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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vorburger, SL Tan, NG Orji, J. Fu, “Interlaboratory Comparison of Traceable Atomic Force Microscope Pitch Measurements,” SPIE Proceedings Vol. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass L. Tetard a,b , A. Passian a,b,n , R.H. Farahi a , U.C. Kalluri c , B.H. Davison c , T. Thundat a,b a Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Atomic force microscopy Spectroscopy Plant cells Biomass Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass

3

Feasibility and limitation of track studies using atomic force microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feasibility and limitation of track studies using atomic force microscopy D. Nikezic, J.P.Y. Ho, C.W.Y. Yip, V.S.Y. Koo, K.N. Yu * Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong July 2002 Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to investigate characteristics

Yu, K.N.

4

Depth Charge: Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Study ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... right circumstances, surface science instruments such ... Electric force microscopy can be used to ... superior strength and electrical conductance, added ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ultrasonic-Based Mode-Synthesizing Atomic Force Microscopy  

In a single run and without damaging the sample, ORNL’s mode-synthesizingatomic force microscopy (MSAFM), along with mode-synthesizing sensing, ...

6

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Roughness as Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy on the Wetting Properties of PTFE Thin Engineering College of Mines and Earth Sciences University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and G. YAMAUCHI films has been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry. Surface

Drelich, Jaroslaw W.

7

Potential contributions of noncontact atomic force microscopy for the future Casimir force measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface electric noise, i.e., the non-uniform distribution of charges and potentials on a surface, poses a great experimental challenge in modern precision force measurements. Such a challenge is encountered in a number of different experimental circumstances. The scientists employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) have long focused their efforts to understand the surface-related noise issues via variants of AFM techniques, such as Kelvin probe force microscopy or electric force microscopy. Recently, the physicists investigating quantum vacuum fluctuation phenomena between two closely-spaced objects have also begun to collect experimental evidence indicating a presence of surface effects neglected in their previous analyses. It now appears that the two seemingly disparate science communities are encountering effects rooted in the same surface phenomena. In this report, we suggest specific experimental tasks to be performed in the near future that are crucial not only for fostering needed collaborations between the two communities, but also for providing valuable data on the surface effects in order to draw the most realistic conclusion about the actual contribution of the Casimir force (or van der Waals force) between a pair of real materials.

W. J. Kim; U. D. Schwarz

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

Very large-scale structures in sintered silica aerogels as evidenced by atomic force microscopy and ultra-small angle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very large-scale structures in sintered silica aerogels as evidenced by atomic force microscopy of silica aerogels has been extensively studied mainly by scattering techniques (neutrons, X-rays, light) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments have been carried out on aerogels at dierent steps of densi

Demouchy, Sylvie

9

Observation of Localized Corrosion of Ni-Based Alloys Using Coupled Orientation Imaging Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a method for assessing the relative vulnerabilities of distinct classes of grain boundaries to localized corrosion. Orientation imaging microscopy provides a spatial map which identifies and classifies grain boundaries at a metal surface. Once the microstructure of a region of a sample surface has been characterized, a sample can be exposed to repeated cycles of exposure to a corrosive environment alternating with topographic measurement by an atomic force microscope in the same region in which the microstructure had been mapped. When this procedure is applied to Ni and Ni-based alloys, we observe enhanced attack at random grain boundaries relative to special boundaries and twins in a variety of environments.

Bedrossian, P.J.

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

10

Loss tangent imaging: Theory and simulations of repulsive-mode tapping atomic force microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expression for loss tangent measurement of a surface in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is derived using only the cantilever phase and the normalized cantilever amplitude. This provides a direct measurement of substrate compositional information that only requires tuning of the cantilever resonance to provide quantitative information. Furthermore, the loss tangent expression incorporates both the lost and stored energy into one term that represents a fundamental interpretation of the phase signal in amplitude modulation imaging. Numerical solutions of a cantilever tip interacting with a simple Voigt modeled surface agree with the derived loss tangent to within a few percent.

Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Yablon, Dalia G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, Annandale, New Jersey (United States)

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

On single-molecule DNA sequencing with atomic force microscopy using functionalized carbon nanotube probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel DNA sequencing method is proposed based on the specific binding nature of nucleotides and measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). A single molecule of DNA is denatured and immobilized on an atomically fiat ...

Burns, Daniel James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

X-ray holographic microscopy using the atomic-force microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present authors have been seeking for some time to improve the resolution of holographic microscopy and have engaged in a continuing series of experiments using the X1A soft x-ray undulator beam line at Brookhaven. The principle strategy for pushing the resolution lower in these experiments has been the use of polymer resists as x-ray detectors and the primary goal has been to develop the technique to become useful for examining wet biological material. In the present paper the authors report on progress in the use of resist for high-spatial-resolution x-ray detection. This is the key step in in-line holography and the one which sets the ultimate limit to the image resolution. The actual recording has always been quite easy, given a high-brightness undulator source, but the difficult step was the readout of the recorded pattern. The authors describe in what follows how they have built a special instrument: an atomic force microscope (AFM) to read holograms recorded in resist. They report the technical reasons for building, rather than buying, such an instrument and they give details of the design and performance of the device. The authors also describe the first attempts to use the system for real holography and the authors show results of both recorded holograms and the corresponding reconstructed images. Finally, the authors try to analyze the effect that these advances are likely to have on the future prospects for success in applications of x-ray holography and the degree to which the other technical systems that are needed for such success are available or within reach.

Howells, M.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jacobsen, C.J.; Lindaas, S. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Study of anion adsorption at the gold--aqueous solution interface by atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The forces between a gold coated colloidal silica sphere and a pure gold plate have been measured in aqueous solution as a function of electrolyte concentration using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Forces in the presence of gold(III) chloride (HAuCl[sub 4]), sodium chloride, and trisodium citrate were recorded as a function of concentration. Each of these anion species is present during the formation of colloidal gold by the reduction of gold(III) chloride with trisodium citrate. In pure water the force between the gold surfaces was exclusively attractive. In sodium chloride or trisodium citrate solution a repulsive interaction was observed which is attributed to the adsorption of these anions at the gold/water interface. The observed interaction force in gold(III) chloride solution was always attractive, the surface potential never exceeding 20 mV. Data taken in aqueous solutions of citrate and chloride ions together suggested that the citrate ions were preferentially adsorbed to the surface of the gold. Addition of gold(III) chloride to the AFM liquid cell after the pre-adsorption of citrate anions caused the force of interaction to change from a repulsvie force to an attractive one initially as the gold(III) chloride was reduced to gold by the citrate anions. 33 refs., 11 figs.

Biggs, S.; Mulvaney, P.; Grieser, F. (Univ. of Melbourne (Australia)); Zukoski, C.F. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

In-situ monitoring of electron beam induced deposition by atomic force microscopy in a scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of atomic force microscope is proposed for atomic force microscopic analysis inside a scanning electron microscope. We attached a piezoresisitive atomic force microscopic cantilever to a micro manipulator to achieve a compact and guidable ... Keywords: atomic force, electron beam induced deposition, in-situ monitoring, local gas injection, micro manipulator, microscope

S. Bauerdick; C. Burkhardt; R. Rudorf; W. Barth; V. Bucher; W. Nisch

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electrical transport and mechanical properties of alkylsilane self-assembled monolayers on silicon surfaces probed by atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The correlation between molecular conductivity and mechanical properties (molecular deformation and frictional responses) of hexadecylsilane self-assembled monolayers was studied with conductive probe atomic force microscopy/friction force microscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Current and friction were measured as a function of applied pressure, simultaneously, while imaging the topography of self-assembled monolayer molecule islands and silicon surfaces covered with a thin oxide layer. Friction images reveal lower friction over the molecules forming islands than over the bare silicon surface, indicating the lubricating functionality of alkylsilane molecules. By measuring the tunneling current change due to changing of the height of the molecular islands by tilting the molecules under pressure from the tip, we obtained an effective conductance decay constant ({beta}) of 0.52/{angstrom}.

Park, Jeong Young; Qi, Yabing; Ashby, Paul D.; Hendriksen, Bas L.M.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mechanical Property Measurements of Membranes and Viruses by Using Fluorescence Interference Contrast Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment.Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment.

Gui, Dong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Lipophosphoglycan (LPG) Molecules in Lipid Bilayers  

SciTech Connect

Lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is a lypopolysaccharide found on the surface of the parasite Leishmania donovani that is thought to play an essential role in the infection of humans with leishamniasis. LPG acts as an adhesion point for the parasite to the gut of the sand fly, whose bite is responsible for transmitting the disease. In addition, LPG acts to inhibit protein kinase C (PKC) in the human macrophage, possibly by structural changes in the membrane. The Ca{sup 2+} ion is believed to play a role in the infection cycle, acting both as a crosslinker between LPG molecules and by playing a part in modulating PKC activity. To gain insight into the structure of LPG within a supported lipid membrane and into the structural changes that occur due to Ca{sup 2+} ions, we have employed the atomic force microscope (AFM). We have observed that the LPG molecules inhibit bilayer fusion, resulting in bilayer islands on the mica surface. One experiment suggests that the LPG molecules are parallel to the mica surface and that the structure of the LPG changes upon addition of Ca{sup 2+}, with an increase in the height of the LPG molecules from the bilayer surface and an almost complete coverage of LPG on the bilayer island.

LAST, JULIE A.; HUBER, TINA; SASAKI, DARRYL Y.; SALVATORE, BRIAN; TURCO, SALVATORE J.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Novel Protein Crystal Growth Electrochemical Cell For Applications in X-ray Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new crystal growth cell based on transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-electrodes for electrochemically assisted protein crystallization allows for reduced nucleation and crystal quality enhancement. The crystallization behavior of lysozyme and ferritin was monitored as a function of the electric current applied to the growth cell. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that for specific currents, the crystal quality is substantially improved. No conformational changes were observed in the 3D crystallographic structures determined for crystals grown under different electric current regimes. Finally, the strong crystal adhesion on the surface of ITO electrode because of the electroadhesion allows a sufficiently strong fixing of the protein crystals, to undergo atomic force microscopy investigations in a fluid cell.

G Gil-Alvaradejo; R Ruiz-Arellano; C Owen; A Rodriguez-Romero; E Rudino-Pinera; M Antwi; V Stojanoff; A Moreno

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Haptics and graphic analogies for the understanding of atomic force microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to evaluate the benefits of using virtual reality and force-feedback to help teaching nanoscale applications. We propose a teaching aid that combines graphic analogies and haptics intended to improve the grasp of non-intuitive nanoscale ... Keywords: Analogies, Education, Haptic I/O, Human factors, Micro/nano technology

Guillaume Millet, Anatole LéCuyer, Jean-Marie Burkhardt, Sinan Haliyo, StéPhane RéGnier

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Determining Mechanical Properties of Carbon Microcoils Using Lateral Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical properties of amorphous carbon microcoil (CMC) synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition method were examined in compression and tension tests, using the lateral force mode of atomic force microscope (AFM). The AFM cantilever tip was ... Keywords: Atomic force microscopy (AFM), atomic force microscopy, carbon microcoil, shear modulus, spring constant

Neng-Kai Chang; Shuo-Hung Chang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the surface in order to minimize the total surface energy. With an understanding of the structural and environmental parameters which govern polymer surface structure, SFG is then used to explore the effects of surface hydrophobicity and solvent polarity on the orientation and ordering of amphiphilic neutral polymers adsorbed at the solid/liquid interface. SFG spectra show that poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) adsorb with their hydrophobic moieties preferentially oriented toward hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. These same moieties, however, disorder when adsorbed onto a hydrophilic silica/water interface. Water is identified as a critical factor for mediating the orientation and ordering of hydrophobic moieties in polymers adsorbed at hydrophobic interfaces. The role of bulk water content and water vapor, as they influence hydrogel surface structure and mechanics, continues to be explored in the next series of experiments. A method was developed to probe the surface viscoelastic properties of hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based contact lens materials by analyzing AFM force-distance curves. AFM analysis indicates that the interfacial region is dehydrated, relative to the bulk. Experiments performed on poly(HEMA+MA) (MA = methacrylic acid), a more hydrophilic copolymer with greater bulk water content, show even greater water depletion at the surface. SFG spectra, as well as surface energy arguments, suggest that the more hydrophilic polymer component (such as MA) is not favored at the air interface; this may explain anomalies in water retention at the hydrogel surface. Adsorption of lysozyme onto poly(HEMA+MA) was found to further reduce near-surface viscous behavior, suggesting lower surface water content. Lastly, protein adsorption is studied using a model polymer system of polystyrene covalently bound with a monolayer of bovine serum albumin. SFG results indicate that some amino acid residues in proteins adopt preferred orientations. SFG spectra also show that the phenyl rings of the bare polystyrene substrate in contact with air or

Koffas, Telly Stelianos

2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

APS/123-QED Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin Probe Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APS/123-QED Understanding the atomic-scale contrast in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Laurent Nony 1 are crucial to understand the atomic-scale KPFM signal. The calculations of the force #12;eld were performed

Recanati, Catherine

23

Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Atomic force microscope: Enhanced sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are a recent development representing the state of the art in measuring ultrafine surface features. Applications are found in such fields of research as biology, microfabrication, material studies, and surface chemistry. Fiber-optic interferometer techniques developed at LLNL offer the potential of improving the vertical resolution of these instruments by up to 2 orders of magnitude. We are attempting to replace the current AFM measurement scheme, which consists of an optical beam deflection approach, with our fiber-optic interferometer scheme, a much more sensitive displacement measurement technique. In performing this research, we hope to accomplish two important goals; (1) to enhance the sensitivity of the AFM, and (2) to achieve important improvements in our fiber-optic interferometer technology.

Davis, D.T.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Scanning magnetoresistance microscopy of atom chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface based geometries of microfabricated wires or patterned magnetic films can be used to magnetically trap and manipulate ultracold neutral atoms or Bose-Einstein condensates. We investigate the magnetic properties of such atom chips using a scanning magnetoresistive (MR) microscope with high spatial resolution and high field sensitivity. By comparing MR scans of a permanent magnetic atom chip to field profiles obtained using ultracold atoms, we show that MR sensors are ideally suited to observe small variations of the magnetic field caused by imperfections in the wires or magnetic materials which ultimately lead to fragmentation of ultracold atom clouds. Measurements are also provided for the magnetic field produced by a thin current-carrying wire with small geometric modulations along the edge. Comparisons of our measurements with a full numeric calculation of the current flow in the wire and the subsequent magnetic field show excellent agreement. Our results highlight the use of scanning MR microscopy as a convenient and powerful technique for precisely characterizing the magnetic fields produced near the surface of atom chips.

Volk, M.; Whitlock, S.; Wolff, C. H.; Hall, B. V.; Sidorov, A. I. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Atomic Force Microscope 2: Digital Instruments/Veeco ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tapping mode; Contact mode; Phase mode; Magnetic force microscopy; Scanning tunneling microscopy; Stepper-motor controlled stage; Top view ...

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Atomic Force Microscopy - Applications to Energy & Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

More Search Research & Development Batteries and Fuel Cells Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool...

28

Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atom probe tomography (APT) and analytical transmission .... of a Leaking Type 316 Socket Weld in a Boron Injection Tank Sampling Line.

29

Instrument Series: Microscopy Atom Probe The LEAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Atom Probe The LEAP ® 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first- ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical imaging studies of low electrical conductivity materials, such as ceramics, semiconductors and oxides. The LEAP capability is assisting EMSL's efforts to further scientific advancements in interface analysis and microstructural characterization, providing a new tool for understanding the relationship between the nanoscale structure of materials and their macroscopic properties. Research Applications Geochemistry - Studying chemical processes that compose rocks and soils has long been used to determine matter cycles and transport in the environment, which supports critical EMSL research in areas including bioremediation.

30

Open-loop Band excitation Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multidimensional scanning probe microscopy approach for quantitative, cross-talk free mapping of surface electrostatic properties is demonstrated. Open-loop band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (OL BE KPFM) probes the full response-frequency-potential surface at each pixel at standard imaging rates. The subsequent analysis reconstructs work function, tip surface capacitance gradient and resonant frequency maps, obviating feedback-related artifacts. OL BE KPFM imaging is demonstrated for several materials systems with topographic, potential and combined contrast. This approach combines the features of both frequency and amplitude KPFM and allows complete decoupling of topographic and voltage contributions to the KPFM signal.

Guo, Senli [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Note: A scanning electron microscope sample holder for bidirectional characterization of atomic force microscope probe tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel sample holder that enables atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to be mounted inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the purpose of characterizing the AFM tips is described. The holder provides quick and easy handling of tips by using a spring clip to hold them in place. The holder can accommodate two tips simultaneously in two perpendicular orientations, allowing both top and side view imaging of the tips by the SEM.

Eisenstein, Alon; Goh, M. Cynthia [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Optical Sciences, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H6 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Model Development for Atomic Force Microscope Stage Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model Development for Atomic Force Microscope Stage Mechanisms Ralph C. Smith and Andrew G. Hatch of the Philippines Virginia Commonwealth University Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Richmond VA 23284 rcdelros titanate (PZT) devices employed in atomic force microscope stage mechanisms. We focus specifically on PZT

33

Nuclear forces and ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear forces and the nuclear many-body problem have been some of Gerry Brown's main topics in his so productive life as a theoretical physicist. In this talk, I outline how Gerry's work laid the foundations of the modern theory of nuclear forces and ab initio calculations of atomic nuclei. I also present some recent developments obtained in the framework of nuclear lattice simulations.

Meißner, Ulf-G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Using Atom Interferometry to Search for New Forces  

SciTech Connect

Atom interferometry is a rapidly advancing field and this Letter proposes an experiment based on existing technology that can search for new short distance forces. With current technology it is possible to improve the sensitivity by up to a factor of 10{sup 2} and near-future advances will be able to rewrite the limits for forces with ranges from 100 {micro}m to 1km.

Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Refined tip preparation by electrochemical etching and ultrahigh vacuum treatment to obtain atomically sharp tips for scanning tunneling microscope and atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A modification of the common electrochemical etching setup is presented. The described method reproducibly yields sharp tungsten tips for usage in the scanning tunneling microscope and tuning fork atomic force microscope. In situ treatment under ultrahigh vacuum (p {<=}10{sup -10} mbar) conditions for cleaning and fine sharpening with minimal blunting is described. The structure of the microscopic apex of these tips is atomically resolved with field ion microscopy and cross checked with field emission.

Hagedorn, Till; Ouali, Mehdi El; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Miyahara, Yoichi; Gruetter, Peter [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

New modes for subsurface atomic force microscopy through nanomechanica...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by studying the remaining problem of the cellular level compositional variations of poplar wood cross-sections (see Supplementary Section S5) 16 . MSAFM is based on exerting a...

37

Standard and High Speed Atomic Force Microscopy of Porous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Frontiers of Materials Science: Fundamentals of Porous ... insight into material performance due to the nanoscale topographic and/or property mapping ... Separately, for human tooth cross sections measured in liquid, a range of ...

38

Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Home Staff Only Microscopy Group Staff InstrumentationCapabilities The Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) Microscopy User Centers: MAUC SHaRE Research Highlights...

39

Getting the Point: Real-Time Monitoring of Atomic-Microscope ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... done with atomic force microscopy (AFM). ... small scales, so researchers use atomic force microscopes. ... of the tip with an electron microscope, a time ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Single-spin measurements for quantum computation using magnetic resonance force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The quantum theory of a singlespin measurements using a magnetic resonance force microscopy is presented. We use an oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals technique. The frequency shift of the cantilever vibrations is estimated. We show that the frequency shift causes the formation of the Schroedinger cat state for the cantilever. The interaction between the cantilever and the environment quickly destroys the coherence between the two cantilever trajectories. It is shown that using partial adiabatic reversals one can obtain a significant increase in the frequency shift. We discuss the possibility of sub-magneton spin density detection in molecules using magnetic resonance force microscopy.

Berman, G. P. (Gennady P.); Borgonovi, F.; Rinkevicius, Z.; Tsifrinovich, V. I. (Vladimir I.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Automated Dna Curvature Profile Reconstruction In Atomic Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An automated algorithm is presented to determine the DNA molecule intrinsic curvature profiles and the molecular spatial orientations in Atomic Force Microscope images. The curvature is composed by static and dynamic contributions. The first one is the intrinsic curvature, vectorial function of the DNA nucletide sequence, while the second one is due to thermal noise. This algorithm allows to reconstruct the intrinsic curvature profile excluding the thermal contribution and detects fragment orientation on AFM image with a percentage of molecular-orientation detection of 96.79 % for molecules with a high curvature peak. The automated approach allows to minimize the processing time compared to semi-automated methods, avoids errors introduced from operator bias and increases the amount of available information.

Microscope Images Elisa; Elisa Ficarra; Daniele Masotti; Luca Benini; Michela Milano

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R.; Lam, P.

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.

Torres, R.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Lam, P.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Low Temperature Scanning Force Microscopy of the Si(111)-( 7x7) Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low temperature scanning force microscope (SFM) operating in a dynamic mode in ultrahigh vacuum was used to study the Si(111)-(7x7) surface at 7.2 K. Not only the twelve adatoms but also the six rest atoms of the unit cell are clearly resolved for the first time with SFM. In addition, the first measurements of the short range chemical bonding forces above specific atomic sites are presented. The data are in good agreement with first principles computations and indicate that the nearest atoms in the tip and sample relax significantly when the tip is within a few Angstrom of the surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Lantz, M. A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Hug, H. J. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Schendel, P. J. A. van [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Hoffmann, R. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Martin, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Baratoff, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Abdurixit, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Guentherodt, H.-J. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel, (Switzerland); Gerber, Ch. [IBM Research Division, Zuerich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon, (Switzerland)

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Scientists Report First Observation of an “Atomic Air Force”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... orbit but then very quickly decay back to the lower energy state by ... cubic arrangement of the atomic clusters changes as the intensity and frequency ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

46

Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fractal properties in fundamental force coupling constants, in atomic energies, and in elementary particle masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the discrete-scale invariance theory, we show that the coupling constants of fundamental forces, the atomic masses and energies, and the elementary particle masses, obey to the fractal properties.

Boris Tatischeff

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Study on Carbon-Nanotube Local Oxidation Lithography Using an Atomic Force Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, nanoscale anodic oxidation lithography using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is systematically studied on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Trends between the produced feature size and the corresponding process parameters, such as applied voltage, ...

K. Kumar; O. Sul; S. Strauf; D. S. Choi; F. Fisher; M. G. Prasad; E. Yang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Atomic-scale properties of semiconductor heterostructures probed by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The engineering of advanced semiconductor heterostructure materials and devices requires a detailed understanding of, and control over, the structure and properties of semiconductor materials and devices at the atomic to nanometer scale. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a unique and powerful method to characterize structural morphology and electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial layers and device structures at these length scales. The basic experimental techniques in cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy are described, and some representative applications to semiconductor heterostructure characterization drawn from recent investigations in the authors laboratory are discussed. Specifically, they describe some recent studies of InP/InAsP and InAsP/InAsSb heterostructures in which nanoscale compositional clustering has been observed and analyzed.

Yu, E.T.; Zuo, S.L.; Bi, W.G.; Tu, C.W. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Robust atomic resolution imaging of light elements using scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We show that an annular detector placed within the bright field cone in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of light elements in crystals. In contrast to common high angle annular dark field imaging, both light and heavy atom columns are visible simultaneously. In contrast to common bright field imaging, the images are directly and robustly interpretable over a large range of thicknesses. We demonstrate this through systematic simulations and present a simple physical model to obtain some insight into the scattering dynamics.

Findlay, S. D. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of silver oxidation in ionized/atomic gas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between silver and ionized and atomic gas was observed directly by in situ transmission electron microscopy with an environmental cell for the first time. The electron beam provides dual functions as the source of both gas ionization and imaging. The concentration of ionized gas was tuned via adjusting the current density of the electron beam. Oxidation of the silver is observed in situ, indicating the presence of ionized and/or atomic oxygen. The evolution of microstructure and phase constituents was characterized. Then the oxidation rate was measured, and the relationships among grain size, mass transport rate, and electron flux were characterized. The role of the electron beam is discussed, and the results are rationalized with respect to ex situ results from the literature.

Sun, L.; Noh, K. W.; Wen, J-G.; Dillon, S. J. (Materials Science Division); (Massachusetts Inst. Tech.); (Univ. Illinois - Urbana)

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

53

FORCE SENSING IN SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY U. DURIG, J.K. GIMZEWSKI, D.W. POHL and R. SCHLITTLER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORCE SENSING IN SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY U. DURIG, J.K. GIMZEWSKI, D.W. POHL and R, (1986) 930. [3] U. Durig, J.K. Gimzewski, and D.W. Pohl, Phys. Rev. Lett., in press. [4] J. Soler, A

Gimzewski, James

54

Presentation to the Atomic Energy Commission and the Air Force, June 14, 1962  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the charts and backup material presented to the Atomic Energy Commission and Air Force on June 14, 1962 concerning General Electric's Nuclear Materials and Propulsion Operation (formerly the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Department), during its work on the development of a nuclear power plant for manned aircraft.

