramids and wedges on wetting layer patches from identical embryos composed by 8 dimers through formation of 1 monolayer high 16-dimer nuclei different only in their symmetry is discussed. Schematics of these processes are presented. It is concluded from precise STM measurements that top layers of wetting layer patches are relaxed when huts nucleate on them.

Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)] [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic vapor deposited Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Articles Surfactant-Catalyzed Chemical Vapor Deposition of Copper Thin Films Eui Seong Hwang... and demonstrated for deposition of copper thin films from ... Source:...

133

Disilane-based cyclic deposition/etch of Si, Si:P and Si1?yCy:P layers: I. The elementary process steps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have benchmarked the 550C, 20 Torr growth of Si:P and Si1?yCy:P using SiH4and Si2H6. P segregation has prevented us from reaching P+ion concentrations in Si higher than a few 1019cm?3using SiH4; the resulting surface 'poisoning' led to a severe growth rate reduction. Meanwhile, [P+] increased linearly with the phosphine flow when using Si2H6as the Si precursor; values as high as 1.7?1020cm?3were obtained. The Si:P growth rate using Si2H6was initially stable then increased as the PH3flow increased. Mono-methylsilane flows 6.510times higher were needed with Si2H6than with SiH4to reach the same substitutional C concentrations in intrinsic Si1?yCy layers ([C]subst.up to 1.9%). Growth rates were approximately six times higher with Si2H6than with SiH4, however. 30nm thick Si1?yCy layers became rough as [C]subst.exceeded 1.6% (formation of increasing numbers of islands). We have also studied the structural and electrical properties of 'low' and 'high' C content Si1?yCy:P layers (~ 1.5 and 1.8%, respectively) grown with Si2H6. Adding significant amounts of PH3led to a reduction of the tensile strain in the films. This was due to the incorporation of P atoms (at the expense of C atoms) in the substitutional sites of the Si matrix. Si1?yCy:P layers otherwise became rough as the PH3flow increased. Resistivities lower than 1m?cm were nevertheless associated with those Si1?yCy:P layers, with P atomic concentrations at most 3.9?1020cm?3. Finally, we have quantified the beneficial impact of adding GeH4to HCl for the low-temperature etching of Si. Etch rates 1236times higher with HCl+GeH4than with pure HCl were achieved at 20 Torr. Workable etch rates close to 1nmmin?1were obtained at 600C (versus 750C for pure HCl), enabling low-temperature cyclic deposition/etch strategies for the selective epitaxial growth of Si, Si:P and Si1?yCy:P layers on patterned wafers.

J M Hartmann; V Benevent; J P Barnes; M Veillerot; C Deguet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sensitivity analysis of single-layer graphene resonators using atomic finite element method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic finite element simulation is applied to study the natural frequency and sensitivity of a single-layer graphene-based resonator with CCCC, SSSS, CFCF, SFSF, and CFCF boundary conditions using the commercial code ANSYS. The fundamental frequencies of the graphene sheet are compared with the results of the previous finite element study. In addition, the sensitivity of the resonator is compared with the early work based on nonlocal elasticity theory. The results of the comparison are very good in all considered cases. The sensitivities of the resonator with different boundary conditions are obtained, and the order based on the boundary condition is CCCC > SSSS > CFCF > SFSF > CFFF. The highest sensitivity is obtained when the attached mass is located at the center of the resonator. This is useful for the design of a highly sensitive graphene-based mass sensor.

Lee, Haw-Long; Hsu, Jung-Chang; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chang, Win-Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China)

2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Pulsed Plasma with Synchronous Boundary Voltage for Rapid Atomic Layer Etching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic Layer ETching (ALET) of a solid with monolayer precision is a critical requirement for advancing nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current plasma etching techniques do not have the level of control or damage-free nature that is needed for patterning delicate sub-20 nm structures. In addition, conventional ALET, based on pulsed gases with long reactant adsorption and purging steps, is very slow. In this work, novel pulsed plasma methods with synchronous substrate and/or boundary electrode bias were developed for highly selective, rapid ALET. Pulsed plasma and tailored bias voltage waveforms provided controlled ion energy and narrow energy spread, which are critical for highly selective and damage-free etching. The broad goal of the project was to investigate the plasma science and engineering that will lead to rapid ALET with monolayer precision. A combined experimental-simulation study was employed to achieve this goal.

Economou, Demetre J.; Donnelly, Vincent M.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

X-ray mirrors on flexible polymer substrates fabricated by atomic layer deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, WF6, and disilane, Si2H6. Silicon from Si2H6 serves as a sacrificial species on the surface to reduce

George, Steven M.

137

In Situ Cycle-by-Cycle Flash Annealing of Atomic Layer Deposited Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furthermore, these large thermal budget heating methods may overheat ALD reactor components such as the chamber O-ring. ... For example, the electrochemical properties of TiO2 have been shown to be dependent on the crystalline phase, with anatase TiO2 having desirable performance in photoelectrochemical applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells and photocatalysis. ...

Michael C. Langston; Neil P. Dasgupta; Hee Joon Jung; Manca Logar; Yu Huang; Robert Sinclair; Fritz B. Prinz

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

138

Reduction of magnetostatic interactions in self-organized arrays of nickel nanowires using atomic layer deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-organized nanoporous templates obtained by anodization2 (possibly long-ranged ordered thanks to an initial step and optimized for many years4,5 . A bot- tleneck of this approach is that although anodization pro- cesses may after anodization6 , which is consistent with models of de- magnetizing coefficients7 . On the contrary

Boyer, Edmond

139

Novel Processing to Produce Polymer/Ceramic Nanocomposites by Atomic Layer Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- scale ceramic inclusions within a polymer matrix was demon- strated. Micron-sized high density scale, but ceramics are not homogeneously dispersed in the polymer matrix at a nanoscopic level7 of this novel technique, the mechanical and barrier properties of this kind of polymer/ceramic nano- composite

George, Steven M.

140

Rapid Silica Atomic Layer Deposition on Large Quantities of Cohesive Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, TEM Laboratory, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 ... As determined by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) elemental nanoanalysis, the films were mainly composed of silicon and aluminum (Figure S2, see the Supporting Information). ... Dynamic agglomerates partially break apart and reform because of constant solids recirculation and gas flow through the bed of particles. ...

Xinhua Liang; Kathryn S. Barrett; Ying-Bing Jiang; Alan W. Weimer

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO for thin film electronic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a systematic approach to analyze the simultaneous impact of various reactant plasma parameters of remote plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) on the ZnO thin film properties. Particular emphasis is placed on the film stoichiometry which affects the electrical properties of the thin film. Design of Experiment (DOE) is used to study the impact of the oxygen plasma parameters such as the RF power, pressure and plasma time to realize semiconductor quality of ZnO thin film. Based on the optimized plasma condition, staggered bottom-gate \\{TFTs\\} were fabricated and its electrical characteristics were measured.

S.M. Sultan; O.D. Clark; T.B. Masaud; Q. Fang; R. Gunn; M.M.A. Hakim; K. Sun; P. Ashburn; H.M.H. Chong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Jose, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Malahide, IE)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Deposition of dopant impurities and pulsed energy drive-in  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor doping process which enhances the dopant incorporation achievable using the Gas Immersion Laser Doping (GILD) technique. The enhanced doping is achieved by first depositing a thin layer of dopant atoms on a semiconductor surface followed by exposure to one or more pulses from either a laser or an ion-beam which melt a portion of the semiconductor to a desired depth, thus causing the dopant atoms to be incorporated into the molten region. After the molten region recrystallizes the dopant atoms are electrically active. The dopant atoms are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) or other known deposition techniques.

Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Laser-induced fluorescence measurements and kinetic analysis of Si atom formation in a rotating disk chemical vapor deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive set of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of Si atoms during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane and disilane in a research rotating disk reactor are presented. The experimental results are compared in detail with predictions from a numerical model of CVD from silane and disilane that treats the fluid flow coupled to gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry. The comparisons showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH[sub 2] could not account for the observed gas-phase Si atom density profiles. The H[sub 3]SiSiH [leftrightarrow] Si + SiH[sub 4] and H[sub 3]SiSiH + SiH[sub 2] [leftrightarrow] Si + Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] reactions are proposed as the primary Si atom production routes. The model is in good agreement with the measured shapes of the Si atom profiles and the trends in Si atom density with susceptor temperature, pressure, and reactant gas mixture. 33 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Ho, P.; Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microstructural characteristics of the built up layer of a precipitation hardened nickel based superalloy by electrospark deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildup of precipitation hardened nickel base superalloys by electro spark deposition due to the low heat input of the process has many attractions. Characterization of the microstructure of the ESD built up layer of IN738LC over an as-cast base metal is accomplished in this work. The grain structure and solidification texture of the coating are investigated by orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), optical and scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the deposited layer is formed mainly through epitaxial nucleation and growth on the base metal structure while discontinuities acting as nucleation sites produce fine grains with independent orientations. It is shown that such independent grains can have a significant role in improving the integrity of the ESD built up layer, since they can act as crack arrest sites and make the coating more resistant to the propagation of liquation and solidification fissures. Moreover, it is found that nanosized ?? precipitates exist in the coating indicating the high tendency of ?? for precipitation even in the extremely high cooling rates involved in the ESD process. Hardness measurements indicated a higher hardness for the built up layer which is attributable to the finer microstructure of the coating.

M. Ebrahimnia; F. Malek Ghaini; Y.J. Xie; H. Shahverdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An ultra-low energy (30-200 eV) ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition in ultrahigh vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the design and construction of an ion-atomic beam source with an optimized generation of ions for ion-beam-assisted deposition under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The source combines an effusion cell and an electron impact ion source and produces ion beams with ultra-low energies in the range from 30 eV to 200 eV. Decreasing ion beam energy to hyperthermal values ({approx_equal}10{sup 1} eV) without loosing optimum ionization conditions has been mainly achieved by the incorporation of an ionization chamber with a grid transparent enough for electron and ion beams. In this way the energy and current density of nitrogen ion beams in the order of 10{sup 1} eV and 10{sup 1} nA/cm{sup 2}, respectively, have been achieved. The source is capable of growing ultrathin layers or nanostructures at ultra-low energies with a growth rate of several MLs/h. The ion-atomic beam source will be preferentially applied for the synthesis of GaN under UHV conditions.

Mach, Jindrich; Kolibal, Miroslav; Sikola, Tomas [Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); CEITEC BUT, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 10, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Samoril, Tomas; Voborny, Stanislav; Zlamal, Jakub; Spousta, Jiri; Dittrichova, Libuse [Institute of Physical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Interfacial mixing in as-deposited Si/Ni/Si layers analyzed by x-ray and polarized neutron reflectometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interdiffusion occurring across the interfaces in a Si/Ni/Si layered system during deposition at room temperature was probed using x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). Exploiting the complementarity of these techniques, both structural and magnetic characterization with nanometer depth resolution could be achieved. Suitable model fitting of the reflectivity profiles identified the formation of NiSi mixed alloy layers at the Si/Ni and Ni/Si interfaces. The physical parameters of the layered structure, including quantitative assessment of the stoichiometry of interfacial alloys, were obtained from the analyses of XRR and PNR patterns. In addition, PNR provided magnetic moment density profile as a function of depth in the stratified medium.

Debarati Bhattacharya; Saibal Basu; Surendra Singh; Sumalay Roy; Bhupendra Nath Dev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Containing Directly-Deposited CdSxTe1-x Alloy Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work [1] has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloy films were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and co-evaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both RF-magnetron-sputtered and co-evaporated CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films of lower S content (x<;0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, whereas those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment (HT) at {approx}400 C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O{sub 2}/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl{sub 2} HT. Films sputtered in O{sub 2} partial pressure have a much wider bandgap than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously [2] for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films. Initial PV device results show that the introduction of a directly-deposited CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloy layer into the device structure produces devices of comparable performance to those without the alloy layer when a CdCl{sub 2} HT is performed. Further investigation is required to determine whether the CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment step can be altered or eliminated through direct deposition of the alloy layer.

Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Experimental Verification of Deposition Models for Automotive Painting with Electrostatic Rotating Bell Atomizers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper documents the development, validation, and refinement of analytic deposition models for automotive spray painting, based largely on experimental work conducted in conjunction with the Ford Motor Com...

David C. Conner; Prasad N. Atkar; Alfred A. Rizzi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Abstract --A physical-vapour-deposition (PVD) of AlN thin films is presented in this paper. For AlN layers that are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high quality layers with as high as possible thermal conductivity kTH, different materials have been are developed. The deposition parameters are tuned to guarantee low stress, high thermal conductivity , the dielectric constant about 8, and the thermal conductivity around -1 -1 11 Wm K . The deposition conditions

Technische Universiteit Delft

152

The Effect of Laser Energy and TargetSubstrate Distance on the Quality of CeO2 Seed Layer Deposited by PLD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, CeO2...seed layers have been deposited on RABiTS substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in a reel-to-reel chamber. We have systematically investigated the effect of laser energy and targetsubs...

Xiaokun Song; Dan Hong; Ying Wang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic layer growth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

characterizes the growth of Si1-x-yGexCx and Si1-xCx layers using a mixture of 10% disilane in hydrogen... demonstrates that fully strain compensated SiGeC layers up to at least...

154

Air-stable ink for scalable, high-throughput layer deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing and depositing air-stable, easily decomposable, vulcanized ink on any of a wide range of substrates is disclosed. The ink enables high-volume production of optoelectronic and/or electronic devices using scalable production methods, such as roll-to-roll transfer, fast rolling processes, and the like.

Weil, Benjamin D; Connor, Stephen T; Cui, Yi

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250C, the temperature may reach 1600C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic layer chemical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Diamond and Related Materials A kinetic model of diamond nucleation and silicon carbide interlayer formation during Summary: diffusion of carbon atoms into the silicon...

157

Characterization of metal oxide layers grown on CVD graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth of a fully oxidized aluminum oxide layer with low surface roughness on graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition is demonstrated. This is accomplished by the deposition of a 0.2 nm thick titanium seed layer on the graphene prior to the deposition of the aluminum under ultra high vacuum conditions, which was subsequently oxidized. The stoichiometry and surface roughness of the oxide layers were measured for a range of titanium and aluminum depositions utilizing ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. These fully oxidized films are expected to produce good dielectric layers for use in graphene based electronic devices.

Matsubayashi, Akitomo; Abel, Joseph; Prasad Sinha, Dhiraj; Lee, Ji Ung; LaBella, Vincent P. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Atomically precise (catalytic) particles synthesized by a novel cluster deposition instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a new high vacuum instrument which is dedicated to the preparation of well-defined clusters supported on model and technologically relevant supports for catalytic and materials investigations. The instrument is based on deposition of size selected metallic cluster ions that are produced by a high flux magnetron cluster source. The throughput of the apparatus is maximized by collecting and focusing ions utilizing a conical octupole ion guide and a linear ion guide. The size selection is achieved by a quadrupole mass filter. The new design of the sample holder provides for the preparation of multiple samples on supports of various sizes and shapes in one session. After cluster deposition onto the support of interest, samples will be taken out of the chamber for a variety of testing and characterization.

Yin, C.; Tyo, E. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kuchta, K. [Extrel CMS, LLC, 575 Epsilon Dr. Suite 2, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15238-2838 (United States)] [Extrel CMS, LLC, 575 Epsilon Dr. Suite 2, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15238-2838 (United States); Issendorff, B. von [Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Freiburg, Stefan-Meier Str. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Freiburg, Stefan-Meier Str. 21, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Vajda, S., E-mail: vajda@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 5747 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University, 9 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Performance of Anode-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell with Thin Bi-Layer Electrolyte by Pulsed Laser Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anode-supported yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/samaria doped ceria (SDC) bi-layer electrolytes with uniform thickness and high density were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition at 1000 degrees C. Fuel cells with such bi-layer electrolytes were fabricated and tested, yielding open circuit voltages from 0.94 to 1.0 V at 600-700 degrees C. Power densities from 0.4 to 1.0 W cm{sup -2} at 0.7 V were achieved in air at temperatures of 600-700 degrees C. Cell performance was improved in flowing oxygen, with an estimated peak power density of over 2 W cm{sup -2} at 650 degrees C, assuming the same overall resistance over the entire range of current density. The high cell performance was attributed to the very low ohmic resistance of the fuel cell, owing to the small thickness of the electrolyte. Stable performance was also demonstrated in that the voltage of the fuel cell showed very little change at a constant current density of 1 A cm{sup -2} during more than 400 hours of operation at 650 degrees C in flowing oxygen. SEM analysis of the fuel cell after testing showed that the bi-layer electrolyte had retained its chemical and mechanical integrity.

Lu, Zigui; Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Fisher, Daniel; Wu, Naijuan; Ignatiev, Alex

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Atomic layer-by-layer oxidation of Ge (100) and (111) surfaces by plasma post oxidation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultrathin GeO{sub x}/Ge interfaces formed on Ge (100) and (111) surfaces by applying plasma post oxidation to thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge structures are characterized in detail using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the XPS signals assigned to Ge 1+ and the 2+ states in the GeO{sub x} layers by post plasma oxidation have oscillating behaviors on Ge (100) surfaces in a period of {approx}0.3 nm with an increase in the GeO{sub x} thickness. Additionally, the oscillations of the signals assigned to Ge 1+ and 2+ states show opposite phase to each other. The similar oscillation behaviors are also confirmed on Ge (111) surfaces for Ge 1+ and 3+ states in a period of {approx}0.5 nm. These phenomena can be strongly regarded as an evidence of the atomic layer-by-layer oxidation of GeO{sub x}/Ge interfaces on Ge (100) and (111) surfaces.

Zhang, Rui [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan) [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Huang, Po-Chin; Lin, Ju-Chin; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)] [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fabrication of sharp tungsten-coated tip for atomic force microscopy by ion-beam sputter deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten (W) is significantly suitable as a tip material for atomic force microscopy (AFM) because its high mechanical stiffness enables the stable detection of tip-sample interaction forces. We have developed W sputter-coating equipment to compensate the drawbacks of conventional Si cantilever tips used in AFM measurements. By employing an ion gun commonly used for sputter cleaning of a cantilever tip, the equipment is capable of depositing conductive W films in the preparation chamber of a general ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-AFM system without the need for an additional chamber or transfer system. This enables W coating of a cantilever tip immediately after sputter cleaning of the tip apex and just before the use in AFM observations. The W film consists of grain structures, which prevent tip dulling and provide sharpness (<3 nm in radius of curvature at the apex) comparable to that of the original Si tip apex. We demonstrate that in non-contact (NC)-AFM measurement, a W-coated Si tip can clearly resolve the atomic structures of a Ge(001) surface without any artifacts, indicating that, as a force sensor, the fabricated W-coated Si tip is superior to a bare Si tip.

Kinoshita, Yukinori; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effect of e-beam irradiation on graphene layer grown by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have grown graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred it onto Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates to make tens of micron scale devices for Raman spectroscopy study. The effect of electron beam (e-beam) irradiation of various doses (600 to 12 000 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}) on CVD grown graphene has been examined by using Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the radiation exposures result in the appearance of the strong disorder D band attributed the damage to the lattice. The evolution of peak frequencies, intensities, and widths of the main Raman bands of CVD graphene is analyzed as a function of defect created by e-beam irradiation. Especially, the D and G peak evolution with increasing radiation dose follows the amorphization trajectory, which suggests transformation of graphene to the nanocrystalline and then to amorphous form. We have also estimated the strain induced by e-beam irradiation in CVD graphene. These results obtained for CVD graphene are in line with previous findings reported for the mechanically exfoliated graphene [D. Teweldebrhan and A. A. Balandin, Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 013101 (2009)]. The results have important implications for CVD graphene characterization and device fabrication, which rely on the electron microscopy.

Iqbal, M. Z.; Kumar Singh, Arun; Iqbal, M. W.; Seo, Sunae; Eom, Jonghwa [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Method of transferring a thin crystalline semiconductor layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for transferring a thin semiconductor layer from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a thin epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor layer on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure and allowed to diffuse to the interface. Afterward, the thin semiconductor layer is bonded to a second substrate and the thin layer is separated away at the interface, which results in transferring the thin epitaxial semiconductor layer from one substrate to the other substrate.

