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1

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Cancer in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Radiation carcinogenesis was first noted in studies of individuals with occupational or therapeutic exposure to radiation. Data from long-term follow-up studies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have greatly enhanced our knowledge of radiation carcinogenesis. This book presents current results obtained from epidemiological studies and pathological studies on cancer among atomic bomb survivors. It includes a description of the dosimetry system which is currently being revised. Although many of the details about radiation carcinogenesis remain unknown or uncertain, it is clear that the incidence of radiation-induced cancer among atomic bomb survivors continues unabated 40 years after exposure. Recent increases in occupational and environmental exposure to radiation together with the need for a thorough review of radiation protection standards have led to increased recognition of the importance of research on radiation carcinogenesis and risk assessment.

Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief account of the presentations and discussions at the Late Effects Workshop on Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Reserch Society in Minneapolis, MN, on May 32, 1981 is presented. The following five papers are briefly reviewed: 1)Radiobiological significance of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki data by V.P. Bond; 2)Revised Dose Estimates at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by W.E. Loewe; 3)Review of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors by G.D. Kerr; 4)Ichiban: numberoriginal studies, by J. Auxier; and 5)NCRP's involvement in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Dosimetry, by H.O. Wyckoff. (JMT)

Sinclair, W.K. (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Washington, DC); Failla, P.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

City-effects in the atomic bomb survivors data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was investigated how risk estimates derived from the RERF life span study data sets for cancer incidence and mortality, respectively, differ between the two cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the two sexes. This was done by estimating the excess risk ... Keywords: Absolute risk, Atomic bomb survivors, Relative biological effectiveness of neutorons., Relative risk

W. F. Heidenreich; H. G. Paretzke

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Carter, R.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yamakido, Michio [Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Review of dosimetry for the atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes and discusses results of some 1980-1981 studies of neutron and ..gamma..-ray exposure to the atomic bomb survivors by W.E. Loewe and E. Mendelsohn of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, D.C. Kaul and W.H. Scott of Science Applications, Inc., and J.V. Pace of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Some other special studies which are now underway to complete the review will also be discussed. The expert assistance of others in these special studies is being supported in part by the US Department of Energy and in part by the US Defense Nuclear Agency.

Kerr, G.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Prevalence of skin neoplasma amont the atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki who participate in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Adult Health Study (AHS) were examined to define the relationship between skin neoplasms and exposure to ionizing radiation. Careful clinical inspection of the skin was undertaken to detect not only skin cancer but precancerous lesions such as senile keratosis. Five cases of basal cell carcinoma, five cases of senile keratosis and one case of Bowen`s disease were confirmed histologically among 5955 A-bomb survivors for whom Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) dose estimates are available. The relationship between the combined prevalence of skin cancer and precancerous lesions and DS86 dose was examined together with other factors that might affect skin neoplasms including occupational exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, age, sex and city. The prevalence of basal cell carcinoma and senile keratosis increased as the DS86 dose increased. The prevalent of skin cancer and senile keratosis among persons engaged in work involving frequent exposure to UV rays was higher than among those who were not engaged in such work. Sex and city were not significantly related to those skin diseases. Odds ratios of skin neoplasm for a 1-Gy dose, occupational exposure to UV rays and age at time of examination exposure to UV rays and age at time of examination (in 10-year increments) are 1.7, 5.9 and 1.9, respectively. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

Yamada, Michiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Relationship between cataracts and epilation in atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among 1713 atomic bomb survivors who underwent ophthalmological examinations from 1963-1964, the risk of cataract formation per unit dose of radiation was significantly greater for those who reported hair loss of 67% or more after exposure (the epilation group) than for those who reported less or no hair loss (the no-epilation group) (P,0.01). Such an epilation effect has also been associated with leukemia mortality and the frequency of chromosome aberrations. Although this might be interpreted as indicating differential sensitivity to radiation between the epilation group and the no-epilation group, it could also be explained by imprecision in dose estimates. We have calculated that a 48% random error in DS86 dose estimates could be in accordance with the dose-response relationship for the prevalence of cataracts in the epilation group or the no-epilation group. Possible mechanisms for variations in radiosensitivity are discussed. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Neriishi, Kazuo; Otake, Masanori; Kodama, Kazunori [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