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Highly Reproducible Nanolithography by Dynamic Plough of an Atomic-Force Microscope Tip and Thermal-Annealing Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach has been developed to use atomic-force microscope (AFM) to pattern materials at the nanoscale in a controlled manner. By introducing a thermal-annealing process above the glass-transition temperature of poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), the ... Keywords: 2-D electron gas, Atomic-force microscope (AFM), nanolithography, self-switching diodes (SSDs)

Xiaofeng Lu; C. Balocco; Fuhua Yang; A. M. Song

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Seminar Announcement Nanoscale High Field Chemistry with the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning January 15, 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINAR SEMINAR ANNOUNCMENT Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:00am - 12:00 noon EMSL Boardroom Nanoscale High Field Chemistry With the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning Marco Rolandi Assistant Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 Facile and affordable processes for the fabrication of nanostructures are fundamental to future endeavors in nanoscale science and engineering. The atomic force microscope was designed primarily for imaging, and has evolved into a versatile tool for nanoscale surface modification. We have developed an AFM based scheme capable of direct writing of glassy carbon nanowires as fast as 1 cm/s. In brief, when a bias is applied across the tip-sample gap a molecular precursor undergoes high field reactions that result in the deposition of a cross- linked product on the surface. In order to gain a

57

Method for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged.

Hu, Jun (Berkeley, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Salmeron, Miguel (El Cerrito, CA); Xiao, Xudong (Kowloon, CN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Apparatus for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged. 9 figs.

Hu, J.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

59

Apparatus for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged.

Hu, Jun (Berkeley, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Salmeron, Miguel (El Cerrito, CA); Xiao, Xudong (Kowloon, CN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Method for imaging liquid and dielectric materials with scanning polarization force microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention images dielectric polarization forces on surfaces induced by a charged scanning force microscope (SFM) probe tip. On insulators, the major contribution to the surface polarizability at low frequencies is from surface ions. The mobility of these ions depends strongly on the humidity. Using the inventive SFM, liquid films, droplets, and other weakly adsorbed materials have been imaged. 9 figs.

Hu, J.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Xiao, X.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nanoscale visualization and characterization of Myxococcus xanthus cells with atomic force microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was supported by the Danish Medical Research Council (22-02-National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia. 7National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, Lon-

Pelling, A E; Li, Y N; Shi, W Y; Gimzewski, J K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Direct patterning of surface quantum wells with an atomic force J. Cortes Rosa, M. Wendel, H. Lorenz,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct patterning of surface quantum wells with an atomic force microscope J. Cortes Rosa, MAs­AlSb surface quantum wells. Sharp and sturdy electron beam deposited tips are developed to withstand the comparatively high N forces in the direct patterning process. By direct patterning the InAs surface quantum well

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

64

Atom probe microscopy of three-dimensional distribution of silicon isotopes in {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices with sub-nanometer spatial resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-assisted atom probe microscopy of 2 nm period {sup 28}Si/{sup 30}Si isotope superlattices (SLs) is reported. Three-dimensional distributions of {sup 28}Si and {sup 30}Si stable isotopes are obtained with sub-nanometer spatial resolution. The depth resolution of the present atom probe analysis is much higher than that of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) even when SIMS is performed with a great care to reduce the artifact due to atomic mixing. Outlook of Si isotope SLs as ideal depth scales for SIMS and three-dimensional position standards for atom probe microscopy is discussed.

Shimizu, Yasuo; Kawamura, Yoko; Uematsu, Masashi; Itoh, Kohei M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Tomita, Mitsuhiro [Corporate Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522 (Japan); Sasaki, Mikio; Uchida, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Mamoru [Toshiba Nanoanalysis Corporation, 1 Komukai Toshiba-cho, Saiwai-ku, Kawasaki 212-8583 (Japan)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ?350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO{sub 2} , precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) mineral surface in scCO{sub 2}; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10{overbar 1}4) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, A.S.; Higgins, S.R.; Knauss, K.G.; Rosso, K.M.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in-situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~ 350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in-situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10¯14) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in-situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid-fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, Alan S.; Higgins, Steven R.; Knauss, Kevin G.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Sensing Current and Forces with SPM  

SciTech Connect

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are well established techniques to image surfaces and to probe material properties at the atomic and molecular scale. In this review, we show hybrid combinations of AFM and STM that bring together the best of two worlds: the simultaneous detection of atomic scale forces and conduction properties. We illustrate with several examples how the detection of forces during STM and the detection of currents during AFM can give valuable additional information of the nanoscale material properties.

Park, Jeong Y.; Maier, Sabine; Hendriksen, Bas; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

Atom-probe field-ion-microscopy study of Fe-Ti alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A newly developed high-performance atom-probe (field ion microscope) was employed for the composition analysis of Fe-Ti alloys and their interactions with ambient gas, such as H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. With a mass resolution (m/..delta..m) better than 2000 and a spatial resolution of a few A, all isotopes of Fe and Ti and their hydrides and other compounds are clearly resolved during the depth profile study. Some of our findings are: (1) Titanium segregated on the surface and grain boundaries upon heating (greater than or equal to 900/sup 0/C), in the form of oxides, and (2) some Ti in the bulk forms clusters of various sizes with C, O, and/or N as nuclei.

Pickering, H.W.; Kuk, Y.; Sakurai, T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Measurement of probe displacement to the thermal resolution limit in photonic force microscopy using a miniature quadrant photodetector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A photonic force microscope comprises of an optically trapped micro-probe and a position detection system to track the motion of the probe. Signal collection for motion detection is often carried out using the backscattered light off the probe-however, this mode has problems of low S/N due to the small backscattering cross sections of the micro-probes typically used. The position sensors often used in these cases are quadrant photodetectors. To ensure maximum sensitivity of such detectors, it would help if the detector size matched with the detection beam radius after the condenser lens (which for backscattered detection would be the trapping objective itself). To suit this condition, we have used a miniature displacement sensor whose dimensions makes it ideal to work with 1:1 images of micrometer-sized trapped probes in the backscattering detection mode. The detector is based on the quadrant photo-integrated chip in the optical pick-up head of a compact disc player. Using this detector, we measured absolute displacements of an optically trapped 1.1 {mu}m probe with a resolution of {approx}10 nm for a bandwidth of 10 Hz at 95% significance without any sample or laser stabilization. We characterized our optical trap for different sized probes by measuring the power spectrum for each probe to 1% accuracy, and found that for 1.1 {mu}m diameter probes, the noise in our position measurement matched the thermal resolution limit for averaging times up to 10 ms. We also achieved a linear response range of around 385 nm with cross talk between axes {approx_equal}4% for 1.1 {mu}m diameter probes. The detector has extremely high bandwidth (few MHz) and low optical power threshold-other factors that can lead to its widespread use in photonic force microscopy.

Pal, Sambit Bikas; Haldar, Arijit; Roy, Basudev; Banerjee, Ayan [Department of Physical Sciences, IISER-Kolkata, West Bengal 741252 (India)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

The unification of the fundamental interaction within Maxwell electromagnetism: Model of hydrogen atom. Gravity as the secondary electric force. Calculation of the unified inertia force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considering two static, electrically charged, elementary particles, we demonstrate a possible way of proving that all known fundamental forces in the nature are the manifestations of the single, unique interaction. We re-define the gauging of integration constants in the Schwarzschild solution of Einstein field equations. We consider the potential energy in this context regardless it is gravitational or electric potential energy. With the newly gauged constants, we sketch how the unique interaction can be described with the help of an appropriate solution of the well-known Maxwell equations. According the solution, there are two zones, in the system of two oppositely charged particles, where the force is oscillating. The first particle can be in a stable, constant distance from the second particle, between the neighbouring regions of repulsion and attraction. In an outer oscillation zone, the corresponding energy levels in the proton-electron systems are identical (on the level of accuracy of values calculated by the Dirac's equations) to some experimentally determined levels in the hydrogen atom. For each system of two particles, there is also the zone with the macroscopic, i.e. monotonous behavior of the force. As well, the solution can be used to demonstrate that the net force between two assemblies consisting each (or at least one) of the same numbers of both positively and negatively charged particles is never zero. A secondary electric force, having the same orientation as the primary electric force between the oppositely charged particles, is always present. It can be identified to the gravity. Finally, the solution of the Maxwell equations can be used to calculate the inertia force of a particle. The consistent formulas for both acting and inertia forces enable to construct the dimensionless (without gravitational constant, permitivity of vacuum, etc.) equation of motion.

L. Neslusan

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Investigation of short-range surface forces to develop self-organizing devices by Steven M. Tobias.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force spectra from atomic force microscopy were used to verify surface energy components of indium tin oxide and mesocarbon microbeads. These materials were selected based on spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters to ...

Tobias, Steven M., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Atomic-resolution study of polarity reversal in GaSb grown on Si by scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The atomic-resolved reversal of the polarity across an antiphase boundary (APB) was observed in GaSb films grown on Si by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The investigation of the interface structure at the origin of the APB reveals that coalescence of two domains with Ga-prelayer and Sb-prelayer causes the sublattice reversal. The local strain and lattice rotation distributions of the APB, attributed to the discordant bonding length at the APB with the surrounding GaSb lattice, were further studied using the geometric phase analysis technique. The crystallographic characteristics of the APBs and their interaction with other planar defects were observed with HAADF-STEM. The quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated images confirms the observed polarities in the acquired HAADF-STEM data. The self-annihilation mechanism of the APBs is addressed based on the rotation induced by anti-site bonds and APBs' faceting.

Hosseini Vajargah, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Ghanad-Tavakoli, S. [Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kleiman, R. N.; Preston, J. S. [Brockhouse Institute for Material Research, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M1 (Canada); Centre for Emerging Device Technologies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

atomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

theory and fundamental quantum mechanics In addition to research on hadronic and nuclear physics, we also conduct research in atomic physics, neutron physics, and quantum...

75

Viscoelastic Study Using an Atomic Force Microscope Modified to Operate as a Nanorheometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

software interface. Measurements on an agar gel model substrate reveal a viscoelastic response that is well, considering the cantilever assembly instead as a load transducer, one can study the rheological behavior. Their approaches fall into the following general categories: (I) analysis of conventional force-distance curves,10

Attard, Phil

76

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a PEDOT:PSS coated indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and LiF/Althe e?ciency. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a transparentIn the control device, indium tin oxide(ITO) is used as the

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy of single CdSe nanocrystallites. Accts. Chem.of individual CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals on siliconmicroscopy study of single Au-CdSe hybrid nanodumbbells:

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

In-situ and ex-situ observations of lithium de-intercalation from LiCoO? : atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium cobalt dioxide is the most commonly used material for positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries. During lithium de-intercalation from this material, ... undergoes a number of phase transitions, which ...

Clémençon, Anne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

BNL | CFN: Electron Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and chemistry at the atomic scale is crucial to modern materials science and nanotechnology. Advanced electron microscopy can provide the fundamental knowledge that will...

80

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Real-Time Imaging System for Stereo Atomic Microscopy at SPring-8's BL25SU  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a real-time photoelectron angular distribution (PEAD) and Auger-electron angular distribution (AEAD) imaging system at SPring-8 BL25SU, Japan. In addition, a real-time imaging system for circular dichroism (CD) studies of PEAD/AEAD has been newly developed. Two PEAD images recorded with left- and right-circularly polarized light can be regarded as a stereo image of the atomic arrangement. A two-dimensional display type mirror analyzer (DIANA) has been installed at the beamline, making it possible to record PEAD/AEAD patterns with an acceptance angle of {+-}60 deg. in real-time. The twin-helical undulators at BL25SU enable helicity switching of the circularly polarized light at 10Hz, 1Hz or 0.1Hz. In order to realize real-time measurements of the CD of the PEAD/AEAD, the CCD camera must be synchronized to the switching frequency. The VME computer that controls the ID is connected to the measurement computer with two BNC cables, and the helicity information is sent using TTL signals. For maximum flexibility, rather than using a hardware shutter synchronizing with the TTL signal we have developed software to synchronize the CCD shutter with the TTL signal. We have succeeded in synchronizing the CCD camera in both the 1Hz and 0.1Hz modes.

Matsushita, Tomohiro; Guo, Fang Zhun; Muro, Takayuki [JASRI/SPring-8, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Role of the Electrostatic Force in Spore Adhesion  

SciTech Connect

Electrostatic force is investigated as one of the components of the adhesion force between Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores and planar surfaces. The surface potentials of a Bt spore and a mica surface are experimentally obtained using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-scanning surface potential microscopy technique. On the basis of experimental information, the surface charge density of the spores is estimated at 0.03 {micro}C/cm{sup 2} at 20% relative humidity and decreases with increasing humidity. The Coulombic force is introduced for the spore-mica system (both charged, nonconductive surfaces), and an electrostatic image force is introduced to the spore-gold system because gold is electrically conductive. The Coulombic force for spore-mica is repulsive because the components are similarly charged, while the image force for the spore-gold system is attractive. The magnitude of both forces decreases with increasing humidity. The electrostatic forces are added to other force components, e.g., van der Waals and capillary forces, to obtain the adhesion force for each system. The adhesion forces measured by AFM are compared to the estimated values. It is shown that the electrostatic (Coulombic and image) forces play a significant role in the adhesion force between spores and planar surfaces.

Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mapping out the structural changes of natural and pretreated plant cell wall surfaces by atomic force microscopy single molecular recognition imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fractionation of corn stover by ammonia recyclethe enzymic hydrolysis of corn stover. Biomass Bioenergyafter steam pretreatment of corn stover with or without the

Zhang, Mengmeng; Chen, Guojun; Kumar, Rajeev; Xu, Bingqian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mapping out the structural changes of natural and pretreated plant cell wall surfaces by atomic force microscopy single molecular recognition imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biochem J 2. Solomon BD: Biofuels and sustainability. Ecolplants and enzymes for biofuels production. Science 2007,of lignocellulose. Biofuels Bioprod Biorefin 2012, 11. Yang

Zhang, Mengmeng; Chen, Guojun; Kumar, Rajeev; Xu, Bingqian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Microscopy Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST has worked extensively with microscope manufacturers such as FEI ... Electron microscopy methods have been used to characterize potential ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

Atomic-Scale Investigation of Epitaxial Graphene Grown on 6H-SiC(0001) Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Typically, the atomic structures of the graphene were resolved at sample bias voltages below 0.5 V graphene continuously extended across four SiC bilayers, as confirmed by the line profile. A height .) 13346 J. Phys. Chem. C, Vol. 114, No. 31, 2010 Choi et al. #12;shaped protrusions at high bias voltage

Kim, Sehun

88

Analytical Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM  

SciTech Connect

GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Weak dispersive forces between glass-gold macroscopic surfaces in alcohols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we concentrate on an experimental validation of the Lifshitz theory for van der Waals and Casimir forces in gold-alcohol-glass systems. From this theory weak dispersive forces are predicted when the dielectric properties of the intervening medium become comparable to one of the interacting surfaces. Using inverse colloid probe atomic force microscopy dispersive forces were measured occasionally and under controlled conditions by addition of salt to screen the electrostatic double layer force if present. The dispersive force was found to be attractive, and an order of magnitude weaker than that in air. Although the theoretical description of the forces becomes less precise for these systems even with full knowledge of the dielectric properties, we find still our results in reasonable agreement with Lifshitz theory.

P. J. van Zwol; G. Palasantzas; J. Th. M. DeHosson

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

October 15, 1994 / Vol. 19, No. 20 / OPTICS LETTERS 1651 Quantized atom-field force at the surface of a microsphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the F = 3, MF = 3 hyperfine magnetic sub- level of the 5S ground state (quantization axis Oz). The 5P3 from the atomic transition by several hundred megahertz, couples the ground state to a combina- tion of excited substates with F = 2, 3, 4, a situation equivalent to a two-level atom with a dipole matrix

Sandoghdar, Vahid

92

Nanoimprinting and Piezoresponse Force Microscopy of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Patterned poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) .... Sonochemistry as a Tool for Synthesis of Ion-Substituted Calcium Phosphate ...

93

Positron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The negative work function property that some materials have for positrons make possible the development of positron reemission microscopy (PRM). Because of the low energies with which the positrons are emitted, some unique applications, such as the imaging of defects, can be made. The history of the concept of PRM, and its present state of development will be reviewed. The potential of positron microprobe techniques will be discussed also.

Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Xu, J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Atomic transport at liquid metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces  

SciTech Connect

In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to identify the controlling transport mechanisms at metal/oxide interfaces and measure the corresponding diffusivities. Interfacial transport rates in our experiments are two to four orders of magnitude faster than any previously reported rates for the oxide surface. The interfacial diffusivities and the degree of interfacial anisotropy depend on the oxygen activity of the system. Atomic transport at metal/oxide interfaces plays a defining role in many technological processes, and these experiments provide fundamental data for the formulation of the atomic theory needed to explain many of the observed phenomena.

Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

95

Growth mechanism and surface atomic structure of AgInSe{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of (112)A-oriented AgInSe{sub 2} on GaAs (111)A and its surface reconstruction were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and other techniques. Films were grown by a sputtering and evaporation method. Topographic STM images reveal that the film grew by atomic incorporation into surface steps resulting from screw dislocations on the surface. The screw dislocation density was {approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup 2}. Atomically resolved images also show that the surface atomic arrangement appears to be similar to that of the bulk, with a spacing of 0.35-0.41 nm. There is no observable reconstruction, which is unexpected for a polar semiconductor surface.

Pena Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Lyding, Joseph [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 405 N. Matthews St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mechanochromism, Shear Force Anisotropy, and Molecular Mechanics in Polydiacetylene Monolayers  

SciTech Connect

The authors use scanning probe microscopy to actuate and characterize the nanoscale mechanochromism of polydiacetylene monolayer on atomically-flat silicon oxide substrates. They find explicit evidence that the irreversible blue-to-red transformation is caused by shear forces exerted normal to the polydiacetylene polymer backbone. The anisotropic probe-induced transformation is characterized by a significant change in the tilt orientation of the side chains with respect to the surface normal. They also describe a new technique, based on shear force microscopy, that allows them to image friction anisotropy of polydiacetylene monolayer independent of scan direction. Finally, they discuss preliminary molecular mechanics modeling and electronic structure calculations that allow them to understand the correlation of mechanochromism with bond-angle changes in the conjugated polymer backbone.

BURNS,ALAN R.; CARPICK,R.W.; SASAKI,DARRYL Y.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; HADDAD,R.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

NIST Reference Materials Are 'Gold Standard' for Bio ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential mobility analysis (DMA ...

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Effect Of Low Earth Orbit Atomic Oxygen Exposure On Phenylphosphine Oxide-Containing Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin films of phenylphosphine oxide-containing polymers were exposed to low Earth orbit aboard a space shuttle flight (STS-85) as part of flight experiment designated Evaluation of Space Environment and Effects on Materials (ESEM). This flight experiment was a cooperative effort between the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The thin film samples described herein were part of an atomic oxygen exposure experiment (AOE) and were exposed to primarily atomic oxygen (~1 X 10 19 atoms/cm 2 ). The thin film samples consisted of three phosphine oxide containing polymers (arylene ether, benzimidazole and imide). Based on post-flight analyses using atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and weight loss data, it was found that atomic oxygen exposure of these materials efficiently produces a phosphate layer at the surface of the samples. This layer provides a barrier towards further attack by AO. Consequently, th...

John Connell National; John W. Connell

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electron Microscopy | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy Facility Electron Microscopy This facility consists of four top-of-the line transmission electron microscopes, two of which are highly specialized instruments capable of extreme levels of resolution, achieved through spherical aberration correction. The facility is also equipped with extensive sample-preparation capabilities. The scientific interests of the staff focus on understanding the microscopic origin of the physical and chemical behavior of materials, with specific emphasis on in-situ studies of materials in native, functional environments. Capabilities Atomic-resolution imaging of internal materials structure with scanning transmission and transmission electron microscopy Spectroscopic characterization with energy dispersive x-ray

100

Short Course Agricultural Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Course in Agricultural Microscopy. Fargo North Dakota held June 13-16 2011. Sponsored by the Agricultural Microscopy Division of AOCS and the Great Plains Institute of Food Safety. Short Course Agricultural Microscopy Short Courses ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Whole-cell sensing for a harmful bloom-forming microscopic alga by measuring antibody--antigen forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Aureococcus anophagefferens, a harmful bloomforming alga responsible for brown tides in estuaries of the Middle Atlantic U.S., has been investigated by atomic force microscopy for the first time, using probes functionalized with a monoclonal antibody specific for the alga. The rupture force between a single monoclonal antibody and the surface of A. anophagefferens was experimentally found to be 246 6 11 pN at the load rate of 12 nN/s. Force histograms for A. anophagefferens and other similarly-sized algae are presented and analyzed. The results illustrate the effects of load rates, and demonstrate that force-distance measurements can be used to build biosensors with high signal-to-noise ratios for A. anophagefferens. The methods described in this paper can be used, in principle, to construct sensors with single-cell resolution for arbitrary cells for which monoclonal antibodies are available. Index Terms—Atomic force microscopy, Aureococcus anophagefferens, biosensors, force-distance measurements, single-cell identification.

Er S. Lee; Mrinal Mahapatro; David A. Caron; Aristides A. G. Requicha; Life Fellow; Beth A. Stauffer; Mark E. Thompson; Chongwu Zhou

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Atomic-Layer Engineering of Oxide Superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Molecular beam epitaxy technique has enabled synthesis of atomically smooth thin films, multilayers, and superlattices of cuprates and other complex oxides. Such heterostructures show high temperature superconductivity and enable novel experiments that probe the basic physics of this phenomenon. For example, it was established that high temperature superconductivity and anti-ferromagnetic phases separate on Angstrom scale, while the pseudo-gap state apparently mixes with high temperature superconductivity over an anomalously large length scale (the 'Giant Proximity Effect'). We review some recent experiments on such films and superlattices, including X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy, transport measurements, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, resonant X-ray scattering, low-energy muon spin resonance, and ultrafast photo-induced reflection high energy electron diffraction. The results include an unambiguous demonstration of strong coupling of in-plane charge excitations to out-of-plane lattice vibrations, a discovery of interface high temperature superconductivity that occurs in a single CuO{sub 2} plane, evidence for local pairs, and establishing tight limits on the temperature range of superconducting fluctuations.

Bozovic I.; Bollinger, A.T.; Eckstein, J.N.; Dubuis, G.; Pavuna, D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

Huxford, Theodore J. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

105

Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural Microscopy, Reports, Journals, Websites Agricultural Microscopy Division Of Interest Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Microscopy analytical aocs articles biotechnology courses detergents division divisions f

106

NIST: Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultraviolet Photoemission Electron Microscopy. Summary: Ultraviolet photoemission electron microscopy is used to study ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Atomic History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These Data Centers, one on Atomic Energy Levels and one on Atomic Transition ... After a few years Kessler went on to higher management at NIST. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

Agricultural Microscopy Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agricultural Microscopy Division advances visual imaging in discerning the quality and content of ingredients and finished products of the feed, fertilizer, seed, and agri-food sectors. Agricultural Microscopy Division Divisions achievement ag

110

MML Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MML Electron Microscopy Facility consists of three transmission electron microscopes (TEM), three scanning electron microscopes (SEM), a ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

Mapping Polymer Heterogeneity Using Atomic Force ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the total surface free energy of PB as a function of annealing time were estimated using the geometric means approach of Owens and Wendt.47 In ...

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

112

Nanoscale Mechanics by Contact Resonance Atomic Force ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mechanical tests (eg tensile tests observed inside a ... CR-AFM requires no additional testing device or ... 109, 929, 2009), AlN NTs (Nanotechnology 20 ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Atomic-resolution Chemical Analysis by Aberration-corrected ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In fact, it is possible to analyze materials in the atomic resolution since both the ... State-of-the-art strain Microscopy for Ferroelectrics and Battery Materials.

114

Atomic Cu/Nb Interface Structures Characterized by Transmission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the interface effect on mechanical behavior, atomic Cu/Nb interface structures were studied by (scanning) transmission electron microscopy  ...

115

Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Imaging Small Molecules by Scanning Probe Microscopy Shirley Chiang Department of Physics. Ohtani, R.J. Wilson, S. Chiang, and C.M. Mate, "Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observations of Benzene. V.M. Hallmark, S. Chiang, J.F. Rabolt, J.D. Swalen, and R.J. Wilson, "Observation of Atomic

Chiang, Shirley

116

Metrology Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metrology Electron Microscopy. Technical Contact: Joseph (Joe) Fu. 301-975-3795. Figure 1. SRM 484f Sample and its Micrograph. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Attractive Optical Forces from Blackbody Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackbody radiation around hot objects induces ac Stark shifts of the energy levels of nearby atoms and molecules. These shifts are roughly proportional to the fourth power of the temperature and induce a force decaying with the third power of the distance from the object. We explicitly calculate the resulting attractive blackbody optical dipole force for ground state hydrogen atoms. Surprisingly, this force can surpass the repulsive radiation pressure and actually pull the atoms against the radiation energy flow towards the surface with a force stronger than gravity. We exemplify the dominance of the "blackbody force" over gravity for hydrogen in a cloud of hot dust particles. This overlooked force appears relevant in various astrophysical scenarios, in particular, since analogous results hold for a wide class of other broadband radiation sources.