Nastasi, Michael A. (Sante Fe, NM); Shao, Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Theodore, N. David (Mesa, AZ)

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Zigzag and helical AlN layer prepared by glancing angle deposition and its application as a buffer layer in a GaN-based light-emitting diode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates an aluminum nitride (AlN) nanorod structure sputtered by glancing angle deposition (GLAD) and its application as a buffer layer for GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are fabricated on sapphire substrates. The ray tracing ...

Lung-Chien Chen; Ching-Ho Tien; Liu Xuguang; Xu Bingshe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer A method for transferring a thin semiconductor layer from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a thin epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor layer on a substrate having surface contaminants. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method Of Transferring A Thin Crystalline Semiconductor Layer A method for transferring a thin semiconductor layer from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a thin epitaxial monocrystalline semiconductor layer on a substrate having surface contaminants. An interface that includes the contaminants is formed in between the deposited layer and the substrate. Hydrogen atoms are introduced into the structure

167

Molecular beam deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on p-Ge(001)/Ge{sub 0.95}Sn{sub 0.05} heterostructure and impact of a Ge-cap interfacial layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the molecular beam deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Ge{sub 0.95}Sn{sub 0.05} surface with and without an ultra thin Ge cap layer in between. We first studied the atomic configuration of both Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} and Ge/Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surfaces after deoxidation by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and resulted, respectively, in a c(4x2) and (2x1) surface reconstructions. After in situ deposition of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} high-{kappa} gate dielectric we evidenced using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses that Sn diffusion was at the origin of high leakage current densities in the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate stack. This damage could be avoided by inserting a thin 5-nm-thick Ge cap between the oxide and the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} layer. Finally, metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors on the Ge capped sample showed well-behaved capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with interface trap density (D{sub it}) in the range of 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in mid gap and higher close to the valence band edge.

Merckling, C.; Franquet, A.; Vincent, B.; Vandervorst, W.; Loo, R.; Caymax, M. [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center (IMEC vzw), Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Sun, X. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnelaan 200D, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8284 (United States); Shimura, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Nakatsuka, O.; Zaima, S. [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal stability and long term hydrogen/deuterium release from soft to hard amorphous carbon layers analyzed using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Comparison with Tore Supra deposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thermal stability of 200 nm thick plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited a-C:H and a-C:D layers ranging from soft to hard layers has been studied and compared to that of deposits collected on the Tore Supra tokamak plasma facing components by means of in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Linear ramp heating and long term isotherms (from several minutes to 21 days) have been performed and correlations between spectrometric parameters have been found. The information obtained on the sp 2 clustering has been investigated by comparing the G band shift and the 514 nm photon absorption evolution due to the thermal treatment of the layer. The effects of isotopic substitution have also been investigated.

Pardanaud, C; Giacometti, G; Mellet, N; Pgouri, B; Roubin, P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Monitoring of thin layer deposits of high temperature superconducting materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present here a method for rapidly monitoring the composition of samples deposited on a substrate. This was applied to the case of superconducting material YBa2Cu3O7 deposited by laser evaporation on quartz pla...

Madan Lal; R K Choudhury

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Influences of alcoholic solvents on spray pyrolysis deposition of TiO{sub 2} blocking layer films for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Influences of alcoholic solvents for titanium diisopropoxide bis(acetylacetonate) (TPA) precursor solutions on the spray pyrolysis deposited TiO{sub 2} films and the photovoltaic performance of the solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (SDSCs) using these TiO{sub 2} films as the blocking layers were investigated. Smooth TiO{sub 2} films were obtained by spray pyrolysis deposition of a TPA solution in isopropanol (IPA) at a relatively low temperature of 260 Degree-Sign C. On the other hand, when ethanol was used as solvent, the TiO{sub 2} films fabricated at the same temperature showed much rougher surfaces with many pinholes. Our results showed that ethanol reacts with TPA to form titanium diethoxide bis(acetylacetonate) (TEA), which requires a higher thermal decomposition temperature than that of TPA. SDSCs with TiO{sub 2} blocking layer films fabricated using a TPA solution in IPA showed higher power conversion efficiencies with smaller variations. - Graphical abstract: Alcoholic solvents used for the TiO{sub 2} precursor play a critical role in determining the surface morphology of blocking layers and thus the photovoltaic performance of the SDSCs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solvent influences morphology of spray pyrolysis deposited TiO{sub 2} blocking layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethanol reacts with TPA, resulting poor quality of blocking layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isopropanol is better than ethanol for obtaining smooth blocking layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SDSC with blocking layer made with isopropanol showed better performance.

Jiang, Changyun, E-mail: jiangc@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore)] [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Koh, Wei Lin; Leung, Man Yin [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore)] [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Hong, Wei [Department of Chemical Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN), University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West ON, Waterloo, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Department of Chemical Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN), University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West ON, Waterloo, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Li, Yuning, E-mail: yuning.li@uwaterloo.ca [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore) [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Chemical Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN), University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West ON, Waterloo, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Zhang, Jie [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore)] [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR, 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Diode-laser-based atomic absorption monitor using frequency-modulation spectroscopy for physical vapor deposition process control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diode-laser-based atomic absorption monitor using frequency-modulation spectroscopy for physical, and the dynamic events occur- ring as vapors condense on a substrate. Atomic absorption AA spectroscopy also been measured by means of the Doppler frequency shifts of the atomic absorption with respect

Fejer, Martin M.

172

The optimization of interfaces in InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice (SLS) semiconductors by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under a variety of conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer is indicated by x-ray diffraction patterns. Optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times, and no reactant flow during the purges. MOCVD was used to prepare an optically pumped, single heterostructure InAsSb/InGaAs SLS/InPSb laser which emitted at 3.9 {mu}m with a maximum operating temperature of approximately 100 K.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Kurtz, S.R.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Topography, complex refractive index, and conductivity of graphene layers measured by correlation of optical interference contrast, atomic force, and back scattered electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The optical phase shift by reflection on graphene is measured by interference contrast microscopy. The height profile across graphene layers on 300?nm thick SiO{sub 2} on silicon is derived from the phase profile. The complex refractive index and conductivity of graphene layers on silicon with 2?nm thin SiO{sub 2} are evaluated from a phase profile, while the height profile of the layers is measured by atomic force microscopy. It is observed that the conductivity measured on thin SiO{sub 2} is significantly greater than on thick SiO{sub 2}. Back scattered electron contrast of graphene layers is correlated to the height of graphene layers.

Vaupel, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias.vaupel@zeiss.com; Dutschke, Anke [Training Application Support Center, Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, Knigsallee 9-21, 37081 Gttingen (Germany); Wurstbauer, Ulrich; Pasupathy, Abhay [Department of Physics, Columbia University New York, 538 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Hitzel, Frank [DME Nanotechnologie GmbH, Geysostr. 13, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Photoluminescence study of the substitution of Cd by Zn during the growth by atomic layer epitaxy of alternate CdSe and ZnSe monolayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of the substitution of Cd atoms by Zn atoms during the growth of alternate ZnSe and CdSe compound monolayers (ML) by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) as a function of substrate temperature. Samples contained two quantum wells (QWs), each one made of alternate CdSe and ZnSe monolayers with total thickness of 12 ML but different growth parameters. The QWs were studied by low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. We show that the Cd content of underlying CdSe layers is affected by the exposure of the quantum well film to the Zn flux during the growth of ZnSe monolayers. The amount of Cd of the quantum well film decreases with higher exposures to the Zn flux. A brief discussion about the difficulties to grow the Zn{sub 0.5}Cd{sub 0.5}Se ordered alloy (CuAu-I type) by ALE is presented.

Hernndez-Caldern, I. [Physics Department,Cinvestav, Ave. IPN2508, 07360, Mxico City, DF. (Mexico); Salcedo-Reyes, J. C. [Thin Films Group, Physics Department, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Cr. 7 No. 43-82, Ed. 53, Lab. 404, Bogot, D.C. (Colombia)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Optimization of InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattice growth by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for use in infrared emitters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have prepared InAsSb/InGaAs strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using a variety of growth conditions. Presence of an InGaAsSb interface layer was indicated by x-ray diffraction. This interface effect was minimized by optimizing the purge times, reactant flows, and growth conditions. The optimized growth conditions involved the use of low pressure, short purge times between the growth of the layers, and no reactant flow during the purges. Electron diffraction indicates that CuPt-type compositional ordering occurs in InAs{sub 1{minus}x}Sb{sub x} alloys and SLSs which explains an observed bandgap reduction from previously accepted alloy values.

Biefeld, R.M.; Baucom, K.C.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Quartz crystal microbalance study of tungsten atomic layer deposition using WF6 and Si2H6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(disilane). In this paper, W ALD is explored using in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements for disilane exposures > 4?104 L. The W ALD growth rate was also weakly temperature

George, Steven M.

177

In situ examination of tin oxide atomic layer deposition using quartz crystal microbalance and Fourier transform infrared techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-type semiconductor metal oxide that has many applications in various fields due to its special optical, electrical capacity anode for next gen- eration lithium ion batteries.3,4 SnO2 can also be used as a catalyst typically around 10-2 cm. The adsorp- tion of O2 from air removes the electron charge carriers from

George, Steven M.

178

Rapid SiO2 Atomic Layer Deposition Using Tris(tert-pentoxy)silanol B. B. Burton,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures and higher TPS pressures. SiO2 ALD thicknesses of 125-140 ? were observed at the highest TPS requires high temperatures of >325 °C and large reactant exposure of >109 L (1 L ) 10-6 Torr s).4-7 However ALD films using liquid tris(tert-pentoxy)silanol (TPS). The SiO2 film thicknesses were determined

George, Steven M.

179

Thermal Stability and Substitutional Carbon Incorporation far above Solid-Solubility in Si1-xCx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cx and Si1-x-yGexCy Layers Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition using Disilane M. S. Carroll*, J. C. Sturm on (100) silicon substrates by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (RTCVD) with disilane source gas and disilane is known to produce higher silicon epitaxial growth rates for similar partial

180

Vapor-deposited /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ layers for an ultra-high-sensitivity fission counter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After evaluating the properties of uranium oxide coatings prepared by electrodeposition, painting and physical vapor deposition, the vapor deposition method was selected as being preferable for preparing coatings on aluminum electrodes having a total area of 5 m/sup 2/. The electrodes were used in an experimental fission chamber designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use as a neutron flux monitor the Clinch River Breeder Reactor. Initial testing of the Ultra-High Sensitivity Fission Counter (UHSFC) indicated that a tenfold increase in sensitivity was achieved as compared to commercially available fission counters. Techniques used in vapor coating and characterizing the /sup 235/UO/sub 2/ deposits on the large-area curved substrates are described.

Adair, H.L.; Byrum, B.L.; Dailey, J.M.; Gibson, J.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on GaAs using trimethyaluminum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPA is chosen as the oxygen source for the ALD in the MOCVD. Second, IPA will not react precursor pulse time. b Dependence of ALD Al2O3 growth rate on temperature. The pulse time for TMA and IPA

182

Low-temperature formation of Si O 2 layers using a two-step atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced deposition-oxidation process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon oxide ( Si O 2 ) layers were fabricated at low temperatures ( ? 400 C ) by combining the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous Si ( a - Si : H ) with its oxidation using atmospheric pressure plasmas excited by a 150 MHz very high-frequency (VHF) power. The surface excitation by the atmospheric pressure VHF plasma was capable of reducing the temperature for the hydrogen effusion from a - Si : H . As a result a porous a - Si : H film containing a large amount of hydrogen could be transformed into a stoichiometric Si O 2 with an approximately 24% increase in oxidation rate compared with the oxidation of Si(001) at a temperature of 400 C .

Hiroaki Kakiuchi; Hiromasa Ohmi; Makoto Harada; Heiji Watanabe; Kiyoshi Yasutake

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High-Speed Data Transmission in Multi-Layer Deposited Silicon Photonics for Advanced Photonic Networks-on-Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential to supply an immense amount of bandwidth, while reducing the total energy consumption. The extent a waveguide coupled to a microring resonator, forming an optical filter with a through port (Fig. 3). The 60 layer, comprising another waveguide, providing a drop port to this optical filter (Fig. 3). All

Bergman, Keren

184

From Single to Multiple Atomic Layers: A Unique Approach to the Systematic Tuning of Structures and Properties of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-[(MQ)(L)] systems (1.0-2.0 eV) as a result of the difference in their layer thickness. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis has revealed nanosized II-VI (MQ) particles as the post-TG product of all double-layer hybrids. Introduction II-VI binary chalcogenide compounds such as ZnS, ZnSe, and CdTe are of great fundamental

Li, Jing

185

Low-temperature formation of SiO{sub 2} layers using a two-step atmospheric pressure plasma-enhanced deposition-oxidation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon oxide (SiO{sub 2}) layers were fabricated at low temperatures ({<=}400 deg. C) by combining the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) with its oxidation using atmospheric pressure plasmas excited by a 150 MHz very high-frequency (VHF) power. The surface excitation by the atmospheric pressure VHF plasma was capable of reducing the temperature for the hydrogen effusion from a-Si:H. As a result, a porous a-Si:H film containing a large amount of hydrogen could be transformed into a stoichiometric SiO{sub 2} with an approximately 24% increase in oxidation rate compared with the oxidation of Si(001) at a temperature of 400 deg. C.

Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Harada, Makoto; Watanabe, Heiji; Yasutake, Kiyoshi [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Direct growth of few-layer graphene on 6H-SiC and 3C-SiC/Si via propane chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to grow graphene on SiC by a direct carbon feeding through propane flow in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. X-ray photoemission and low energy electron diffraction show that propane allows to grow few-layer graphene (FLG) on 6H-SiC(0001). Surprisingly, FLG grown on (0001) face presents a rotational disorder similar to that observed for FLG obtained by annealing on (000-1) face. Thanks to a reduced growth temperature with respect to the classical SiC annealing method, we have also grown FLG/3C-SiC/Si(111) in a single growth sequence. This opens the way for large-scale production of graphene-based devices on silicon substrate.

Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Portail, M. [CNRS-CRHEA, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Ouerghi, A. [CNRS-LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T. [NOVASiC, Savoie Technolac, Arche Bat 4, BP267, 73375 Le Bourget du Lac (France)

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Current induced annealing and electrical characterization of single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition for future interconnects in VLSI circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single layer graphene (SLG) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been investigated for its prospective application as horizontal interconnects in very large scale integrated circuits. However, the major bottleneck for its successful application is its degraded electronic transport properties due to the resist residual trapped in the grain boundaries and on the surface of the polycrystalline CVD graphene during multi-step lithographic processes, leading to increase in its sheet resistance up to 5 M?/sq. To overcome this problem, current induced annealing has been employed, which helps to bring down the sheet resistance to 10?k?/sq (of the order of its initial value). Moreover, the maximum current density of ?1.2??10{sup 7?}A/cm{sup 2} has been obtained for SLG (1??2.5??m{sup 2}) on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate, which is about an order higher than that of conventionally used copper interconnects.

Prasad, Neetu, E-mail: neetu.prasad@south.du.ac.in, E-mail: neetu23686@gmail.com; Kumari, Anita; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Mathur, P. C. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Bhatia, C. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Received 1 May 2013 | Accepted 26 Jul 2013 | Published 3 Sep 2013 Atomic layer lithography of wafer-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because of the lack of reliable technology to fabricate uniform nanogaps with atomic-scale resolution and simple adhesive-tape-based planarization. Using this method, we create vertically oriented gaps in opaque the nanogaps, enabling background- free transmission measurements. We observe resonant transmission of near

Park, Namkyoo

189

Infiltrating a thin or single layer opal with an atomic vapour: sub-doppler signals and crystal optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial thin glass opals can be infiltrated with a resonant alkali-metal vapour, providing novel types of hybrid systems. The reflection at the interface between the substrate and the opal yields a resonant signal, which exhibits sub-Doppler structures in linear spectroscopy for a range of oblique incidences. This result is suspected to originate in an effect of the three-dimensional confinement of the vapour in the opal interstices. It is here extended to a situation where the opal is limited to a few or even a single layer opal film, which is a kind of bidimensional grating. We have developed a flexible one-dimensional layered optical model, well suited for a Langmuir-Blodgett opal. Once extended to the case of a resonant infiltration, the model reproduces quick variations of the lineshape with incidence angle or polarization. Alternately, for an opal limited to a single layer of identical spheres, a three-dimensional numerical calculation was developed. It predicts crystalline anisotropy, which is demon...

Moufarej, Elias; Zabkov, Ilya; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ballin, Philippe; Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si)-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 56 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ? 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

Kosemura, Daisuke, E-mail: d-kose@isc.meiji.ac.jp; Mizukami, Yuki; Takei, Munehisa; Numasawa, Yohichiroh; Ogura, Atsushi [School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)] [School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Ohshita, Yoshio [Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)] [Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by Laser Back Ablation. Vacancies Ordered in Screw Form (VOSF) and Layered Indium Selenide Thin Film Deposition by...

192

Experimental study on the energy deposition of an ns-DBD plasma actuator and its effect on a laminar boundary layer:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An experimental study aimed at the influence of different barrier materials on the energy deposition of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuator was (more)

Winkel, R.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Improved graphite furnace atomizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

Siemer, D.D.

1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Unexpected behaviour of one Pb monolayer deposited on aluminum oxide thin film grown on Ag(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy, and low energy electron diffraction, we have observed a surprising complete dissolution at room temperature of one lead monolayer deposited by evaporation on an aluminum oxide thin film (?0.8?nm thick) previously grown on Ag (111). We have observed the quasi-instantaneous diffusion of the lead deposit through the oxide layer to the silver/oxide interface. After the diffusion process, lead atoms form a Moir superstructure, which is characterized by STM through the oxide layer. This unexpected behavior puts in light the very weak interaction between the aluminum oxide and the silver substrate.

Vizzini, Sbastien, E-mail: sebastien.vizzini@im2np.fr; Bertoglio, M. [IM2NP CNRS, Aix Marseille Universit, F-13397 Marseille (France)] [IM2NP CNRS, Aix Marseille Universit, F-13397 Marseille (France); Oughaddou, Hamid [Institut des Sciences Molculaires d'Orsay, ISMO CNRS, Universit de Paris, F-91405 Orsay, France and Deptartamento de Physique, Universit de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France)] [Institut des Sciences Molculaires d'Orsay, ISMO CNRS, Universit de Paris, F-91405 Orsay, France and Deptartamento de Physique, Universit de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Hoarau, J. Y.; Biberian, J. P.; Aufray, B. [CINaM CNRS, Aix Marseille Universit, F-13288 Marseille (France)] [CINaM CNRS, Aix Marseille Universit, F-13288 Marseille (France)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

Large-scale 2D electronics based on single-layer MoS[subscript 2] grown by chemical vapor deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2D nanoelectronics based on single-layer MoS[subscript 2] offers great advantages for both conventional and ubiquitous applications. This paper discusses the large-scale CVD growth of single-layer MoS[subscript 2] and ...

Wang, H.

196

Surface Passivation of Nanoporous TiO2 via Atomic Layer Deposition of ZrO2 for Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrolytes have been presented as a promising renewable energy source, achieving power conversion efficien and the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center, Northwestern UniVersity, EVanston, Illinois 60208Versidade Estadual Paulista, R. Prof. Francisco Degni s/n, 14800-900 Araraquara SP, Brazil ReceiVed: July 12, 2009

197

Self-cleaning and surface recovery with arsine pretreatment in ex situ atomic-layer-deposition of Al2O3 on GaAs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. heavily doped GaAs 001 substrates at 650 °C with TMG Ga CH3 3 and arsine AsH3 V/III=23 with disilane Si2H6

198

Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on V2O5 xerogel film for enhanced lithium-ion intercalation stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tages of using Li-ion batteries as alternative of fossil fuel for hybrid vehicle power source lie.1116/1.3664115] I. INTRODUCTION Lithium-ion batteries become the focus of rechargeable batteries in the new decade in hybrid vehicles requires high discharge capacity which current lithium-ion batteries do not have

Cao, Guozhong

199

High performance organic field-effect transistors with ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} gate insulator deposited directly onto the organic semiconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have produced stable organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with an ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} gate insulator deposited directly on top of rubrene single crystals by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We find that ALD is a gentle deposition process to grow thin films without damaging rubrene single crystals, as results these devices have a negligibly small threshold voltage and are very stable against gate-bias-stress, and the mobility exceeds 1 cm{sup 2}/V s. Moreover, the devices show very little degradation even when kept in air for more than 2 months. These results demonstrate thin HfO{sub 2} layers deposited by ALD to be well suited as high capacitance gate dielectrics in OFETs operating at small gate voltage. In addition, the dielectric layer acts as an effective passivation layer to protect the organic semiconductor.