CHARACTERISTICS OF ABNORMALITIES OBSERVED IN ATOM-BOMB SURVIVORS  

SciTech Connect

Physical and psychosomatic examinations were performed on 356 A-bomb survivors during the 4-yr period complained of fatigue and vertigo, 118 of whom had had no corresponding explanation. There was no significant change in the blood and bone marrow other than a tendency to a higher incidence of either anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, or their combination, particularly in those who had been exposed at a small distance from the hypocenter. In psychosomatic aspects, almost all the survivors had some complaints such as anxiety, a feeling that their lives were hopeless, and fear of A-bomb effects on their descendants. Bodily complaints seemed to stem from a neurotic basis. Since information on sequelae of A-bomb disease has come mainly from mass communication sources (67%) and also partially from physicians (21%), it should be emphasized that both mass communication sources and physicians must be very cautious in describing the morbid sequelae. (P.C.H.)

Misao, T.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Genetic analysis of children of atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies are under way for the detection of potential genetic effects of atomic bomb radiation at the DNA level in the children of survivors. In a pilot study, we have examined six minisatellites and five microsatellites in DNA derived from 100 families including 124 children. We detected a total of 28 mutations in three minisatellite loci. The mean mutation rates per locus per gamete in the six minisatellite loci were 1.5% for 65 exposed gametes for which mean parental gonadal dose was 1.9 Sv and 2.0% for 183 unexposed gamates. We detected four mutations in two tetranucleotide repeat sequences but no mutations in three trinucleotide repeat sequences. The mean mutation rate per locus per gamete was 0% for the exposed gametes and 0.5% for the unexposed gametes in the five microsatellite loci. No significant differences in the mutation rates between the exposed and the unexposed gametes were detected in these repetitive sequences. Additional loci are being analyzed to increase the power of our study to observe a significant difference in the mutation rates at the 0.05 level of significance. 54 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Satoh, Chiyoko; Takahashi, Norio; Asakawa, Jun-ichi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Phagocytic and bactericidal activities of leukocytes in whole blood from atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the phagocytic and bactericidal activities of peripheral blood leukocytes from Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors for Staphylococcus aureus. The data were analyzed by multiple linear regression for age, sex, radiation exposure, city of exposure, and neutrophil counts. No significant radiation effect was observed for either blood phagocytic or bactericidal activities. The only significant variable for these functions was the neutrophil count.

Sasagawa, S.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Toyota, E.; Neriishi, S.; Yamakido, M.; Matsuo, M.; Hosoda, Y.; Finch, S.C. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Estimation of radiation doses for atomic-bomb survivors in the Hiroshima University Registry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study presents the Hiroshima University Registry of atomic bomb survivors, of which the total number is about 270,000, and application of absorbed doses. From this registry, we picked up 49,102 survivors and applied organ doses based on the dosimetry system 1986 (DS86), which is named the Atomic Bomb Survivor 1993 Dose (ABS93D). The applied dose data are based on the tables listed in the DS86 final report such as the free-in-air kermas, the house shielding factors, and organ dose factors for the active bone marrow and the breast. Calculations for the 13 other organs provided in DS86 are possible. To obtained the organ doses for each survivor, it is necessary to obtain information concerning (1) place exposed, (2) whether they were shielded or not, and (3) age. ABS93D body transmission factors for active bone marrow for neutrons and gamma rays agreed with DS 86 to within a few percent. Of the survivors studied, 35, 123 of them were used for the relative risk estimation of leukemia mortality, adopting the same method as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) for comparison. For the observation period from 1968 to 1989, the analyzed relative risks for leukemia mortality at 1 Gy by shielded kerm and by active bone marrow dose are 2.01 and 2.37, respectively, which are consistent with the RERF results. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Hoshi, M.; Matsuura, M.; Hayakawa, N.; Kamada, N. [Hiroshima Univ., Kasumi (Japan); Ito, C. [Hiroshima A-bomb Casualty Council Health Management Promotion Center, Senda-machi Naka-ku (Japan)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

SciTech Connect

This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual.