Matthias Sonnleitner; Monika Ritsch-Marte; Helmut Ritsch

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

Novel Microscopy Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Atomic Imaging of Surface and Bulk with an Aberration Corrected Scanning Electron Microscope: Yimei Zhu1; 1Brookhaven National ...

119

Magneto-Optical Cooling of Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power and reduced complexity.

Raizen, Mark G; Rochester, Simon; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Spectroscopic imaging in electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the scanning transmission electron microscope, multiple signals can be simultaneously collected, including the transmitted and scattered electron signals (bright field and annular dark field or Z-contrast images), along with spectroscopic signals such as inelastically scattered electrons and emitted photons. In the last few years, the successful development of aberration correctors for the electron microscope has transformed the field of electron microscopy, opening up new possibilities for correlating structure to functionality. Aberration correction not only allows for enhanced structural resolution with incident probes into the sub-angstrom range, but can also provide greater probe currents to facilitate mapping of intrinsically weak spectroscopic signals at the nanoscale or even the atomic level. In this issue of MRS Bulletin, we illustrate the power of the new generation of electron microscopes with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy. We show the mapping of elemental distributions at atomic resolution and also the mapping of electronic and optical properties at unprecedented spatial resolution, with applications ranging from graphene to plasmonic nanostructures, and oxide interfaces to biology.

Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Colliex, C. [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Monitoring charge storage processes in nanoscale oxides using electrochemical scanning probe microscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in electrochemical energy storage science require the development of new or the refinement of existing in situ probes that can be used to establish structure - activity relationships for technologically relevant materials. The drive to develop reversible, high capacity electrodes from nanoscale building blocks creates an additional requirement for high spatial resolution probes to yield information of local structural, compositional, and electronic property changes as a function of the storage state of a material. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing a lithium ion battery positive electrode into its basic constituents of ion insertion host particles and a carbon current collector. This model system is then probed in an electrochemical environment using a combination of atomic force microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy to correlate local activity with morphological and electronic configurational changes. Cubic spinel Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles are grown on graphite surfaces using vacuum deposition methods. The structure and composition of these particles are determined using transmission electron microscopy and Auger microprobe analysis. The response of these particles to initial de-lithiation, along with subsequent electrochemical cycling, is tracked using scanning probe microscopy techniques in polar aprotic electrolytes (lithium hexafluorophosphate in ethylene carbonate:diethylcarbonate). The relationship between nanoparticle size and reversible ion insertion activity will be a specific focus of this paper.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Lu, Ping; Huang, Jian Yu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Nonlinear vibrational microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAMM SAMM EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Sub-Ångstrom Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility In order to meet the scientific challenges of the future, the EMC has built a new state-of-the-art laboratory space for advanced electron microscopy. The new building has been designed to provide next- generation science with an operating environment that cannot be attained by renovating existing facilities. The EMC staff learned as much as possible from similar efforts around the world, including the SuperSTEM building at Daresbury, the Triebenberg Special Laboratory, the AML at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the new NIST building, and various facilities for nanoscience.

124

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgment Acknowledgment EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Acknowledgment Please acknowledge your use of the EMC in your publications and presentations with the following acknowledgment statement: The electron microscopy was accomplished at the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Laboratory operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 by UChicago Argonne, LLC.

125

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Laboratory Laboratory Electron Microscopy Center Argonne Home > EMC > EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

126

Agricultural Microscopy Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryAgricultural Microscopy Division2013 Members72 Members as of October 1, 2013Ajbani, RutviInstitute of Chemical TechnologyMumbai, MH, IndiaAlonso, CarmenPuerto Rico Dept ofAgricultureDorado, Puerto RicoArmbrust, KevinLoui

127

The Particle Adventure | What holds it together? | Residual EM force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM force EM force Residual EM force Atoms usually have the same numbers of protons and electrons. They are electrically neutral, therefore, because the positive protons cancel out the negative electrons. Since they are neutral, what causes them to stick together to form stable molecules? The answer is a bit strange: we've discovered that the charged parts of one atom can interact with the charged parts of another atom. This allows different atoms to bind together, an effect called the residual electromagnetic force. So the electromagnetic force is what allows atoms to bond and form molecules, allowing the world to stay together and create the matter you interact with all of the time. Amazing, isn't it? All the structures of the world exist simply because protons and electrons have opposite charges!

128

Diamond-like atomic-scale composite films: Surface properties and stability studied by STM and AFM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous ``diamond-like/quartz-like`` composites a-(C:H/Si:O) and metal containing a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) constitute a novel class of diamond-related materials with a number of unique bulk and surface properties. In order to gain a more fundamental understanding of the surface properties and stability of these solids we have performed a scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy investigation of both a-(C:H/Si:O) and a-(C:H/Si:O/Me) films, including the effects of ion bombardment and annealing.

Dorfman, B.; Abraizov, M. [SUNY, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Pollak, F.H. [CUNY, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Eby, R. [TopoMetrix, Bedminster, NJ (United States); Rong, Z.Y. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Strongin, M.; Yang, X.Q. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Office of Science User Facility An Office of Science User Facility The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff carry out research with collaborators and users from Argonne, universities, and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

130

Electron Microscopy Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Electron Microscopy Lab Electron Microscopy Lab Focusing on the study of microstructures with electron and ion beam instruments, including crystallographic and chemical techniques. April 12, 2012 Transmission electron microscope Rob Dickerson examines a multiphase oxide scale using the FEI Titan 80-300 transmission electron microscope. Contact Rob Dickerson (505) 667-6337 Email Rod McCabe (505) 606-1649 Email Pat Dickerson (505) 665-3036 Email Tom Wynn (505) 665-6861 Email Dedicated to the characterization of materials through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures in support of Basic Energy Science, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, DoD, DOE, Work for Others, nuclear energy, and weapons programs. Go to full website »

131

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Training EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers User Training Prior Training in Electron Microscopy: People who wish to operate TEMs must have at least one college-level course in TEM with a lab component or previous TEM experience. The college course can't be one in which TEM was just one of many topics. For researchers who lack academic training and/or practical experience in electron microscopy, we suggest the short courses in TEM at the Hooke College of Applied Sciences, and the hands-on TEM courses at Northwestern University or the University of Chicago or Northern Illinois University.

132

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The mission of the Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is to: Conduct materials research using advanced microstructural characterization methods; Maintain unique resources and facilities for scientific research for the both the Argonne National Laboratory and national scientific community. Develop and expand the frontiers of microanalysis by fostering the evolution of synergistic state-of-the-art resources in instrumentation, techniques and scientific expertise; The staff members of the EMC carry out their own research as well as participate in collaborative programs with other scientists at Argonne National Laboratory as well as researchers, educators and students worldwide. The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those capabilities to solve materials problems. The EMC staff perform collaborative research with members of other Divisions at Argonne National Laboratory and with collaborators from universities and other laboratories. The expertise and facilities of the EMC additionally serve a group of national and international researchers. The EMC emphasizes three major areas: materials research, technique and instrumentation development, and operation as a national research facility. Research by EMC personnel includes microscopy based studies in high Tc superconducting materials, irradiation effects in metals and semiconductors, phase transformations, and processing related structure and chemistry of interfaces in thin films.

133

A molecular mechanics force field for lignin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived using the RESP electrostatic potential fitting method supplemented by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. Finally, the force field is validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this lignin force field will enable full simulations of lignocellulose.

Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Phase-field crystal modeling and atomic-scale characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation results are compared with the findings of atomic-level electron microscopy ... Evolution of precipitate nuclei during age-hardening · Evolution of  ...

135

What is Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... force may be balanced by an opposing force so that no energy is expended ... The unit of force is the Newton (N). By definition, the newton is the force ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

136

Agricultural Microscopy Newsletter March 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter March 2011 Greetings from the Chairperson The Agricultural Microscopy Division would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere sympathy to the family and friends of George Liepa who rece

137

Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Advanced Developments in Electron Microscopy. Sponsorship, MS&T ...

138

Design and performance of a combined secondary ion mass spectrometry-scanning probe microscopy instrument for high sensitivity and high-resolution elemental three-dimensional analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) instruments allow producing 3D chemical mappings with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. Several important artifacts however arise from the fact that SIMS 3D mapping does not take into account the surface topography of the sample. In order to correct these artifacts, we have integrated a specially developed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) system into a commercial Cameca NanoSIMS 50 instrument. This new SPM module, which was designed as a DN200CF flange-mounted bolt-on accessory, includes a new high-precision sample stage, a scanner with a range of 100 {mu}m in x and y direction, and a dedicated SPM head which can be operated in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy modes. Topographical information gained from AFM measurements taken before, during, and after SIMS analysis as well as the SIMS data are automatically compiled into an accurate 3D reconstruction using the software program 'SARINA,' which was developed for this first combined SIMS-SPM instrument. The achievable lateral resolutions are 6 nm in the SPM mode and 45 nm in the SIMS mode. Elemental 3D images obtained with our integrated SIMS-SPM instrument on Al/Cu and polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) samples demonstrate the advantages of the combined SIMS-SPM approach.

Wirtz, Tom; Fleming, Yves; Gerard, Mathieu [Department 'Science and Analysis of Materials' (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public, Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Gysin, Urs; Glatzel, Thilo; Meyer, Ernst [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Wegmann, Urs [Department of Physics, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Maier, Urs [Ferrovac GmbH, Thurgauerstr. 72, CH-8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Odriozola, Aitziber Herrero; Uehli, Daniel [SPECS Zurich GmbH, Technoparkstr. 1, CH-8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of Chemistry, University of South Carolina High-Angle-Annular-Dark-Field/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF/STEM) is a technique uniquely suited for detailed studies of the structure and composition of complex oxides. The HAADF detector collects electrons which have interact inelastically with the potentials of the atoms in the specimen and therefore resembles the better known Z2 (Z is atomic number) Rutherford scattering. One class of important catalysts consists of bronzes based on pentagonal {Mo6O21} building units; these include Mo5O14 and Mo17O47. In the last 20 years, new materials doped with

140

Glossary Term - Atomic Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Previous Term (Alpha Particle) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Avogadro's Number) Avogadro's Number Atomic Number Silver's atomic number is 47 The atomic number is equal to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Becoming a User Becoming a User EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Procedure to Become a User at the EMC 1. Summary All users have to fulfill certain requirements before access to the EMC can be granted. The following list provides short descriptions of the requirements. Details can be found on this page and via the relevant links at the left. Register for access to Argonne's scientific user facilities (or update your user registration information).

142

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submit an EMC Proposal Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers Submit an EMC Proposal EMC Proposal Submission Deadline Dates for FY2014: November 1, 2013 March 7, 2014 July 11, 2014 Is your proposal a multi-facility proposal? In other words, do you intend to submit proposals to EMC and APS or CNM for your research project? If your answer is "yes," go now to the Proposal Gateway.

143

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMC Users Committee EMC Users Committee EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers EMC Users Committee An EMC Users Committee has been organized to enhance communication between the user community and the EMC. While the EMC relies on and encourages strong interaction among its users and between its staff and users, the Users Committee provides an additional formal mechanism for user input into EMC planning and operations to ensure that users' needs and concerns are addressed.

144

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

End-of-Proposal Report End-of-Proposal Report EMC Home Overview Personnel Resources Highlights Publications Visit EMC Contact Info Information for Users Becoming a User Submit a Proposal End-of-Proposal Report Acknowledgment User Training User Safety User Status Instrument Access User Committee User Meetings Data Storage Policy Visiting the EMC Instrument Calendars Info for EMC Staff SÅMM Facility TEAM Project Microscopy Links Argonne Facilities DOE/BES Facilities DOE/BES BES Electron Beam Microcharacterization Centers End-of-Proposal Report In accordance with the User Agreement, please provide the EMC with the following information when your proposal expires (one year after its acceptance date or when the experiments end, whichever is sooner). A research summary/progress report using these two templates:

145

Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the latest news from the Agricultural Microscopy division. Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 Agricultural Microscopy Division Newsletter September 2013 ...

146

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory, Center for Materials Research Brookhaven National Laboratory, Electron Microscopy Program Sites of Interest to the Microscopy Community The Microscopy...

147

Note: Helical nanobelt force sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the fabrication and characterization of helical nanobelt force sensors. These self-sensing force sensors are based on the giant piezoresistivity of helical nanobelts. The three-dimensional helical nanobelts are self-formed from 27 nm-thick n-type InGaAs/GaAs bilayers using rolled-up techniques, and assembled onto electrodes on a micropipette using nanorobotic manipulations. The helical nanobelt force sensors can be calibrated using a calibrated atomic force microscope cantilever system under scanning electron microscope. Thanks to their giant piezoresistance coefficient (515 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Pa{sup -1}), low stiffness (0.03125 N/m), large-displacement capability ({approx}10 {mu}m), and good fatigue resistance, they are well suited to function as stand-alone, compact ({approx}20 {mu}m without the plug-in support), light ({approx}5 g including the plug-in support), versatile and large range ({approx}{mu}N) and high resolution ({approx}nN) force sensors.

Hwang, G. [Laboratory for Photonics and Nanostructures, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marcoussis 91460 (France); Hashimoto, H. [Department of EECE, Chuo University 1-13-27 Kasuga, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Atomic Layer Deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as Characterized Reference Samples for Nanolayer Metrology  

SciTech Connect

Plasma assisted Atomic Layer Deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were studied using an approach of complementary metrology using Ellipsometry, X-Ray Reflectivity, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence. For modeling the samples, an interfacial rough SiO{sub 2} layer has to be assumed. The excellent linearity of the ALD process was used to cross check Ellipsometry and X-Ray Reflectivity. In contrast to Ellipsometry, X-Ray Reflectivity showed a residual surface layer, identified as chlorine contaminated layer by TXRF. The samples are shown to be ideal candidates for calibration of X-ray fluorescence as the Al signal linearly depends on the film thickness or ALD cycles. Furthermore, the impact of self-absorption of thick layers for TXRF was shown by the samples.

Nutsch, A.; Lemberger, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Systems and Device Technology, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Petrik, P. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege u. 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center. Summary: ... Atomic Spectroscopy Data Webpage. End Date: ongoing. Lead Organizational Unit: physlab. Contact. ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Electron Microscopy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Information for EMC Users General Information for EMC Users The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory. It is one of three scientific user facilities for electron beam microcharacterization and one of several National User Facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory. As a scientific user facility, the EMC supports user-accessible instruments (Resources) for high spatial resolution microanalysis, field imaging, nanoscale structural characterization, nanoscale fabrication and manipulation, and unique in situ studies of materials under the influence of ion-beam irradiation. These capabilities are used in a diverse variety of research areas to address grand challenge scientific questions encompassing, for example, energy-related studies, biology, astrophysics, archaeology, superconductivity, nanotechnology, environmental engineering, tribology, and ferroelectricity. The research is performed both by users and by EMC staff. While many users work independently, the most challenging research activities require extensive contributions from EMC staff.

151

Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Atomic magnetometer  

SciTech Connect

An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

154

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Electron and Scanning Probe Microscopies Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This research area supports basic research in condensed matter physics and materials physics using electron scattering and microscopy and scanning probe techniques. The research includes experiments and theory to understand the atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures of materials.

155

NIST Manuscript Publication Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Scanning Probe Microscopy for Energy Research. ... World Scientific Publishing Company, Hackensack, NJ. ... Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Solar. ...

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

156

NIST CNST Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Atomic force microscopy (AFM) Electron microscopy (EM, TEM, SEM, STEM) Electrospray Differential Mobility Analysis (ES-DMA) ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force Meeting Agenda FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force Meeting Agenda February 26, 2009 Task Force...

158

CNST Researchers Develop Integrated Nanomechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CNST Researchers Develop Integrated Nanomechanical Sensor for Atomic Force Microscopy. June 1, 2011. ...

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Feed Microscopy using microscopic examination of animal feed samples and AAFCO terminology. Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Micr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Forced Trench Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general theory for forced barotropic long trench waves in the presence of linear bottom friction is presented. Two specific forcing mechanisms are considered: (i) transverse fluctuations in a western boundary current as it flows across a trench,...

Lawrence A. Mysak; Andrew J. Willmott

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

SERVOMECHANISMS WITH FORCE FEEDBACK  

SciTech Connect

A class of linear proportional servomechanisms is examined in which an electrical signal proportional to output force is used to improve performance. The effect of this "force feedback" on a positional servomechanism is analyzed as well as the effect on a special type of servomechanism which reflects load forces back to the input. This latter type of servomechanism is called "force reflecting." Laboratory models of these servormechanisms were designed and constructed, and experimental data are presented in support of the analysis. (auth)

Arzbaecher, R.C.

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

CHARTER, Price-Anderson Act Task Force | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHARTER, Price-Anderson Act Task Force CHARTER, Price-Anderson Act Task Force CHARTER, Price-Anderson Act Task Force This charter establishes the responsibilities of the Price-Anderson Act Task Force (Task Force). The Secretary of Energy has approved formation of this Task Force to review the need for the continuation or modification of the Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA), and to prepare a detailed report for submission to Congress as required by section 170p. of the AEA by August 1, 1998. CHARTER, Price-Anderson Act Task Force More Documents & Publications MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY Report to Congress on the Price-Anderson Act Appendix A. Notice of Inquiry: Preparation of Report to Congress on Price-Anderson Act. 62 Federal Register 68,272 (December 31, 1997)

164

Electron microscopy of ceramic superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The critical current Jc is at least as important as Tc (transition temperature) for applications in superconducting materials. Jc is strongly dependent on microstructure and, in consequence, electron microscopy will continue to be important in the development of practical ceramic superconductors. We will review the progress that has been made over the past year or so in studying the superconductors by electron microscopy techniques of all kinds--conventional, high resolution, analytical, etc. A thorough review is impossible but a bibliography is available, as well as two special issues of Journals. 25 refs., 9 figs.

Mitchell, T.E.; Roy, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Summary: Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Microscopy for STEM Educators - SPIE Conference 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SPIE Conference 2012. SPIE Conference 2012. ... Microscopy for STEM Educators - SPIE Conference 2012. Sound interesting? ...

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nano Positioning of Single Atoms in a Micro Cavity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coupling of individual atoms to a high-finesse optical cavity is precisely controlled and adjusted using a standing-wave dipole-force trap, a challenge for strong atom-cavity coupling. Ultracold Rubidium atoms are first loaded into potential minima of the dipole trap in the center of the cavity. Then we use the trap as a conveyor belt that we set into motion perpendicular to the cavity axis. This allows us to repetitively move atoms out of and back into the cavity mode with a repositioning precision of 135 nm. This makes possible to either selectively address one atom of a string of atoms by the cavity, or to simultaneously couple two precisely separated atoms to a higher mode of the cavity.

Stefan Nussmann; Markus Hijlkema; Bernhard Weber; Felix Rohde; Gerhard Rempe; Axel Kuhn

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

A molecular mechanics force field for lignin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Molecular Mechanics Force Field for Lignin LOUKAS PETRIDIS, JEREMY C. SMITH Center for Molecular Biophysics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Received 14 February 2008; Revised 8 May 2008; Accepted 12 June 2008 DOI 10.1002/jcc.21075 Published online 1 August 2008 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Abstract: A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived using the RESP electrostatic potential fitting method supplemented by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. Finally, the force field is validated

169

David J. Gross and the Strong Force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David J. Gross and the Strong Force David J. Gross and the Strong Force Resources with Additional Information The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to David Gross for "the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". 'Gross, who obtained his PhD in physics in 1966, currently is a professor of physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC Santa Barbara. ... David Gross Courtesy of UC Santa Barbara [When on the faculty at Princeton University,] he and then-graduate student Frank Wilczek came up with a way to describe the "strong force" that governs interactions between protons and neutrons in the nucleus of the atom. He and Wilczek published their proposal simultaneously with H. David Politzer, a graduate student [at Harvard University] who independently came up with the same idea. ...

170

Why measure force?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Automated industrial processes such as rolling mills require accurate force measurement to control roll pressure on bar steel, sheet metal, paper ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

NUCLEAR PROXIMITY FORCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One might summarize of nuclear potential energy has beendegree of freedom) for the nuclear interaction between anyUniversity of California. Nuclear Proximity Forces 'I< at

Randrup, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Universe Adventure - Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matter and Atoms Matter and Atoms Richard Feynman "If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that...all things are made of atoms." -Richard P. Feynman, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics All is atoms Matter is made of atoms, and atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Everything in the Universe is made of matter. Though matter exists in many different forms, each form is made out of the same basic constituents: small particles called atoms. Atoms themselves are made of smaller particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.

173

Reading Comprehension - Atomic History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic History Atomic History A Greek philosopher named Democritus said that all atoms are small, hard particles. He thought that atoms were made of a single material formed into different shapes and sizes. The word " _________ element compound mixture atom " is derived from the Greek word "atomos" which means "not able to be divided." In 1803, John Dalton, a school teacher, proposed his atomic theory. Dalton's theory states that elements (substances composed of only one type of _________ molecules ions atom ) combine in certain proportions to form _________ compounds atoms mixtures elements . In 1897, a British scientist named J. J. Thomson experimented with a cathode-ray tube which had a positively charged plate. The plate attracted negatively charged particles that we now call _________ protons neutrons

174

Atomic site-specific theory of H on {gamma}U surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This effort is a fundamental study of local chemical, electronic and physical behavior of metal and metal oxides as exposed to corrosive gases such as hydrogen and water vapor. The study benefits from state-of-art surface science experimental tools, such as scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopies (STM/AFM), photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry (MMBMS), to provide detailed knowledge of how, why and where a chemical reaction initiates and subsequently progresses with time, and theoretical/computational methods at the atomistic scale. The theoretical/computational component reported here consists of the first-principles calculation of the electronic structure of U surfaces exposed to H attack The calculations were designed to shed light on the energetic of various configurations of H interstitial impurities on the surface or in the substrate of U bcc metal. Predictions as to the preference of H to occupy surface or substrate interstitial positions can be made on the basis of the configuration with the lowest ground-state total energy.

Gonis, A.

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Atomic and Molecular Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DG, * SRD 105 Physic Laboratory's Elemental ... Nuclear Physics SRD 144 Atomic Weights & ... Physical Constants SRD 121 Fundamental Physical ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atomizing nozzle and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

178

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

179

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

180

ILC Citizens' Task Force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force June 2008 Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force 3 Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 Chapter 1 Purpose 7 Chapter 2 Origins and Purpose of the Fermilab Citizens' Task Force 15 Chapter 3 Setting the Stage 19 Chapter 4 Current Status of High Energy Physics Research 25 Chapter 5 Bringing the Next-Generation Accelerator to Fermilab 31 Chapter 6 Learning from Past Projects 37 Chapter 7 Location, Construction and Operation of Facilities Beyond Fermilab's Borders 45 Chapter 8 Health and Safety 49 Chapter 9 Environment 53 Chapter 10 Economics 59 Chapter 11 Political Considerations 65 Chapter 12 Community Engagement 77 Chapter 13 Summary 81 Appendices Appendix A. Task Force Members Appendix B. Task Force Meetings and Topics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of New Methods in Scanning Probe Microscopy for Lignocellulosic Biomass Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods Development of New Methods in Scanning Probe Microscopy for Lignocellulosic Biomass implicated in recalcitrance is important for utili- zation of lignocellulosic biomass in the world new technologies to explore the ultrastructure of biomass at nanoscale.4 Mode-synthesizing atomic

182

OOTW Force Design Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an Oxide ... Line Dislocation Dynamics Simulation of fundamental dislocation properties in ...

184

Microscopy Technique Could Help Computer Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microscopy Technique Could Help Computer Industry Develop 3-D Components. From NIST Tech Beat: June 25, 2013. ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies on Lithium Battery ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Energy Nanomaterials. Presentation Title, Transmission Electron Microscopy ...

186

Visual-servoing optical microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time; quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

187

Visual-servoing optical microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides methods and devices for the knowledge-based discovery and optimization of differences between cell types. In particular, the present invention provides visual servoing optical microscopy, as well as analysis methods. The present invention provides means for the close monitoring of hundreds of individual, living cells over time: quantification of dynamic physiological responses in multiple channels; real-time digital image segmentation and analysis; intelligent, repetitive computer-applied cell stress and cell stimulation; and the ability to return to the same field of cells for long-term studies and observation. The present invention further provides means to optimize culture conditions for specific subpopulations of cells.

Callahan, Daniel E. (Martinez, CA); Parvin, Bahram (Hercules, CA)

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mercury (Hg) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg). ...

189

Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plutonium (Pu) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu). ...