Ono, S., E-mail: shimpei@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Husermann, R. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan) [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Chiba, D. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 322-0012 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Batlogg, B. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

Atom Interferometry  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

Mark Kasevich

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effect of Ti seed layers on structure of self-organized epitaxial face-centered-cubic-Ag(001) oriented nanodots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of Ti seed layers on the structure of self-organized Ag nanodots, obtained with a Ti seed-layer-assisted thermal agglomeration method, has been investigated. The samples were grown on MgO(001) single crystal substrates by RF magnetron sputter deposition. The samples were deposited at room temperature and post-annealed at 350 C for 4 h while maintaining the chamber vacuum conditions. The results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations indicated that the insertion of the Ti seed layer (0.65.0 nm) between the MgO substrate and Ag layer promotes the agglomeration process, forming the nanodot array. Comparisons between the AFM images revealed that the size of the Ag nanodots was increased with an increase in the Ti seed layer thickness. The atomic concentration of the film surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS result suggested that the nanodot surface mainly consisted of Ag. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results proved that the initial deposition of the Ti seed layer (0.65.0 nm) onto MgO(001) prior to the Ag deposition yielded high-quality fcc-Ag(001) oriented epitaxial nanodots. The optical absorbance spectra of the fabricated Ag nanodots with various Ti seed layer thicknesses were obtained in the visible light range.

Kamiko, M.; Nose, K. [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)] [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Suenaga, R.; Kyuno, K. [Department of Material Science, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan)] [Department of Material Science, Shibaura Institute of Technology, 3-7-5 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Koo, J.-W.; Ha, J.-G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comparative Study of Zn(O,S) Buffer Layers and CIGS Solar Cells Fabricated by CBD, ALD, and Sputtering: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zn(O,S) thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD), atomic layer deposition, and sputtering. Composition of the films and band gap were measured and found to follow the trends described in the literature. CBD Zn(O,S) parameters were optimized and resulted in an 18.5% efficiency cell that did not require post annealing, light soaking, or an undoped ZnO layer. Promising results were obtained with sputtering. A 13% efficiency cell was obtained for a Zn(O,S) emitter layer deposited with 0.5%O2. With further optimization of process parameters and an analysis of the loss mechanisms, it should be possible to increase the efficiency.

Ramanathan, K.; Mann, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Pankow, J.; Li, J.; Scharf, J.; Mansfield, L. M.; Contreras, M. A.; Noufi, R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia by ion-beam-assisted deposition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biaxially textured yttria (8 mol %)-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were deposited on randomly oriented Hastelloy C and Stainless Steel 304 at room temperature as a buffer layer for subsequent deposition of oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} films. The 0.16-1.3 {micro}m thick YSZ films were deposited by e-beam evaporation at rates of 1.2-3.2 {angstrom}/sec. Biaxially textured films were produced with an Ar/O{sub 2} ion beam directed at the substrate during film growth. X-ray diffraction was used to study in-plane and out-of-plane orientation as a function of ion-bombardment angle, film thickness, ion-to-atom flux ratio, and substrate material. In-plane and out-of-plane average-misorientation angles on these YSZ films that were deposited by ion-beam-assisted deposition were as low as 17 and 5.4{degree}, respectively, on as-received substrates.

Chudzik, M. P.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ion bombardment in silane VHF deposition plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement of mass resolved ion energy distributions at the grounded substrate in an RF glow discharge allows to determine the ion flux and the ion energy flux towards the surface of a growing hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. This provides the means to study the influence of ions on the structural properties of a-Si:H. Here the authors focus on the {alpha}-{gamma}{prime} transition as occurs in silane-hydrogen plasmas at an RF frequency of 50 MHz and a substrate temperature of 250 C. The structural properties of the layers appear to depend on the kinetic energy of the arriving ions. This is supported by measurements of ion fluxes under other deposition conditions and by characterization of the corresponding layers. The influence of ions on the growth is discussed in terms of their flux, and the amount of delivered kinetic and potential energy to the growing film. The measurements suggest that a threshold energy of about 5 eV per deposited atom is needed for the construction of a dense amorphous silicon network.

Hamers, E.A.G.; Bezemer, J.; Meiling, H.; Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Van Der Weg, W.F.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Atomic and electronic structures of single-layer FeSe on SrTiO3(001): The role of oxygen deficiency  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Using first-principles calculation, we propose an interface structure for single triple-layer FeSe on the SrTiO3(001) surface, a high-Tc superconductor found recently. The key component of this structure is the oxygen deficiency on the top layer of the SrTiO3 substrate, as a result of Se etching used in preparing the high-Tc samples. The O vacancies strongly bind the FeSe triple layer to the substrate giving rise to a (21) reconstruction, as observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The enhanced binding correlates to the significant increase of Tc observed in experiment. The O vacancies also serve as the source of electron doping, which modifies the Fermi surface of the first FeSe layer by filling the hole pocket near the center of the surface Brillouin zone, as suggested from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement.

Bang, Junhyeok; Li, Zhi; Sun, Y. Y.; Samanta, Amit; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Wenhao; Wang, Lili; Chen, X.; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Q.-K.; Zhang, S. B.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Initial growth on microcrystalline silicon on atomically flat hetero-substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial growth of microcrystalline silicon ({micro}c-Si:H) deposited on an atomically flat GaAs (001) wafer using a RF glow-discharge decomposition of hydrogen diluted monosilane gas mixture has been studied by means of atomic force microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). It is shown that the initial growth of {micro}c-Si:H deposited at a substrate temperature of 50--250 C consists of four successive stages, i.e., (1) a layer-by-layer growth of a-Si:H up to d {approximately}5 {angstrom}, (2) island formation of a-Si:H, (3) the coalescence of the islands and the nucleation of microcrystalline at d{approximately}10{approximately}40 {angstrom} depending on the growth temperature, and (4) a rapid roughening with microcrystalline growth.

Saitoh, K.; Kondo, M.; Matsuda, A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fabrication of a single layer graphene by copper intercalation on a SiC(0001) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu atoms deposited on a zero layer graphene grown on a SiC(0001) substrate, intercalate between the zero layer graphene and the SiC substrate after the thermal annealing above 600?C, forming a Cu-intercalated single layer graphene. On the Cu-intercalated single layer graphene, a graphene lattice with superstructure due to moir pattern is observed by scanning tunneling microscopy, and specific linear dispersion at the K{sup } point as well as a characteristic peak in a C{sub 1s} core level spectrum, which is originated from a free-standing graphene, is confirmed by photoemission spectroscopy. The Cu-intercalated single layer graphene is found to be n-doped.

Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Tomokage, Hajime; Suzuki, Takayuki [Department of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Tajiri, Takayuki; Kohno, Atsushi [Department of Applied Physics, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Takahashi, Kazutoshi [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Surface atomic structure of c(22)-Si on Cu(110)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technological importance of Schottky barriers has led to many experiments of metal-on-semiconductor systems. Here we present an example of the inverse case by depositing a semiconductor on a metal, studying the very early stages of the metal-semiconductor interface formation. We show that 0.5 monolayers of Si on Cu(110) form an ordered c(22) overlayer and resolve its geometrical structure. Using full-hemispherical x-ray photoelectron diffraction, we find that Si atoms form an almost coplanar layer, replacing one out of two Cu surface atoms.

J. A. Martn-Gago; R. Fasel; J. Hayoz; R. G. Agostino; D. Naumovic-acute; P. Aebi; L. Schlapbach

1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Structured luminescence conversion layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a BiTeSe write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40nm BTS films show ca. 10nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.15.9nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 172nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The third SE model predicted ca. 90% void at the film surface. XRR modeling of the film agreed well with the predictions from SE. The uniquenesses of the SE models were confirmed.

Hao Wang; Nitesh Madaan; Jacob Bagley; Anubhav Diwan; Yiqun Liu; Robert C. Davis; Barry M. Lunt; Stacey J. Smith; Matthew R. Linford

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Phase Behavior and Electrophoretic Deposition of LPEI-PAA Polyelectrolyte Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project aims to discover a new means of overcoming the drawbacks of traditional layer-by-layer dip coating through the use of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) and electrophoretic deposition. The layer-by-layer process, by which oppositely...

Davis, Ryan

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ge atom distribution in buried dome islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-assisted atom probe tomography microscopy is used to provide direct and quantitative compositional measurements of tri-dimensional Ge distribution in Ge dome islands buried by Si. Sub-nanometer spatial resolution 3D imaging shows that islands keep their facets after deposition of the Si cap, and that the island/substrate/Si cap interfaces are abrupt. The core of the domes contains 55% of Ge, while the island shell exhibits a constant composition of 15% of Ge. The {l_brace}113{r_brace} facets of the islands present a Ge enrichment up to 35%. The wetting layer composition is not homogeneous, varying from 9.5% to 30% of Ge.

Portavoce, A.; Berbezier, I.; Ronda, A.; Mangelinck, D. [CNRS, IM2NP, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Hoummada, K. [Aix-Marseille Universite, IM2NP, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called inverted wedding cake stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu, E-mail: ncholu.manyala@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa)] [Department of Physics, Institute of Applied Materials, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028 (South Africa); Charlie Johnson, A. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Interfacial and structural properties of sputtered HfO{sub 2} layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetron sputtered HfO{sub 2} layers formed on a heated Si substrate were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometer (SE), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling techniques. The results show that the formation of a SiO{sub x} suboxide layer at the HfO{sub 2}/Si interface is unavoidable. The HfO{sub 2} thickness and suboxide formation are highly affected by the growth parameters such as sputtering power, O{sub 2}/Ar gas ratio during sputtering, sputtering time, and substrate temperature. XRD spectra show that the deposited film has (111) monoclinic phase of HfO{sub 2}, which is also supported by FTIR spectra. The atomic concentration and chemical environment of Si, Hf, and O have been measured as a function of depth starting from the surface of the sample by XPS technique. It shows that HfO{sub 2} layers of a few nanometers are formed at the top surface. Below this thin layer, Si-Si bonds are detected just before the Si suboxide layer, and then the Si substrate is reached during the depth profiling by XPS. It is clearly understood that the highly reactive sputtered Hf atoms consume some of the oxygen atoms from the underlying SiO{sub 2} to form HfO{sub 2}, leaving Si-Si bonds behind.

Aygun, G. [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla, TR-35430 Izmir (Turkey); Yildiz, I. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, TR-06531 Ankara (Turkey); Central Laboratory, Middle East Technical University, TR-06531 Ankara (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Layering Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Planar technology requires that thin layers of materials be formed and patterned sequentially, commencing with a flat rigid substrate. The key aspects of each layer are its Thi...

Ivor Brodie; Julius J. Muray

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chemical solution seed layer for rabits tapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for making a superconducting article includes the steps of providing a biaxially textured substrate. A seed layer is then deposited. The seed layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different rare earth or transition metal cations. A superconductor layer is grown epitaxially such that the superconductor layer is supported by the seed layer.

Goyal, Amit; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Wee, Sung-Hun

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Calculating Deposit Formation in the Pipelining of Waxy Crude Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition from a waxy crude oil is modelled in turbulent flow in a pipeline. Molecular diffusion in a thin boundary layer...

S. Correra; A. Fasano; L. Fusi; D. Merino-Garcia

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Effects of boron dopants of Si (001) substrates on formation of Ge layers by sputter epitaxy method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of Ge layers on boron-doped Si (001) substrates by our sputter epitaxy method has been investigated. The surface morphology of Ge layers grown on Si substrates depends on the substrate resistance, and flat Ge layers are obtained on Si substrates with 0.015 ? cm resistivity. Highly boron-doped Si substrates cause a transition in the dislocation structure from complex dislocations with 60 dislocation glide planes to 90 pure-edge dislocations, resulting in the formation of flat Ge layers. Furthermore, we have found that the surface morphology of the Ge layers improves with increasing Ge layer thickness. Ge atoms migrating on the deposited Ge layers tend to position themselves at the reactive sites, where the reactivity is related to the number of bonding contacts between the Ge atom and the surface. This modifies the surface morphology, resulting in a flatter surface. Boron dopants together with the sputter epitaxy method effectively suppress the growth of Ge islands and result in the formation of flat Ge layers.

Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)] [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

Berkman, Samuel (Florham Park, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hadronic Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the theory of hadronic atoms in QCD+QED. The non-relativistic effective Lagrangian approach, used to describe this type of bound states, is illustrated with the case of pi+pi- atoms. In addition, we discuss the evaluation of isospin-breaking corrections to hadronic atom observables by invoking chiral perturbation theory.

J. Gasser; V. E. Lyubovitskij; A. Rusetsky

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Diffusion of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As elements through hafnium oxide during post deposition annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion of indium through HfO{sub 2} after post deposition annealing in N{sub 2} or forming gas environments is observed in HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As stacks by low energy ion scattering and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy and found to be consistent with changes in interface layer thickness observed by transmission electron microscopy. Prior to post processing, arsenic oxide is detected at the surface of atomic layer deposition-grown HfO{sub 2} and is desorbed upon annealing at 350?C. Reduction of the interfacial layer thickness and potential densification of HfO{sub 2}, resulting from indium diffusion upon annealing, is confirmed by an increase in capacitance.

Cabrera, W.; Brennan, B.; Dong, H.; Wallace, R. M.; Chabal, Y. J., E-mail: chabal@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); O'Regan, T. P.; Povey, I. M.; Monaghan, S.; O'Connor, .; Hurley, P. K. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)] [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Deposition Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsed Plasma Processing Pulsed Plasma Processing NEW: Downloadable: Invited Talk "Pulsed Metal Plasmas," presented at the 2006 AVS Meeting, San Francisco, California, November 15, 2006. (PDF, file size 8 MB). Plasma Sources for Window Coatings Deposition processes for low-emittance and solar control coatings can be improved through the use of advanced plasma technology developed at LBNL. A new type of constricted glow-discharge plasma source was selected for the 1997 R&D 100 Award. Invented by LBNL researchers Andre Anders, Mike Rubin, and Mike Dickinson, the source was designed to be compatible with industrial vacuum deposition equipment and practice. Construction is simple, rugged and inexpensive. It can operate indefinitely over a wide range of chamber pressure without any consumable parts such as filaments or grids. Several different gases including Argon, Oxygen and Nitrogen have been tested successfully.

224

Layer-by-layer assembly of electrically conductive polymer thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) to deposit layers of carbon black that are pre-stabilized with polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (see chemical structures in Fig. 3). The resulting films are thin, flexible, and relatively dense, with a high concentration of carbon black... within the deposition mixtures is described in Chapter III. Materials and Methods Materials Two types of polymers were used to stabilize carbon black for layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of composite thin films. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA...

Jan, Chien Sy Jason

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, A. Wayne (Albuquerque, NM); Omstead, Thomas R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Near-field microwave microscopy of high-? oxides grown on graphene with an organic seeding layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) is used for non-destructive nanoscale characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} films grown on epitaxial graphene on SiC by atomic layer deposition using a self-assembled perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride seeding layer. SMM allows imaging of buried inhomogeneities in the dielectric layer with a spatial resolution close to 100?nm. The results indicate that, while topographic features on the substrate surface cannot be eliminated as possible sites of defect nucleation, the use of a vertically heterogeneous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2} stack suppresses formation of large outgrowth defects in the oxide film, ultimately improving lateral uniformity of the dielectric film.

Tselev, Alexander, E-mail: tseleva@ornl.gov; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sangwan, Vinod K.; Jariwala, Deep; Lauhon, Lincoln J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pulsed Laser Deposition | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsed Laser Deposition Pulsed Laser Deposition EMSL's pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system is designed for epitaxial growth of oxide, ceramic, or synthetic mineral thin films and...

228

Strain relaxation in graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of single layer graphene by chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Cu substrates induces large internal biaxial compressive strain due to thermal expansion mismatch. Raman backscattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the strain relaxation during and after the transfer process from Cu foil to SiO{sub 2}. Interestingly, the growth of graphene results in a pronounced ripple structure on the Cu substrate that is indicative of strain relaxation of about 0.76% during the cooling from the growth temperature. Removing graphene from the Cu substrates and transferring it to SiO{sub 2} results in a shift of the 2D phonon line by 27?cm{sup ?1} to lower frequencies. This translates into additional strain relaxation. The influence of the processing steps, used etching solution and solvents on strain, is investigated.

Troppenz, Gerald V., E-mail: gerald.troppenz@helmholtz-berlin.de; Gluba, Marc A.; Kraft, Marco; Rappich, Jrg; Nickel, Norbert H. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fr Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut fr Silizium Photovoltaik, Kekulstr. 5, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Semiclassical atom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semiclassical quantization is incorporated into the average potential approach to atomic physics. The stationary energy functional is shown to be the sum of the Thomas-Fermi functional and a mainly oscillatory part. The latter turns out to be a small correction for sufficiently large atomic numbers, allowing perturbative treatment. Further, a detailed study of semiclassical spectra, with emphasis on energy degeneracy, is performed.

Berthold-Georg Englert and Julian Schwinger

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Scalable Manufacture of Built-to-Order Nanomedicine: Spray-Assisted Layer-by-Layer Functionalization of PRINT Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scalable methods, PRINT particle fabrication, and spray-assisted Layer-by-Layer deposition are combined to generate uniform and functional nanotechnologies with precise control over composition, size, shape, and surface ...

Herlihy, Kevin P.

231

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Boundary Layer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sea Spray on the Thermodynamics of the Hurricane Boundary Layer For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

234

Process for thin film deposition of cadmium sulfide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention teaches a process for depositing layers of cadmium sulfide. The process includes depositing a layer of cadmium oxide by spray pyrolysis of a cadmium salt in an aqueous or organic solvent. The oxide film is then converted into cadmium sulfide by thermal ion exchange of the O.sup.-2 for S.sup.-2 by annealing the oxide layer in gaseous sulfur at elevated temperatures.

Muruska, H. Paul (East Windsor, NJ); Sansregret, Joseph L. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Young, Archie R. (Montclair, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Chemical composition and temperature dependent performance of ZnO-thin film transistors deposited by pulsed and continuous spray pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) deposited by continuous and pulsed spray pyrolysis were investigated to analyze process kinetics which make reduction of process temperature possible. Thus, fluid mechanics, chemical composition, electrical performance, and deposition and annealing temperature were systematically analyzed. It was found that ZnO layers continuously deposited at 360?C contained zinc oxynitrides, CO{sub 3}, and hydro carbonate groups from pyrolysis of basic zinc acetate. Statistically, every second wurtzite ZnO unit cell contained an impurity atom. The purity and performance of the ZnO-TFTs increased systematically with increasing deposition temperature due to an improved oxidation processes. At 500?C the zinc to oxygen ratio exceeded a high value of 0.96. Additionally, the ZnO film was not found to be in a stabilized state after deposition even at high temperatures. Introducing additional subsequent annealing steps stabilizes the film and allows the reduction of the overall thermal stress to the substrate. Further improvement of device characteristics was obtained by pulsed deposition which allowed a more effective transport of the by-products and oxygen. A significant reduction of the deposition temperature by 140?C was achieved compared to the same performance as in continuous deposition mode. The trap density close to the Fermi energy could be reduced by a factor of two to 4??10{sup 17}?eV{sup ?1}?cm{sup ?3} due to the optimized combustion process on the surface. The optimization of the deposition processes made the fabrication of TFTs with excellent performance possible. The mobility was high and exceeded 12 cm{sup 2}/V s, the subthreshold slope was 0.3 V dec{sup ?1}, and an on-set close to the ideal value of 0?V was achieved.