Shimizu, Y.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Incidence of female breast cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-1985  

SciTech Connect

An incidence survey among atomic bomb survivors identified 807 breast cancer cases, and 20 second breast cancers. As in earlier surveys of the Life Span Study population, a strongly linear radiation dose response was found, with the highest dose-specific excess relative risk (ERR) among survivors under 20 years old at the time of the bombings. Sixty-eight of the cases were under 10 years old at exposure, strengthening earlier reports of a marked excess risk associated with exposure during infancy and childhood. A much lower, but marginally significant, dose response was seen among women exposed at 40 years and older. It was not possible, however to discriminate statistically between age at exposure and age at observation for risk as the more important determinant of ERR per unit dose. A 13-fold ERR at 1 Sv was found for breast cancer occurring before age 35, compared to a 2-fold excess after age 35, among survivors exposed before age 20. This a posteriori finding, based on 27 exposed, known-dose, early-onset cases, suggests the possible existence of a susceptible genetics subgroup. Further studies, involving family histories of cancer and investigations at the molecular level, are suggested to determine whether such a subgroup exists. 41 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Tokunaga, Masayoshi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Municipal Hospital (Japan); Land, C.E. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Tokuoka, Shoji; Akiba, Suminori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Nishimori, Issei; Soda, Midori [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Copyright ? The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences ? BRIEF COMMUNICATION? Biological Profiles of Korean Atomic Bomb Survivors in Residence at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1945, many Koreans, in addition to Japanese, were killed or injured by the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. This study compared the biological profiles of Korean atomic bomb survivors in residence at Daegu and Kyungbuk, Republic of Korea with those of a representative sample of Koreans obtained during a similar period. We evaluated anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood cell counts, blood chemistry, and urinalysis of survivors (n=414) and age- and sex-matched controls (n=414) recruited from the third Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2005. Univariate analyses revealed significantly higher systolic blood pressure, white blood cell count, and serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and aspartate aminotransferase levels (patomic bomb survivors were adversely affected by radiation exposure.

Republic Of Korea; Hyung-joon Jhun; Byoung-gwon Kim; Bon-min Koo; Jin-kook Kim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large, fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P . 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A.; Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cancer of the head and neck in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1957-1976  

SciTech Connect

A search was conducted in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for all cases of cancer of the lip, nose and nasal cavity, accessory sinuses, larynx, and the oral cavity and pharynx with their subdivisions occurring during the period 1957-1976 among a large fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors. A total of 232 cases were identified, of which 154 (66.4%) were histologically confirmed (definite cases). Among definite cases, cancer of the epiglottis and larynx predominated (31.2%), followed by accessory sinus (24.7%) and tongue (18.8%). Of the 154 definite cases, 141 (91.6%) were squamous-cell carcinomas. Only two sarcomas were identified, neither of which was attributable to radiation exposure. Analysis of both total and definite cases, by both total group and major anatomic site, failed to reveal definite evidence of a radiation relationship. Although a suggestive relationship to radiation dose was found for accessory sinus cancers (P = 0.06) among the definite cases, inconsistencies in the data do not permit the conclusion that the incidence of tumors in this group increased as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure. The medical literature concerning post-irradiation head and neck tumors is briefly reviewed.

Pinkston, J.A. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima-Nagasaki, Japan); Wakabayashi, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Asano, M.; Harada, Y.; Kumagami, H.; Takeuchi, M.

1981-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Salivary gland tumors in atomic bomb survivors, Hiroshima, Japan. II. Pathologic study and supplementary epidemiologic observations  

SciTech Connect

A pathological investigation was undertaken in Hiroshima on cases seen between 1945 and 1971 to determine the relationship between salivary gland tumors and exposure to atomic (A) bomb radiation. Of the 208 cases of histologically confirmed salivary gland tumors, 62 were A-bomb survivors and 146 were nonexposed. The relative risk based on the rate in the nonexposed for malignant tumors of salivary glands among the exposed in Hiroshima Prefecture was 11.0, while that of the submaxillary gland was 13.8 and that of the parotid gland was 9.8. They were all highly significant by X/sub 2/ test (P less than 0.001). The latent period of malignant salivary gland tumors was shorter in the exposed than in the nonexposed. Four cases of benign salivary gland tumor, all being benign mixed tumors of the parotid gland, were observed in children whose parents had been exposed. The incidence of mixed tumors of the salivary gland among the exposed in Hiroshima City was 2.0 times higher than that among the nonexposed and showed a tendency to increase with proximity to the hypocenter (P less than 0.01).

Takeichi, N.; Hirose, F.; Yamamoto, H.; Ezaki, H.; Fujikura, T.

1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered.

Yoshimoto, Y. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cataract in atomic bomb survivors based on a threshold model and the occurrence of severe epilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report re-examines the relationship of radiation dose to the occurrence of cataracts among 1742 a-bomb survivors seen in the years 1963-1964 for whom the degree of epilation and Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) doses are known. Of these, 67 had cataracts.