190

Atomic Data for Uranium (U )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Uranium (U). ...

191

Atomic Data for Thorium (Th)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thorium (Th) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Thorium (Th). ...

192

Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen (H) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H). ...

193

Atomic Data for Tungsten (W )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tungsten (W) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Tungsten (W). ...

194

Kaonic Atom X?ray Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In kaonic atoms energy displacement and broadening of states result from the strong interaction. The most simple kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium open the possibility to measure this strong interaction induced shift and width by x?ray spectroscopy. In the SIDDHARTA experiment al LNF (Frascati) the DA?NE electron?positron collider delivers nearly mono?energetic negatively charged kaons from ? meson decay. This unique kaon source is used to form kaonic atoms. New high performance x?ray detectors (silicon drift detectors) arranged in an array allow x?ray spectroscopy with high energy resolution combined with timing capability. High precision x?ray measurements like SIDDHARTA at LNF will open the way to study the low energy regime of the strong force in the antikaon?nucleon interaction. The experiment and its current status is presented in this talk.

J. Marton; on behalf of the SIDDHARTA Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Constraint and Restoring Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-lived sensor network applications must be able to self-repair and adapt to changing demands. We introduce a new approach for doing so: Constraint and Restoring Force. CRF is a physics-inspired framework for computing ...

Beal, Jacob

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Optical Bernoulli forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By Bernoulli's law, an increase in the relative speed of a fluid around a body is accompanied by a decrease in the pressure. Therefore, a rotating body in a fluid stream experiences a force perpendicular to the motion of ...

Movassagh, Ramis

197

Reduction-in-Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reduction in force (RIF) is a set of regulations and procedures that are used to determine whether an employee keeps his or her present position, or whether the employee has a right to another...

198

Weak nuclear forces cause the strong nuclear force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the strength of the weak nuclear force which holds the lattices of the elementary particles together. We also determine the strength of the strong nuclear force which emanates from the sides of the nuclear lattices. The strong force is the sum of the unsaturated weak forces at the surface of the nuclear lattices. The strong force is then about ten to the power of 6 times stronger than the weak force between two lattice points.

E. L. Koschmieder

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

199

ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATOMS ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission Richard G. Hewlett and lack M. Roll With a Foreword by Richard S. Kirkendall and an Essay on Sources by Roger M. Anders University of California Press Berkeley Los Angeles London Published 1989 by the University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California University of California Press, Ltd. London, England Prepared by the Atomic Energy Commission; work made for hire. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hewlett, Richard G. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961. (California studies in the history of science) Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Nuclear energy-United States-History. 2. U.S. Atomic Energy Commission-History. 3. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.

200

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Atomic Spectroscopy: An Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 60. A. de-Shalit and I. Talmi, Nuclear Shell Theory (Academic, New York, 1963). ... CE Moore, Atomic Energy Levels, Natl. Stand. Ref. ...

203

NIST Atomic Spectra Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ground states and ionization energies of atoms ... the US Department of Energy, by the ... SRDP), and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cold Atoms News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the first time caused a gas of atoms ... mysterious data in ultracold gases of rubidium ... Material May Demonstrate Long-Sought 'Liquid' Magnetic State ...

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Harnessed Atom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased,...

206

Atomic Collapse Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collapse State Observed Aided by Simulations, Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 |...

207

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods Z.epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy,establish their quality. Transmission electron microscopy (

Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum, J.; Anderson, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EUV Dark-Field Microscopy for Defect Inspection  

SciTech Connect

An actinic EUV microscope for defect detection on mask blanks for operation in dark field using a table-top discharge-produced plasma source has been developed. Several test structures (pits and bumps) on multilayer mirrors were investigated by our Schwarzschild objective-based EUV microscope at 13.5-nm wavelength and then characterized with an atomic force microscope. Possible defect-detection limits with large field of view and moderate magnification are discussed in terms of required irradiation dose and system performance.

Juschkin, L.; Maryasov, A.; Herbert, S. [Chair for Technology of Optical Systems (TOS), RWTH Aachen University and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Aretz, A. [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy (GFE), RWTH Aachen University and JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Ahornstrasse 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergmann, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Steinbachstr. 15, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Lebert, R. [Bruker Advanced Supercon GmbH, Friedrich-Ebert-Strasse 1, 51429 Bergisch Gladbach (Germany)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiative Forcing of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Work Force Restructuring Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Force Restructuring Activities Force Restructuring Activities December 10, 2008 Note: Current updates are in bold # Planned Site/Contractor HQ Approved Separations Status General * LM has finalized the compilation of contractor management team separation data for the end of FY07 actuals and end of FY08 and FY09 projections. LM has submitted to Congress the FY 2007 Annual Report on contractor work force restructuring activities. The report has been posted to the LM website. *LM conducted a DOE complex-wide data call to the Field and Operations offices for DOE Contractor Management teams to provide, by program, actual contractor separation data for the end of FY 2008 and projections for the end of FY 2009 and FY 2010. The data will be used to keep senior management informed of upcoming large WFR actions.

211

All Optical Formation of an Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have created a Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms directly in an optical trap. We employ a quasi-electrostatic dipole force trap formed by two crossed CO_2 laser beams. Loading directly from a sub-doppler laser-cooled cloud of atoms results in initial phase space densities of ~1/200. Evaporatively cooling through the BEC transition is achieved by lowering the power in the trapping beams over ~ 2 s. The resulting condensates are F=1 spinors with 3.5 x 10^4 atoms distributed between the m_F = (-1,0,1) states.

M. D. Barrett; J. A. Sauer; M. S. Chapman

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Frontiers of In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... significance and versatility of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has ... applied stimulus is observed as it happens inside the microscope. ...

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Maximizing fluorescence collection efficiency in multiphoton microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-depth limit in two-photon microscopy," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23(12), 3139­3149 (2006). 9. D. Kobat, M. E. Durst

Levene, Michael J.

214

Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

4 days ago ... The Ohio State University Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis ... There are also two X-ray diffractometer (XRD) systems, facilities for ...

215

Reduction of the Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Mohideen, U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Klimchitskaya, G. L. [North-West Technical University, Millionnaya Street 5, St. Petersburg, 191065 (Russian Federation); Mostepanenko, V. M. [Noncommercial Partnership ''Scientific Instruments,'' Tverskaya Street 11, Moscow, 103905 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Reduction of the Casimir force from indium tin oxide film by UV treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide (ITO) sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory, and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

Chang, C C; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Reduction of the Casimir force from indium tin oxide film by UV treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide (ITO) sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory, and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

C. C. Chang; A. A. Banishev; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; U. Mohideen

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

218

Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic .... What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

219

Measuring the Casimir force gradient from graphene on a SiO_2 substrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gradient of the Casimir force between a Si-SiO${}_2$-graphene substrate and an Au-coated sphere is measured by means of a dynamic atomic force microscope operated in the frequency shift technique. It is shown that the presence of graphene leads to up to 9% increase in the force gradient at the shortest separation considered. This is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of an additive theory using the Dirac model of graphene.

A. A. Banishev; H. Wen; J. Xu; R. K. Kawakami; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; U. Mohideen

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

general_atomics.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

former former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level. The General Atomics site is in the center of Torrey Mesa Science Center, a 304-acre industrial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Discussions between DOE and General Atomics led to an agreed cost-sharing and no-fee arrangement for the decontamination and site...

222

Sharing the atom bomb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shaken by the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and fearful that the American atomic monopoly would spark an arms race, Dean Acheson led a push in 1946 to place the bomb-indeed, all atomic energy-under international control. But as the memories of wartime collaboration faded, relations between the superpowers grew increasingly tense, and the confrontational atmosphere undid his proposal. Had Acheson succeeded, the Cold War might not have been. 2 figs.

Chace, J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Atomizing nozzle and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pairing: from atomic nuclei to neutron-star crusts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear pairing is studied both in atomic nuclei and in neutron-star crusts in the unified framework of the energy-density functional theory using generalized Skyrme functionals complemented with a local pairing functional obtained from many-body calculations in homogeneous nuclear matter using realistic forces.

Chamel, N; Goriely, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Atomic Data for Americium (Am)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Atomic Number = 95. Atomic Weight = (243). Reference E95. Isotope, Mass, Abundance, Spin, Mag Moment, 241 Am, 241.056823, 0, 5/2, +1.61. ...

227

Force Modulator System  

SciTech Connect

Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better marry the die-specific Force Modulator technology with stamping presses in the form of a press cushion. This system would be designed to operate the binder ring for multiple parts, thus cutting the per-die cost of the technology. This study reports the results of technology field application. This project produced the following conclusions: (1) The Force Modulator system is capable of operating at very high tempos in the stamping environment; (2) The company can generate substantial, controlled holding tonnage (binder ring pressure) necessary to hold high strength steel parts for proper formation during draw operations; (3) A single system can be designed to operate with a family of parts, thus significantly reducing the per-die cost of a FM system; (4) High strength steel parts made with these systems appear to show significant quality improvements; (5) The amounts of steel required to make these parts is typically less than the amounts required with traditional blank-holding technologies; and (6) This technology will aid in the use of higher strength steels in auto and truck production, thus reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency.

Redmond Clark

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

ARMY SERVICE FORCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ARMY SERVICE FORCES ARMY SERVICE FORCES ' -, 1 MANHATTAN ENGINEER DISTRICT --t 4 IN "LPLI RC,' LR io EIDM CIS INTELLIGENCE AND SECURITY DIVISION CHICAGO BRANCH OFFICE i ., -,* - P. 0. Box 6770-A I ' 1 .' CHICAGO 80. ILLINOIS /lvb 15 February 1945 Subject: shipment Security Survey at &Uinckrodt Chemical Works. MEMORANDUM to the Officer in Charge. 1. The Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri, was contacted by the undersigned on 16 November 1944, for the purpose of -king an investigation to determine security provided shipments of interest to the Manhattan Engineer District. The investigation in- cluded shipments of vital materials originating with the Mallinckrodt Company and those received by them. Particular attention has been given to the future production and shipment schedules of these materials.

229

Questions and Answers - How do atoms form?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Biggest and smallest atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Does gravity affect atoms?) Does gravity affect atoms? How do atoms form? The current view is that...

230

Questions and Answers - Can you crush atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does gravity affect atoms? Previous Question (Does gravity affect atoms?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Parts and weights of atoms?) Parts and weights of atoms?...

231

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Microscopes and Facilities:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPLEEM SPLEEM Publications Imaging Spin Reorientation Transitions in Consecutive Atomic Co layers, Farid El Gabaly, Silvia Gallego, M. Carmen Munoz, Laszlo Szunyogh, Peter Weinberger, Kevin F. McCarty, Christof Klein, Andreas K. Schmid, Juan de la Figuera, submitted Direct imaging of spin-reorientation transitions in ultra-thin Ni films by spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, C. Klein, A. K. Schmid, R. Ramchal, and M. Farle, submitted Controlling the kinetic order of spin-reorientation transitions in Ni/Cu(100) films by tuning the substrate step-structure, C. Klein, R. Ramchal, A.K. Schmid, M. Farle, submitted Self-organization and magnetic domain microstructure of Fe nanowire arrays, N. Rougemaille and A.K. Schmid, submitted Self-Assembled Nanofold Network Formation on Layered Crystal Surfaces

232

Peaceful Uses of the Atom and Atoms for Peace  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Peaceful Uses of the Atom Peaceful Uses of the Atom Fermi and Atoms for Peace · Understanding the Atom · Seaborg · Teller Atoms for Peace Atoms for Peace + 50 - Conference, October 22, 2003 Celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Eisenhower's "Atoms for Peace" speech to the UN General Assembly Atoms for Peace (video 12:00 Minutes) Atoms for Peace Address given by Dwight D. Eisenhower before the General Assembly of the United Nations, New York City, December 8, 1953 Documents: Atomic Power in Space: A History A history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States from the mid-1950s through 1982; interplanetary space exploration successes and achievements have been made possible by this technology. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

233

Dipole traps for neutral atoms formed by nonuniformly polarised Laguerre modes  

SciTech Connect

Field configurations of two counterpropagating nonuniformly polarised Laguerre modes forming three-dimensional dipole traps for neutral atoms are proposed. Peculiarities of the stochastic dynamics of atoms in such traps, associated with the anisotropy of dipole forces and manifestations of various radiative friction mechanisms are analysed. The problem of increasing the confinement time for atoms in such field configurations is studied. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Bezverbny, Aleksandr V [Maritime State University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Niz'ev, Vladimir G [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tumaikin, Anatolii M [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Potential Distribution in Functionalized Graphene Devices Probed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-contacted pristine graphene [6]. The line scan of the voltage drop along the FGS shows a pronounced non uniform was used to make contacts to FGS, which requires high accuracy in locating any graphene sheets of typically;contacts with the graphene sheet underneath. As can be seen in Figure 1 (b), the Kelvin voltage changes

Aksay, Ilhan A.

235

C10: Piezoresponse Force Microscopy to study the bio-ferroelectric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A8: Microstructural Investigation of Nano-Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride Ions .... D7: Surfactant Structure–property Relationship: Effect of Polypropylene ... E4: The Effect of Monobutyl Ether Ethylene Glycol on the Conductivity and ...

236

Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

237

Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... hydrogen production by steam reforming of methanol and oxidation of CO for low ... Recent Developments in In Situ Studies of Catalytic Materials at Atomic ...

238

NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center. ... Responds to user requests for data, literature references, and technical information. ...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Lesson 3- Atoms and Isotopes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

You’ve probably heard people refer to nuclear energy as “atomic energy.” Why? Nuclear energy is the energy that is stored in the bonds of atoms, inside the nucleus. Nuclear power plants are designed to capture this energy as heat and convert it to electricity. This lesson looks closely at what atoms are and how atoms store energy.

240

Miniature quartz resonator force transducer  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to a piezoelectric quartz force transducer having the shape of a double-ended tuning fork.

Eer Nisse, Errol P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Spatially resolved quantitative mapping of thermomechanical properties and phase transition temperatures using scanning probe microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An approach for the thermomechanical characterization of phase transitions in polymeric materials (polyethyleneterephthalate) by band excitation acoustic force microscopy is developed. This methodology allows the independent measurement of resonance frequency, Q factor, and oscillation amplitude of a tip-surface contact area as a function of tip temperature, from which the thermal evolution of tip-surface spring constant and mechanical dissipation can be extracted. A heating protocol maintained a constant tip-surface contact area and constant contact force, thereby allowing for reproducible measurements and quantitative extraction of material properties including temperature dependence of indentation-based elastic and loss moduli.

Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Nikiforov, Maxim P

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

former General former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level.

243

Strength of intermediate-range forces coupling to isospin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental search for new forces coupling to nuclear isospin with a range of {ge}3 m was conducted using a torsion balance driven in resonance by a set of masses configured to generate a nearly pure isospin source field. The strength of any such coupling {xi} in units of gravity per atomic mass unit is found to be bounded by {minus}2.3{times}10{sup {minus}4}{le}{xi}{le}+2.7{times}10{sup {minus}5}, where the positive sign represents an attractive force between like isospin charges.

Cowsik, R.; Krishnan, N.; Tandon, S.N.; Unnikrishnan, S. (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay 400005, India (IN))

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

244

Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.

Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Complex Oxides Monday, May 23, 2011 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference room 137-322 Professor Tom Vogt, NanoCenter & Department of...

246

Advanced Photon Source | Combining Scanning Probe Microscopy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications | SXSPM Related Book Chapters V. Rose, J.W. Freeland, S.K. Streiffer, "New Capabilities at the Interface of X-rays and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy", in Scanning...

247

JILA Researchers Discover Atomic Clock Can Simulate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Artist's conception of interactions among atoms in JILA's strontium atomic clock during a quantum simulation experiment. ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electrostatic Potentials in Rhodopseudomonas Wiridis Reaction Centers: Implications for the Driving Force and Directionality of Electron Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force and Directionality of Electron Transfer M. R. Gunner* Department of Physics, City College of New membrane protein to have a structure solved to atomic resolu- tion.4,5 Since then a higher resolution

Gunner, Marilyn

249

Steven Chu: Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Steven Chu Steven Chu Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms Resources with Additional Information · Interviews, Speeches, and Presentations · Patents Steven Chu Photo Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Roy Kaltschmidt, Photographer Steven Chu was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the 12th Secretary of Energy and served in this capacity until April 22, 2013. He was previously Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Professor in the Physics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and 'the Theodore and Frances Geballe Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University. Professor Chu's research is in atomic physics, polymer and biophysics. His thesis and postdoctoral work at Berkeley ... was the observation of parity non-conservation in atomic transitions in 1978. This experiment was one of the earliest atomic physics confirmations of the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow theory that unifies the weak and electromagnetic forces.

250

Steven Chu: Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steven Chu Steven Chu Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms Resources with Additional Information · Interviews, Speeches, and Presentations · Patents Steven Chu Photo Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Roy Kaltschmidt, Photographer Steven Chu was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the 12th Secretary of Energy and served in this capacity until April 22, 2013. He was previously Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Professor in the Physics Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and 'the Theodore and Frances Geballe Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University. Professor Chu's research is in atomic physics, polymer and biophysics. His thesis and postdoctoral work at Berkeley ... was the observation of parity non-conservation in atomic transitions in 1978. This experiment was one of the earliest atomic physics confirmations of the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow theory that unifies the weak and electromagnetic forces.

251

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established NNSA's Administrator...

252

TEXT Pro Force Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basic Protective Basic Protective Force Training Program DOE/IG-0641 March 2004 * None of the 10 sites included instruction in rappelling even though it was part of the special response team core curriculum and continued to be offered by the Nonprolif- eration and National Security Institute; * Only one site conducted basic training on use of a shotgun, despite the fact that a num- ber of sites used the weapon for breaching exercises and other purposes; and, * Seven of the sites modified prescribed training techniques by reducing the intensity or delivery method for skills that some security experts characterized as critical, such as handcuffing, hand-to- hand combat, and vehicle assaults. We found that the Department's facilities were not required to report departures from the core

253

98-4 Planning Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... market. ... As quality specifications tightened, inside the battery limit metrology ... ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), dynamic SIMS, atomic force microscopy ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Dynamic Space of General Relativity in Second Atomization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The notion that the geometry of our space-time is not only a static background but can be physically dynamic is well established in general relativity. Geometry can be described as shaped by the presence of matter, where such shaping manifests itself as gravitational force. We consider here probabilistic or atomistic models of such space-time, in which the active geometry emerges from a statistical distribution of 'atoms'. Such atoms are not to be confused with their chemical counterparts, however the shift of perspective obtained in analyzing a gas via its molecules rather than its bulk properties is analogous to this "second atomization". In this atomization, space-time itself (i.e. the meter and the second) is effectively atomized, so the atoms themselves must exist in a 'subspace'. Here we build a simple model of such a space-time from the ground up, establishing a route for more complete theories, and enabling a review of recent work. We first introduce the motivation behind statistical interpretations and atomism, and look at applications to the realm of dynamic space-time theories. We then consider models of kinetic media in subspace compatible with our understanding of light. From the equations governing the propagation of light in subspace we can build a metric geometry, describing the dynamic and physical space-time of general relativity. Finally, implications of the theory on current frontiers of general relativity including cosmology, black holes, and quantum gravity are discussed.

Lukas A. Saul

2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Laser Probing of Neutron-Rich Nuclei in Light Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron-rich 6He and 8He isotopes exhibit an exotic nuclear structure that consists of a tightly bound 4He-like core with additional neutrons orbiting at a relatively large distance, forming a halo. Recent experimental efforts have succeeded in laser trapping and cooling these short-lived, rare helium atoms, and have measured the atomic isotope shifts along the 4He-6He-8He chain by performing laser spectroscopy on individual trapped atoms. Meanwhile, the few-electron atomic structure theory, including relativistic and QED corrections, has reached a comparable degree of accuracy in the calculation of the isotope shifts. In parallel efforts, also by measuring atomic isotope shifts, the nuclear charge radii of lithium and beryllium isotopes have been studied. The techniques employed were resonance ionization spectroscopy on neutral, thermal lithium atoms and collinear laser spectroscopy on beryllium ions. Combining advances in both atomic theory and laser spectroscopy, the charge radii of these light halo nuclei have now been determined for the first time independent of nuclear structure models. The results are compared with the values predicted by a number of nuclear structure calculations, and are used to guide our understanding of the nuclear forces in the extremely neutron-rich environment.

Z. -T. Lu; P. Mueller; G. W. F. Drake; W. Noertershaeuser; Steven C. Pieper; Z. -C. Yan

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Instrument Series: Microscopy Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Transmission Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) provides in situ capabilities that enable atomic-resolution imaging and spectroscopic studies of materials under dynamic operating conditions. In contrast to traditional operation of TEM under high vacuum, EMSL's ETEM uniquely allows imaging within high- temperature and gas environments-with a gas pressure up to 20 Torr. With a spherical aberration corrector for the objective lens, the ETEM captures atomic-level processes as they occur, enabling vital research across a range of scientific fields. Research Applications Chemical science and engineering - providing in situ observation of catalytic processes with atomic-level resolution Materials science and engineering - allowing

257

Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROTECTIVE FORCE PROTECTIVE FORCE FIREARMS QUALIFICATION COURSES U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses July 2011 i TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION A - APPROVED FIREARMS QUALIFICATION COURSES .......................... I-1 CHAPTER I . INTRODUCTION ................................................................................... I-1 1. Scope .................................................................................................................. I-1 2. Content ............................................................................................................... I-1

258

Tenth Atomic Physics Program workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains short papers and abstracts on the following main topics: Ion-atom collision theory; laser physics; spectroscopy of atoms; spectroscopy of ions; and high velocity collisions.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear effects in atomic transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

Pálffy, Adriana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EPRI Transformer Task Force Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Transformer Task Force held a meeting on December 4, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. This technical update contains the proceedings of the meeting.

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EPRI Transformer Task Force Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the proceedings from the EPRI Transformers Task Force, which was held in Montreal on October 26 and 27, 2006.

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

262

Physics Out Loud - Electromagnetic Force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detector Previous Video (Detector) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Electron Scattering) Electron Scattering Electromagnetic Force Cynthia Keppel, a nuclear physicist,...

263

Army Energy Initiatives Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Army Energy Initiatives Task Force.

264

Atomic Devices and Instrumentation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2001 and 2005, demonstrated an atomic clock physics package with ... magnetometers for magnetic anomaly detection, nuclear magnetic resonance ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Atom-Based Dimensional Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Awarded a five year, three phase DARPA contract to conduct collaborative research in atomically precise positioning, patterning and metrology ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Does entropic force always imply the Newtonian force law?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the entropic force by introducing a bound between entropy and area of $S \\le A^{3/4}$ which was derived by imposing the non-gravitational collapse condition. In this case, applying a recent argument of Verlinde to this system does not lead to the Newtonian force law.

Myung, Yun Soo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Quantum transport of bosonic cold atoms in double-well optical lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We numerically investigate, using the time evolving block decimation algorithm, the quantum transport of ultracold bosonic atoms in a double-well optical lattice through slow and periodic modulation of the lattice parameters (intra- and inter-well tunneling, chemical potential, etc.). The transport of atoms does not depend on the rate of change of the parameters (as along as the change is slow) and can distribute atoms in optical lattices at the quantized level without involving external forces. The transport of atoms depends on the atom filling in each double well and the interaction between atoms. In the strongly interacting region, the bosonic atoms share the same transport properties as noninteracting fermions with quantized transport at the half filling and no atom transport at the integer filling. In the weakly interacting region, the number of the transported atoms is proportional to the atom filling. We show the signature of the quantum transport from the momentum distribution of atoms that can be measured in the time-of-flight image. A semiclassical transport model is developed to explain the numerically observed transport of bosonic atoms in the noninteracting and strongly interacting limits. The scheme may serve as an quantized battery for atomtronics applications.

Qian Yinyin; Gong Ming; Zhang Chuanwei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Scanning probe microscopy in the superconductor industry  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature superconductivity and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have much in common. Both revolutionized their scientific fields and earned Nobel prizes for the original researchers. Both represent small-scale table-top research. Finally, both have emerged from research laboratories into growing industries. Applications of scanning probe microscopy to the superconductor industry range from the straightforward to the exotic. The superior three-dimensional resolution of scanning probe microscopes makes them ideal for routine topographic imaging and profilometry of substrates and thin films. On the other hand, the more esoteric applications of SPM include spectroscopic investigations of various electromagnetic properties of superconductors above and below the critical temperature.

Howland, R.S.; Kirk, M.D. (Park Scientific Instruments (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Why is hydrogen's atomic number 1?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the number of protons in an atom's nucleus. Hydrogen's atomic number is 1 because all hydrogen atoms contain exactly one proton. Author: Steve Gagnon, Science Education Specialist...

270

NIST: Phys. Lab. Brochure; Atomic Physics Div.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ultra-cold atoms and investigate atom optics for innovative instrumentation. Measure and analyze spectra of highly ionized atoms for fusion energy ...