Ortel, Marlis; Balster, Torsten; Wagner, Veit [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Interaction of epitaxial silicene with overlayers formed by exposure to Al atoms and O{sub 2} molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As silicene is not chemically inert, the study and exploitation of its electronic properties outside of ultrahigh vacuum environments require the use of insulating capping layers. In order to understand if aluminum oxide might be a suitable encapsulation material, we used high-resolution synchrotron photoelectron spectroscopy to study the interactions of Al atoms and O{sub 2} molecules, as well as the combination of both, with epitaxial silicene on thin ZrB{sub 2}(0001) films grown on Si(111). The deposition of Al atoms onto silicene, up to the coverage of about 0.4 Al per Si atoms, has little effect on the chemical state of the Si atoms. The silicene-terminated surface is also hardly affected by exposure to O{sub 2} gas, up to a dose of 4500 L. In contrast, when Al-covered silicene is exposed to the same dose, a large fraction of the Si atoms becomes oxidized. This is attributed to dissociative chemisorption of O{sub 2} molecules by Al atoms at the surface, producing reactive atomic oxygen species that cause the oxidation. It is concluded that aluminum oxide overlayers prepared in this fashion are not suitable for encapsulation since they do not prevent but actually enhance the degradation of silicene.

Friedlein, R.; Yamada-Takamura, Y. [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, School of Materials Science, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F. B.; Kovalgin, A. Y.; Jong, M. P. de, E-mail: M.P.deJong@utwente.nl [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Selective deposition of silicon and silicon-germanium alloys by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Selective deposition of SiGe alloys by rapid thermal deposition has been studied using a commercially available Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (RTCVD) cluster tool. The precursors used in this work were dichlorosilane and germane diluted in either hydrogen or argon. An initial characterization was performed to find the appropriate temperature and GeH{sub 4} flow ranges to deposit epitaxial layers with low surface roughness. For layers with higher germanium concentration lower deposition temperatures are required to minimize surface roughness. The effects of the dilutant gas on the deposition were examined. An H{sub 2} dilutant affects the deposition by consuming chlorine released by the SiCl{sub 2}H{sub 2} and forming HCl. When Ar is used as the dilutant, more chlorine is available for other reactions that can result in etching of the silicon surface. Finally, the effects of pre-deposition treatment were determined. When compared to a wet HF dip, a gas/vapor phase HF/methanol native oxide removal treatment appears to increase the initiation time for the epitaxial deposition reaction. This is most likely due to increased fluorine termination of the surface. When a wet HF or HF/methanol native oxide removal is followed by a UV-Cl{sub 2} process, the deposition reaction initiation time is reduced. The UV-Cl{sub 2} process was also found to etch silicon through the native oxide.

Grant, J.M.; Ang, M.; Allen, L.R. [Sharp Microelectronics Technology, Inc., Camas, WA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chapter 7 - Nanofabrication via atom optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents a review of the basic concepts that are used for atomoptical nanofabrication, as well as a discussion of the progress to date in realizations of the techniques. As a new approach to nanofabrication, atom optics offers the possibility of several advantages over existing techniques. For one thing, the fundamental diffraction limit imposed on resolution, present in any process where one attempts to focus particles (whether photons, charged particles, or neutral atoms), can be very small for atoms. Furthermore, atom optics can be used both in a direct deposition mode, where neutral atoms are focused by atom lenses into an extremely fine spot as they deposit onto a substrate, and also in a lithography mode, where focused atoms are used to expose a suitable resist material. In the direct deposition mode, nanostructures can be fabricated in a clean, resist-free environment, with little or no damage to the underlying substrate. Thus, the process can be very localized, with very little scattering and resist penetration. In either mode, parallelism, which is advantageous when issues of fabrication speed and/or long-range spatial coherence are important, can be achieved with very high dimensional accuracy over a large area of the substrate using laser focusing of atoms in a laser interference pattern.

Jabez J. McClelland

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Adsorbate Electric Fields on a Cryogenic Atom Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the behaviour of electric fields originating from adsorbates deposited on a cryogenic atom chip as it is cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency we measure the field strength versus distance from a 1 mm square of YBCO patterned onto a YSZ chip substrate. We find a localized and stable dipole field at room temperature and attribute it to a saturated layer of chemically adsorbed rubidium atoms on the YBCO. As the chip is cooled towards 83 K we observe a change in sign of the electric field as well as a transition from a localized to a delocalized dipole density. We relate these changes to the onset of physisorption on the chip surface when the van der Waals attraction overcomes the thermal desorption mechanisms. Our findings suggest that, through careful selection of substrate materials, it may be possible to reduce the electric fields caused by atomic adsorption on chips, opening up experiments to controlled Rydberg-surface co...

Chan, K S; Hufnagel, C; Dumke, R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Chemical vapor deposition of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deposition conditions and film properties for a variety of boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and silicon-carbon films produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are discussed. Deposition gases include monosilane, disilane, trisilane, and acetylene. Two types of optically wide band-gap p layers are obtained. One of these window p layers (without carbon) has been extensively tested in photovoltaic devices. Remarkably, this p layer can be deposited between about 200 to 300 /sup 0/C. A typical open circuit voltage in an all CVD p-i-n device is 0.70--0.72 V, and in a hybrid device where the i and n layers are deposited by glow discharge, 0.8--0.83 V.

Ellis F.B. Jr.; Delahoy, A.E.

1985-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Effect of plasma CVD operating temperature on nanomechanical properties of TiC nanostructured coating investigated by atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? The TiC{sub x} nanostructure coatings have been deposited by PACVD method. ? Dominant mechanism of growth structure at 490 C is island-layer type. ? TiC{sub x} nanostructure coating applied at 490 C, exhibits lowest friction coefficient. ? Young's moduli are 289.9, 400 and 187.6 GPa for 470, 490 and 510 C, respectively. ? This higher elastic modulus and higher hardness of nanocoating obtain at 490 C. -- Abstract: The structure, composition, and mechanical properties of nanostructured titanium carbide (TiC) coatings deposited on H{sub 11} hot-working tool steel by pulsed-DC plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at three different temperatures are investigated. Nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests are carried out by atomic force microscopy to determine the mechanical properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, surface roughness, and friction coefficient. The nanostructured TiC coatings prepared at 490 C exhibit lower friction coefficient (0.23) than the ones deposited at 470 and 510 C. Increasing the deposition temperature reduces the Young's modulus and hardness. The overall superior mechanical properties such as higher hardness and lower friction coefficient render the coatings deposited at 490 C suitable for wear resistant applications.

Shanaghi, Ali, E-mail: alishanaghi@gmail.com [Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Malayer University, P.O. Box: 95863-65719, Malayer (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Malayer University, P.O. Box: 95863-65719, Malayer (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rouhaghdam, Ali Reza Sabour, E-mail: sabour01@modares.ac.ir [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahangarani, Shahrokh, E-mail: sh.ahangarani@gmail.com [Advanced Materials and Renewable Energies Department, Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 15815-3538, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Advanced Materials and Renewable Energies Department, Iranian Research Organization for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 15815-3538, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Layer-by-layer Assembly of Nanobrick Wall Ultrathin Transparent Gas Barrier Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin layers with high barrier to oxygen and other gases are a key component to many packaging applications, such as flexible electronics, food, and pharmaceuticals. Vapor deposited thin films provide significant gas barrier, but are prone...

Priolo, Morgan Alexander

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure.

Wu, Xin D. (Greenbelt, MD); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method for depositing high-quality microcrystalline semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the plasma deposition of a layer of a microcrystalline semiconductor material is carried out by energizing a process gas which includes a precursor of the semiconductor material and a diluent with electromagnetic energy so as to create a plasma therefrom. The plasma deposits a layer of the microcrystalline semiconductor material onto the substrate. The concentration of the diluent in the process gas is varied as a function of the thickness of the layer of microcrystalline semiconductor material which has been deposited. Also disclosed is the use of the process for the preparation of an N-I-P type photovoltaic device.

Guha, Subhendu (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Yan, Baojie (Rochester Hills, MI)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Method for making photovoltaic devices using oxygenated semiconductor thin film layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a photovoltaic device is presented. The method includes steps of disposing a window layer on a substrate and disposing an absorber layer on the window layer. Disposing the window layer, the absorber layer, or both layers includes introducing a source material into a deposition zone, wherein the source material comprises oxygen and a constituent of the window layer, of the absorber layer or of both layers. The method further includes step of depositing a film that comprises the constituent and oxygen.

Johnson, James Neil; Albin, David Scott; Feldman-Peabody, Scott; Pavol, Mark Jeffrey; Gossman, Robert Dwayne

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

247

Christmas Island lagoonal lakes, models for the deposition of carbonateevaporiteorganic laminated sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, halite) and organic layers are deposited. Observations suggest that deposition of these different laminae), followed by evaporitic minerals (carbonate, calcium sulfate, halite) when salinity increases through Laminated series displaying sequential alternations of evaporitic (anhydrite, gypsum, halite) and carbonate

Boyer, Edmond

248

Electrostatic force assisted deposition of graphene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a method of depositing graphene includes bringing a stamp into contact with a substrate over a contact area. The stamp has at least a few layers of the graphene covering the contact area. An electric field is developed over the contact area. The stamp is removed from the vicinity of the substrate which leaves at least a layer of the graphene substantially covering the contact area.

Liang, Xiaogan (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

Affinito, J.D.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Inclined substrate deposition of magnesium oxide for YBCO-coated conductors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) were grown on MgO buffered metallic substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The MgO buffer films, which provide the initial biaxial texture, had been grown on polished Hastelloy C276 (HC) tapes using inclined substrate deposition (ISD). The ISD process is promising for the fabrication of coated superconductor wires because it produces biaxially textured template films on nontextured substrate at high deposition rates. Biaxially aligned MgO films were deposited at deposition rates of 20 to 100 {angstrom}/sec. The buffer films were deposited on these template films before ablation of the YBCO films by PLD. The microstructure was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. X-ray pole figure analysis and {phi}- and {omega}-scans were used for texture characterization. Good in- and out-of-plane textures were observed on the ISD MgO films ({approx}1.5 {micro}m thick). The full width at half maximums were 9.2{sup o} for the MgO (002) {phi}-scan and 5.4{sup o} for the {omega}-scan. Cube-on-cube epitaxial growth of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}) films on the ISD MgO films was also achieved by PLD. A superconducting critical temperature of 90 K, with a sharp transition, and transport critical current density of >2.5 x 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} were obtained on a 0.5-{micro}m-thick, 0.5-cm-wide, and 1-cm-long YBCO film with MgO buffer layer at 77 K in self-field.

Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Koritala, R. E.; Dorris, S. E.; Maroni, V. A.; Balachandran, U.

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Melanin as an active layer in biosensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

Piacenti da Silva, Marina, E-mail: marinaness@yahoo.com; Congiu, Mirko, E-mail: congiumat@gmail.com; Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de, E-mail: graeff@fc.unesp.br [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences - UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Jssica Colnaghi, E-mail: jeziga-cf@yahoo.com.br; Biziak de Figueiredo, Natlia, E-mail: natbiziak@yahoo.com.br; Mulato, Marcelo, E-mail: mmulato@ffclrp.usp.br [Department of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, Science and Letters at Ribeiro Preto, University of So Paulo, Ribeiro Preto, SP (Brazil)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, Science and Letters at Ribeiro Preto, University of So Paulo, Ribeiro Preto, SP (Brazil)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

GIS package on mineral deposits database and thematic maps of Central Eurasia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The GIS (Geographic Information System) Central Asia is composed of spatially referenced geographical, geological, geophysical, geochemical and mineral deposit thematic layers, and their respective attribute d...

R. Seltmann; V. Shatov; G. Guriev

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Layer-thickness dependence of cw photoluminescence in single a-Si:H layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoluminescence data are presented for ultrathin single layers of a-Si:H deposited on a-SiO2. We observe a nonmonotonic shift of the luminescence peak with layer thickness, indicating that more than one mechanism is operative. Possible sources of the opposing shifts are discussed.

B. A. Wilson; C. M. Taylor; J. P. Harbison

1986-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

High density Ru nanocrystal deposition for nonvolatile memory applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High density Ru nanocrystal deposition for nonvolatile memory applications Damon B. Farmer School density optimizes the charge storing capability of the floating layer, while a high degree of size

255

Atom Probe Tomography | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Tomography Atom Probe Tomography The LEAP 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first-ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical...

256

Metal-gate-induced reduction of the interfacial layer in Hf oxide gate stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of high-{kappa} metal oxide gate stacks are often determined in the final processing steps following dielectric deposition. We report here results from medium energy ion scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of oxygen and silicon diffusion and interfacial layer reactions in multilayer gate stacks. Our results show that Ti metallization of HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si stacks reduces the SiO{sub 2} interlayer and (to a more limited extent) the HfO{sub 2} layer. We find that Si atoms initially present in the interfacial SiO{sub 2} layer incorporate into the bottom of the high-{kappa} layer. Some evidence for Ti-Si interdiffusion through the high-{kappa} film in the presence of a Ti gate in the crystalline HfO{sub 2} films is also reported. This diffusion is likely to be related to defects in crystalline HfO{sub 2} films, such as grain boundaries. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and corresponding electron energy loss spectroscopy scans show aggressive Ti-Si intermixing and oxygen diffusion to the outermost Ti layer, given high enough annealing temperature. Thermodynamic calculations show that the driving forces exist for some of the observed diffusion processes.

Goncharova, L. V.; Dalponte, M.; Gustafsson, T.; Celik, O.; Garfunkel, E.; Lysaght, P. S.; Bersuker, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Rd., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Rd., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); SEMATECH, 2705 Montopolis Dr., Austin, Texas 78741 (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Colloidal particle deposition in turbulent flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the initial deposition of monodispersed spherical colloidal particles from a steady fully developed turbulent flow onto conduit walls. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential is attractive, particle deposition is shown to be often governed by turbulent hydrodynamics. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential possess a repulsive maximum, particle deposition to first order is uniform and depends solely on electrical interaction effects. The developed theoretical model specialized to orifice deposition with the use of Harwell Flow3D turbulence modelling software qualitatively described the deposition of 0.5 {mu}m silica particles onto glass orifices from an aqueous suspension. The effect of the electrical double layer on the rate of colloidal particle deposition in laminar flow has been described by Spielman and Friedlander (1), Dahneke (2), Bowen et al. (3) and Bowen and Epstein (4). This article describes the extension of their work to colloidal particle deposition under steady fully developed turbulent flow conditions. This article also reports the results of orifice particle deposition experiments which were conducted to qualitatively investigate the developed theoretical model.

Morton, D.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

Hsu, George C. (La Crescenta, CA); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (W. Corine, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cambridge Nanotech Atomic Layer Deposition A Cambridge Nanotech (USA) Savannah S200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system was purchased for conformal growth of metal oxide films....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed increase in the optical bandgap of a-Si:H films close to the a-Si:H/cSi interface.

Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hierarchical functional layers on high-capacity lithium-excess cathodes for superior lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Li-excess layered Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 (LMNCO) nanoparticles are facilely synthesized using a surfactant-assisted dispersion method. Ultrathin and conformal oxide coatings are deposited on the surface of individual LMNCO nanoparticle via atomic layer deposition (ALD). The effect of oxide ALD coatings on improving electrochemical performance of LMNCO electrodes is evaluated and optimized via tuning the coating thickness and composition. In addition, we synthesize a novel coreshell structure cathode consisting of Li-excess LMNCO as core and Li-stoichiometric material as shell, and its electrochemical property is optimized by tailoring weight content and composition of shell materials. Finally, electrochemical performance of Li-excess cathode material can be maximized by surface modification with hierarch functional layers composed of 10wt.% LiCoO2 shell (?10nm thick) and 6ZrO2 ALD layers (?1nm thick), which delivers very high initial discharge capacities of 296.4, 259.8, 156.6 and 104.2mAhg?1 at 0.1C, 1C, 5C and 10C, and can retain 184.0mAhg?1 at 1C after 100 electrochemical cycles. Such remarkably improved cycleabilitiy and rate capability of nanoarchitected Li-excess layered cathode material can be attributed to the synergic effect from hierarchical functional coatings to reduce electrochemical polarization, structural degradation and side reactions during electrochemical cycling.

Jianqing Zhao; Saad Aziz; Ying Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Local elastic modulus of RF sputtered HfO{sub 2} thin film by atomic force acoustic microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) is a useful nondestructive technique for measurement of local elastic modulus of materials at nano-scale spatial resolution by measuring the contact resonance spectra for higher order modes of the AFM cantilever. The elastic modulus of RF sputtered HfO{sub 2} thin film has been measured quantitatively, using reference approach in which measurements are performed on the test and reference samples. Using AFAM, the measured elastic modulus of the HfO{sub 2} thin film is 22327 GPa, which is in agreement with the literature value of 22040 GPa for atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} thin film using nanoindentation technique.

Jena, S., E-mail: shuvendujena9@gmail.com; Tokas, R. B., E-mail: shuvendujena9@gmail.com; Sarkar, P., E-mail: shuvendujena9@gmail.com; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Misal, J. S.; Rao, K. D. [Optics and Thin Film Laboratory, Autonagar, BARC-Vizag, Visakhapatnam-530 012 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sandy Depositional Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Why is the study of sandy depositional systems central to the understanding of sand and sandstone? From earliest times geologists have wanted to know where and under what conditions a sandstone was depositedt...

F. J. Pettijohn; Paul Edwin Potter; Raymond Siever

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atomic magnetometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Spatially resolved excitation of Rydberg atoms and surface effects on an atom chip  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate spatially resolved, coherent excitation of Rydberg atoms on an atom chip. Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is used to investigate the properties of the Rydberg atoms near the gold-coated chip surface. We measure distance-dependent shifts ({approx}10 MHz) of the Rydberg energy levels caused by a spatially inhomogeneous electric field. The measured field strength and distance dependence is in agreement with a simple model for the electric field produced by a localized patch of Rb adsorbates deposited on the chip surface during experiments. The EIT resonances remain narrow (<4 MHz) and the observed widths are independent of atom-surface distance down to {approx} 20 {mu}m, indicating relatively long lifetime of the Rydberg states. Our results open the way to studies of dipolar physics, collective excitations, quantum metrology, and quantum information processing involving interacting Rydberg excited atoms on atom chips.

Tauschinsky, Atreju; Thijssen, Rutger M. T.; Whitlock, S.; Linden van den Heuvell, H. B. van; Spreeuw, R. J. C. [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

270

Glow discharge deposition at high rates using disilane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research program reported makes use of the fact that amorphous silicon films can be grown faster from disilane in a glow discharge than from the traditional silane. The goal is to find a method to grow films at a high rate and with sufficiently high quality to be used in an efficient solar cell. It must also be demonstrated that the appropriate device structure can be successfully fabricated under conditions which give high deposition rates. High quality intrinsic films have been deposited at 20 A/s. Efficiency of 5.6% on steel substrates and 5.3% on glass substrates were achieved using disilane i-layers deposited at 15 A/s in a basic structure, without wide-gap doped layers or light trapping. Wide gap p-layers were deposited using disilane. Results were compared with those obtained at Vactronic using high power discharges of silane-hydrogen mixtures. (LEW)

Rajeswaran, G.; Corderman, R.R.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams.

Krauss, Alan R. (Plainfield, IL); Auciello, Orlando (Cary, NC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sputter deposition for multi-component thin films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ion beam sputter-induced deposition using a single ion beam and a multicomponent target is capable of reproducibly producing thin films of arbitrary composition, including those which are close to stoichiometry. Using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and a computer controlled, well-focused ion beam, this sputter-deposition approach is capable of producing metal oxide superconductors and semiconductors of the superlattice type such as GaAs-AlGaAs as well as layered metal/oxide/semiconductor/superconductor structures. By programming the dwell time for each target according to the known sputtering yield and desired layer thickness for each material, it is possible to deposit composite films from a well-controlled sub-monolayer up to thicknesses determined only by the available deposition time. In one embodiment, an ion beam is sequentially directed via a set of X-Y electrostatic deflection plates onto three or more different element or compound targets which are constituents of the desired film. In another embodiment, the ion beam is directed through an aperture in the deposition plate and is displaced under computer control to provide a high degree of control over the deposited layer. In yet another embodiment, a single fixed ion beam is directed onto a plurality of sputter targets in a sequential manner where the targets are each moved in alignment with the beam under computer control in forming a multilayer thin film. This controlled sputter-deposition approach may also be used with laser and electron beams. 10 figs.

Krauss, A.R.; Auciello, O.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

273

Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); McCamy, James W. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films by pressure control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); McCamy, James W. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Atomic Calligraphy: The Direct Writing of Nanoscale Structures using MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) based method for the resist free patterning of nano-structures. Using a focused ion beam (FIB) to customize larger MEMS machines, we fabricate apertures as small as 50 nm on plates that can be moved with nanometer precision over an area greater than 20x20 {\\mu}m^2. Depositing thermally evaporated gold atoms though the apertures while moving the plate results in the deposition of nanoscale metal patterns. Adding a shutter only microns above the aperture, enables high speed control of not only where but also when atoms are deposited. Using a shutter, different sized apertures can be selectively opened and closed for nano-structure fabrication with features ranging from nano- to micrometers in scale. The ability to evaporate materials with high precision, and thereby fabricate circuits and structures in situ, enables new kinds of experiments based on the interactions of a small number of atoms and eventually even single atoms.

Matthias Imboden; Han Han; Jackson Chang; Flavio Pardo; Cristian A. Bolle; Evan Lowell; David J. Bishop

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

Erbil, A.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

277

Measuring atomic properties with an atom interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two experiments are presented which measure atomic properties using an atom interferometer. The interferometer splits the sodium de Broglie wave into two paths, one of which travels through an interaction region. The paths ...

Roberts, Tony David, 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic shell structure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Physics 8 Strain in Layered Nanocrystals Russel E. Caflisch Summary: in optoelectronic devices 5. Because of the small size of these systems, their atomic structure is...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic vapor laser Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE 1 Summary: vapor, atomic physics and vapor ionization, absorption reflection in a heated plasma layer, and...

280

Superconductive articles including cerium oxide layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic superconductor comprising a metal oxide substrate, a ceramic high temperature superconductive material, and a intermediate layer of a material having a cubic crystal structure, said layer situated between the substrate and the superconductive material is provided, and a structure for supporting a ceramic superconducting material is provided, said structure comprising a metal oxide substrate, and a layer situated over the surface of the substrate to substantially inhibit interdiffusion between the substrate and a ceramic superconducting material deposited upon said structure. 7 figures.

Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method for forming a barrier layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Carbon Layers Lead the Way towards a New Generation of Metamaterials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Layers Lead the Way towards a New Generation of Metamaterials Graphene - a one layer thick sheet of carbon atoms - has special properties that make it a desirable material...

283

direct_deposit_111609  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: PROTECT YOUR BANKING INFORMATION: DO NOT complete this form until you are ready to submit it to the Payroll Department. DIRECT DEPOSIT REQUEST Directions: 1. Provide required information neatly, legibly; 2. If Checking Account Direct Deposit, include a voided check. a. DO NOT submit a deposit slip! 3. If Savings Account Direct Deposit, include a copy of savings card. 4. Sign this form; 5. Inter-office mail it to Craft Payroll at "P238." DIRECT DEPOSITION AUTHORIZATION I hereby authorize Los Alamos National Laboratory, hereinafter called The Laboratory, to initiate credit entries and, if necessary, debit entries and adjustments for any credit entries in error to my account listed on this form. If deposit is for:

284

Spores from Devonian Deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN a well-illustrated paper on "Spores from Devonian Deposits, Mimerdalen, Spitsbergen" (Norsk. Polarinstitutt Skrifter, No. 132, 1964), Jorunn Os Vigran deals with the dispersed ...

1965-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

EMSL - ion deposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

deposition en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-labora...

286

EMSL - Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion beam for nanolithography and deposition and manipulation of structures at the nano scale* Microfabrication suite for designing and etching complex patterns into varied...

287

Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

1988-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Atomization, charge and deposition characteristics of electrostatically charged aircraft sprays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&&r rn&&rc bulges r&n rhe &urus, These bulges &&r dr&&pa are then pr&&pelled fr&&m thc periphery. Th? moment that the dr&&plets are split olf from thc protuberances &vill be different f&&r various droplets; this &ueans that the protuberances u ill... droplets by the electric repulsion: 15 Table '2: Critical drol&let size versus air velocity. AIR VELOCITY (mz's ) CRITICAL Hinze DROPET (um) Lane DIANETER Richardson 1. 0 2. 0 3. 0 4. 0 5. 0 6. 0 7. 0 8. 0 9. 0 10. 0 11. 0 12. 0 13. 0 14. 0...

Kim, Bong Hun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Infiltration in Unsaturated Layered Fluvial Deposits at Rio Bravo:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...meetings since 1992. We acknowledge funding from DOEs Environmental Management...fracture network at Fran Ridge, Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A photo essay and data...radioactive and hazardous waste disposal. Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor...

R. J. Glass; J. R. Brainard; T.-C. Jim Yeh

291

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

Frey, Terry

292

Solution deposition assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Building biomedical materials layer-by-layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this materials perspective, the promise of water based layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly as a means of generating drug-releasing surfaces for biomedical applications, from small molecule therapeutics to biologic drugs and ...

Hammond, Paula T.

294

Buffer layers for REBCO films for use in superconducting devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A superconducting article includes a substrate having a biaxially textured surface. A biaxially textured buffer layer, which can be a cap layer, is supported by the substrate. The buffer layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different transition metal cations. A biaxially textured superconductor layer is deposited so as to be supported by the buffer layer. A method of making a superconducting article is also disclosed.

Goyal, Amit; Wee, Sung-Hun

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Neutral atom traps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

Pack, Michael Vern

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (approximately 1100.degree.-1300.degree. C.) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20-50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Brian, Riley (Willimantic, CT); Szreders, Bernard E. (Oakdale, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fabrication of solid oxide fuel cell by electrochemical vapor deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), the deposition of an impervious high density thin layer of electrically conductive interconnector material, such as magnesium doped lanthanum chromite, and of an electrolyte material, such as yttria stabilized zirconia, onto a porous support/air electrode substrate surface is carried out at high temperatures (/approximately/1100/degree/ /minus/ 1300/degree/C) by a process of electrochemical vapor deposition. In this process, the mixed chlorides of the specific metals involved react in the gaseous state with water vapor resulting in the deposit of an impervious thin oxide layer on the support tube/air electrode substrate of between 20--50 microns in thickness. An internal heater, such as a heat pipe, is placed within the support tube/air electrode substrate and induces a uniform temperature profile therein so as to afford precise and uniform oxide deposition kinetics in an arrangement which is particularly adapted for large scale, commercial fabrication of SOFCs.

Riley, B.; Szreders, B.E.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Experimental study of the residual stress-induced self-assembly of MEMS structures during deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of using residual stresses favorably as a means of self-assembling MEMS during material deposition is experimentally investigated. Two atomic force microscope cantilevers are placed in contact at their free ends. Material...

Kim, Sang-Hyun

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Quantitative determination of energy enhanced interlayer transport in pulsed laser deposition of SrTiO3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the analysis of single-shot surface x-ray diffraction transients in terms of time-dependent coverages allows quantitative determination of interlayer transport in pulsed-laser deposition of SrTiO3. The fast interlayer transport during and immediately after the arrival of the laser plume and before crystallization represents the dominant mechanism for redistribution of the deposited material that is completed on a ?s-range or faster time scale. Following crystallization interlayer transport is more than four orders of magnitude slower because it is driven only by sluggish thermally activated processes, which represent a small fraction of total interlayer transport that decreases with increasing laser repetition rate. The analysis of growth kinetics shows that it is fast interlayer transport driven by hyperthermal energy species and not thermal annealing that governs layer completion that determines the growth mode and the formation of atomically sharp interfaces in pulsed-laser deposition of epitaxial oxide films and similar energy-enhanced growth processes.

Gyula Eres; J. Z. Tischler; C. M. Rouleau; P. Zschack; H. M. Christen; B. C. Larson

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

Perspectives on Deposition Velocity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deposition Deposition Velocity ... Going down the rabbit hole to explain that sinking feeling Brian DiNunno, Ph.D. Project Enhancement Corporation June 6 th , 2012 Discussion Framework  Development of the HSS Deposition Velocity Safety Bulletin  Broader discussion of appropriate conservatism within dispersion modeling and DOE-STD-3009 DOE-STD-3009 Dose Comparison "General discussion is provided for source term calculation and dose estimation, as well as prescriptive guidance for the latter. The intent is that calculations be based on reasonably conservative estimates of the various input parameters." - DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A.3 DOE-STD-3009 Dispersion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimized deposition and characterization of nanocrystalline magnesium indium oxide thin films for opto-electronic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transparent conducting magnesium indium oxide films (MgIn2O4) were deposited on to quartz substrates without a buffer layer at an optimized deposition temperature of 450C to achieve high transmittance in the visible spectral range and electrical conductivity in the low temperature region. Magnesium ions are distributed over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the inverted spinel structure with preferential orientation along (311) Miller plane. The possible mechanism that promotes conductivity in this system is the charge transfer between the resident divalent (Mg2+) and trivalent (In3+) cations in addition to the available oxygen vacancies in the lattice. A room temperature electrical conductivity of 1.5נ10?5Scm?1 and an average transmittance >75% have been achieved. Hall measurements showed n-type conductivity with electron mobility value 0.95נ10?2cm2V?1s?1 and carrier concentration 2.7נ1019cm?3. Smoothness of the film surface observed through atomic force microscope measurements favors this material for gas sensing and opto-electronic device development.

A. Moses Ezhil Raj; C. Ravidhas; R. Ravishankar; A. Rathish Kumar; G. Selvan; M. Jayachandran; C. Sanjeeviraja

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption #12;2 Bound-Bound & Bound

Sitko, Michael L.

303

7 -ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 7 - ATOMIC PROCESSES Atomic processes can be: 1. Scattering 2. Absorption/Thermal Emission scattering, although the results won't change much when this condition is relaxed. #12;2 Absorption/Thermal Emission Free-free (continuum) ("Bremsstrahlung") Emission/Absorption Bound-Bound & Bound-Free Processes

Sitko, Michael L.

304

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

305

Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wilson 2003). The use of citric acid as a dispersant allowed the deposition of thin...poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles embedded...stent for local drug delivery. Polyacrylic acid was used as surfactant because...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Future of Atomic Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

Fermi, E.

1946-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon at high deposition rates with increased stability using the hot wire filament technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate, comprising the steps of: positioning the substrate in a deposition chamber at a distance of about 0.5 to 3.0 cm from a heatable filament in the deposition chamber; maintaining a pressure in said deposition chamber in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr and pressure times substrate-filament spacing in the range of about 10 to 100 millitorr-cm, heating the filament to a temperature in the range of about 1,500 to 2,000.degree. C., and heating the substrate to a surface temperature in the range of about 280 to 475.degree. C.; and flowing silicohydride gas into the deposition chamber with said heated filament, decomposing said silicohydride gas into silicon and hydrogen atomic species and allowing products of gas reactions between said atomic species and the silicohydride gas to migrate to and deposit on said substrate while adjusting and maintaining said pressure times substrate-filament spacing in said deposition chamber at a value in said 10 to 100 millitorr range to produce statistically about 3 to 50 atomic collisions between the silicon and hydrogen atomic species migrating to said substrate and undecomposed molecules of the silane or other silicohydride gas in the deposition chamber.

Molenbroek, Edith C. (Utrecht, NL); Mahan, Archie Harvin (Golden, CO); Gallagher, Alan C. (Louisville, CO)

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thick adherent dielectric films on plastic substrates and method for depositing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thick adherent dielectric films deposited on plastic substrates for use as a thermal barrier layer to protect the plastic substrates from high temperatures which, for example, occur during laser annealing of layers subsequently deposited on the dielectric films. It is desirable that the barrier layer has properties including: a thickness of 1 .mu.m or greater, adheres to a plastic substrate, does not lift-off when cycled in temperature, has few or no cracks and does not crack when subjected to bending, resistant to lift-off when submersed in fluids, electrically insulating and preferably transparent. The thick barrier layer may be composed, for example, of a variety of dielectrics and certain metal oxides, and may be deposited on a variety of plastic substrates by various known deposition techniques. The key to the method of forming the thick barrier layer on the plastic substrate is maintaining the substrate cool during deposition of the barrier layer. Cooling of the substrate maybe accomplished by the use of a cooling chuck on which the plastic substrate is positioned, and by directing cooling gas, such as He, Ar and N.sub.2, between the plastic substrate and the cooling chucks. Thick adherent dielectric films up to about 5 .mu.m have been deposited on plastic substrates which include the above-referenced properties, and which enable the plastic substrates to withstand laser processing temperatures applied to materials deposited on the dielectric films.

Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA); Theiss, Steven D. (Woodbury, MN); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is deposited by passing a stream of silane gas (SiH{sub 4}) over a high temperature, 2,000 C, tungsten (W) filament in the proximity of a high temperature, 400 C, substrate within a low pressure, 8 mTorr, deposition chamber. The silane gas is decomposed into atomic hydrogen and silicon, which in turn collides preferably not more than 20--30 times before being deposited on the hot substrate. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films thus produced have only about one atomic percent hydrogen, yet have device quality electrical, chemical, and structural properties, despite this lowered hydrogen content. 7 figs.

Mahan, A.H.; Carapella, J.C.; Gallagher, A.C.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Reading Comprehension - Atomic History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic History Atomic History A Greek philosopher named Democritus said that all atoms are small, hard particles. He thought that atoms were made of a single material formed into different shapes and sizes. The word " _________ element compound mixture atom " is derived from the Greek word "atomos" which means "not able to be divided." In 1803, John Dalton, a school teacher, proposed his atomic theory. Dalton's theory states that elements (substances composed of only one type of _________ molecules ions atom ) combine in certain proportions to form _________ compounds atoms mixtures elements . In 1897, a British scientist named J. J. Thomson experimented with a cathode-ray tube which had a positively charged plate. The plate attracted negatively charged particles that we now call _________ protons neutrons

312

The Universe Adventure - Atoms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Matter and Atoms Matter and Atoms Richard Feynman "If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that...all things are made of atoms." -Richard P. Feynman, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics All is atoms Matter is made of atoms, and atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Everything in the Universe is made of matter. Though matter exists in many different forms, each form is made out of the same basic constituents: small particles called atoms. Atoms themselves are made of smaller particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.

313

Atomizing nozzle and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hybrid treatment involving micro-arc discharge oxidation and EPD. A dual-coating...the porous TiO2 layer by micro-arc oxidation coupled with EPD has been...within porous TiO2 layer by micro-arc oxidation coupled with electrophoretic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electrical properties of thin-film structures formed by pulsed laser deposition of Au, Ag, Cu, Pd, Pt, W, Zr metals on n-6H-SiC crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diode structures with ideality factors of 1.28-2.14 and potential barriers from 0.58 to 0.62 eV on the semiconductor side were formed by pulsed laser deposition of Au, Ag, Cu, Pd, Pt, W, and Zr metal films on n-6H-SiC crystal without epitaxial layer preparation. A high density of surface acceptor and donor states was formed at the metal-semiconductor interface during deposition of the laser-induced atomic flux, which violated the correlation between the potential barrier height and metal work function. The barrier heights determined from characteristic currents and capacitance measurements were in quite good agreement. For the used low-resistance semiconductor and contact elements, the sizes of majority carrier (electron) depletion regions were determined as 26-60 nm.

Romanov, R. I.; Zuev, V. V.; Fominskii, V. Yu., E-mail: vyfominskij@mephi.ru; Demin, M. V.; Grigoriev, V. V. [MEPhI National Research Nuclear University (Russian Federation)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

A simplified model of thin layer static/flowing dynamics for granular materials with yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/deposition processes when a layer of particles is flowing over a static layer or near the destabilization and arrestA simplified model of thin layer static/flowing dynamics for granular materials with yield, 75005 Paris, France, 4 ANGE team, INRIA, CETMEF, Lab. J.-L. Lions, Paris, France Abstract We introduce

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

317

As-deposited low-strain LPCVD (low-pressure, chemical-vapor-deposition) polysilicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As-deposited polysilicon films with very low residual strain (lower than 5 x 10/sup -5/) are obtained by a low-pressure, chemical-vapor-deposition (LPCVD) process. Straight polysilicon bridges 300 ..mu..m long, 1.2 ..mu..m thick, and 2 to 20 ..mu..m wide, made using this process. No buckling has been observed in any of the nearly one thousand bridges of this type made in two separate process runs. In addition, no problems of sticking between the bridges and the substrate were encountered with these structures. The polysilicon films from which the beams were fabricated were deposited by pyrolyzing silane at 605/degree/C on a phosphosilicate-glass (PSG) layer (8 wt % P). The PSG layer serves as a sacrificial layer to be subsequently etched away to free the bridge. Our research is aimed at obtaining an understanding of these relationships through consideration of the role of interfacial stresses and the kinetics of initial crystalline nucleation. The technique for producing these low-strain films is significant, however, because no high-temperature annealing steps are required to produce them. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Fan, L.S.; Muller, R.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Vacuum arc deposition devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Instrument Series: Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Sputter Deposition System Only available at EMSL, the Discovery ® Deposition System has been customized to be a fully automated multi-functional "hybrid" instrument with several modes for thin film processing, including multi-target sputtering, effusion cell deposition, electron beam deposition, and in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) materials characterization. Unlike most systems, the Discovery ® Deposition System's unique configuration offers operational flexibility, efficiency, and control, allowing a range of applications and materials to be processed simultaneously. Because it is software controlled, users can provide their own "recipes" and have a complete log of what happens throughout the

320

Layer-By-Layer Deposition and Ordering of Low-Molecular-Weight Dye Molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) that exhibit second- harmonic generation (red 3green), with c(2) values as large as 11.3 ? 10?9 esu, that is processes using reactive silane compounds require organic solvents and high temperatures.[5

Heflin, Randy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Atomic Energy Commission : Atomic Power at Shippingport - 1958 Educational Film  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Atomic Energy Commission & Westinghouse Electric Company take us on a tour of an atomic power station.

None

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

323

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

324

Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOB ER, 1970 Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures* B. E. Allen, G. P. Alldredge, and F. W. de bette DePartment of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 18... monolayers of identical particles, stacked atop one another to form a 21-layer slab. A side view of this system is shown in Fig. 1. The films alternately have atomic masses m and M, with m corresponding to the outermost films. The crys- tal structure...

Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; WETTE, FWD.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Magnetism of Mn layers on Fe(100)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic state of epitaxial overlayers of Mn grown on Fe(100) is studied using spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy. Nonzero exchange asymmetries are found, demonstrating that the surface layer of the Mn overlayers has a net magnetic moment. The exchange asymmetry oscillates with a period of about two atomic layers as the Mn overlayer thickness is varied, proving that the Mn forms ferromagnetic (100) sheets and that the sheets align antiferromagnetically. The average Mn exchange splitting is found to be 2.9 eV, indicating a magnetic moment of the order 3?B.

T. G. Walker and H. Hopster

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Substrate-dependent wetting layer formation during GaN growth: Impact on the morphology of the films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have compared epitaxial growth of GaN films on 6H-SiC(0001)-({radical}(3)x{radical}(3))R30 deg. -Ga and on (0001)-sapphire. Predeposited Ga layers were nitrided by ion beam assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Whereas on SiC the initially deposited Ga covers the substrate surface completely, on sapphire only Ga droplets are present. The different distribution of the predeposited Ga affects the morphology of GaN significantly. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis of the grown films show that the complete wetting of the SiC substrate with Ga enhances finally the size and the flatness of GaN terraces and thus the quality of the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that metallic Ga resides also on top of the GaN films during the growth.

Sidorenko, A.; Peisert, H.; Neumann, H.; Chasse, T. [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung e.V. Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

Fischer, D.; Jansen, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Fuente, G. F. de la [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy deposition by Alfven waves into the dayside auroral oval: Cluster and FAST observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy deposition by Alfve´n waves into the dayside auroral oval: Cluster and FAST observations C observations from the Cluster and FAST spacecraft showing the deposition of energy into the auroral ionosphere from broadband ULF waves in the cusp and low-latitude boundary layer. A comparison of the wave Poynting

California at Berkeley, University of

329

Ambipolar silicon nanowire FETs with stenciled-deposited metal gate Davide Sacchetto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ambipolar silicon nanowire FETs with stenciled-deposited metal gate Davide Sacchetto , Veronica Keywords: Schottky barrier Ambipolarity Si nanowire Stencil lithography FET Silicide a b s t r a c t We chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of amorphous Si (a-Si) and SiO2 layers as well as metal gate patterning

De Micheli, Giovanni

330

Properties of nitrogen doped silicon films deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition from disilane and ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen doped silicon films have been deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition from disilane Si2H6 and ammonia NH3. Deposition kinetics is investigated, pointing out the influences of the deposition temperature, the total pressure and the gas flow rates. According to the Bruggeman theory, variations of the NH3/Si2H6 gaseous ratio allow for a wide range of the SiNx stoichiometry as well as a good control of the film nitrogen doping. The different behaviours of the nitrogen atom in silicon films are discussed and an overview of the nitrogen doped silicon physical properties (optical, mechanical and electrical) is proposed for the development of boron-doped polysilicon gates.