271

Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron microscopy techniques in strongly correlated electron systems and nanostructured materials. As a first step, with the support of Materials Science Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, and the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research, recently we acquired three aberration-corrected electron microscopes from the three major microscope manufacturers, i.e., JEOL, Hitachi, and FEI. The Hitachi HD2700C is equipped with a probe corrector, the FEI Titan 80-300 has an imaging corrector, while the JEOL2200MCO has both. All the correctors are of the dual-hexapole type, designed and manufactured by CEOS GmbH based on the design due to Rose and Haider [3, 18]. All these three are one-of-a-kind in the US, designed for specialized capabilities in characterizing nanoscale structure. In this chapter, we review the performance of these state-of-the art instruments and the new challenges associated with the improved spatial resolution, including the environment requirements of the laboratory that hosts these instruments. Although each instrument we describe here has its own strengths and drawbacks, it is not our intention to rank them in terms of their performance, especially their spatial resolution in imaging.

Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Atomistic Film Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...(AES) Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) Work function change as a function of mass deposited Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) ( Ref 16 ) Atomic force microscopy (AFM) Photon tunneling microscopy...

273

Air Force Renewable Energy Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Ken Gray P.E. HQ AFCESA /CENR Air Force Renewable Energy Programs April, 2011 FUPWG "Make Energy a Consideration in All We Do" I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e THINK GREEN, BUILD GREEN, Topics  Air Force Energy Use  Air Force Facility Energy Center  Current RE Generation  Project Development System  Programmed RE Generation FY11-13  Goal Achievement 2 I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e THINK GREEN, BUILD GREEN, Air Force 2010 Energy Use The Air Force spent approximately $8.2 billion for energy in 2010; an increase of 22% from 2009 Energy Cost and Consumption Trends Energy Cost Breakdown Aviation 79% Facilities 17% 3 Aviation 84% Facilities 12% Vehicles & Equipment

274

Atomic Scale Characterization of Complex Oxide Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Complex oxides exhibit the most disparate behaviors, from ferroelectricity to high Tc superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance to insulating properties. For these reasons, oxide thin films are of interest for electronics and the emerging field of spintronics. But epitaxial complex oxide ultrathin films and heterostructures can be significantly affected or even dominated by the presence of interfaces and may exhibit intriguing new physical properties quite different from the bulk. A study of the relations between structure and chemistry at the atomic scale is needed to understand the macroscopic properties of such "interface-controlled" materials. For this purpose, the combination of aberration corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) represents a very powerful tool. The availability of sub- ngstr m probes allows a level of unprecedented detail when analyzing not only the interface structure with sensitivity to single atoms, but also the interface chemistry. In this work state of the art STEM-EELS will be applied to the study of different oxide interfaces in heterostructures with titanates, manganites and cuprates based on the perovskite structure.

Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Timothy J [ORNL; Tian, Wei [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Pena, V. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Sefrioui, Z. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Santamaria, J. [Universidad Complutense, Spain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Electron Microscopy (EM, TEM, SEM, STEM) Information at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron holography. Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

277

Neural network characterization of scanning electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a sophisticated equipment employed for fine imaging of processed film surfaces. In this study, a prediction model of scanning electron microscopy was constructed by using a generalized regression neural network ... Keywords: generalized regression neural network, genetic algorithm, model, scanning electron microscope, statistical experiment

Sanghee Kwon; Donghwan Kim; Byungwhan Kim

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Atomic data for fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.) [eds.; Barnett, C.F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Surface and Microscopic Characterization of Manufactured ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Characterization of Graphene-related Nanomaterials Using Atomic ... Current state of atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of graphene and its ...

280

Atomic-scale investigations of the struct. and dynamics of complex catalytic materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prerequisite to the non-empirical design and refinement of improved catalysts is the identification of the atomic-scale structure and properties of the catalytically active sites. This has become a major industrial research priority. The focus of this research program was to combine atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy with first-principles density functional theory calculations to deliver an atomic-scale description of heterogeneous catalytic systems that could form the basis for non-empirical design of improved catalysts with greater energy efficiency.

Karl Sohlberg, Drexel University

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Questions and Answers - Does gravity affect atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Answers Main Index Next Question (Can you crush atoms?) Can you crush atoms? Does gravity affect atoms? Gravity affects atoms the same way it affects all other matter. Every...

282

Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic ...

Cronin, Alexander D.

283

Magnetometry with entangled atomic samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theory for the estimation of a scalar or a vector magnetic field by its influence on an ensemble of trapped spin polarized atoms. The atoms interact off-resonantly with a continuous laser field, and the measurement of the polarization rotation of the probe light, induced by the dispersive atom-light coupling, leads to spin-squeezing of the atomic sample which enables an estimate of the magnetic field which is more precise than that expected from standard counting statistics. For polarized light and polarized atoms, a description of the non-classical components of the collective spin angular momentum for the atoms and the collective Stokes vectors of the light-field in terms of effective gaussian position and momentum variables is practically exact. The gaussian formalism describes the dynamics of the system very effectively and accounts explicitly for the back-action on the atoms due to measurement and for the estimate of the magnetic field. Multi-component magnetic fields are estimated by the measurement of suitably chosen atomic observables and precision and efficiency is gained by dividing the atomic gas in two or more samples which are entangled by the dispersive atom-light interaction.

Vivi Petersen; Lars Bojer Madsen; Klaus Molmer

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

NIST - Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra Bibliographic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in this database are from Bibliography on Atomic Energy Levels and ... references to atomic transition probabilities, line intensities, or broadening. ...

286

Simulations of Kinetic Events at the Atomic Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of kinetic events at the atomic scale of kinetic events at the atomic scale Graeme Henkelman UT Austin Al / Al(100) B 3 I / Si Pd / MgO How can we simulate the dynamics of molecular systems over experimental time scales? Objective: To calculate dynamics of a surface over time scales which are much longer than can be calculated with direct classical dynamics. Problem: time scale gap fs ps ns ms ms s mins atomic dynamics thermally activated experimental vibrations simulations reaction dynamics time scales Most interesting transitions are rare 0.5 eV 1000/s events (much slower than vibrations) Simulating a transition for a typical rare event with classical dynamics can require ~10 12 force evaluations Transition state theory A statistical theory for calculating the rate of slow thermal processes

287

Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

288

Atomic total energies: Atomic Ref.Data Elec Struc Cal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These tables contain the atomic total energies and orbital eigenvalues, for the ground electronic configuration of the elements H ... Definition of format ...

289

Atomic total energies: Atomic Ref. Data Elec. Struc. Cal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These tables contain the atomic total energies and orbital eigenvalues, for the ground electronic configuration of the elements H ... Definition of format ...

290

Nuclear forces and chiral theories  

SciTech Connect

Recent successes in ab initio calculations of light nuclei (A=2-6) will be reviewed and correlated with the dynamical consequences of chiral symmetry. The tractability of nuclear physics evinced by these results is evidence for that symmetry. The relative importance of three-nucleon forces, four-nucleon forces, multi-pion exchanges, and relativistic corrections will be discussed in the context of effective field theories and dimensional power counting. Isospin violation in the nuclear force will also be discussed in this context.

Friar, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Frank K. Pittman, Director, bivisioa of Waste &&gement and s- portation, Headquarters j CONTAMItUTED RX-AEC-OWNED OR LEASED FACILITIES' This memorandum responds to your TWX certain information on the above subject. the documentation necessary to answer your available due to the records disposal vailing at the time of release or From records that are available and from disc&ions with most familiar with the transfer operations, &have the current radiological conditibn of transferred property is adequate under present standards. The following tabulations follow the format suggested in your TWX and are grouped to an operations or contract r+ponsibility. A,I Ex-AEC Storage Sites - I r:/ National Stockpile Site '(NSS) and OperatEonal

292

River-Forced Estuarine Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development, maintenance, and dissipation of river-forced estuarine plumes with and without seaward sloping bottom are studied by use of a three-dimensional, primitive-equation model. Inside the estuary, discussion is focused on how the ...

Shenn-Yu Chao

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nuclear Forces and Chiral Symmetry  

SciTech Connect

We review the main achievements of the research program for the study of nuclear forces in the framework of chiral symmetry and discuss some problems which are still open.

Renato Higa; Manoel Robilotta; Carlos Antonio da Rocha

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

NIST Atomic Spectra Bibliographic Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Atomic Energy Levels Data Center and Data Center on ... Reference Data Program (SRDP) and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Atomic Devices and Instrumentation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ten millionths of a second over the course of one day, and are paving the way for atomic-level timekeeping in portable, battery-operated systems ...

296

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The program in atomic spectroscopy at NIST provides accurate reference data on spectral lines and energy levels for a wide variety of important ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Technical Highlights Atomic Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physics Division is to develop and apply atomic physics research methods ... community, and to produce and critically compile physical reference data ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

298

Is Gravity an Entropic Force?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The remarkable connections between gravity and thermodynamics seem to imply that gravity is not fundamental but emergent, and in particular, as Verlinde suggested, gravity is probably an entropic force. In this paper, we will argue that the idea of gravity as an entropic force is debatable. It is shown that there is no convincing analogy between gravity and entropic force in Verlinde's example. Neither holographic screen nor test particle satisfies all requirements for the existence of entropic force in a thermodynamics system. Furthermore, we show that the entropy increase of the screen is not caused by its statistical tendency to increase entropy as required by the existence of entropic force, but in fact caused by gravity. Therefore, Verlinde's argument for the entropic origin of gravity is problematic. In addition, we argue that the existence of a minimum size of spacetime, together with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in quantum theory, may imply the fundamental existence of gravity as a geometric property of spacetime. This may provide a further support for the conclusion that gravity is not an entropic force.

Shan Gao

2010-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

299

Site-specific force-distance characteristics on NaCl(001): Measurements versus atomistic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning force microscope was used to measure the frequency shift above various atomic sites on a NaCl(001) surface at 7 K. The data was converted to force and compared to the results of atomistic simulations using model NaCl and MgO tips. We find that the NaCl tip demonstrates better agreement in the magnitude of the forces in experiments, supporting the observation that the tip first came into contact with the sample. Using the MgO tip as a model of the originally oxidized silicon tip, we further demonstrate a possible mechanism for tip contamination at low temperatures.

Lantz, M. A.; Hoffmann, R.; Hidber, H. R. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Foster, A. S. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 1100, 02015 HUT (Finland); Baratoff, A.; Hug, H. J.; Guentherodt, H.-J. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) on Nanoscale Science, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

An Atom-Wide Antennae Created from Difference-Making Defects | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Atom-Wide Antennae Created from Difference-Making Defects An Atom-Wide Antennae Created from Difference-Making Defects An Atom-Wide Antennae Created from Difference-Making Defects March 7, 2012 - 3:35pm Addthis Take advantage of microwave microscopy, researchers were able to locate graphene islands on graphene. “Point defects” locally enhanced the graphene’s ability to transform waves of light into electronic signals. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Take advantage of microwave microscopy, researchers were able to locate graphene islands on graphene. "Point defects" locally enhanced the graphene's ability to transform waves of light into electronic signals. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

String model of the Hydrogen Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-moving electron hydrogen model is proposed, resolving a long standing contradiction (94 years) in the hydrogen atom. This, however, forces to not use the "in an orbit point particle kinetic energy" as the phenomenon responsible for the atom stability. The repulsion between the masses of the electron and proton is what is responsible of such stability. The mass of the electron is a field fully described by the uncertainty principle through the confinement of the particle, which is also consistent with the general theory of relativity that states: "mass-energy tells the space how to bend". Ergo, mass exerts a tension on its surrounding space and the lighter the mass the larger the space it will occupy. Based on this concept it is proposed that the orbital is the electron. The electron's orbitals are just the electron's different ways of intersecting the space; with different magnetic momenta. The coupling of this momenta with the magnetic moment of the proton finally explains the hyperfine structure of the hydrogen spectrum with an overwhelming simplicity

Omar Yepez

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Casimir forces beyond the proximity approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proximity force approximation (PFA) relates the interaction between closely spaced, smoothly curved objects to the force between parallel plates. Precision experiments on Casimir forces necessitate, and spur research ...

Bimonte, G.

303

Structure and Reactions of Carbon and Hydrogen on Ru(0001): A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between carbon and hydrogen atoms on a Ru(0001) surface was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and STM image calculations. Formation of CH species by reaction between adsorbed H and C was observed to occur readily at 100 K. When the coverage of H increased new complexes of the form CH+nH (n = 1, 2 and 3) were observed. These complexes, never observed before, might be precursors for further hydrogenation reactions. DFT analysis reveals that a considerable energy barrier exists for the CH+H {yields} CH{sub 2} reaction.

Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

304

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb member of the project, to draft a report about its activities. Smyth completed the report in the summer, in a censored version. On August 11, 1945, five days after the Allies dropped the first nuclear bomb on Japan

Landweber, Laura

305

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATOMIC LAW  

SciTech Connect

Since a uniform federal statute hss not been passed in the German Federal Republic, the development of atomic law has centered around the formation of the Federal Ministry for Atomic Affairs, appeal to the German Commission, and the enactment of temporary laws in several of the states. (J.S.R.)

Fischerhof, H.

1958-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Task Force Approach | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task Force Approach Task Force Approach Task Force Approach Task Force Approach Results of the ARI Task Force: The purpose of the ARI Task Force is to 1) identify, prioritize, and resolve issues to enable sites and programs to implement revitalization efforts more effectively and 2) to facilitate programmatic incorporation of revitalization concepts into DOE's programmatic business environments. The Task Force must do this through coordinating and facilitating communication and connections, sharing lessons learned, broadening the general knowledge base, facilitating, analyzing problems, developing implementable solutions, and considering and incorporating broader perspectives and knowledge. The success of the Task Force can be evaluated by impacts to the Department upon its completion. These impacts

307

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Title Attribution of climate forcing to economic sectors Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Unger,...

308

Fast Computation of Optimal Contact Forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirement, i.e., the ability of the contact forces to resist a specified external .... does not exceed the friction coefficient times the normal force. (In particular, it ...

309

Web Force-Field (WebFF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web Force-Field (WebFF). Summary: ... WebFF - A web hosted, extensible force field repository with integrated assignment engine. Description: ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Integration of contractile forces during tissue invagination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contractile forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton within individual cells collectively generate tissue-level force during epithelial morphogenesis. During Drosophila mesoderm invagination, pulsed actomyosin ...

Martin, Adam C.

311

Perspective: Advances and challenges in treating van der Waals dispersion forces in density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the previous noble gas and group III atom. Fur- thermore, the dispersion energy, Edisp, is scaled according range dispersion interaction with the underlying exchange or XC functionals. A. Gas phase clustersPerspective: Advances and challenges in treating van der Waals dispersion forces in density

Alavi, Ali

312

Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle - the graviton - that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms "feeling" laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials - both Abelian and non-Abelian - in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

N. Goldman; G. Juzeliunas; P. Ohberg; I. B. Spielman

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

AtomicNuclear Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTML_PAGES HTML_PAGES This AtomicNuclearProperties page is under intermittent development. Suggestions and comments are welcome. Please report errors. Chemical elements: For entries in red, a pull-down menu permits selection of the physical state. Cryogenic liquid densties are at the boiling point at 1 atm. 0n 1Ps 1H 2He 3Li 4Be 5B 6C 7N 8O 9F 10Ne 11Na 12Mg 13Al 14Si 15P 16S 17Cl 18Ar 19K 20Ca 21Sc 22Ti 23V 24Cr 25Mn 26Fe 27Co 28Ni 29Cu 30Zn 31Ga 32Ge 33As 34Se 35Br 36Kr 37Rb 38Sr 39Y 40Zr 41Nb 42Mo 43Tc 44Ru 45Rh 46Pd 47Ag 48Cd 49In 50Sn 51Sb 52Te 53I 54Xe 55Cs 56Ba 57La 72Hf 73Ta 74W 75Re 76Os 77Ir 78Pt 79Au 80Hg 81Tl 82Pb 83Bi 84Po 85At 86Rn 87Fr 88Ra 89Ac 104Rf 105Db 106Sg 107Bh 108Hs 109Mt 110Ds 111Rg 112 113 114 115 116 mt 118

314

Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences The goal of the program is to understand the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules using photons and ions as probes. The current program is focussed on studying inner-shell photo-ionization and photo-excitation of atoms and molecules, molecular orientation effects in slow collisions, slowing and cooling molecules, and X-ray photo-excitation of laser-dressed atoms. The experimental and theoretical efforts are designed to break new ground and to provide basic knowledge that is central to the programmatic goals of the Department of Energy (DOE). Unique LBNL facilities such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ECR ion sources at the 88-inch cyclotron, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) are

315

Spectral Emission of Moving Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2006-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

316

Studying The Kinetics Of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation With In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon is an attractive high-capacity anode material for Li-ion batteries, but a comprehensive understanding of the massive ~300% volume change and fracture during lithiation/delithiation is necessary to reliably employ Si anodes. Here, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the lithiation of crystalline Si nanoparticles reveals that the reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior. Analysis suggests that this behavior is due to the influence of mechanical stress at the reaction front on the driving force for the reaction. These experiments give insight into the factors controlling the kinetics of this unique reaction.

Mcdowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seokwoo; Wang, Chong M.; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Quantitative imaging of living cells by deep ultraviolet microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in light microscopy over the past three centuries have opened new windows into cell structure and function, yet many questions remain unanswered by current imaging approaches. Deep ultraviolet microscopy ...

Zeskind, Benjamin J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to cover the situations that these labs, which respectively represent nuclear weapons labs, nuclear energy labs, and science labs and environmental management sites, would encounter during a complementary access. Each of the three labs hosted a mock complementary access activity, which included mock inspectors from the BNL-LANL team. In addition to reviewing the draft declarations from each of the host labs, the BNL-LANL team conducted open source research in a manner similar to what IAEA inspectors would do to research the activities at a location and prepare questions for the location to answer and that would be the focus of a complementary access. The host labs and other labs attending the training found the training to be extremely useful and helpful in making sure that each lab's Additional Protocol team had made correct declarations of nuclear activities, had properly trained staff ready to host and answer IAEA inquiries, and would implement managed access during a complementary access that would provide access by the IAEA team to resolve questions or inconsistencies about a particular declaration and still protect the information addressed by Articles 1 and 7 of the U.S. AP.

Boyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stevens, Rebecca C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valente, John U [BNL; Jo, Jae H [BNL; Sellen, Joana [U.S. DOE/NNSA; Wonder, Edward [QINETIQ-NORTH AMERICA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Anticipating the atom: popular perceptions of atomic power before Hiroshima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Before Hiroshima made the Bomb an object of popular concern, possible implications and applications of atomic physics had been discussed in the public forum. The new science of X-rays and radium promised the possibilities of unlimited energy and the transmutation of elements in the two decades leading up to World War 1. During the twenties, as scientific method struggled to keep pace with atomic theory, discussion centered on the feasibility of atomic disintegration as an energy source and the many uses of radium. The 1927 case of the New Jersey Radium Dial Painters, who sued their employers for compensation after contracting radium poisoning, revealed a dark side to the new science, that, along with the development of artificial radioactive isotopes by the Jollot-Curies in Paris, and, in Italy, Enrico Fenni's neutron bombardment experiments, sobered attitudes toward the ever-increasing probability of atomic power. When Otto Hahn finally split the atom in 1938, it opened the way to the practical industrial use of atomic fission, and stimulated a flurry of newspaper and magazine articles before World War 11 brought about censorship. Popular entertainment through 1945 reflects the extent to which atomic power had entered the public awareness. Atomic themes and motifs appeared in English language fiction as early as 1895, as did discussions of the social implications of the new science. Such popular culture imagery, including motion pictures and comic book superheroes, that presented the atom to mass audiences provide insight into the popular perceptions at the time, and to the shaping of attitudes toward the Bomb after Hiroshima.

d'Emal, Jacques-Andre Christian

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Public Safety and Security in Analytical Microscopy Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public Safety and Security in Analytical Microscopy Group. Summary: Reliable standards are needed to test, maintain, and ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... Recent Advances in Structural Characterization of Materials: Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of Nanoscale ...

322

Opportunities for Multimodal CARS Microscopy in Materials Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization. Presentation Title, Opportunities for Multimodal CARS Microscopy in Materials ...

323

Electron Microscopy Study of Tin Whisker Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of tin whiskers formed on sputtered tin layers deposited on brass was studied using electron microscopy. The occurrence of whiskers appeared to be largely independent of the macroscopic stress state in the film; rather it was microscopic compressive stresses arising from the formation of an intermetallic phase that appeared to be the necessary precursor. Whisker morphology was a result of whether nucleation had occurred on single grains or on multiple grains. In the latter case, the whiskers had a fluted or striated surface. The formation of whiskers on electron transparent samples was demonstrated. These samples showed the whiskers were monocrystalline and defect free, and that the growth direction could be determined.

Norton, Murray G. (Washington State University); Lebret, Joel (8392)

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Manhattan Project: Adventures Inside the Atom  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM General Electric, National Archives (1948) Resources > Library Below is Adventures Inside the Atom, a comic book history of nuclear energy that was produced in 1948 by the General Electric Company. Scroll down to view the full-size images of each page. This publication was produced at the request of the the Assistant Manager for Public Education, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Atomic Energy Commission. It is reproduced here via the National Archives. Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 1 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 2 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 3 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 4 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 5 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 6 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 7 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 8 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 9

325

Nuclear Forces and Nuclear Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forces and Nuclear Systems Forces and Nuclear Systems Our goal is to achieve a description of nuclear systems ranging in size from the deuteron to nuclear matter and neutron stars using a single parameterization of the nuclear forces. Our work includes both the construction of two- and three-nucleon potentials and the development of many-body techniques for computing nuclear properties with these interactions. Detailed quantitative, computationally intense studies are essential parts of this work. In the last decade we have constructed several realistic two- and three-nucleon potential models. The NN potential, Argonne v18, has a dominant charge-independent piece plus additional charge-dependent and charge-symmetry-breaking terms, including a complete electromagnetic interaction. It fits 4301 pp and np elastic scattering data with a chi**2

326

Nuclear force in Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform the quenched lattice QCD analysis on the nuclear force (baryon-baryon interactions). We employ $20^3\\times 24$ lattice at $\\beta=5.7$ ($a\\simeq 0.19$ fm) with the standard gauge action and the Wilson quark action with the hopping parameters $\\kappa=0.1600, 0.1625, 0.1650$, and generate about 200 gauge configurations. We measure the temporal correlators of the two-baryon system which consists of heavy-light-light quarks. We extract the inter-baryon force as a function of the relative distance $r$. We also evaluate the contribution to the nuclear force from each ``Feynman diagram'' such as the quark-exchange diagram individually, and single out the roles of Pauli-blocking effects or quark exchanges in the inter-baryon interactions.

T. T. Takahashi; T. Doi; H. Suganuma

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

In-situ control system for atomization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

In-situ control system for atomization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Figliola, Richard S. (Central, SC); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Feeling molecular forces: tactile feedback to enhance drug design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular modeling is a vital component for structure-based drug design. Currently implemented technology combines data and graphics to give the user visual capabilities to assist in discovering possible binding arrangements. Visual modeling has become a tremendous help to scientists in reducing the amount of time needed to create new inhibitory compounds. However, the visual medium used for modeling lacks the ability to convey the forces between the molecules to the user. Potentially, tactile feedback can provide this missing information. SensAble Devices has developed a device capable of producing force feedback to a user-defined environment called the PHANToM, The PHANToM is a 6 dimensional (3 translational and 3 rotational) haptic device that can return force and torque to the user through a hand held stylus. The system configuration for molecular modeling consists of integrating the haptic device with a high-end PC running Windows NT and developing code to model the intermolecular forces. The programming language used was C with some C++ constructs and the OpenGL graphics library for the graphics implementation. The optimized code running with the system has proven capable of calculating and relaying tactile feedback between a 100-atom active site of a protein and a small 15-atom inhibitor in real time (ca. 1 millisecond). Trials are now underway on the system to evaluate accuracy and explore other forms of useful output. Once this is accomplished, modeling will be done on an active site and an untested inhibitor to evaluate novel binding modes.

Williams, Jocylin Amber

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1 Mary C. Brady,1 Hai C. Tang,1 Anne L. Plant2 * Abstract The analysis of fluorescence microscopy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUS

Bernal, Javier

331

The use of atomic level stress to characterize the structure of irradiated iron  

SciTech Connect

The behaviour of irradiated material near a primary knock on atom immediately after impact is of great importance for designing reactor materials. Currently, molecular dynamics simulations with classical force fields provide the foundation for understanding the resulting cascade. However, modern density functional calculations can now treat large enough numbers of atoms that they can provide additional details of the magnetic and electronic nature of irradiated samples. In this paper we calculate from first principles the atomic level stresses for an instantaneous configuration following the initiation of a low energy cascade in iron.

Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Ojha, Madhusudan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nicholson, Donald M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Bala [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

An atomic view of surface diffusion on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of surface diffusion and cluster nucleation by field ion microscopy have provided a considerable amount of physical insight concerning the fundamental interactions that control dynamical processes on surfaces. The investigations rely not only on the FIM`s ability to resolve and track individual atoms on a surface, but also its ability to manipulate the number of adatoms and the size of clusters by the process of field desorption. Results of the investigations are surprising. Whereas metal atom diffusion was once thought to be a simple hopping process, FIM experiments have revealed new mechanisms for atom transport. Whereas cluster nucleation was once thought to be an aggregation process dependent only upon pairwise interactions between atoms, FIM investigations have shown that long-range and many body interactions can make non-negligible contributions to the overall process. By providing a brief overview of the experimental methods used in FIM surface diffusion studies and discussing a few selected applications, I hope to have conveyed some of the rich history as well as the current excitement associated with FIM investigations of dynamical processes on surfaces.

Kellogg, G.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Automatic HTS force measurement instrument  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

336

Materials Applications of Photoelectron Emission Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) is a versatile technique that can image a variety of materials including metals, semiconductors and even insulators. Under favorable conditions the most advanced aberration corrected instruments have a spatial resolution approaching 2 nm. Although PEEM cannot compete with transmission or scanning electron microscopies for ultimate resolution, the technique is much more gentle and has the unique advantage of imaging structure as well as electronic and magnetic states on the nanoscale. Since the image contrast is derived from spatial variations in electron photoemission intensity, PEEM is ideal for interrogating both static and dynamic electronic properties of complex nanostructured materials. PEEM can be performed using a variety of photoexcitation sources including synchrotron emission, femtosecond laser pulses and conventional UV lamp emission. Each source has advantages, for example, fs laser excitation enables time-resolved imaging for study of ultrafast dynamics of surface intermediate states while tunable synchrotron sources allow chemically specific excitation. Even more detail can be extracted from energy resolved PEEM. Here, we review the key principles and contrast mechanisms of PEEM and briefly summarize materials applications of PEEM with examples of a thermally-induced structural phase transformation in barium titanate, inter-diffusion between thin metal copper and ruthenium layers, and multiphoton imaging of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silver coated substrate.

Xiong, Gang; Shao, Rui; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Cai, Mingdong; Duchene, J.; Wang, J. Y.; Wei, Wei

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Questions and Answers - Does an atom smasher really smash atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an accelerator? is an accelerator? Previous Question (What is an accelerator?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Where and how do you get your electrons for your accelerator?) Where and how do you get yourelectrons for your accelerator? Does an atom smasher really smash atoms? Well, yes, they do, but we now prefer to call them by their less aggression-centered name, "particle harmony disrupters." Of course some atom smashers do much more smashing than others. We use electrons in our accelerator to study the nucleus of an atom. Remember that electrons are negative, as are the electrons surrounding the target. Since like charged particles repel each other, our particles have to have enough energy to blast through that electron cloud to get to the nucleus. The electrons then

338

CO Oxidation on supported single Pt atoms - Experimental and Ab Initio density functional studies of CO interaction with Pt atom on theta-alumina(010) surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although there are only a few known examples of supported single atoms, they are unique because they bridge the gap between homogenous and heterogeneous catalysis. The metal center is single supported atoms can be isoelectronic with their homogenous catalyst counterpart and may allow mechanistic pathways normally seen in homogenous catalysts. Here, we report CO oxidation activity of mono-disperse single Pt atoms supported on an inert substrate, -alumina (Al2O3), in the presence of stoichiometric oxygen. Since CO oxidation on single Pt atoms cannot occur via a conventional Langmuir-Hinshelwood scheme (L-H scheme) which requires at least one Pt-Pt bond, we have carried out a first principles density functional theoretical study of a proposed pathway which is a variation on the conventional L-H scheme and is inspired by organometallic chemistry of platinum. We find that a single supported Pt atom prefers to bond to O2 over CO. The CO then bonds with the oxygenated Pt atom and forms a carbonate which dissociates to liberate CO2, leaving an oxygen atom on Pt. A subsequent reaction with another CO molecule regenerates the single atom catalyst. An in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared study of CO adsorption on the catalyst s supported single atoms has been carried out to infer information on CO absorption modes and compare the observed spectra with calculated ones for intermediates in the proposed CO oxidation pathway. Our results clearly show that supported Pt single atoms are catalytically active and that this catalytic activity can occur without involving the substrate. Characterization by electron microscopy and X-ray absorption studies of the mono-disperse Pt/ -Al2O3, synthesized by solution methods, are also presented.

Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Debusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Yoon, Mina [ORNL; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL; Yang, Xiaofan [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Raqs Media Collective Flash Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extended only to a couple of inches. With the invention of light bulbs, scientists started detonatingRaqs Media Collective Flash Force: A Visual History of Might, Right and Light Perhaps the greatest of light and divorcing these from the potent explosions that initially produced them. It is a history

Canales, Jimena

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Energy Task Force to Energy Task Force to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Energy Task Force on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Energy Task Force The Governor's Task Force on Energy Policy is developing a state energy plan to facilitate energy efficiency and the use of alternative and renewable fuels in Tennessee. The energy plan will include a summary of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Force Field Development and Molecular Dynamics of [NiFe] Hydrogenase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classical molecular force-field parameters describing the structure and motion of metal clusters in [NiFe] hydrogenase enzymes can be used to compare the dynamics and thermodynamics of [NiFe] under different oxidation, protonation, and ligation circumstances. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of small model clusters representative of the active site and the proximal, medial, and distal Fe/S metal centers and their attached protein side chains, we have calculated classical force-field parameters for [NiFe] in reduced and oxidized states, including internal coordinates, force constants, and atom-centered charges. Derived force constants revealed that cysteinate ligands bound to the metal ions are more flexible in the Ni-B active site, which has a bridging hydroxide ligand, than in the Ni-C active site, which has a bridging hydride. Ten nanosecond all-atom, explicit-solvent MD simulations of [NiFe] hydrogenase in oxidized and reduced catalytic states established the stability of the derived force-field parameters in terms of C{alpha} and metal cluster fluctuations. Average active site structures from the protein MD simulations are consistent with [NiFe] structures from the Protein Data Bank, suggesting that the derived force-field parameters are transferrable to other hydrogenases beyond the structure used for testing. A comparison of experimental H{sub 2}-production rates demonstrated a relationship between cysteinate side chain rotation and activity, justifying the use of a fully dynamic model of [NiFe] metal cluster motion.

Smith, Dayle MA; Xiong, Yijia; Straatsma, TP; Rosso, Kevin M.; Squier, Thomas C.

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

342

AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEADQUARTERS aII?y HEADQUARTERS aII?y 9 AIR FORCE SPECIAL WEAPONS CENTER 1 AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND . - KlRTlAND AIR FORCE BASE, NEW MEXICO - k FINAL REPORT O N AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION PROJECT RULISON .1 O c t o b e r 1969 P r e p a r e d by : CONT INENTAL TEST D I V I S ION DIRECTORATE OF NUCLEAR FIELD OPERATIONS This page intentionally left blank INDEX AIR FORCE PARTICIPATION I N PROJECT RULISON FINAL REPORT PARAGRAPH BASIC REPORT SUBJECT R e f e r e n c e s PAGE 2 G e n e r a l 1 3 P l a n n i n g 3 4 Command a n d C o n t r o l 5 O p e r a t i o n s , G r a n d ' J u n c t i o n M u n i c i p a l A i r p o r t . . ' A i r O p e r a t i o n s C e n t e r , He1 i c o p t e r P a d / ' 7.. - . M a t e r i e l : ' 8 M e d i c a l 1 9 R a d - S a f e C r a s h - R e s c u e S e c u r i t y 2 1 C o m m u n i c a t i o n s ~ d m i n i s t r a t ' i o n Summary ATTACHMENTS ATTACHMENT SUBJECI' 1 F r a g O r d e r 69-1 ( ~ r o j ' e c t RULISON) , AFSWC D

343

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

producing uranium for the Mo"hz,t,a, Projec, can best be qwtcd Irom the Smyth official report - Atomic Energy - . ' .: CCL, + NaCl - ."-l Figure 6. apparatus used in electrcdytic...

344

Single artificial-atom lasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-state superconducting circuits are versatile systems in which quantum states can be engineered and controlled. Recent progress in this area has opened up exciting possibilities for exploring fundamental physics as well as applications in quantum information technology; in a series of experiments it was shown that such circuits can be exploited to generate quantum optical phenomena, by designing superconducting elements as artificial atoms that are coupled coherently to the photon field of a resonator. Here we demonstrate a lasing effect with a single artificial atom - a Josephson-junction charge qubit - embedded in a superconducting resonator. We make use of one of the properties of solid-state artificial atoms, namely that they are strongly and controllably coupled to the resonator modes. The device is essentially different from existing lasers and masers; one and the same artificial atom excited by current injection produces many photons.

O. Astafiev; K. Inomata; A. O. Niskanen; T. Yamamoto; Yu. A. Pashkin; Y. Nakamura; J. S. Tsai

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

u. S. Atomic Energy Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

October 31, 1949 Manager of Operations u. S. Atomic Energy Commission R. 0. Box 30, Ansonia Station New York ES, N. Y. MATERIALS 5+k& hJf Reference: SK:BL Attention: Mr. R. J....

346

Exotic atoms and leptonic conservations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major 1989 efforts have been on two aspects of experiments at TRIUMF. One effort was production of muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium into a vacuum. We study rates relevant to muonic catalyzed fusion, and if there are found an adequate number of muons in the 2s state then we plan to measure precision energies. The second effort was to develop plans for kaonic atoms at the kaon factory. We also completed analyses from the experiments with pionic atoms at LAMPF.

Kunselman, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effects of size, shape, crystal plane and atomic discrete structure on interactions between carbon nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding various interaction forces between building blocks is of great importance to their selfassembly. In this paper, the effects of size, crystal plane, shape and atomic discrete structure on interaction potentials between carbon nanoparticles ... Keywords: Hamaker approach, carbon, interaction, molecular dynamics simulation, nanoparticle

Weifu Sun; Qinghua Zeng; Aibing Yu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transition from LEDCOP to ATOMIC  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the development of the ATOMIC code, a new low to mid Z opacity code, which will replace the current Los Alamos low Z opacity code LEDCOP. The ATOMIC code is based on the FINE code, long used by the Los Alamos group for spectral comparisons in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and for non-LTE calculations, both utilizing the extensive databases from the atomic physics suite of codes based on the work of R.D. Cowan. Many of the plasma physics packages in LEDCOP, such as line broadening and free-free absorption, are being transferred to the new ATOMIC code. A new equation of state (EOS) model is being developed to allow higher density calculations than were possible with either the FINE or LEDCOP codes. Extensive modernization for both ATOMIC and the atomic physics code suites, including conversion to Fortran 90 and parallelization, are underway to speed up the calculations and to allow the use of expanded databases for both the LTE opacity tables and the non-LTE calculations. Future plans for the code will be outlined, including considerations for new generation opacity tables.

Magee, N. H. (Norman H.); Abdallah, J. (Joseph); Colgan, J. (James); Hakel, P. (Peter); Kilcrease, D. P. (David P.); Mazevet, S. (Stephane); Sherrill, M. E. (Manolo E.); Fontes, C. J. (Christopher J.); Zhang, H. (Honglin)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Atomic Physics Division 1999 - Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lying Rydberg states constitute a "frozen" Rydberg gas. ... of atom interactions in cold atomic gases and Bose ... or optical fields and tight confinement of ...

350

Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics with Ultracold Atoms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Wechselwirkung ultrakalter Atome mit der Mode eines optischen Resonators hoher Gu?te. Die Atome sind dabei in einem periodischen… (more)

Habibian, Hessam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Scientific Technical / Admin. Postdoctoral and Visitors Uli Dahmen, Head Jane Cavlina / Administrator Abhay Gautam Christian Kisielowski John Turner Helmut Poppa Andrew Minor ChengYu Song Frances Allen Andreas Schmid Marissa Libbee Tamara Radetic Peter Ercius Karen Bustillo Haimei Zheng Jim Ciston Alpha N'Diaye Colin Ophus Gong Chen Burak Ozdol Velimir Radmilovic Sara Kiani Hua Guo Christian Liebscher Josh Kacher Chris Nelson Xiuguang Jin Qian Yu Mary Scott Search the LBNL directory services page for other LBNL staff. Scientific Staff Uli Dahmen udahmen@lbl.gov (510) 486-4627 Ulrich Dahmen is Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy. His current research interests include embedded nanostructures and interfaces in materials. Embedded nanostructures. Size- and shape-dependence of structural phase

352

Manhattan Project: Order to Drop the Atomic Bomb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ORDER TO DROP THE ATOMIC BOMB Handy to Spaatz, National Archives (July 25, 1945) Resources > Library The document below is the order to attack Japanese cities with atomic bombs. In it, the Acting Army Chief of Staff, Thomas Handy, orders Commanding General Carl Spaatz, Army Strategic Air Forces, to "deliver [the] first special bomb as soon as weather will permit . . . after about 3 August 1945." The target list: "Hiroshima, Kokura, Niigata, and Nagasaki." Further attacks were also authorized: "additional bombs will be delivered on the above targets as soon as made ready." Handy was the acting chief of staff because George Marshall was with President Harry S. Truman at the Potsdam Conference. The letter explicitly notes that this order was approved by Marshall and Secretary of War Henry Stimson. Truman, of course, provided the ultimate authorization for dropping the bomb.

353

Regularized perturbative series for the ionization potential of atomic ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study N-electron atoms with nuclear charge Z. It is well known that, in the cationic (Z > N) high-Z region, the atom behaves as a weakly interacting system. The anionic (Z < N) regime, on the other hand, is characterized by an instability threshold at $Z \\lesssim N-1$ below which the atom spontaneously emits an electron. We construct a regularized perturbative series (RPS) for the ionization potential of ions in an isoelectronic sequence that exactly reproduces both, the large Z and the Z near $Z_c$ limits. The large-Z expansion coefficients are analytically computed from perturbation theory, whereas the slope of the energy curve at Z=N-1 is computed from a kind of zero-range forces theory that uses as input the electron affinity and the covalent radius of the neutral atom with N-1 electrons. Relativistic effects at the level of first-order perturbation theory in the one-particle Hamiltonian are considered. Our RPS results are compared with numbers from the NIST database.

Gil, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Material Science for Quantum Computing with Atom Chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In its most general form, the atom chip is a device in which neutral or charged particles are positioned in an isolating environment such as vacuum (or even a carbon solid state lattice) near the chip surface. The chip may then be used to interact in a highly controlled manner with the quantum state. I outline the importance of material science to quantum computing (QC) with atom chips, where the latter may be utilized for many, if not all, suggested implementations of QC. Material science is important both for enhancing the control coupling to the quantum system for preparation and manipulation as well as measurement, and for suppressing the uncontrolled coupling giving rise to low fidelity through static and dynamic effects such as potential corrugations and noise. As a case study, atom chips for neutral ground state atoms are analyzed and it is shown that nanofabricated wires will allow for more than $10^4$ gate operations when considering spin-flips and decoherence. The effects of fabrication imperfections and the Casimir-Polder force are also analyzed. In addition, alternative approaches to current-carrying wires are briefly described. Finally, an outlook of what materials and geometries may be required is presented, as well as an outline of directions for further study.

Ron Folman

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES  

SciTech Connect

A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

Walstrom, Peter L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tri-n-Butyl-Phophate Liquid: A Force Field Comparative Study  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to compare the performance of four force fields in predicting thermophysical properties of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) in the liquid phase. The intramolecular force parameters used were from the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement (AMBER) force field model. The van der Waals parameters were based on either the AMBER or the Optimized Potential for Liquid Simulation (OPLS) force fields. The atomic partial charges were either assigned by performing quantum chemistry calculations or utilized previously published data, and were scaled to approximate the average experimental value of the electric dipole moment. Canonical ensemble computations based on the aforementioned parameters were performed near the atmospheric pressure and temperature to obtain the electric dipole moment, mass density, and self-diffusion coefficient. In addition, the microscopic structure of the liquid was characterized via pair correlation functions between selected atoms. It has been demonstrated that the electric dipole moment can be approximated within 1% of the average experimental value by virtue of scaled atomic partial charges. The liquid mass density can be predicted within 0.5-1% of its experimentally determined value when using the corresponding charge scaling. However, in all cases the predicted self- diffusion coefficient is significantly smaller than a commonly quoted experimental measurement; this result is qualified by the fact that the uncertainty of the experimental value was not available.

Cui, Shengting [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Ye, Xianggui [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Casimir force for absorbing media in an open quantum system framework: Scalar model  

SciTech Connect

In this article we compute the Casimir force between two finite-width mirrors at finite temperature, working in a simplified model in 1+1 dimensions. The mirrors, considered as dissipative media, are modeled by a continuous set of harmonic oscillators which in turn are coupled to an external environment at thermal equilibrium. The calculation of the Casimir force is performed in the framework of the theory of open quantum systems. It is shown that the Casimir interaction has two different contributions: the usual radiation pressure from the vacuum, which is obtained for ideal mirrors without dissipation or losses, and a Langevin force associated with the noise induced by the interaction between dielectric atoms in the slabs and the thermal bath. Both contributions to the Casimir force are needed in order to reproduce the analogous Lifshitz formula in 1+1 dimensions. We also discuss the relationship between the electromagnetic properties of the mirrors and the spectral density of the environment.

Lombardo, Fernando C.; Rubio Lopez, Adrian E. [Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mazzitelli, Francisco D. [Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Atomico Bariloche Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, R8402AGP Bariloche (Argentina)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Modifying the Casimir force between indium tin oxide film and Au sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present complete results of the experiment on measuring the Casimir force between an Au-coated sphere and an untreated or, alternatively, UV-treated indium tin oxide film deposited on a quartz substrate. Measurements were performed using an atomic force microscope in a high vacuum chamber. The measurement system was calibrated electrostatically. Special analysis of the systematic deviations is performed, and respective corrections in the calibration parameters are introduced. The corrected parameters are free from anomalies discussed in the literature. The experimental data for the Casimir force from two measurement sets for both untreated and UV-treated samples are presented. The experimental errors are determined at a 95% confidence level. It is demonstrated that the UV treatment of an I TO plate results in a significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35% depending on separation). However, ellipsometry measurements of the imaginary parts of dielectric permittivities of the un...

Banishev, A A; Castillo-Garza, R; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U; 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.045436

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium and heat transfer between arbitrary bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Casimir-Lifshitz force and the radiative heat transfer occurring between two arbitrary bodies, each one held at a given temperature, surrounded by environmental radiation at a third temperature. The system, in stationary configuration out of thermal equilibrium, is characterized by a force and a heat transfer depending on the three temperatures, and explicitly expressed in terms of the scattering operators of each body. We find a closed-form analytic expression valid for bodies of any geometry and dielectric properties. As an example, the force between two parallel slabs of finite thickness is calculated, showing the importance of the environmental temperature as well as the occurrence of a repulsive interaction. An analytic expression is also provided for the force acting on an atom in front of a slab. Our predictions can be relevant for experimental and technological purposes.

Riccardo Messina; Mauro Antezza

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ion-induced electron emission microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

Doyle, Barney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Vizkelethy, Gyorgy (Albuquerque, NM); Weller, Robert A. (Brentwood, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NIST: Atomic Spectros. - Spectral Continuum Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy: home page. 21. Spectral Continuum Radiation. Hydrogenic Species. Precise quantum-mechanical ...

363

SCHROEDINGER'S CAT IN AN ATOMIC CAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov SCHROEDINGER'S CAT IN AN ATOMIC CAGE. They ... conditions. Schroedinger cat states are extremely fragile. Any ...

364

A flow cell for electron microscopy imaging of specimen in ...  

A flow cell for electron microscopy imaging of specimen in liquid or gas. Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. ...

365

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: NCEM Fellowship  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Scientist Program Visiting Scientist Program The National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) offers a program that gives participants the opportunity to conduct...

366

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Workshops and Seminars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upcoming Seminars Thursday, October 3, 2013 at 11am Matthew Mecklenburg Center for Electron Microscopy and MicroAnalysis, University of Southern California 2D crystals are...

367

Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Material Characterization II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2013 ... By measuring the phase of the SHG, it provides information about the relative ... We combined interferometry to SHG microscopy to retrieve the ...

368

Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Characterization of Battery Cycling by In-Situ Microscopy ... of lithium ion batteries provides an important route to reducing the lifetime costs of ...

369

High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The APS 1-ID beamline is dedicated to high-energy diffraction and the status of the ... High Energy Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source 1-ID ...

370

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanocompression testing, we ... Ab Initio DFT Modeling of the Dislocation and Its Mobility in TiN Ceramic.

371

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Radiation carcinogenesis was first noted in studies of individuals with occupational or therapeutic exposure to radiation. Data from long-term follow-up studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have greatly enhanced our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis. This book presents current results obtained from epidemiological studies and pathological studies on cancer among atomic bomb survivors. It includes a description of the dosimetry system which is currently being revised. Although many of the details about radiation carcinogenesis remain unknown or uncertain, it is clear that the incidence of radiation-induced cancer among atomic bomb survivors continues unabated 40 years after exposure. Recent increases in occupational and environmental exposure to radiation together with the need for a thorough review of radiation protection standards have led to increased recognition of the importance of research on radiation carcinogenesis and risk assessment.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Degeneracy Breaking of Hydrogen Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The three dimensional rotation group, SO(3), is a symmetry group of the normal hydrogen atom. Each reducible representation of this group can be associated with a degenerate energy level. If this atom is placed in an external magnetic field, the interaction between the orbital magnetic moment with this field will lead to a symmetry breaking where the symmetry group of the atom is a new group distinct from the SO(3) group. This phenomenon describes the normal Zeeman effect, where a degenerate energy level splits into several new energy levels. It is explicitly shown that each of the new energy levels can be associated with an irreducible representation of the new symmetry group.

Agung Trisetyarso; Pantur Silaban

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vacuum fluctuations and moving atoms/detectors: From Casimir-Polder to Unruh effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note we report on some new results \\cite{SHP} on corrections to the Casimir-Polder \\cite{caspol} retardation force due to atomic motion and present a preliminary (unpublished) critique on one recently proposed cavity QED detection scheme of Unruh effect \\cite{Unr76}. These two well-known effects arise from the interaction between a moving atom or detector with a quantum field under some boundary conditions introduced by a conducting mirror/cavity or dielectric wall. The Casimir-Polder force is a retardation force on the atom due to the dressing of the atomic ground state by the vacuum electromagnetic field in the presence of a conducting mirror or dielectric wall. We have recently provided an improved calculation by treating the mutual influence of the atom and the (constrained) field in a self-consistent way. For an atom moving adiabatically, perpendicular to a mirror, our result finds a coherent retardation correction up to twice the stationary value. Unruh effect refers loosely to the fact that a uniformly accelerated detector feels hot. Two prior schemes have been proposed for the detection of `Unruh radiation', based on charged particles in linear accelerators and storage rings. Here we are interested in a third scheme proposed recently by Scully {\\it et al} \\cite{Scully03} involving the injection of accelerated atoms into a microwave or optical cavity. We analyze two main factors instrumental to the purported success in this scheme, the cavity factor and the sudden switch-on factor. We conclude that the effects engendered from these factors are unrelated to the Unruh effect.

B. L. Hu; A. Roura; S. Shresta

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory (PNNL). The research was performed usingResearch and located at PNNL. 1 R. S. Arvidson, M. Collier,

Lea, A.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Reactive gas atomization processing for Fe-based ODS alloys  

SciTech Connect

Gas atomization reaction synthesis was employed as a simplified method for processing oxide dispersion forming precursor Fe-based powders (e.g., Fe–Cr–Y–Hf). During this process a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar–O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 50 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide shell that was used as a vehicle to transport oxygen into the consolidated microstructure. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatment promoted thermodynamically driven oxygen exchange reactions between trapped films of Cr-enriched oxide and internal (Y, Hf)-enriched intermetallic precipitates, resulting in highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y–Hf–O) that were identified with X-ray diffraction. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography results also revealed that the size and distribution of the dispersoids were found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, several oxide dispersion strengthened microstructures were engineered from different powder particle size ranges, illustrating microstructural control as a function of particle solidification rate. Additionally, preliminary thermal–mechanical processing was used to develop a fine scale dislocation substructure for ultimate strengthening of the alloy.

Rieken, Joel R [Ames Laboratory; Anderson, Iver E [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Odette, G R [University of California; Stergar, E [University of California; Haney, E [University of California

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Atomic resolution of Lithium Ions in LiCoO  

SciTech Connect

LiCoO2 is the most common lithium storage material for lithium rechargeable batteries, used widely to power portable electronic devices such as laptop computers. Lithium arrangements in the CoO2 framework have a profound effect on the structural stability and electrochemical properties of LixCoO2 (0 < x < 1), however, probing lithium ions has been difficult using traditional X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Here we have succeeded in simultaneously resolving columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in layered LiCoO2 battery material using experimental focal series of LiCoO2 images obtained at sub-Angstrom resolution in a mid-voltage transmission electron microscope. Lithium atoms are the smallest and lightest metal atoms, and scatter electrons only very weakly. We believe our observations of lithium to be the first by electron microscopy, and that they show promise to direct visualization of the ordering of lithium and vacancy in LixCoO2.

Shao-Horn, Yang; Croguennec, Laurence; Delmas, Claude; Nelson, Chris; O' Keefe, Michael A.

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

Methods for Estimating Climate Anomaly Forcing Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse methods for determining the anomalous mean forcing functions responsible for climate change are investigated. First, an iterative method is considered, and it is shown to successfully reproduce forcing functions for various idealized and ...

Meelis J. Zidikheri; Jorgen S. Frederiksen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of a light force accelerometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the feasibility of a light force accelerometer was experimentally demonstrated. The light force accelerometer is an optical inertial sensor which uses focused laser light to levitate and trap glass microspheres ...

Butts, David LaGrange

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 May 2009 Demonstrating commercially availale physical security/force protection soultions around the world The bombing of Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia on 25 June 1996 revealed the need for continal vigilance and protection againist terrorist forces intent on harming US personnel and interests. The Chairman if the Joint Chiefs of Staff directed the Services to investigate COTS equipments solutions for physical security/force protection needs. The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquistion, Technology, and Logistics (OUSD {at&l}) tasked the Office of the US Army Product Manager, force Protection Systems (PM-FPS), to coordiante and facilitate a Force Protection Equipment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Methods for estimating climate anomaly forcing patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse methods for determining the anomalous mean forcing functions responsible for climate change are investigated. Firstly, an iterative method is considered, and it is shown to successfully reproduce forcing functions for various idealised and ...

Meelis J. Zidikheri; Jorgen S. Frederiksen

382

In situ atomic layer deposition and synchrotron-radiation photoemission study of Al2O3 on pristine n-GaAs(0 0 1)-4×6 surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and synchrotron-radiation photoemission studies for the morphological and interfacial chemical characterization of in situ atomic ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition, GaAs, Molecular beam epitaxy, Synchrotron-radiation photoemission

Y. H. Chang; M. L. Huang; P. Chang; J. Y. Shen; B. R. Chen; C. L. Hsu; T. W. Pi; M. Hong; J. Kwo

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Supercomputers and atomic physics data  

SciTech Connect

The advent of the supercomputer has dramatically increased the possibilities for generating and using massive amounts of detailed fine structure atomic physics data. Size, speed, and software have made calculations which were impossible just a few years ago into a reality. Further technological advances make future possibilities seem endless. The cornerstone atomic structure codes of R.D. Cowan have been adapted into a single code CATS for use on Los Alamos supercomputers. We provide a brief overview of the problem; and report a sample CATS calculation using configuration interaction to calculate collision and oscillator strengths for over 300,000 transitions in neutral nitrogen. We also discuss future supercomputer needs. 2 refs.

Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities. 3 figs.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.S.; Balsavich, J.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

386

Dynamical polarization in pionic atoms  

SciTech Connect

Dynamical nuclear polarization occurs in pionic atoms when a nuclear excitation of appropriate multipolarity is nearly degenerate with de-excitation of a pion atomic level. This phenomenon has been studied in several nuclei, one goal being to test the pion optical potential for pion atomic states normally ''hidden'' because of pion absorption. We find that, in addition to Coulomb mixing of the atomic and nuclear levels, strong interaction mixing and nuclear excitations above the lowest collective quadrupole mode are important for understanding the experimental results. All cases except /sup 110/Pd can then be understood. For /sup 110/Pd, additional nuclear structure information is needed to determine whether or not the conventional pion optical potential will suffice again. We discuss the sensitivity of dynamical polarization measurements to the parameters of the optical potential and to various aspects of nuclear structure. In particular, we find that pionic /sup 150/Sm provides a test of the interacting boson model and that the difference in neutron and proton radii predicted by Hartree-Fock calculations affects the mixing appreciably.

Dubach, J.F.; Moniz, E.J.; Nixon, G.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lesson 6- Atoms to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most power plants make electricity by boiling water to make steam that turns a turbine. A nuclear power plant works this way, too. At a nuclear power plant, splitting atoms produce the heat to boil the water. This lesson covers inside the reactor, fission control and electricity generation.

388

Air Force Enhanced Use Lease  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Air Force Enhanced Use Lease Mr. Brian Brown 16 Oct. 12 I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e 2 Agenda  Brian Brown  Enhanced Use Lease (EUL) Overview  Energy EULs  EUL Goals  David Swanson  Energy EUL Market Drivers  Current EUL Projects  Partnering with the Air Force  Contact Information I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e 3 Overview  Authority 10 USC 2667  An EUL is a lease  By the government  Of "non-excess" property  Under the control of the government  To a public or private sector lessee  In exchange for fair market value rental payments in cash and/or in kind consideration I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

389

In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Nanomaterials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the recent development of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization techniques, the real time study of property-structure correlations in nanomaterials becomes possible. This dissertation reports the direct observations of deformation behavior of Al2O3-ZrO2-MgAl2O4 (AZM) bulk ceramic nanocomposites, strengthening mechanism of twins in YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) thin film, work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel and deformation of 2wt% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film with nanorod structures using the in situ TEM nanoindentation tool. The combined in situ movies with quantitative loading-unloading curves reveal the deformation mechanism of the above nanomaterial systems. At room temperature, in situ dynamic deformation studies show that the AZM nanocomposites undergo the deformation mainly through the grain-boundary sliding and rotation of small grains, i.e., ZrO2 grains, and some of the large grains, i.e., MgAl2O4 grains. We observed both plastic and elastic deformations in different sample regions in these multi-phase ceramic nanocomposites at room temperature. Both ex situ (conventional) and in situ nanoindentation were conducted to reveal the deformation of YBCO films from the directions perpendicular and parallel to the twin interfaces. Hardness measured perpendicular to twin interfaces is ~50% and 40% higher than that measured parallel to twin interfaces, by ex situ and in situ, respectively. By using an in situ nanoindentation tool inside TEM, dynamic work hardening event in nanocrystalline nickel was directly observed. During stain hardening stage, abundant Lomer-Cottrell (L-C) locks formed both within nanograins and against twin boundaries. Two major mechanisms were identified during interactions between L-C locks and twin boundaries. Quantitative nanoindentation experiments recorded during in situ experiments show an increase of yield strength from 1.64 to 2.29 GPa during multiple loading-unloading cycles. In situ TEM nanoindentation has been conducted to explore the size dependent deformation behavior of two different types (type I: ~ 0.51 of width/length ratio and type II: ~ 088 ratio) of AZO nanorods. During the indentation on type I nanord structure, annihilation of defects has been observed which is caused by limitation of the defect activities by relatively small size of the width. On the other hand, type II nanorod shows dislocation activities which enhanced the grain rotation under the external force applied on more isotropic direction through type II nanorod.

Lee, Joon Hwan 1977-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

Weisheit, J.C.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Scanning tunneling microscopy studies on the structure and stability of model catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An atomic level understanding of the structure and stability of model catalysts is essential for surface science studies in heterogeneous catalysis. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) can operate both in UHV and under realistic pressure conditions with a wide temperature span while providing atomic resolution images. Taking advantage of the ability of STM, our research focuses on 1) investigating the structure and stability of supported Au catalysts, especially under CO oxidation conditions, and 2) synthesizing and characterizing a series of alloy model catalysts for future model catalytic studies. In our study, Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) have been used to model supported Au catalysts. Our STM studies in UHV reveal surface structures of TiO2(110) and show undercoordinated Ti cations play a critical role in the nucleation and stabilization of Au clusters on TiO2(110). Exposing the TiO2(110) surface to water vapor causes the formation of surface hydroxyl groups and subsequently alters the growth kinetics of Au clusters on TiO2(110). STM studies on Au/TiO2(110) during CO oxidation demonstrate the real surface of a working catalyst. Au clusters supported on TiO2(110) sinter rapidly during CO oxidation, but are mostly stable in the single component reactant gas, either CO or O2. The sintering kinetics of supported Au clusters has been measured during CO oxidation and gives an activation energy, which supports the mechanism of CO oxidation induced sintering. CO oxidation was also found to accelerate the surface diffusion of Rh(110). Our results show a direct correlation between the reaction rate of CO oxidation and the diffusion rate of surface metal atoms. Synthesis of alloy model catalysts have also been attempted in our study with their structures successfully characterized. Planar Au-Pd alloy films has been prepared on a Rh(100) surface with surface Au and Pd atoms distinguished by STM. The growth of Au-Ag alloy clusters have been studied by in-situ STM on a cluster-to-cluster basis. Moreover, the atomic structure of a solution-prepared Ru3Sn3 cluster has been resolved on an ultra-thin silica film surface. The atomic structure and adsorption sites of the ultrathin silica film have also been well characterized in our study.

Yang, Fan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Smart Grid Task Force Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Technology Development Smart Grid Federal Smart Grid Task Force Smart Grid Task Force Presentations Smart Grid Task Force Presentations Presentations about the...

393

Smart Grid Task Force Presentations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Federal Smart Grid Task Force Smart Grid Task Force Presentations Smart Grid Task Force Presentations Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development...

394

Electron Microscopy Studies of GaP(N,As) Grown on Si  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to perform transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of GaP(N,As) alloys grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si substrates. These alloys are of interest for the fabrication of high-efficiency tandem solar cells based on Si. The results indicated that the nucleation and growth conditions used are critical for obtaining planar epitaxial layers with a low defect density. In particular, antiphase domains are eliminated using a low growth temperature. TEM studies of these alloy layers, which contain only a few percent N, revealed no phase separation. However, electron diffraction studies revealed the first evidence of CuPt-type atomic ordering in these P-rich, dilute nitride alloy layers.

Norman, A. G.; Geisz, J. F.; Olson, J. M.; Jones, K. M.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Army Energy Initiatives Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Kathy Ahsing Director, Planning and Development UNCLASSIFIED 2 Perfect Storm UNCLASSIFIED 3 U.S. Army Energy Consumption, 2010 23% 77% 42% 58%  Facilities  Vehicles & Equipment (Tactical and Non-tactical) Sources: Energy Information Agency, 2010 Annual Energy Review; Agency Annual Energy Management Data Reports submitted to DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (Preliminary FY 2010) 32% 68% DoD 80% Army 21% Federal Gov 1% Federal Government United States Department of Defense U.S. = 98,079 Trillion Btu DoD = 889 Trillion Btu Fed Gov = 1,108 Trillion Btu U.S. Army = 189 Trillion Btu FY10 Highlights - $2.5+B Operational Energy Costs - $1.2 B Facility Energy Costs

396

Nuclear forces from lattice QCD  

SciTech Connect

Lattice QCD construction of nuclear forces is reviewed. In this method, the nuclear potentials are constructed by solving the Schroedinger equation, where equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions are regarded as quantum mechanical wave functions. Since the long distance behavior of equal-time NBS wave functions is controlled by the scattering phase, which is in exactly the same way as scattering wave functions in quantum mechanics, the resulting potentials are faithful to the NN scattering data. The derivative expansion of this potential leads to the central and the tensor potentials at the leading order. Some of numerical results of these two potentials are shown based on the quenched QCD.

Ishii, Noriyoshi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

397

Stability of atoms in the anionic domain (Z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the stability and universal behaviour of the ionization energy of N-electron atoms with nuclear charge Z in the anionic domain (Zatom region to the anionic instability threshold. As testing systems we choose inert gases (He-like, Ne-like and Ar-like isoelectronic sequences) and alkali metals (Li-like, Na-like, K-like sequences). From the results, it is apparent that, for inert gases case, the stability relation with N is completely inverted in the singly-charged anion region (Z=N-1) with respect to the neutral atom region (Z=N), i.e. larger systems are more stable than the smaller ones. We devised a semi-analytical model (inspired by the zero-range forces theory) which lead us to establish the ionization energy dependence on the nuclear charge n...

Gil, G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Bimetallic Nanocatalysts by Fast Electrons Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 3:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Huolin Xin Center for Functional Nanomaterials Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study structural, compositional, and electronic information of materials at the atomic scale. With the recent addition of 3rd-order and now 5th-order aberration correction, the numerical aperture can be opened up by a factor of 2-3, allowing sub-Angstrom resolution to be achieved in a STEM. Additionally, the enlarged numerical aperture couple with the use of

399

Atomic scale control of catalytic process in oxidation of Pb thin films  

SciTech Connect

Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate that oxidation on Pb films is greatly enhanced by atomic Cs catalysts. With only a minute concentration of isolated Cs substitutional atoms in the surface layer (0.004 ML coverage), surface oxidation rates are greatly enhanced. First-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that a substitutional Cs atom strongly increases O2 binding on the surface. Then, with additional oxygen exposure this substitutional Cs-initiated oxidation process results in growth of PbO layers in an auto-catalytic manner. Furthermore, we investigate the role of temperature in the oxidation of the Pb films with and without Cs, and we explore the overall morphology of the resultant oxide layers.

Kim, Jisun [University of Texas, Austin; Khajetoorians, Alexander Ako [University of Texas, Austin; Zhu, Wenguang [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ICQD, University of S& T, Hefei, China; Shih, Chih-Kang [University of Texas, Austin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I(S.0 -01: I(S.0 -01: SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCEWSE Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 70, "Special Nuclear Material Regulations," o. license is hereby issued authorizing the licensee to receive and possess the special nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear material for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below; and to transfer such material to persons' authorized to receive it in accordance with the regulations in said Port. This license shall be deemed to contain the conditions specified in Section 70.32(a) of said regulations, and is subject to all applicable rules, regtdations, and orders of the Atomic Energy Commission now or hereafter in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Conventional And Analytical Electron Microscopy Study Of Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What Can we Learn from Atomic Scale Calculations of Grain Boundary Properties? What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

403

The Future of Atomic Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

Fermi, E.

1946-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Role of atomic collisions in fusion  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

Post, D.E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Summary of uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... element. This "H92 - 3/5CL" value is 1.09 e/atom for uranium or 0.002 e/atom for Z = 6 (ie, 40 % of the dipole correction). ...

406

Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 m/s, any gas in equilibrium (other than spin-polarized atomic hydro- ... lattice-trapped atoms, a physical picture with the simplicity and power of the ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Plasmonic Field Enhancement of Individual Nanoparticles by Correlated Scanning and Photoemission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We present results of a combined two-photon photoemission and scanning electron microscopy investigation to determine the electromagnetic enhancement factors of silver-coated spherical nanoparticles deposited on an atomically flat mica substrate. Femtosecond laser excitation, of the nanoparticles, produces intense photoemission, attributed to near-resonant excitation of localized surface plasmons. Enhancement factors are determined by comparing the respective two-photon photoemission yield measured for equal areas between single nanoparticles to that of the surrounding flat surface. For s-polarized, 400 nm (~ 3.1 eV) femtosecond radiation a distribution of enhancement factors are found with a large percentage (77%) of the nanoparticles falling within a median range. A correlated scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the nanoparticles typifying the median of the distribution were characterized by ideal spherical shapes and defect-free morphologies. The single largest enhancement factors were in contrast produced by a very small percentage (8%) of the total, for which evidence of silver defect anomalies were found that contributed to the overall structure of the nanoparticle. Comparisons are made between the experimentally measured enhancement factors and previously reported theoretical predictions of the localized surface plasmon near-field intensities for isolated nanometer-sized silver spheres.

Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - Past News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics of the American Physical Society (DAMOP) in ... and Determination of Relative Nuclear Charge Radius.". ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Institute for Atom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for...

413

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene under Tensile Loading · Atomistic Predictions of Age Hardening in Al-Cu Alloys.

414

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - John Curry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chemical equilibrium and deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium. I am also interested in the acquisition and compilation of basic atomic data. ...

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

NIST Atomic Physics Division 2000 - Technical Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Astrophysical Quantities," a handbook widely used ... and single-atom chemistry, where controlled ... understanding of fundamental processes occurring ...

416

Mapping Ionic Currents and Reactivity on the Nanoscale: Electrochemical Strain Microscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state electrochemical processes in oxides underpin a broad spectrum of energy and information storage devices, ranging from Li-ion and Li-air batteries, to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) to electroresistive and memristive systems. These functionalities are controlled by the bias-driven diffusive and electromigration transport of mobile ionic species, as well as intricate a set of electrochemical and defect-controlled reactions at interfaces and in bulk. Despite the wealth of device-level and atomistic studies, little is known on the mesoscopic mechanisms of ion diffusion and electronic transport on the level of grain clusters, individual grains, and extended defects. The development of the capability for probing ion transport on the nanometer scale is a key to deciphering complex interplay between structure, functionality, and performance in these systems. Here we introduce Electrochemical Strain Microscopy, a scanning probe microscopy technique based on strong strain-bias coupling in the systems in which local ion concentrations are changed by electrical fields. The imaging capability, as well as time- and voltage spectroscopies analogous to traditional current based electrochemical characterization methods are developed. The reversible intercalation of Li and mapping electrochemical activity in LiCoO2 is demonstrated, illustrating higher Li diffusivity at non-basal planes and grain boundaries. In Si-anode device structure, the direct mapping of Li diffusion at extended defects and evolution of Li-activity with charge state is explored. The electrical field-dependence of Li mobility is studied to determine the critical bias required for the onset of electrochemical transformation, allowing reaction and diffusion processes in the battery system to be separated at each location. Finally, the applicability of ESM for probing oxygen vacancy diffusion and oxygen reduction/evolution reactions is illustrated, and the high resolution ESM maps are correlated with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging. The future potential for deciphering mechanisms of electrochemical transformations on an atomically-defined single-defect level is discussed.

Kalinin, S.V. (Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, ORNL)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Stability of alert survivable forces during reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of current and projected strategic forces are discussed within a framework that contains elements of current US and Russian analyses. For current force levels and high alert, stability levels are high, as are the levels of potential strikes, due to the large forces deployed. As force levels drop towards those of current value target sets, the analysis becomes linear, concern shifts from stability to reconstitution, and survivable forces drop out. Adverse marginal costs generally provide disincentives for the reduction of vulnerable weapons, but the exchange of vulnerable for survivable weapons could reduce cost while increasing stability even for aggressive participants. Exchanges between effective vulnerable and survivable missile forces are studied with an aggregated, probabilistic model, which optimizes each sides` first and determines each sides` second strikes and costs by minimizing first strike costs.

Canavan, G.H.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Frictional forces in helical buckling of tubing  

SciTech Connect

Previous analyses of helical buckling of tubing have not considered frictional forces. This paper describes the modifications to helical buckling theory necessary to include friction. The first need is a relationship between the buckling force and the casing to tubing contact force. This contact force is determined through use of the principle of virtual work. The next need is the relationship between the friction forces, the buckling force, and the geometry of the tubing helix. Differential equations are derived and solved for two cases of interest: buckling during the landing of the tubing and thermal and differential pressure loading subsequent to landing. Several example problems are examined to evaluate the relative importance of friction.

Mitchell, R.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Collisionally Induced Atomic Clock Shifts and Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts and blackbody radiation effects for atomic clock transitions using a density matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Results for a finite temperature ${}^{87}$Sr ${}^1S_0$ ($F = 9/2$) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

Y. B. Band; I. Osherov

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Multi-sensorial interaction with a nano-scale phenomenon : the force curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) to manipulate nano-objects is an actual challenge for surface scientists. Basic haptic interfacesbetween the AFM and experimentalists have already been implemented. Themulti-sensory renderings (seeing, hearing and feeling) studied from acognitive point of view increase the efficiency of the actual interfaces. Toallow the experimentalist to feel and touch the nano-world, we add mixedrealities between an AFM and a force feedback device, enriching thus thedirect connection by a modeling engine. We present in this paper the firstresults from a real-time remote-control handling of an AFM by our ForceFeedback Gestural Device through the example of the approach-retract curve.

Marliere, Sylvain; Florens, Jean-Loup; Marchi, Florence

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Elastic actuator for precise force control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

Pratt, Gill A. (Lexington, MA); Williamson, Matthew M. (Boston, MA)

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

422

Internet Engineering Task Force KK Ramakrishnan ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Engineering Task Force KK Ramakrishnan INTERNET DRAFT AT&T Labs Research draft-kksjf-ecn-00.txt Sally Floyd LBNL November 1997 ...

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Reduction of the Casimir force using aerogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using silicon oxide based aerogels we show numerically that the Casimir force can be reduced several orders of magnitude, making its effect negligible in nanodevices. This decrease in the Casimir force is also present even when the aerogels are deposited on metallic substrates. To calculate the Casimir force we model the dielectric function of silicon oxide aerogels using an effective medium dielectric function such as the Clausius-Mossotti approximation. The results show that both the porosity of the aerogel and its thickness can be use as control parameters to reduce the magnitude of the Casimir force.

R. Esquivel-Sirvent

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

Reduction of the Casimir force using aerogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using silicon oxide based aerogels we show numerically that the Casimir force can be reduced several orders of magnitude, making its effect negligible in nanodevices. This decrease in the Casimir force is also present even when the aerogels are deposited on metallic substrates. To calculate the Casimir force we model the dielectric function of silicon oxide aerogels using an effective medium dielectric function such as the Clausius-Mossotti approximation. The results show that both the porosity of the aerogel and its thickness can be use as control parameters to reduce the magnitude of the Casimir force.

Esquivel-Sirvent, R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Weardale Task Force | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Weardale Task Force Place England, United Kingdom Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy, Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product Durham based project consortium that is...

426

Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys  

SciTech Connect

In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strength- ened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.; Anderegg, J.W.; Shechtman, D.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Microstructure Evolution of Gas Atomized Iron Based ODS Alloys  

SciTech Connect

In a simplified process to produce precursor powders for oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys, gas-atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was used to induce a surface oxide layer on molten droplets of three differing erritic stainless steel alloys during break-up and rapid solidification. The chemistry of the surface oxide was identified using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The precursor iron-base powders were consolidated at 850 C and 1,300 C using hot isostatic pressing (HIPing). Consolidation at the lower temperature resulted in a fully dense microstructure, while preventing substantial prior particle-boundary-oxide dissociation. Microstructural analysis of the alloys consolidated at the higher temperature confirmed a significant reduction in prior-particle-boundary-oxide volume fraction, in comparison with the lower-temperature-consolidated sample. This provided evidence that a high-temperature internal oxygen-exchange reaction occurred between the metastable prior particle-boundary-oxide phase (chromium oxide) and the yttrium contained within each prior particle. This internal oxygen-exchange reaction is shown to result in the formation of yttrium-enriched oxide dispersoids throughout the alloy microstructure. The evolving microstructure was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD).

Rieken, J.R.; Anderson, I.E.; Kramer, M.J.

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

Air Force Announces Funding for Alternative Energy Research ...  

Air Force Announces Funding for Alternative Energy Research & Development. December 16, 2013. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has ...

429

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New...

430

Pages that link to "Atomic City, Idaho" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Atomic City, Idaho" Atomic City, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: Atomic City,...

431

Recent Advances in Electron Microscopy, Spectral Imaging, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as adhesion performance, corrosion resistance, electrical and magnetic ... and surface analysis techniques for probing the composition and structure of ... microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (FESEM/STEM/EDS); ...

432

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Becoming an NCEM User  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Research New Research Gallery Microscopy Links Becoming an NCEM User Step 1: Submit a proposal Step 2: Before you begin your research Step 3: Instrument qualification Step 4: Accessing NCEM facilities and performing research Step 1: Submit a proposal Deadlines for new proposals are March 15, June 15, September 15, December 15. Access to NCEM facilities is granted to researchers whose proposals are accepted by the NCEM proposal review committee. NCEM users are expected to have a strong background in transmission electron microscopy, and submitted proposals should include evidence of prior electron microscopy experience by the intended operator. Researchers who do not have sufficient experience in electron microscopy may be able to use NCEM facilities through a collaborative project.

433

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Contact NCEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Contact Jane Cavlina National Center for Electron Microscopy, MS 72-150 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Tel.: (510) 486-6036 Fax: (510) 486-5888...

434

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

435

Target-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) can be used to delineate prominent architectonic features in the human brain, but increased contrast is required to visualize more subtle distinctions. The goal ...

Hepler Blackwell, Megan Leticia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Estimating Geometric Dislocation Densities in Polycrystalline Materialsfrom Orientation Imaging Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Herein we consider polycrystalline materials which can be taken as statistically homogeneous and whose grains can be adequately modeled as rigid-plastic. Our objective is to obtain, from orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), estimates of geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities.

Man, Chi-Sing [University of Kentucky; Gao, Xiang [University of Kentucky; Godefroy, Scott [University of Kentucky; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 2.1 Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom Atomic;Chapter 3 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 3.1 Atomic Structure: relates the # of protons and neutrons of intercepts 2 2 1 Reduction not necessary Enclosure (221) #12;Chapter 12 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key

Grunlan, Melissa A.