P Temple-Boyer; L Jalabert; E Couderc; E Scheid; P Fadel; B Rousset

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ATOMS ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission Richard G. Hewlett and lack M. Roll With a Foreword by Richard S. Kirkendall and an Essay on Sources by Roger M. Anders University of California Press Berkeley Los Angeles London Published 1989 by the University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California University of California Press, Ltd. London, England Prepared by the Atomic Energy Commission; work made for hire. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hewlett, Richard G. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961. (California studies in the history of science) Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Nuclear energy-United States-History. 2. U.S. Atomic Energy Commission-History. 3. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.

333

Accelerated guided atomic pulse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The deleterious effects of dispersion on a propagating coherent atomic pulse, along the axis of a traveling-wave laser beam, can be ameliorated by the nonlinear self-interacting force due to dipole-dipole coupling between atoms. We show that a wide atomic pulse with a particular profile can retain its shape during propagation and, moreover, the momentum of the pulse increases due to photon absorption. For the wide soliton case, we demonstrate analytically that the self-interacting atomic force scales inversely with the third power of the pulse width.

S. Dyrting; Weiping Zhang; B. C. Sanders

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Atomic Collapse Observed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

335

Multiplicative Sets of Atoms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??It is possible for an element to have both an atom factorization and a factorization that will always contain a reducible element. This leads us (more)

Rand, Ashley Nicole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Atom Nano-Optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanolocalized light fields composed of photon dots and photon holes are being used to control the motion of atoms on a nanometer spatial scale.

Balykin, Victor; Klimov, Vasilii; Letokhov, Vladilen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Model for reflectance anisotropy spectra of molecular layered systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a theoretical study based on the local field interaction for the reflectance anisotropy spectra of organic molecular layers. Each layer is formed by an ordered two-dimensional array of polarizable organic molecules that respond to the local electric field like point-like harmonic oscillators. We concentrate on the morphological characteristics of the layers and its effect on the spectra, showing that the reorientation of the molecules from layer to layer, as the system is assembled, gives rise to a line shape of the spectra that goes from peak-like to derivative-like. Our spectra shows good qualitative agreement with experimental results of a layered system of metalloporphyrin octaesters molecules deposited onto an isotropic gold substrate by the Langmuir-Schaefer technique.

Bernardo S. Mendoza and R. A. Vzquez-Nava

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic layer-by-layer force Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the 3D hut cluster growth mode to the ... Source: Kim, Sehun - Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Collection: Computer...

339

Epitaxial graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition on single crystal thin iridium films on sapphire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Epitaxial graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition on single crystal thin iridium films Cedex 9, France (Dated: 15 March 2011) Uniform single layer graphene was grown on single-crystal Ir. These graphene layers have a single crystallographic orientation and a very low density of defects, as shown

Boyer, Edmond

340

Atoms for Peace Awards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Technology, is to be chairman of the Organization and Planning Committee of Atoms for Peace Awards. In addition to Dr. Killian, the Committee will include Dr. Detlev W. ... and Dr. Alan Waterman, director of the National Science Foundation. The Atoms for Peace Awards, it will be recalled, were established last summer as a memorial to Henry Ford ...

1955-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hirshfeld atom refinement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement method is explained and validated through comparison of structural models of Gly-L-Ala obtained from synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction data at 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Structural parameters involving hydrogen atoms are determined with comparable precision from both experiments and agree mostly to within two combined standard uncertainties.

Capelli, S.C.

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

Stability of polymer-dielectric bi-layers for athermal silicon photonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature sensitivity of Si based rings can be nullified by the use of polymer over-cladding. Integration of athermal passive rings in an electronic-photonic architecture requires the possibility of multi-layer depositions ...

Raghunathan, Vivek

343

Organic solar cells with an ultra thin organized hole transport layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discotic liquid crystals (LC) are promising materials to manufacture devices for organic photovoltaic conversion. These molecules possess a mesophase ... the columns. After the deposition of an organic layer on t...

S. Archambeau; H. Bock; I. Seguy; P. Jolinat

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hybrid Thin Film Deposition System | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hybrid Thin Film Deposition System Hybrid Thin Film Deposition System Only available at EMSL, the Discovery Deposition System has been customized to be a fully automated...

345

Atomic dark matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose that dark matter is dominantly comprised of atomic bound states. We build a simple model and map the parameter space that results in the early universe formation of hydrogen-like dark atoms. We find that atomic dark matter has interesting implications for cosmology as well as direct detection: Weak-scale dark atoms can accommodate hyperfine splittings of order 100 keV, consistent with the inelastic dark matter interpretation of the DAMA data while naturally evading direct detection bounds. Moreover, protohalo formation can be suppressed below M{sub proto} ? 10{sup 3}10{sup 6}M{sub s}un for weak scale dark matter due to Ion-Radiation and Ion-Atom interactions in the dark sector.

Kaplan, David E.; Krnjaic, Gordan Z.; Rehermann, Keith R.; Wells, Christopher M., E-mail: dkaplan@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: gordan@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: keith@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: cwells13@pha.jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of October I to December 31, 1997. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was continued. Variations of vorticity contours which are averaged over a short time duration are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. Sample particle trajectories are obtained and discussed. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed. Particle resuspension process in turbulent flows are studied. The model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ash & Pulverized Coal Deposition in Combustors & Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of July 1 to September 30, 1997. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was continued. Variations of vorticity contours which are averaged over a short time duration are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advance flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analysis. Sample particle trajectories are obtained and discussed. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed. Particle resuspension process in turbulent flows are studied. The model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data.

Goodarz Ahmadi

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

Lim, Chong Wee (Urbana, IL); Ohmori, Kenji (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan Georgiev (Champaign, IL); Greene, Joseph E. (Champaign, IL)

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Depth profiling of oxidized a-C:D Layers on Be -- A comparison of {sup 4}He RBS and {sup 28}Si ERD analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In applications dealing with the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon layers or in the determination of the composition of deposited layers on the walls of nuclear fusion plasma experiments, the analysis of mixtures of light elements on heavy substrates is necessary. Depth profiling by means of RBS is often difficult due to the overlap of the backscattering intensities of different constituents from different depths. The erosion and reaction of deposited amorphous deuterated carbon (a-C:D) films with a Be substrate due to annealing in air poses an analytical challenge especially if simultaneously the exchange of hydrogen isotopes should be monitored. The analysis of the different recoiling atoms from collisions with heavy ions in Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) can provide a tool which resolves all constituents in a single analysis. In the present study the composition of intermixed layers on Be containing H, D, Be, C and O has been analyzed using conventional {sup 4}He RBS at 2.2 MeV together with 2.5 MeV {sup 4}He ERD for hydrogen isotope analysis. At these energies, an overlap of signals from different constituents could be avoided in most cases. As alternative method heavy ion ERD using Si{sup 7+} ions extracted from a 5 MeV Tandem Van de Graff accelerator was investigated. At a scattering angle of 30{degree} Si ions could not be scattered into the detector and a solid state detector without protecting foil could be used. Even in the intermixed layers at terminal energies of 5 MeV the heavy constituents could be separated while signals from recoiling hydrogen and deuterium atoms could be resolved on top of the signal from the Be substrate. For the analysis of the RBS and ERD data the newly developed spectra simulation program SIMNRA has been used which includes a large data bank for scattering and nuclear reaction cross sections. The depth profiles of all constituents extracted from the simulation are compared for both methods.

Roth, J.; Mayer, M. [EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany). Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Walsh, D.; Wampler, W.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

High-rate deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In high-rate deposition of a-Si:H films, the effect of deposition parameters on material properties are examined when silane and disilane are the feed gases. The emphasis is on RF glow discharge, but other deposition methods are also covered. The problems of gas-phase polymerization and power formation at high rates have been overcome by modified reactor designs. Deposition rates of 1-3 nm/s are adequate for economically fabricating the intrinsic layer. Laboratory-size a-Si:H cells with greater than 10% efficiency have been achieved with both silane and disilane at rates in the 1- to 2-nm/s range.

Luft, W.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chemical vapor deposition sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modifications of the surface properties of metals by oxide overlayers: 1, Oxidized zirconium deposited on the Pt(100) single crystal surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic zirconium was deposited on a single crystal Pt(100) surface by thermal evaporation in UHV conditions. The deposit was oxidized by exposure to oxygen immediately after deposition. Oxidized zirconium was found to grow on the platinum ace by the layer-by-layer mechanism. The adsorption of carbon monoxide on the surface was studied as a function of the zirconium coverage. The results show that oxidized zirconium forms a chemically inert layer which blocks the adsorptive sites of the underlying platinum substrate. The properties of the free Pt surface were unaffected by the presence of the oxidized zirconium layer.

Bardi, U.; Ross, P.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

355

general_atomics.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

former former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level. The General Atomics site is in the center of Torrey Mesa Science Center, a 304-acre industrial

356

Uncertainties on Atomic Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Processes in Fusion, September 4-7, 2012, Daejeon, Republic of Korea

C. P. Ballance; S. D. Loch; A. R. Foster; R. K. Smith; M. C. Witthoeft; T. R. Kallman

357

Relativistic Atomic Structure Calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review surveys methods for computing the electronic structures of atoms based on the use of relativistic quantum mechanics. The main mathematical formulas are presented with some account of the underlying...

Ian P. Grant

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300 feet above sea level. The General Atomics site is in the center of Torrey Mesa Science Center, a 304-acre industrial park. No ground water wells are at or near the Hot Cell...

359

Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cleaning graphene with a titanium sacrificial layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene is a promising material for future electronic applications and chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper is a promising method for synthesizing graphene on the wafer scale. The processing of such graphene films into electronic devices introduces a variety of contaminants which can be difficult to remove. An approach to cleaning residues from the graphene channel is presented in which a thin layer of titanium is deposited via thermal e-beam evaporation and immediately removed. This procedure does not damage the graphene as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy, greatly enhances the electrical performance of the fabricated graphene field effect transistors, and completely removes the chemical residues from the surface of the graphene channel as evidenced by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Joiner, C. A., E-mail: cjoiner3@gatech.edu; Roy, T.; Hesabi, Z. R.; Vogel, E. M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Chakrabarti, B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Harnessed Atom | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on...

362

Optical imaging of Rydberg atoms .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present an experiment exploring electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rydberg atoms in order to observe optical nonlinearities at the single photon level. ??Rb atoms (more)

Mazurenko, Anton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Rydberg Atoms for Quantum Information.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I examine interactions between ensembles of cold Rydberg atoms, and between Rydberg atoms and an intense, optical standing wave. Because of their strong electrostatic interactions, (more)

Younge, Kelly Cooper

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Methods for improved growth of group III nitride buffer layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for growing high crystal quality group III-nitride epitaxial layers with advanced multiple buffer layer techniques. In an embodiment, a method includes forming group III-nitride buffer layers that contain aluminum on suitable substrate in a processing chamber of a hydride vapor phase epitaxy processing system. A hydrogen halide or halogen gas is flowing into the growth zone during deposition of buffer layers to suppress homogeneous particle formation. Some combinations of low temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) and high temperature buffers that contain aluminum (e.g., AlN, AlGaN) may be used to improve crystal quality and morphology of subsequently grown group III-nitride epitaxial layers. The buffer may be deposited on the substrate, or on the surface of another buffer. The additional buffer layers may be added as interlayers in group III-nitride layers (e.g., GaN, AlGaN, AlN).

Melnik, Yurity; Chen, Lu; Kojiri, Hidehiro

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Optical atomic magnetometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Multiple density layered insulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Tunable Phonon Polaritons in Atomically Thin van der Waals Crystals of Boron Nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

van der Waals heterostructures assembled from atomically thin crystalline layers of diverse two-dimensional solids are emerging as a new paradigm in the physics of materials. We used infrared nanoimaging to study the ...

Dai, S.

369

Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-1 Layering as OptimizationLayering as Optimization DecompositionDecomposition Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-2 CONTENTSCONTENTS Introduction (Marta;2 Layering as Optimization Decomposition 3-3 Layering as Optimization Decomposition Introduction By Marta

Fan, Xingzhe

370

Atomic mass compilation 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fr Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitt Gieen, Gieen (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Multiple layer insulation cover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes.

Qin, Shengyong [ORNL; Hellstrom, Sondra L [ORNL; Bao, Zhenan [ORNL; Boyanov, Boyan [Intel Corporation; Li, An-Ping [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Solid particle deposition during turbulent flow production operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production and transportation of petroleum fluids could be severely affected by deposition of suspended particles (i.e., asphaltene, paraffin/wax, sand, and/or diamondoid) in the production wells and/or transfer pipelines. In many instances the amount of precipitation is rather large causing complete plugging of these conduits. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of suspended particles during flow conditions. In this paper the authors present an analysis of the diffusional effects on the rate of solid particle deposition during turbulent flow conditions (crude oil production generally falls within this regime). The turbulent boundary layer theory and the concepts of mass transfer have been utilized to calculate the particle deposition rates on the walls of the flowing conduit. The developed model accounts for the eddy and Brownian diffusivities as well as for inertial effects. The analysis presented in this paper shows that rates of solid-particle deposition (during crude oil production) on the walls of the flowing channel due solely to diffusional effects are small. It is also shown that deposition rates decrease with increasing particle size. However, when the process is momentum controlled (large particle sizes) higher deposition rates are expected.

Escobedo, J.; Mansoori, G.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Characterization of YSZ solid oxide fuel cells electrolyte deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying and low pressure plasma spraying  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Yttria doped zirconia has been widely used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Plasma spraying is a cost-effective process to...2O3 stabilized ZrO2...(YSZ) layer was deposited by low press...

C. Zhang; H. L. Liao; W. Y. Li; G. Zhang; C. Coddet

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

McIntyre, B.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous semiconductor films. Semiannual report, 1 May 1984-31 October 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of research done by the Institute of Energy Conversion for the Solar Energy Research Institute in 1984 on high-efficiency, stable, amorphous silicon solar cells, fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane at high growth rates. The kinetics of CVD with higher order silanes were modelled for a tubular reactor with static substrates. A gas-phase reaction network was adopted, based on published silylene insertion and decomposition pathways. Mass balances for hydrogen and all saturated silanes through octasilane were derived. Boron-doped a-Si:H p-layers were deposited by CVD at 200/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C. Band gap and conductivity depended strongly on the diborane fraction in the feed gas, independent of substrate temperature. The effects of intrinsic layer deposition temperature and growth rate on material properties and device performance were studied. Cell parameters of p-i-n cells were correlated with i-layer deposition temperature and growth rate. Fill factor and short-circuit current depended on deposition conditions, while open-circuit voltage did not. Effects of diborane additions to the feed gas during i-layer deposition were studied. Experimental evidence and calculations indicate high resistance at the back contact.

Baron, B.N.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Hegedus, S.S.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Peaceful Uses of the Atom and Atoms for Peace  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Peaceful Uses of the Atom Peaceful Uses of the Atom Fermi and Atoms for Peace · Understanding the Atom · Seaborg · Teller Atoms for Peace Atoms for Peace + 50 - Conference, October 22, 2003 Celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Eisenhower's "Atoms for Peace" speech to the UN General Assembly Atoms for Peace (video 12:00 Minutes) Atoms for Peace Address given by Dwight D. Eisenhower before the General Assembly of the United Nations, New York City, December 8, 1953 Documents: Atomic Power in Space: A History A history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States from the mid-1950s through 1982; interplanetary space exploration successes and achievements have been made possible by this technology. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

378

Fabrication of alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique has been proposed for the fabrication of atmospheric corrosion resistant alkali halide UV photocathodes by pulsed laser deposition. We produced photocathodes with a highly homogeneous photoemissive layer well-adherent to the substrate. The photocathodes were mounted in a vacuum photodiode, and a tungsten grid was used as an anode. Using pulsed UV lasers, we carried out experiments aimed at evaluating the quantum efficiency of the photocathodes. With a dc voltage applied between the photocathode and anode grid, we measured a shunt signal proportional to the total charge emitted by the cathode exposed to UV laser light. The proposed deposition technique enables one to produce photocathodes with photoemissive layers highly uniform in quantum efficiency, which is its main advantage over thin film growth by resistive evaporation. (laser technologies)

Brendel', V M; Bukin, V V; Garnov, Sergei V; Bagdasarov, V Kh; Denisov, N N; Garanin, Sergey G; Terekhin, V A; Trutnev, Yurii A

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Imaging individual dopant atoms on cleavage surfaces of wurtzite-structure compound semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the identification of bulk-dopant atoms in (1120) and (1010) cleavage surfaces of wurtzite CdSe in atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images. The In dopant atoms give rise to elevations (hillocks) of up to 5 nm in diameter in the empty- and occupied-state images. This contrast is simulated and it shows that the dopant atoms are positively charged. Hillocks with different symmetries with respect to the underlying lattice are correlated with different subsurface locations of the In-dopant atoms. Dopant atoms can be observed up to a depth below the surface of 3 to 5 layers. A quantitative analysis of the concentration of dopant atoms in the bulk yield the same values for both surfaces and agrees well with the In content of the crystal. Similar features in CdS(1010) surfaces are also attributed to In-dopant atoms.

B. Siemens, C. Domke, M. Heinrich, Ph. Ebert, and K. Urban

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Deposition of platinum catalyst by plasma sputtering for fuel cells: 3D simulation and experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma sputtering is one of the most promising methods for reducing the amount of platinum catalyst in porous electrodes for low temperature fuel cells. Here, a simulation of the platinum deposition by radio frequency plasma sputtering has been developed and compared with experimental results to allow optimization of the deposition process. In the simulation, the transport of sputtered atoms through the argon plasma is obtained using a 3D Monte Carlo model called SPaTinG (Sputtered Particles Transport in Gas). The Yamamura formula provides the Pt sputtering yield on the target, and the initial energy distribution of sputtered atoms is given by the Thompson distribution. A 1D hybrid model is used to estimate the mean energy of argon ions impinging onto the platinum target. Experimentally, platinum is deposited on silicon in two plasma sputtering chambers with different geometries. The deposition rate is measured by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The angular distribution of the Pt atoms ejected from the target surface and the condensation coefficient of the Pt atoms on silicon are calculated by adjusting the simulated and experimental deposition rates at 0.5?Pa. A good agreement between the simulation and the experiment is observed as a function of the targetsubstrate distance for the two system geometries at low pressure (0.5?Pa).

A Caillard; C Charles; R Boswell; A Meige; P Brault

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

WHAT'S GRAPHENE? Mono or few layers of sp2 bonded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHAT'S GRAPHENE? · Mono or few layers of sp2 bonded carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice 105cm2/Vs at RT. 1 Due to its unique transport properties, graphene is suitable for implementation sampling (EOS) timeresolved spectroscopy to optically pump and THz probe exfoliated graphene ribbons (GR

Mellor-Crummey, John

382

Atomic-scale characterization of germanium isotopic multilayers by atom probe tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report comparison of the interfacial sharpness characterization of germanium (Ge) isotopic multilayers between laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). An alternating stack of 8-nm-thick naturally available Ge layers and 8-nm-thick isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge layers was prepared on a Ge(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The APT mass spectra consist of clearly resolved peaks of five stable Ge isotopes ({sup 70}Ge, {sup 72}Ge, {sup 73}Ge, {sup 74}Ge, and {sup 76}Ge). The degree of intermixing at the interfaces between adjacent layers was determined by APT to be around 0.8 {+-} 0.1 nm which was much sharper than that obtained by SIMS.