438

Nuclear Force from Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first lattice QCD result on the nuclear force (the NN potential) is presented in the quenched level. The standard Wilson gauge action and the standard Wilson quark action are employed on the lattice of the size 16^3\\times 24 with the gauge coupling beta=5.7 and the hopping parameter kappa=0.1665. To obtain the NN potential, we adopt a method recently proposed by CP-PACS collaboration to study the pi pi scattering phase shift. It turns out that this method provides the NN potentials which are faithful to those obtained in the analysis of NN scattering data. By identifying the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter wave function with the Schroedinger wave function for the two nucleon system, the NN potential is reconstructed so that the wave function satisfies the time-independent Schroedinger equation. In this report, we restrict ourselves to the J^P=0^+ and I=1 channel, which enables us to pick up unambiguously the ``central'' NN potential V_{central}(r). The resulting potential is seen to posses a clear repulsive core of about 500 MeV at short distance (r < 0.5 fm). Although the attraction in the intermediate and long distance regions is still missing in the present lattice set-up, our method is appeared to be quite promising in reconstructing the NN potential with lattice QCD.

Noriyoshi ISHII; Sinya AOKI; Tetsuo HATSUDA

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Atomic Energy Commission By Alice Buck  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atomic Energy Atomic Energy Commission By Alice Buck July 1983 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Office of the Executive Secretariat Office of History and Heritage Resources 1 Introduction Almost a year after World War II ended, Congress established the United States Atomic Energy Commission to foster and control the peacetime development of atomic science and technology. Reflecting America's postwar optimism, Congress declared that atomic energy should be employed not only in the Nation's defense, but also to promote world peace, improve the public welfare, and strengthen free competition in private

440

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - General Atomics (GA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

general-atomics-ga General general-atomics-ga General Atomics en The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" http://www.pppl.gov/node/1132

American Fusion News Category: 
atomics-ga">General Atomics (GA)
442

Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom.  

SciTech Connect

Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally. Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub J} can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

Hu, S.-M.; Lu, Z.-T.; Yan, Z.-C.; Physics; Univ. of Science and Technology of China; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of New Brunswick

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Test of the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a bosonic gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a trapped bosonic gas can be made observable. Application of continuous feedback control of the center of mass of the atomic cloud is shown to generate oscillations of the spatial extension of the cloud, whose amplitude can be directly used as a characterization of atom-atom correlations. Feedback parameters can be chosen such that the violation of a Schwarz inequality for atom-atom correlations can be tested at noise levels much higher than the standard quantum limit.

D. Ivanov; S. Wallentowitz

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

Narrow-line magneto-optical cooling and trapping of strongly magnetic atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser cooling on weak transitions is a useful technique for reaching ultracold temperatures in atoms with multiple valence electrons. However, for strongly magnetic atoms a conventional narrow-line magneto-optical trap (MOT) is destabilized by competition between optical and magnetic forces. We overcome this difficulty in Er by developing an unusual narrow-line MOT that balances optical and magnetic forces using laser light tuned to the blue side of a narrow (8 kHz) transition. The trap population is spin-polarized with temperatures reaching below 2 microkelvin. Our results constitute an alternative method for laser cooling on weak transitions, applicable to rare-earth-metal and metastable alkaline earth elements.

Berglund, Andrew J; McClelland, Jabez J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Narrow-line magneto-optical cooling and trapping of strongly magnetic atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser cooling on weak transitions is a useful technique for reaching ultracold temperatures in atoms with multiple valence electrons. However, for strongly magnetic atoms a conventional narrow-line magneto-optical trap (MOT) is destabilized by competition between optical and magnetic forces. We overcome this difficulty in Er by developing an unusual narrow-line MOT that balances optical and magnetic forces using laser light tuned to the blue side of a narrow (8 kHz) transition. The trap population is spin-polarized with temperatures reaching below 2 microkelvin. Our results constitute an alternative method for laser cooling on weak transitions, applicable to rare-earth-metal and metastable alkaline earth elements.

Andrew J. Berglund; James L. Hanssen; Jabez J. McClelland

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Los Alamos: MST-MTM: EML: Electron Microscopy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 Electron Microscopy Laboratory, MST-6 MST-6 Home Home In the MSL FEI Tecnai F30 Analytical TEM/STEM JEOL 6300FXV High Resolution SEM JEOL 3000F High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Philips XL30 F Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System Phillips CM30 Transmission Electron Microscope In the Sigma Building JEOL 840 EPMA with Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy FEI Strata DB235 FIB/SEM FEI XL30 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope & Orientation Imaging System CONTACTS Bob Field 665.3938 Pat Dickerson 665.3036 Rob Dickerson 667.6337 Rod McCabe 606.1649 The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory's Capabilities The Electron Microscopy Laboratory (EML) is part of MST-6, the Materials Technology - Metallurgy Group within the Materials Science and Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is a facility dedicated to the characterization of materials primarily through imaging, chemical, and crystallographic analyses of material microstructures with several electron and ion beam instruments. Accessory characterization techniques and equipment include energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS), wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

447

Monitoring atom-atom entanglement and decoherence in a solvable tripartite open system in cavity QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve exactly the dynamics of two strongly-driven two-level atoms resonantly coupled to a dissipative cavity field mode. Starting with the cavity field vacuum state, we show that the entanglement of the atom-atom subsystem cannot be created or increased. On the other hand, when the atoms are initially entangled the atomic Hilbert space divides into two subspaces. One of them is decoherence free so that the initial atomic entanglement remains available for applications, even in presence of a low enough atomic decay rate. In the other subspace a measure of entanglement, decoherence, and also purity, are described by a similar functional behavior that can be monitored by joint atomic measurements. Furthermore, we show the possible generation of Schr\\"odinger-cat-like states for the whole system in the transient regime, as well as of entanglement for the cavity field and the atom-atom subsystems conditioned by measurements on the complementary subsystem.

Bina, Matteo; Lulli, Alfredo; Solano, Enrique

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force Meeting Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force Meeting Agenda FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE - February 26, 2009 Task Force Meeting Agenda February 26, 2009 Task Force Meeting Agenda - CONFERENCE CALL Agenda FEDERAL SMART GRID TASK FORCE CONFERENCE CALL February 26, 2009 10:00-11:00 AM 10:00 Opening and Introduction - Eric Lightner, DOE * Call the meeting to order, around-the-table introductions, review of the agenda, additions to agenda 10:05 Update from DOE - Eric Lightner * Stimulus update * E-Forum * Fact sheet - discussion 10:30 Update from FERC - Ray Palmer, David Andrejcak * NARUC-FERC Smart Grid Collaborative meeting update 10:40 Update from NIST - William Anderson, Jerry FitzPatrick * Interoperability Standards Framework report to Congress

449

Einstein's Dream of Unified Forces - forces | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Do all the forces become one? Do all the forces become one? The International Linear Collider The U.S. is pushing superconducting technology forward for use in future accelerators like the proposed International Linear Collider. (Credit: Fermilab) At the most fundamental level, particles and forces may converge, either through hidden principles like grand unification, or through radical physics like superstring. We already know that remarkably similar mathematical laws and principles describe all the known forces except gravity. Perhaps all forces are different manifestations of a single grand unified force, a force that would relate quarks to leptons and predict new ways of converting one kind of particle into another. Such a force might eventually make protons decay, rendering ordinary matter unstable.

450

The Response of a Stochastically Forced ENSO Model to Observed Off-Equatorial Wind Stress Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the response of a stochastically forced coupled atmosphere–ocean model of the equatorial Pacific to off-equatorial wind stress anomaly forcing. The intermediate-complexity coupled ENSO model comprises a linear, first ...

Shayne McGregor; Neil J. Holbrook; Scott B. Power

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Manhattan Project: Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES (1890s-1939) Events A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 Philosophers of Ancient Greece reasoned that all matter in the universe must be composed of fundamental, unchangeable, and indivisible objects, which they called "atoma" ("ατoµα"). The exact nature of these atoms remained elusive, however, despite centuries of attempts by alchemists to create a "philosopher's stone" that could transmute atoms of lead to gold, prove the Greeks wrong, and make its inventors Modern model of an atom very rich. It was only in the late 1890s and the early twentieth-century that this view of a solid atom, bouncing around the universe like a billiard ball, was replaced by an atom that resembled more a miniature solar system, its electrons orbiting around a small nucleus. Explorations into the nature of the atom from 1919 to 1932 confirmed this new model, especially with Ernest Rutherford's 1919 success in finally transmuting an atom of one substance into another and with James Chadwick's 1932 discovery of the elusive final basic particle of the atom, the neutron. From 1932 to 1938, scientists around the world learned a great deal more about atoms, primarily by bombarding the nuclei of atoms and using a variety of particle accelerators. In 1938, word came from Berlin of the most startling result of them all: the nucleus of an atom could actually be split in two, or "fissioned." This breakthrough was quickly confirmed in the United States and elsewhere. According to the theories of Albert Einstein, the fission of an atom should result in a release of energy. An "atomic bomb" was now no longer just science fiction -- it was a distinct possibility.

452

Nonlinear Response to Anomalous Tropical Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the nonlinear steady-state response of a barotropic model to an estimate of the observed anomalous tropical divergence forcing for the El Niño winter of 1982/83. The 400 mb climatological flow was made a forced solution of ...

R. J. Haarsma; J. D. Opsteegh

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Quantifying cellular traction forces in three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the gels. Analysis of the normal displacement profiles suggests that normal forces play important roles-dimensional (2-D) analysis and interpretation of cell-matrix interactions. Furthermore, these approaches cal allows a more complete analysis of cellular forces than does consideration of only in-plane (2-D

Stein, Derek

454

Work Force Retention Work Group Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Work force Retention Work Group is established to support the Department’s critical focus on maintaining a high-performing work force at a time when a significant number of the workers needed to support DOE’s national security mission are reaching retirement age.

455

Regular Article THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL D Light-pulse atom interferometry in microgravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We describe the operation of a light pulse interferometer using cold 87 Rb atoms in reduced gravity. Using a series of two Raman transitions induced by light pulses, we have obtained Ramsey fringes in the low gravity environment achieved during parabolic flights. With our compact apparatus, we have operated in a regime which is not accessible on ground. In the much lower gravity environment and lower vibration level of a satellite, our cold atom interferometer could measure accelerations with a sensitivity orders of magnitude better than the best ground based accelerometers and close to proven spaced-based ones. PACS. 37.25.+k Atom interferometry techniques – 03.75.Dg Atom and neutron interferometry Atom interferometry is one of the most promising candidates for ultra-accurate measurements of gravito-inertial forces [1], with both fundamental [2–5] and practical (navigation or geodesy) applications. Atom interferometry is most often performed by applying successive coherent beam-splitting and-recombining processes separated by an interrogation time T to a set of particles [6]. Understanding

G. Stern; B. Battelier; R. Geiger; G. Varoquaux; A. Villing; F. Moron; O. Carraz; N. Zahzam; Y. Bidel; W. Chaibi; F. Pereiradossantos; A. Bresson; P. Bouyer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ARM - PI Product - Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in

457

Zero forcing parameters and minimum rank problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zero forcing number Z(G), which is the minimum number of vertices in a zero forcing set of a graph G, is used to study the maximum nullity / minimum rank of the family of symmetric matrices described by G. It is shown that for a connected graph of order at least two, no vertex is in every zero forcing set. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number Z_+(G) is introduced, and shown to be equal to |G|-OS(G), where OS(G) is the recently defined ordered set number that is a lower bound for minimum positive semidefinite rank. The positive semidefinite zero forcing number is applied to the computation of positive semidefinite minimum rank of certain graphs. An example of a graph for which the real positive symmetric semidefinite minimum rank is greater than the complex Hermitian positive semidefinite minimum rank is presented.

Barioli, Francesco; Fallat, Shaun M; Hall, H Tracy; Hogben, Leslie; Shader, Bryan; Driessche, P van den; van der Holst, Hein

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

merged under the newly created parent organization, HQ Air Force Officer and Accession Training School-to-day operations of either organization. In June 2008, HQ AFOATS was redesignated as the Jeanne M. Holm Center,796 new Second Lieutenants who entered active duty in the United States Air Force. Organization Air Force

Su, Xiao

459

Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

M. Jarvinen

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Expanding Professional Horizons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horizons collaboration put him in contact with an environmental study - using atomic force microscopy - examining limestone (calcium carbonate) dissolution and its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic force microscopy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

MSc Plant Biology Future Crops UCD School of Biology & Environmental Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

campus, close to Dublin city centre Extensive range of campus accommodation options. UCD College Ecological Significance of Different Photosynthetic Pathways Biological Atomic Force Microscopy The last

462

The Molecular Foundry - Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiore, R. Cingolani, L. Manna, R. Krahne, "Probe tips functionalized with colloidal nanocrystal tetrapods for high resolution atomic force microscopy imaging", Small, 4, 2123-2126...

463

Quantum Efficiency of Micron Scaled Organic Light Emitting Diodes ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2004 ... Quantum Efficiency of Micron Scaled Organic Light Emitting Diodes Using Atomic Force Electroluminescence Microscopy by L.S.C. Pingree ...

464

CTrigger: Exposing Atomicity Violation Bugs from Their Hiding Places  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the two molecules, broken down by atom, helps the user to understand which atoms of the drug and protein

Lu, Shan

465

Monitoring atom-atom entanglement and decoherence in a solvable tripartite open system in cavity QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a fully analytical solution of the dynamics of two strongly-driven atoms resonantly coupled to a dissipative cavity field mode. We show that an initial atom-atom entanglement cannot be increased. In fact, the atomic Hilbert space divides into two subspaces, one of which is decoherence free so that the initial atomic entanglement remains available for applications, even in presence of a low enough atomic decay rate. In the other subspace a measure of entanglement, decoherence, and also purity, are described by a similar functional behavior that can be monitored by joint atomic measurements. Furthermore, we show the possible generation of Schr\\"odinger-cat-like states for the whole system in the transient regime, as well as of entanglement for the cavity field and the atom-atom subsystems conditioned by measurements on the complementary subsystem.

Matteo Bina; Federico Casagrande; Alfredo Lulli; Enrique Solano

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

466

Swept source optical coherence microscopy for pathological assessment of cancerous tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) with confocal microscopy and enables depth resolved visualization of biological specimens with cellular resolution. OCM offers a suitable ...

Ahsen, Osman Oguz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodman, Miriam B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Atomic-level investigation of the growth of Si/Ge by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

Si and Ge films can be prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by chemical vapor deposition using disilane and digermane as source gases. These gases offer a high sticking probability, and are suitable for atomic layer epitaxy. Using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we have examined the surface processes associated with the heteroepitaxial growth of Ge/Si. The measured surface-induced shifts and chemical shifts of the Si 2p and Ge 3d core levels allow us to identify the surface species and to determine the surface chemical composition, and this information is correlated with the atomic features observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Issues related to precursor dissociation, attachment to dangling bonds, diffusion, surface segregation, growth morphology, and pyrolytic reaction pathways will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

Lin, D. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of (China); Miller, T.; Chiang, T. [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacks with HfO2 dielectrics and TiN electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scanning transmission electron microscopy of gate stacksEELS) in scanning transmission electron microscopy were usedWe use scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)

Agustin, Melody P.; Fonseca, Leo R. C.; Hooker, Jacob C.; Stemmer, Susanne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Harnessed Atom | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » The Harnessed Atom Services » The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased, and up-to-date information on the roles that energy and nuclear science play in our lives. The curriculum includes essential principles and fundamental concepts of energy science. This teacher's kit is an updated and expanded edition of the acclaimed 1985 Harnessed Atom curriculum from the U.S. Department of Energy. It was developed with extensive input from classroom teachers across the country in pilot test reviews and workshops, as well as technical reviews from scientists and experts at universities, professional societies, and

471

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism res...

Maunz, P; Schuster, I; Syassen, N; Pinkse, P W H; Rempe, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Manhattan Project: Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT (1932-1938) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 M. Stanley Livingston and Ernest O. Lawrence in front of a 27-inch cyclotron, Rad Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 1934. In the 1930s, scientists learned a tremendous amount about the structure of the atom by bombarding it with sub-atomic particles. Ernest O. Lawrence's cyclotron, the Cockroft-Walton machine, and the Van de Graaff generator, developed by Robert J. Van de Graaff at Princeton University, were particle accelerators designed to bombard the nuclei of various elements to disintegrate atoms. Attempts of the early 1930s to split atoms, however, required huge amounts of energy because the first accelerators used proton beams and alpha particles as sources of energy. Since protons and alpha particles are positively charged, they Albert Einstein met substantial resistance from the positively charged target nucleus when they attempted to penetrate atoms. Even high-speed protons and alpha particles scored direct hits on a nucleus only approximately once in a million tries. Most simply passed by the target nucleus. Not surprisingly, Ernest Rutherford, Albert Einstein (right), and Niels Bohr regarded particle bombardment as useful in furthering knowledge of nuclear physics but believed it unlikely to meet public expectations of harnessing the power of the atom for practical purposes anytime in the near future. In a 1933 interview, Rutherford called such expectations "moonshine." Einstein compared particle bombardment with shooting in the dark at scarce birds, while Bohr, the Danish Nobel laureate, agreed that the chances of taming atomic energy were remote.

473

Theory of atomic motion in resonant radiation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic motion in resonant and near resonant electromagnetic radiation is investigated theoretically. The exposition begins with a study of atomic motion in a resonant standing light wave, with a view toward isotope separation by selective photodeflection, and proceeds to the investigation of more general problems of atomic motion in resonant radiation. The body of the work consists of six chapters, each of which was prepared as a manuscript for publication in the open literature.

Cook, R.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Method for enhanced atomization of liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for atomizing a slurry or liquid process stream in which a slurry or liquid is passed through a nozzle to provide a primary atomized process stream, an improvement which comprises subjecting the liquid or slurry process stream to microwave energy as the liquid or slurry process stream exits the nozzle, wherein sufficient microwave heating is provided to flash vaporize the primary atomized process stream.

Thompson, Richard E. (27121 Puerta del Oro, Mission Viejo, CA 92691); White, Jerome R. (44755 Wyandotte, Hemet, CA 92544)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

NIST Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). ... Access the Data. ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

476

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Concerns with standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... pair production cross-section in the nuclear field (? n ... upon angle (in f 0 ) and energy (in f ... All general theories make the isolated atom approximation ...

477

Atom Manipulation with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nanostructure from an unknown random collection of atoms without human intervention. ... a set of extensible rules, and allows for error correction. ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

478

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission - written by Alice L. BuckWashington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, July 1983. 41 pp. 

479

Quantization of Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the atomic and nuclear rest masses. Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

F. A. Gareev; G. F. Gareeva; I. E. Zhidkova

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

480

Prospects for Atomic-Scale Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atomic-scale tomography (AST) may be defined as any technique that ... Initial Age Hardening and Nanostructural Evolution in a Cu-Ni-P Alloy.

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481

Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to produce unique single crystals and epitaxial structures that are deposited with atomic-level precision is critical for many applications, such as thermoelectrics,...

482

NIST Unveils Chip-Scale Atomic Clock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 times smaller than any other atomic clock—has ... precise timekeeping in portable, battery-powered devices ... to be operated on batteries) and are ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

483

Schroedinger's Cat in an Atomic Cage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Schroedinger's Cat in an Atomic Cage. ... ``Schroedinger's cat'' soon became a shorthand way to refer to a whole class of superposed states. ...

484

Primary Atomic Frequency Standards at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a set of four quartz oscillators calibrated against the mean solar second [4 ... The cesium oven, operated near 100 C, creates a vapor of atoms that are ...

2001-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

485

NIST Atomic Physics Division 2000 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Although these data are needed for magnetic fusion research, astronomy, and industry, there is ... Physics of Cold, Trapped Gases of Neutral Atoms. ...

486

Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FW96 JR Fuhr and WL Wiese, NIST Atomic Transition Probability Tables, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th ed., DR Lide, ed. CRC ...

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

487

Critically Evaluated Atomic Transition Probabilities for Sulfur ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this new work all ionization stages (except for hydro- genic) are covered. The data are presented in separate tables for each atom and ion. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

488

Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy of Sm-doped ceria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable temperature electrochemical strain microscopy has been used to study the electrochemical activity of Sm-doped ceria as a function of temperature and bias. The electrochemical strain microscopy hysteresis loops have been collected across the surface at different temperatures and the relative activity at different temperatures has been compared. The relaxation behavior of the signal at different temperatures has been also evaluated to relate kinetic process during bias induced electrochemical reactions with temperature and two different kinetic regimes have been identified. The strongly non-monotonic dependence of relaxation behavior on temperature is interpreted as evidence for water-mediated mechanisms.

Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Morozovska, A. N. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Eliseev, E. A. [National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine; Yang, Nan [ORNL; Doria, Sandra [ORNL; Tebano, Antonello [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Kirland Air Force Base wins Robot Rodeo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kirland Air Force Base wins Robot Rodeo Kirland Air Force Base wins Robot Rodeo Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Kirland Air Force Base wins Robot Rodeo Hazardous devices teams test their maneuvering skills July 1, 2013 Students from Valarde Middle School won the video competition in the Best in Show and Middle School categories. They are shown here with sixth-grade teacher Jimmy Lara. During the Robot Rodeo, an unseen operator attempts to conduct reconnaissance and rescue injured personnel Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Kirland Air Force Base wins Robot Rodeo Police and public safety teams from as far away as New Jersey recently convened in Albuquerque to test their ability to remotely deploy robots

490

Casimir force at a knife's edge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Casimir force has been computed exactly for only a few simple geometries, such as infinite plates, cylinders, and spheres. We show that a parabolic cylinder, for which analytic solutions to the Helmholtz equation are ...

Graham, Noah

491

Definition: Forced Outage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forced Outage Forced Outage Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Forced Outage The removal from service availability of a generating unit, transmission line, or other facility for emergency reasons., The condition in which the equipment is unavailable due to unanticipated failure.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Forced_Outage&oldid=480310" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data

492

Halving the Casimir force with conductive oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of Micro- and NanoElectroMechanical Systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the electrostatic force arising from trapped charges overcomes the Casimir attraction, leaving no room for exploitation of Casimir force engineering at ambient conditions. Here we show that, in the presence of a conductive oxide, the Casimir force can be the dominant interaction even in air, and that the use of conductive oxides allows one to reduce the Casimir force up to a factor of 2 when compared to noble metals.

S. de Man; K. Heeck; R. J. Wijngaarden; D. Iannuzzi

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

493

Scattering theory approach to electrodynamic Casimir forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a comprehensive presentation of methods for calculating the Casimir force to arbitrary accuracy, for any number of objects, arbitrary shapes, susceptibility functions, and separations. The technique is applicable ...

Rahi, Sahand Jamal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Weather Noise Forcing of Surface Climate Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model-based method to evaluate the role of weather noise forcing of low-frequency variability of surface properties, including SST, surface currents, land surface temperature, and soil moisture, is presented. In this procedure, an “interactive ...

Edwin K. Schneider; Meizhu Fan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Casimir forces between cylinders at different temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study Casimir interactions between cylinders in thermal nonequilibrium, where the objects as well as the environment are held at different temperatures. We provide the general formula for the force, in a one reflection ...

Golyk, Vladyslav A.

496

Casimir forces in the time domain: Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our previous article [Phys. Rev. A 80, 012115 (2009)] introduced a method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries and for arbitrary materials that was based on a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme. In ...

Johnson, Steven G.

497

On Thermally Forced Circulations over Heated Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of analytical and numerical models is used to gain insight into the dynamics of thermally forced circulations over diurnally heated terrain. Solutions are obtained for two-layer flows (representing the boundary layer and the ...

Daniel J. Kirshbaum

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Casimir Forces On A Silicon Micromechanical Chip  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum fluctuations give rise to van der Waals and Casimir forces that dominate the interaction between electrically neutral objects at sub-micron separations. Under the trend of miniaturization, such quantum electrodynamical effects are expected to play an important role in micro- and nano-mechanical devices. Nevertheless, so far the Casimir force has been experimentally observed only in situations involving an external object manually positioned close to a micromechanical element on a silicon chip. Here, we demonstrate the Casimir effect between two silicon components on the same substrate. In addition to providing an integrated and compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens the possibility of tailoring the Casimir force using lithographically defined components of non-conventional shapes on a single micromechanical chip.

Zou, J. [Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, University of Florida; Marset, zsolt [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rodriguez, A.W. [Harvard University; Reid, M. T.H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); McCauley, A. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Bao, Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Johnson, S. G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Chan, Ho Bun [Hong Kong University of Science & Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Radiative Forcing of Stationary Planetary Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stationary wave components of the planetary-scale circulation are maintained by topographic forcing and by latent and sensible heat transfers and radiation. These waves have a potential vorticity balance mainly due to vertically differential ...

Leo J. Donner; Hsiao-Lan Kuo

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Baroclinic Eddy Equilibration under Specified Seasonal Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy equilibration under a Northern Hemisphere–like seasonal forcing is studied using a modified multilayer quasigeostrophic channel model to investigate the widely used “quick baroclinic eddy equilibration” assumption and to ...

Yang Zhang; Peter H. Stone

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z