Shimizu, Y.; Takamizawa, H.; Toyama, T.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2145-2 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kawamura, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Itoh, K. M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Haller, E. E. [University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lesson 3- Atoms and Isotopes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Youve probably heard people refer to nuclear energy as atomic energy. Why? Nuclear energy is the energy that is stored in the bonds of atoms, inside the nucleus. Nuclear power plants are designed to capture this energy as heat and convert it to electricity. This lesson looks closely at what atoms are and how atoms store energy.

384

Educational Multiwavelength Atomic Emission Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atomic absorption is the capability for simultaneous multielement analysis. It can be used colleges had acquired atomic absorption instruments by the year 1990.[2] In contrast, atomic emission with the acetylene-air flame source taken from an existing atomic absorption instrument. Two spectrometer units

Nazarenko, Alexander

385

Atomic and electronic shells of Al77 X. G. Gong,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic and electronic shells of Al77 X. G. Gong,1,2 D. Y. Sun,2,1 and Xiao-Qian Wang2 1 Institute shell structures for the experimentally characterized Al77 . The onionlike Al77 structure can be described by a stable Al13 inner core covered by a two-layer atomic shell. The stability of Al77

Gong, Xingao

386

Systems having optical absorption layer for mid and long wave infrared and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical system according to one embodiment includes a substrate; and an optical absorption layer coupled to the substrate, wherein the optical absorption layer comprises a layer of diamond-like carbon, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). A method for applying an optical absorption layer to an optical system according to another embodiment includes depositing a layer of diamond-like carbon of an optical absorption layer above a substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). Additional systems and methods are also presented.

Kuzmenko, Paul J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

IPredictions for gain in the fission-fragment-excited atomic xenon laser Jong W. Shon and Mark J. Kushnera)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, New Mexico 87185 (Received 30 June 1992; accepted for publication 1 December 1992) The infrared atomic-power deposition (l-100 W cm-s), long pulse lengths (I-10 ms), and high-energy deposition (100s J 8-l). Optical responsible for this behavior. I. INTRODUCTION During the past few years, there has been a renewed interest

Kushner, Mark

388

Composition Control in the Direct Laser-Deposition Process R.R. UNOCIC and J.N. DuPONT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the LENS system makes this feasible. Dissimilar powder materials can be placed into separate powder hoppers the composition within each layer deposit. Previous work in the closely related process of fusion welding has changes in a continuous manner from one target value to another. However, with a direct metal- deposition

DuPont, John N.

389

Graphene-based textured surface by pulsed laser deposition as a robust platform for surface enhanced Raman scattering applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Graphene-based textured surface by pulsed laser deposition as a robust platform for surface scattering (SERS)-active substrate based on gold nanoparticles-decorated few-layer (fl) graphene grown by pulsed laser deposition. Diamond-Like Carbon film has been converted to fl-graphene after thermal

Boyer, Edmond

390

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

former General former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level.

391

OCTOBER 1990 DEPOSITION AND REMOVAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, shielding, resuspension, indoor deposition, the relative airborne con- centrations indoors and outdoors RESUSPENSION; PLANTS; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTION; REMEDIAL ACTION; SHIELDING; SURFACE CONTAMINATION; URBAN effected by road traffic, and street cleaning the degree of resuspension, i.e. the return of deposited

392

Magnetism of Chinese loess deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......April 1984 research-article Articles Magnetism of Chinese loess deposits Friedrich Heller...astr. Soc. (1984) 77, 125-141 Magnetism of Chinese loess deposits Friedrich Heller...considerable improvement of NRM cleaning. Often Magnetism of Chinese loess LOG R h ' M A H B......

Friedrich Heller; Liu Tungsheng

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Atomic Josephson vortices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that Josephson vortices in a quasi-one-dimensional atomic Bose Josephson junction can be controllably manipulated by imposing a difference of chemical potentials on the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate waveguides forming the junction. This effect, which has its origin in the Berry phase structure of a vortex, turns out to be very robust in the whole range of the parameters where such vortices can exist. We also propose that a Josephson vortex can be created by the phase imprinting technique and can be identified by a specific tangential feature in the interference picture produced by expanding clouds released from the waveguides.

Kaurov, V. M.; Kuklov, A. B. [Department of Engineering Science and Physics, College of Staten Island, CUNY, Staten Island, New York 10314 (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Atomic Force Microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ni-Pt Silicide Formation Through Ti Mediating Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With Ni1-xPtxSi, the variation in queue time between the final surface cleaning and Ni-Pt deposition represents a significant manufacturability issue. A short queue time is often difficult to maintain, leading to the formation of an oxide layer on the Si substrate prior to Ni-Pt deposition that can affect the formation of Ni1-xPtxSi and its texture. In this manuscript, it will be shown that an extended queue time prior to Ni-Pt deposition leads to morphological changes in the Ni1-xPtxSi formation sequence. A layer of Ti deposited between Ni-Pt and Si reduces the native oxide and may facilitate Ni1-xPtxSi formation. With increasing Ti thickness, the presence of metal-rich phases is gradually reduced and the formation temperature of Ni1-xPtxSi increases, suggesting a direct formation of Ni1-xPtxSi from Ni-Pt. In the presence of an interfacial oxide, an increase in formation temperature is also observed with increasing Ti interlayer thickness. When the Ti layer is sufficiently thick, the phase formation sequence becomes relatively insensitive to the presence of an interfacial oxide or extended queue time.

Besser,P.; Lavoie, C.; Ozcan, A.; Murray, C.; Strane, J.; Wong, K.; Gribelyuk, M.; Wang, Y.; Parks, C.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hydrothermal Deposition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Deposition Hydrothermal Deposition Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Hydrothermal Deposition Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Deposition: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Quartz veins indicate ancient fluid flow, possibly the result of a hydrothermal system (reference: http://www.nvcc.edu/home/cbentley/dc_rocks/) Tufa mounds indicate the location of extinct hot springs. In this photo they show the ancient extent of the surface manifestations at Mono Lake, CA (reference: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/climatechange/page.aspx?id=170704)(photo by Scott Stine) Hydrothermal water carries minerals as it travels through the crust. These minerals are often deposited as pressure decreases as the fluid approaches

398

Asphaltene and other heavy-organic particle deposition during transfer and production operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production and transportation of petroleum fluids could be severely affected by deposition of suspended particles (i.e. asphaltene, paraffin/wax, sand, and/or diamondoid) in the production wells and/or transfer pipelines. In many instances the amount of precipitation is rather large causing complete plugging of these conduits. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of suspended particles during flow conditions. In this paper we present an overview of the heavy organic deposition problem, its causes, effects and preventive techniques. We also present an analysis of the diffusional effects on the rate of solid particle deposition during turbulent flow conditions (crude oil production generally falls within this regime). We utilize the turbulent boundary layer theory and the concepts of mass transfer to explain the particle deposition rates on the walls of the flowing conduits. The developed model accounts for the Brownian and eddy diffusivities as well as for inertial effects and other forces acting acting upon the particles. The analysis presented in this paper shows that rates of particle deposition (asphaltene, paraffin/wax, sand, and/or diamondoid) on the walls of the flowing channel, due solely to diffusional effects, are negligible. It is also shown that deposition rates decrease with with increasing particle size. However, when the deposition process is momentum controlled (large particles) higher deposition rates are predicted. It is shown a decrease in deposition rates with increasing crude oil kinematic viscosity. An increase in deposition rates with increasing production rates is also observed.

Escobedo, J.; Mansoori, G.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Laser techniques for studying chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to produce thin films for microelectronics, protective coatings and other materials processing applications. Despite the large number of applications, however, little is known about the fundamental chemistry and physics of most CVD processes. CVD recipes have generally been determined empirically, but as process requirements become more stringent, a more basic understanding will be needed to improve reactor design and speed process optimization. In situ measurements of the reacting gas are important steps toward gaining such an understanding, both from the standpoint of characterizing the reactor and testing models of a CVD process. Our work, a coordinated program of experimental and theoretical research in the fundamental mechanisms of CVD, illustrates the application of laser techniques to the understanding of a CVD system. We have used a number of laser-based techniques to probe CVD systems and have compared our measurements with predictions from computer models, primarily for the silane CVD system. The silane CVD model solves the two-dimensional, steady-state boundary layer equations of fluid flow coupled to 26 elementary chemical reactions describing the thermal decomposition of silane and the subsequent reactions of intermediate species that result in the deposition of a silicon film.

Ho, P.; Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two-Phase Studies, with a focus on heat transfer and paraffin deposition at various pipe inclinations, which will be used to enhance the paraffin deposition code for gas-liquid flow in pipes. (3) Deposition Physics and Water Impact Studies, which will address the aging process, improve our ability to characterize paraffin deposits and enhance our understanding of the role water plays in paraffin deposition in deepwater pipelines. As in the previous two studies, knowledge gained in this suite of studies will be integrated into a state-of-the-art three-phase paraffin deposition computer program.

Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Atomic Scientists Brief Congress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Topics covered included underground explosions to produce energy, chemicals, or petroleum; advanced reactors capable of producing chemicals; atomic power for space propulsion; direct conversion of heat energy to electricity; and controlled thermonuclear reactions. ... (For details on controlled fusion research see page 46.) ...

1960-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Atomic Power in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NUCLEAR ENERGY will provide most of the power requirements in Japan by the end of this century. So predicts Charles H. Weaver, vice president in charge of atomic power activities for Westinghouse Electric.Addressing the Conference on Peaceful Uses of ...

1957-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Bohr's model: Extreme atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... by bombarding atoms with accelerated protons, then slow them down by passing them through metallic foil, cool them with cold electrons and trap them with electromagnetic fields. A similar trap ... Curiosity and national pride undoubtedly have a role, with politicians and scientists both looking to stamp their country's name into a new box on the periodic table. But each ...

Richard Van Noorden

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Magnetism and Atomic Structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the information with regard to the atom has been obtained by studying spectra; chemistry, magnetism, X-ray scattering, etc., play only a subsidiary part. We must admit, ... for fresh sources of information. Much may be said in support of the opinion that magnetism will open a new way by which to approach the study of the structure of ...

P. KAPITZA

1927-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

Layered electrode for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided an electrode structure comprising a current collector sheet and first and second layers of electrode material. Together, the layers improve catalyst utilization and water management.

Swathirajan, Swathy (West Bloomfield, MI); Mikhail, Youssef M. (Sterling Heights, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Growth of Large-Area Single- and Bi-Layer Graphene by Controlled Carbon Precipitation on Polycrystalline Ni Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report graphene films composed mostly of one or two layers of graphene grown by controlled carbon precipitation on the surface of polycrystalline Ni thin films during atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Controlling ...

Reina, Alfonso

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Enhancement of the nucleation of smooth and dense nanocrystalline diamond films by using molybdenum seed layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for the nucleation enhancement of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon substrates at low temperature is discussed. A sputter deposition of a Mo seed layer with thickness 50 nm on Si substrates was applied followed by an ultrasonic seeding step with nanosized detonation diamond powders. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was used to nucleate and grow NCD films on substrates heated up at 550 deg. C. The nucleation of diamond and the early stages of NCD film formation were investigated at different methane percentages in methane/hydrogen gas mixtures by atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and grazing incidence x-ray analyses in order to gain specific insight in the nucleation process of NCD films. The nucleation kinetics of diamond on the Mo-coated Si substrates was found to be up to ten times higher than on blank Si substrates. The enhancement of the nucleation of diamond on thin Mo interlayers results from two effects, namely, (a) the nanometer rough Mo surface shows an improved embedding of ultrasonically introduced nanosized diamond seeds that act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD and (b) the rapid carbonization of the Mo surface causes the formation of Mo{sub 2}C onto which diamond easily nucleates. The diamond nucleation density progressively increases at increasing methane percentages and is about 5x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} at 4.0% methane. The improved nucleation kinetics of diamond on Mo interlayers facilitates the rapid formation of NCD films possessing a very low surface roughness down to {approx}6 nm, and allows a submicron thickness control.

Buijnsters, J. G. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Vazquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dreumel, G. W. G. van; Meulen, J. J. ter; Enckevort, W. J. P. van [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Celis, J. P. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Influence of molecular arrangement and morphology on optical spectra of oligothiophene heterostructures grown by organic molecular-beam deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heterostructures of quaterthiophene and sexithiophene were grown by organic molecular beam deposition both on fused silica and on potassium acid phthalate (001) single crystals. The influence of both the substrate and the order of deposition on the sample morphology and, in turn, on their optical properties has been investigated. In particular, by changing the deposition conditions, the heterostructures have been found to grow either in an island or in a layer by layer mode. The emission spectra of the latter show the individual quaterthiophene and sexithiophene bands, while the spectra of the island samples are related to effects of the boundary between quaterthiophene and sexithiophene.

S. Tavazzi; D. Besana; A. Borghesi; F. Meinardi; A. Sassella; R. Tubino

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

Norton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

High Rydberg Atoms: Newcomers to the Atomic Physics Scene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HYDROGEN ATOM, NUCLEAR FUSION 5 : 41 ( 1965 ). BAYFIELD...HIGHLY-EXCITED KR ATOMS BY HF AND HCL MOLECULES, BULLETIN...USING A CW TUNABLE DYE LASER, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS...such diverse fields as laser development, laser isotopeseparation, energy...

Ronald F. Stebbings

1976-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

411

Growth of CdTe Films on Amorphous Substrates Using CaF2 Nanorods as a Buffer Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of CdTe Films on Amorphous Substrates Using CaF2 Nanorods as a Buffer Layer NICHOLAS LICAUSI biaxially textured CdTe films were grown on biaxial CaF2 buffer layers. The CaF2 nanorods were grown by oblique angle vapor deposition and possessed a {111}h121i biaxial texture. The CdTe film was deposited

Wang, Gwo-Ching

412

Ba Deposition and Oxidation on ?-Al2O3/NiAl(100) Ultrathin Films. Part I: Anaerobic Deposition Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Room temperature Ba deposition on an oxygen terminated ?-Al2O3/NiAl(100) ultrathin film substrate under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. In addition, Ba oxidation by the alumina substrate at 300 K < T < 1200 K in the absence of a gas phase oxidizing agent is investigated. Our results indicate that at room temperature Ba grows in a layer by layer fashion for the first two layers and Ba is partially oxidized. Annealing at T < 700 K results in further oxidation of the Ba species whereas annealing at higher temperatures leads to loss of Ba from the surface via desorption.

Ozensoy, Emrah; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Other Hydrothermal Deposits | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

hydrothermal deposits dot the landscape at the Hverir Geothermal Area, Iceland. Photo by Darren Atkins User-specified field for unlisted hydrothermally deposited rock and...

414

Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials, Elsevier, .O R Y Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer1600 Sol-Gel Deposited Electrochromic Coatings Nilgun Ozer

Ozer, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sandia National Laboratories: ion beam assisted deposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion beam assisted deposition Sandia, Los Alamos, Superconducting Technologies Inc., & Superpower: Solution Deposition Planarization On March 20, 2013, in CINT, Facilities, Grid...

416

IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES AT EXTENDED SINKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES that at high temperatures (where vacancies are mobile) growth can be accounted for using a combination of : #12 vacancies and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) as proposed by Woo and Gosele [5,6]. This theory seems

Motta, Arthur T.

417

Linked Deposit Loan Program (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Linked Deposit Program provides loan financing for small businesses of up to $100,000 for up to 7 years. The State Investment Commission invests funds from the state's Abandoned Property Cash...

418

Success Story: Chrome Deposit Corporation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study describes how Chrome Deposit Corporation was able to reduce plant-wide energy use, minimize its environmental impact, and improve energy management practices amidst ongoing growth.

419

Optical imaging of Rydberg atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an experiment exploring electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in Rydberg atoms in order to observe optical nonlinearities at the single photon level. ??Rb atoms are trapped and cooled using a magneto-optical ...

Mazurenko, Anton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Seaborg Predicts Bright Atomic Future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seaborg Predicts Bright Atomic Future ... To explore both the immediate and long-term ramifications of the cutbacks, C&EN talked to the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg . ...

1964-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Asphalt deposition in miscible floods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. . 22 23 8. REFERENCES. 24 9. APPENDIX. 26 LIST OF TABLES Table Page I II IV Properties of the Crude Oils Studied Average Core Properties for Different Tests Average Perrneabilities of Different Sections of Core Before and After... Displacement with Liquefied Petroleum Gas Percent Reduction in Permeability in Different Sections of Core Due to Asphalt Deposition Average Recoveries of Four Crude Oils and Increase in Swept Area due to Plugging by Asphalt Deposition 27 29 ABSTRACT...

Hasan, Syed Mir Ahmed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Vapor deposition of hardened niobium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

Blocher, Jr., John M. (Columbus, OH); Veigel, Neil D. (Columbus, OH); Landrigan, Richard B. (Columbus, OH)

1983-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form ohmic contacts to p-CdTe films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of is disclosed improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact. 11 figs.

Gessert, T.A.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form OHMIC contacts to p-CdTe films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurim-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact.

Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Pulsed laser deposited Si on multilayer graphene as anode material for lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pulsed laser deposition and chemical vapor deposition were used to deposit very thin silicon on multilayer graphene (MLG) on a nickel foam substrate for application as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The as-grown material was directly fabricated into an anode without a binder and tested in a half-cell configuration. Even under stressful voltage limits that accelerate degradation the Si-MLG films displayed higher stability than Si-only electrodes. Post-cycling images of the anodes reveal the differences between the two material systems and emphasize the role of the graphene layers in improving adhesion and electrochemical stability of the Si.

Gouri Radhakrishnan; Brendan Foran; Michael V. Quinzio; Miles J. Brodie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Initial Structure and Growth Dynamics of YBa2Cu3O7-? during Pulsed Laser Deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial heteroepitaxial growth of YBa2Cu3O7-? films on SrTiO3(001) substrates during pulsed laser deposition shows a growth-mode transition and a change of growth unit. The growth starts with two blocks, each two-thirds the size of the complete unit cell. The first of these blocks grows in a step-flow fashion, whereas the second grows in the layer-by-layer mode. Subsequent deposition occurs layer-by-layer of complete unit cells. These results suggest that the surface diffusion in the heteroepitaxial case is strongly influenced by the competition with formation energies, which is important for the fabrication of heteroepitaxial devices on the unit cell scale.

V. Vonk; K. J. I. Driessen; M. Huijben; G. Rijnders; D. H. A. Blank; H. Rogalla; S. Harkema; H. Graafsma

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

430

Chemical Solution Derived Planarization Layers for Highly Aligned IBAD MgO Templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this research is to develop a chemical solution derived planarization layer to fabricate highly aligned IBAD-MgO templates for the development of high temperature superconductor (HTS) based coated conductors. The standard IBAD-MgO template needs an additional electrochemical polishing step of the mechanically polished 50- m-thick Hastelloy C-276 substrates to ensure a flat and smooth surface for subsequent growth of multi-layer buffer architectures, which include: sputtered 80-nm Al2O3; sputtered 7-nm Y2O3; IBAD 10-nm MgO; sputtered 30-nm homo-epi MgO; and sputtered 30-nm LaMnO3 (LMO) layers. We have successfully developed a solution planarization layer that removes the electrochemical polishing step and also acts as a barrier layer. Crack-free, smooth Al2O3 layers were prepared on mechanically polished Hastelloy substrates using a chemical solution process. A nearly 10-15-nm thick Al2O3 layer was formed with each coating and the coating was repeated several times to achieve the desired film thickness with intermediate heat-treatments after each coating. The Al2O3 planarization layer significantly reduced the surface roughness of the substrate. The average surface roughness value, Ra for a starting substrate was 9-10 nm. After 8 coatings of Al2O3 layer, the Ra was reduced to 2 nm. Highly aligned IBAD-MgO layers with out-of-plane and in-plane textures comparable to the standard IBAD-MgO layers were successfully deposited on top of the solution planarization Al2O3 layers with an Y2O3 nucleation layer using a reel-to-reel ion-beam sputtering system. Both homo-epi MgO and LMO layers were subsequently deposited on the IBAD-MgO layers using rf sputtering to complete the buffer stack required for the growth of HTS films. YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) films with a thickness of 0.8 m deposited on these IBAD-MgO templates by pulsed laser deposition showed a high self-field critical current density, Jc of 3.04 MA/cm2 at 77 K and 6.05 MA/cm2 at 65 K. These results demonstrate that a low-cost chemical-solution-based, high-throughput Al2O3 planarization layer can remove the electro-polishing step and replace sputtered Al2O3 layers for the production of high Jc YBCO-coated conductors.

Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL] [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL] [ORNL; Stan, Liliana [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Jia, Quanxi [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL] [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

432

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

433

Recent Progress in ultracold atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Einstein What is Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)? #12;300 K to 1 mK 109 atoms 1 mK to 1 mK 108 106 atoms How to make a BEC: Cool atoms at ultra low temperature Laser beams Fluorescence Laser cooling (Doppler

Baltisberger, Jay H.

434

Layered permeable systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Permeability is a second rank tensor relating flow rate to pressure gradient in a porous medium. If the permeability is a constant times the identity tensor the permeable medium is isotropic; otherwise it is anisotropic. A formalism is presented for the simple calculation of the permeability tensor of a heterogeneous layered system composed of interleaved thin layers of several permeable constituent porous media in the static limit. Corresponding to any cumulative thickness {ital H} of a constituent is an element consisting of scalar {ital H} and a matrix which is {ital H} times a hybrid matrix function of permeability. The calculation of the properties of a medium equivalent to the combination of permeable constituents may then be accomplished by simple addition of the corresponding scalar/matrix elements. Subtraction of an element removes a permeable constituent, providing the means to decompose a permeable medium into many possible sets of permeable constituents, all of which have the same flow properties. A set of layers of a constituent medium in the heterogeneous layered system with permeability of the order of 1{ital h} as {ital h} {r arrow} 0, where {ital h} is that constituent's concentration, acts as a set of infinitely thin channels and is a model for a set of parallel cracks or fractures. Conversely, a set of layers of a given constituent with permeability of the order of {ital h} as {ital h} {r arrow} 0 acts as a set of parallel flow barriers and models a set of parallel, relatively impermeable, interfaces, such as shale stringers or some faults.

Schoenberg, M. (Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

VARIOUS APPLICATIONS OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATIONS OF ZEEMAN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPYthe Zeeman effect to atomic absorption spectroscopy has beenthe Zeeman effect on atomic absorption spectrometry has been

Koizumi, Hideaki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Preparation and properties of high-deposition-rate a-Si:H films and solar cells using disilane: Annual subcontract report, 1 May 1987--30 April 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains results of the first year of research on producing p-i-n amorphous silicon solar cells with the intrinsic layer deposited from higher order silanes at deposition rates of 1 nm/s or more. The research was divided into three major areas: diagnostic studies of monosilane and disilane RF discharges using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to assist in optimizing discharge conditions and gas-phase processes; parametric studies of material properties of 1-layers prepared form disilane as a function of deposition rate and other process parameters; and parametric studies of p-i-n devices with the i-layer prepared from disilane at various deposition rates. The focus during the first year was to fabricate a p-i-n solar cell with 9/percent/ AM1.5 efficiency over an area greater than 0.08 cm/sup 2/ with the i-layer deposited at 1 nm/s or more. Material properties such as the dark and AM1.5 light conductivities, optical band gap, and conductivity activation energy showed a weak dependence on deposition rate. The performance characteristics of unoptimized p-i-n solar cells with i-layers prepared from disilane were independent of the deposition rate of the i-layer. A p-i-n device was prepared at a rate close to 1 nm/s with an AM1.5 efficiency of 9/percent/. 20 refs, 26 figs, 2 tabs.

Bhat, P.K.; Chatham, H.; Madan, A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Adhesion layer for etching of tracks in nuclear trackable materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming nuclear tracks having a width on the order of 100-200 nm in nuclear trackable materials, such as polycarbonate (LEXAN) without causing delamination of the LEXAN. The method utilizes an adhesion film having a inert oxide which allows the track to be sufficiently widened to >200 nm without delamination of the nuclear trackable materials. The adhesion film may be composed of a metal such as Cr, Ni, Au, Pt, or Ti, or composed of a dielectric having a stable surface, such as silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), silicon nitride (SiN.sub.x), and aluminum oxide (AlO). The adhesion film can either be deposited on top of the gate metal layer, or if the properties of the adhesion film are adequate, it can be used as the gate layer. Deposition of the adhesion film is achieved by standard techniques, such as sputtering or evaporation.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

EXAFS Determination of Cation Local Order in Layered Perovskites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EXAFS analysis of Bi{sub 6}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 18} Aurivillius ceramic was performed to elucidate the local environment of Fe cations. Experiments were performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, at T = 10, 30, 50, 75, 100 and 298 K, in fluorescence regime. EXAFS spectra were processed using the ab initio multiple scattering program FEFF6. Distances among representative atomic pairs were refined. As a basic result, the previous hypothesis suggested by X-ray diffraction experiments, regarding a preference of iron atoms for the centered perovskite layer of the unit cell, was confirmed.

Montero-Cabrera, M.E.; Garcia-Guaderrama, M.; Mehta, A.; Webb, S.; Fuentes-Montero, L.; Moller, J.A.D.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; /Autonoma U., Chihuahua /SLAC, SSRL

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 075024 (10pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/49/7/075024  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IOP PUBLISHING and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 075024 from classical NB deposition as input give rise to strong EPM activity, resulting in relaxed EP radial

Zonca, Fulvio

440

Spectroscopy of Ba and Ba$^+$ deposits in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progress on a method of barium tagging for the nEXO double beta decay experiment is reported. Absorption and emission spectra for deposits of barium atoms and ions in solid xenon matrices are presented. Excitation spectra for prominent emission lines, temperature dependence and bleaching of the fluorescence reveal the existence of different matrix sites. A regular series of sharp lines observed in Ba$^+$ deposits is identified with some type of barium hydride molecule. Lower limits for the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the principal Ba emission transition are reported. Under current conditions, an image of $\\le10^4$ Ba atoms can be obtained. Prospects for imaging single Ba atoms in solid xenon are discussed.

B. Mong; S. Cook; T. Walton; C. Chambers; A. Craycraft; C. Benitez-Medina; K. Hall; W. Fairbank Jr.; J. B. Albert; D. J. Auty; P. S. Barbeau; V. Basque; D. Beck; M. Breidenbach; T. Brunner; G. F. Cao; B. Cleveland; M. Coon; T. Daniels; S. J. Daugherty; R. DeVoe; T. Didberidze; J. Dilling; M. J. Dolinski; M. Dunford; L. Fabris; J. Farine; W. Feldmeier; P. Fierlinger; D. Fudenberg; G. Giroux; R. Gornea; K. Graham; G. Gratta; M. Heffner; M. Hughes; X. S. Jiang; T. N. Johnson; S. Johnston; A. Karelin; L. J. Kaufman; R. Killick; T. Koffas; S. Kravitz; R. Krucken; A. Kuchenkov; K. S. Kumar; D. S. Leonard; C. Licciardi; Y. H. Lin; J. Ling; R. MacLellan; M. G. Marino; D. Moore; A. Odian; I. Ostrovskiy; A. Piepke; A. Pocar; F. Retiere; P. C. Rowson; M. P. Rozo; A. Schubert; D. Sinclair; E. Smith; V. Stekhanov; M. Tarka; T. Tolba; K. Twelker; J. -L. Vuilleumier; J. Walton; M. Weber; L. J. Wen; U. Wichoski; L. Yang; Y. -R. Yen; Y. B. Zhao

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic layer deposition" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method for materials deposition by ablation transfer processing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method in which a thin layer of semiconducting, insulating, or metallic material is transferred by ablation from a source substrate, coated uniformly with a thin layer of said material, to a target substrate, where said material is desired, with a pulsed, high intensity, patternable beam of energy. The use of a patternable beam allows area-selective ablation from the source substrate resulting in additive deposition of the material onto the target substrate which may require a very low percentage of the area to be covered. Since material is placed only where it is required, material waste can be minimized by reusing the source substrate for depositions on multiple target substrates. Due to the use of a pulsed, high intensity energy source the target substrate remains at low temperature during the process, and thus low-temperature, low cost transparent glass or plastic can be used as the target substrate. The method can be carried out atmospheric pressures and at room temperatures, thus eliminating vacuum systems normally required in materials deposition processes. This invention has particular application in the flat panel display industry, as well as minimizing materials waste and associated costs.

Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ash aerosol formation from oxy-coal combustion and its relation to ash deposit chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ash aerosol and ash deposit formation during oxy-coal combustion were explored through experiments in a self-sustained 100kW rated down-fired oxy-fuel combustor. Inlet oxidant conditions consisted of 50% inlet oxygen with CO2 (hereafter denoted as OXY50 conditions). A Berner low pressure impactor (BLPI), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) were used to obtain size segregated ash aerosol samples and to determine the particle size distributions (PSD). A novel surface temperature controlled ash deposition probe system that allowed inside and outside deposits to be separated was used to collect the ash deposits. The ash aerosol \\{PSDs\\} given by the BLPI and those produced by SMPS/APS were consistent with each other. Data suggested that oxy-coal combustion under these conditions did not change the formation mechanisms controlling the bulk ash aerosol composition, but it did increase the formation of ultra-fine particles initially formed through metal vaporization, due to increased vaporization of silicon at the higher combustion temperature. The smaller particles contained within the deposits had higher Si and lower Na and S concentrations under OXY50 conditions than for air combustion. Moreover, the ash aerosol composition for particle sizes less than 2.4?m was related to the composition of the inside deposits. A higher Na in the ash aerosol resulted in higher Na in inside deposits with comparable absolute Na concentrations in both those aerosol particles and those inside deposits particles. The contribution of S and Si to the inside deposits showed that S in the vaporization modes together with Si in the ultrafine vaporization mode, contributed significantly to the composition of the inside deposits. These results provided direct evidence that prediction of the chemistry of the initial deposit layer (but not of the bulk deposits) required knowledge of the size segregated chemistry of the ash aerosol.

Zhonghua Zhan; Andrew Fry; Yanwei Zhang; Jost O.L. Wendt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Potpourri of deposition and resuspension questions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty questions and answers are listed dealing with particulate deposition, resuspension, and precipitation scavenging.

Slinn, W.G.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hot-Jupiter Inflation due to Deep Energy Deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some extrasolar giant planets in close orbits---"hot Jupiters"---exhibit larger radii than that of a passively cooling planet. The extreme irradiation $L_{\\rm eq}$ these hot Jupiters receive from their close in stars creates a thick isothermal layer in their envelopes, which slows down their convective cooling, allowing them to retain their inflated size for longer. This is yet insufficient to explain the observed sizes of the most inflated planets. Some models invoke an additional power source, deposited deep in the planet's envelope. Here we present an analytical model for the cooling of such irradiated, and internally heated gas giants. We show that a power source $L_{\\rm dep}$, deposited at an optical depth $\\tau_{\\rm dep}$, creates an exterior convective region, between optical depths $L_{\\rm eq}/L_{\\rm dep}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm dep}$, beyond which a thicker isothermal layer exists, which in extreme cases may extend to the center of the planet. This convective layer, which occurs only for $L_{\\rm dep}\\tau_{\\r...

Ginzburg, Sivan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Ion transport and structure of layer-by-layer assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layer-by-layer (LbL) films of various architectures were examined as potential solid state electrolytes for electrochemical systems (e.g. batteries and fuel cells). The relationship between materials properties and ion ...

Lutkenhaus, Jodie Lee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

On neutron numbers and atomic masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On neutron numbers and atomic masses ... Assigning neutron numbers, correct neutron numbers, and atomic masses and nucleon numbers. ...

R. Heyrovsk

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined using optical reflectance and the nucleation density was determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Nomarski microscopy. Dislocation density was measured using X-ray diffraction and AFM after coating the surface with silicon nitride to delineate all dislocation types. The program milestone of producing GaN films with dislocation densities of 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} was met by silicon nitride treatment of annealed sapphire followed by the multiple deposition of a low density of GaN nuclei followed by high temperature GaN growth. Details of this growth process and the underlying science are presented in this final report along with problems encountered in this research and recommendations for future work.

Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ash pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of April 1 to June 30, 1997. The computational modeling of particle transport, dispersion and deposition in a recirculating turbulent flows was completed. Considerable progress was also made in the direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. The predictions of the particle resuspension model is compared with the experimental data. It is shown that when the effects of the near wall flow structure, as well as the surface roughness are included the model agrees with the available experimental data. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows was extended to include the effect of particle rebound. A new more advanced flow model for the near wall vortices is also used in these analyses. Experimental data for transport and deposition of glass fibers in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data and discussed.

Ahmadi, G.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

451

Theory of Leakage Preventing Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a brand new concept for leakage prevention layer. The practice to place HEPA filter at the terminal is improved when the theory of leakage prevention layer applies, which becomes the core of novel air distr...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Z .Thin Solid Films 392 2001 231 235 Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electrochromic tungsten oxide films Roy G. Gordona,U , Sean Barryb , Jeffrey T. Bartona , Randy N.R. Broomhall oxide, WO , is a coloring layer commonly used in electrochromic windows and displays. Successful: Chemical vapor deposition; Tungsten; Oxides; Electrochromism 1. Introduction Tungsten oxide is a key

453

Ionized physical vapor deposition of integrated circuit interconnects* J. Hopwood,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alloy silicide gate level and several metal-SiO2 interlayer dielectric ILD levels joined together metal layers. By the year 2007 it is predicted that logic circuits will use 6 to 7 interconnected metal physical vapor deposition I-PVD . The technique economically creates a unidirectional flux of metal which

454

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Figure 3-1 IV curve of a UT fabricated triple cell, showing 12.7% initial, active-area efficiency. Figure1 High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells PHASE I Annual-junction a-Si Solar Cells with Heavily Doped Thin Interface Layers at the Tunnel Junctions Section 4 High

Deng, Xunming

455

High-pressure turbine deposition in land-based gas turbines from various synfuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ash deposits from four candidate power turbine synfuels were studied in an accelerated deposition test facility. The facility matches the gas temperature and velocity of modern first-stage high-pressure turbine vanes. A natural gas combustor was seeded with finely ground fuel ash particulate from four different fuels: straw, sawdust, coal, and petroleum coke. The entrained ash particles were accelerated to a combustor exit flow Mach number of 0.31 before impinging on a thermal barrier coating (TBC) target coupon at 1150{sup o}C. Postexposure analyses included surface topography, scanning electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy. Due to significant differences in the chemical composition of the various fuel ash samples, deposit thickness and structure vary considerably for fuel. Biomass products (e.g., sawdust and straw) are significantly less prone to deposition than coal and petcoke for the same particle loading conditions. In a test simulating one turbine operating year at a moderate particulate loading of 0.02 parts per million by weight, deposit thickness from coal and petcoke ash exceeded 1 and 2 mm, respectively. These large deposits from coal and petcoke were found to detach readily from the turbine material with thermal cycling and handling. The smaller biomass deposit samples showed greater tenacity, in adhering to the TBC surface. In all cases, corrosive elements (e.g., Na, K, V, Cl, S) were found to penetrate the TBC layer during the accelerated deposition test. Implications for the power generation goal of fuel flexibility are discussed.

Bons, J.P.; Crosby, J.; Wammack, J.E.; Bentley, B.I.; Fletcher, T.H. [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Study on the wax deposition of waxy crude in pipelines and its application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental loop for the wax deposition study is established; a novel method to determine the thickness of the wax deposition in the experimental loop is developed, taking into account the impact of the instant temperature decreasing of the test section wall which leads to the increasing of the viscosity of the crude oil near the pipe wall and the distortion of the flow field in the pipe. The wax deposition characteristics of the QH crude are studied using the experimental loop. For the QH crude oil, there is a peak area of the wax deposition when it is 40C around. And very little deposition emerges when the temperature is not only higher than the wax appearance point but also lower than the temperature of solidification. It is also proved in the lab that the shearing dispersion of the wax crystal particles plays little role in the wax deposition when the shearing rate is high. The observation of the pipe which is cut in the field shows that the laying of the wax deposition in the pipe is very clear, and the wax deposition caused by the shearing dispersion exists clearly. From the angel of the shutdown temperature drop and safely restart for the hot oil pipeline, it is concluded that there is a permissible critical thickness of the sedimentary layer for the low flow rate pipelines.

Zhang Guozhong; Liu Gang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Model for Phosphosilicate Glass Deposition via POCl3 for Control of Phosphorus Dose in Si  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective control of diffused phosphorus profiles in crystalline silicon requires detailed understanding of the doping process. We develop a model and analyze concentration profiles within the deposited phosphosilicate glass (PSG) for a range of POCl3 conditions. During predeposition, a PSG layer with composition nearly independent of process conditions forms. This layer is separated from Si by a thin SiO2 layer. There is also strong accumulation of P at the SiO2-Si interface. A simple linear-parabolic model cannot fully explain the kinetics of thickness and dose; while an improved model including oxygen dependence and dose saturation gives better fits to the experiments.

Chen, Renyu; Wagner, Hannes; Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir; Kessler, Michael; Zhu, Zihua; Shutthanandan, V.; Altermatt, Pietro P.; Dunham, Scott T.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Magnetic trap for thulium atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

ATOMIC-LEVEL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER CHARACTERIZATION OF METAL-CERAMIC INTERFRACES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engines. These TBC's are comprised of ceramics, with favorably low thermal conductivity, deposited years ago.2 Hence, engineers looked to ceramic materials as a means of providing a thermal barrierChapter 1 ATOMIC-LEVEL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS : CHARACTERIZATION OF METAL

Carter, Emily A.

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461

Digital Deposition of Ultrathin Pd Films on Well-Defined Pt(111) Electrodes via Surface-Limited Redox Replacement Reaction: An Electron Spectroscopy-Electrochemistry Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, ultrathin (submonolayer to eight-monolayer) Pd films were deposited one layer at a time on well-defined Pt(111) surfaces via a process known as surface-limited redox replacement reaction (SLR^3). In this digital-deposition method, one...

Hossain, Mohammad

2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

462

Additive manufacturing with friction welding and friction deposition processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the commercially available additive manufacturing processes that are meant for fabrication of fully dense metallic parts involve melting and solidification. Consequently, these processes suffer from a variety of metallurgical problems. Processes that can facilitate material addition in solid-state are therefore ideally suited for additive manufacturing. In this work, we explore two new solid-state processes, viz. friction welding and friction deposition, for additive manufacturing. Stainless steel samples produced using these processes showed excellent layer bonding and Z-direction tensile properties. The authors believe that these processes are uniquely capable and can offer significant benefits over existing commercial additive manufacturing processes.

J.J.S. Dilip; G.D. Janaki Ram; B.E. Stucker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Frank K. Pittman, Director, bivisioa of Waste &&gement and s- portation, Headquarters j CONTAMItUTED RX-AEC-OWNED OR LEASED FACILITIES' This memorandum responds to your TWX certain information on the above subject. the documentation necessary to answer your available due to the records disposal vailing at the time of release or From records that are available and from disc&ions with most familiar with the transfer operations, &have the current radiological conditibn of transferred property is adequate under present standards. The following tabulations follow the format suggested in your TWX and are grouped to an operations or contract r+ponsibility. A,I Ex-AEC Storage Sites - I r:/ National Stockpile Site '(NSS) and OperatEonal

464

Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (Bettis) is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and has been operated under Government contract by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation since 1949. The Bettis Site in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania conducts research and development work on improved nuclear propulsion plants for US Navy warships and is the headquarters for all of the Laboratory's operations. For many years, environmental monitoring has been performed to demonstrate that the Bettis Site is being operated in accordance with environmental standards. While the annual report describes monitoring practices and results, it does not describe the nature and environmental aspects of work and facilities at the Bettis Site nor give a historical perspective of Bettis' operations. The purpose of this report is to provide this information as well as background information, such as the geologic and hydrologic nature of the Bettis Site, pertinent to understanding the environmental aspects of Bettis operations. Waste management practices are also described.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Rydberg Atoms in Ponderomotive Potentials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this thesis, we examine the ponderomotive interaction between an applied optical field and a highly excited Rydberg electron. An atom in a Rydberg state (more)

Knuffman, Brenton J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Absorption properties of identical atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: The absorption rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. The absorption properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions.

Sancho, Pedro, E-mail: psanchos@aemet.es

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

EMSL - atomic-resolution imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atomic-resolution-imaging en Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110). http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmolecular-hydrogen-formation-proxima...

468

Magnetism and Atomic Structure. I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

3 January 1921 research-article Magnetism and Atomic Structure. I A. E. Oxley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access...