Otake, Masanori; Neriishi, K.; Schull, W.J. [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan); Neriishi, Kazuo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Schull, W.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Akiba, S. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Height reduction among prenatally exposed atomic-bomb survivors: A longitudinal study of growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a random coefficient regression model, sex-specific longitudinal analyses of height were made on 801 (392 male and 409 female) atomic-bomb survivors exposed in utero to detect dose effects on standing height. The data set resulted from repeated measurements of standing height of adolescents (age 10-18 y). The dose effect, if any, was assumed to be linear. Gestational ages at the time of radiation exposure were divided into trimesters. Since an earlier longitudinal data analysis has demonstrated radiation effects on height, the emphasis in this paper is on the interaction between dose and gestational age at exposure and radiation effects on the age of occurrence of the adolescent growth spurt. For males, a cubic polynomial growth-curve model applied to the data was affected significantly by radiation. The dose by trimester interaction effect was not significant. The onset of adolescent growth spurt was estimated at about 13 y at 0 Gy. There was no effect of radiation on the adolescent growth spurt For females, a quadratic polynomial growth-curve model was fitted to the data. The dose effect was significant, while the dose by trimester interaction was again not significant. 27 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Nakashima, Eiji; Funamoto, Sachiyo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Carter, R.L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The cohort of the atomic bomb survivors major basis of radiation safety regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1950 about 87 000 A-bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been monitored within the framework of the Life Span Study, to quantify radiation-induced late effects. In terms of incidence and mortality, a statistically significant excess was found for leukemia and solid tumors. In another major international effort, neutron and gamma radiation doses were estimated, for those survivors (Dosimetry System DS02). Both studies combined allow the deduction of risk coefficients that serve as a basis for international safety regulations. As an example, current results on all solid tumors combined suggest an excess relative risk of 0.47 per Sievert for an attained age of 70 years, for those who were exposed at an age of 30 years. After exposure to an effective dose of one Sievert the solid tumor mortality would thus be about 50% larger than that expected for a similar cohort not exposed to any ionizing radiation from the bombs.

Rühm, W; Nekolla, E A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Delayed immunologic effects of low dose radiation in Japanese A-bomb survivors. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on a project to analyze the level of circulating immune complexes in atomic bomb survivors. (ACR)

Makinodan, Takashi; Bloom, E.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part IV: Comparison of cancer incidence and mortality  

SciTech Connect

This report compares cancer incidence and mortality among atomic bomb survivors in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Life Span Study (LSS) cohort. Because the incidence data are derived from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, case ascertainment is limited to the time (1958-1987) and geographic restrictions (Hiroshima and Nagasaki) of the registries, whereas mortality data are available from 1950-1987 anywhere in Japan. With these conditions, there were 9,014 first primary incident cancer cases identified among LSS cohort members compared with 7,308 deaths for which cancer was listed as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. When deaths were limited to those occurring between 1958-1987 in Hiroshima or Nagasaki, there were 3,155 more incident cancer cases overall, and 1,262 more cancers of the digestive system. For cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, skin, breast, female and male genital organs, urinary system and thyroid, the incidence series was at least twice as large as the comparable mortality series. Although the incidence and mortality data are dissimilar in many ways, the overall conclusions regarding which solid cancers provide evidence of a significant dose response generally confirm the mortality findings. When either incidence or mortality data are evaluated, significant excess risks are observed for all solid cancers, stomach, colon, liver (when it is defined as primary liver cancer or liver cancer not otherwise specified on the death certificate), lung, breast, ovary and urinary bladder. No significant radiation effect is seen for cancers of the pharynx, rectum, gallbladder, pancreas, nose, larynx, uterus, prostate or kidney in either series. There is evidence of a significant excess of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the incidence data, but not in the mortality series. 19 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part III: Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma, 1950-1987  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an analysis of data on the incidence of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors during the period from late 1950 through the end of 1987 (93,696 survivors accounting for 2,778,000 person-years). These analyses add 9 additional years of follow-up for leukemia and 12 for myeloma to that in the last comprehensive reports on these diseases. This is the first analysis of the lymphoma incidence data in the cohort. Using both the Leukemia Registry and the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, a total of 290 leukemia, 229 lymphoma and 73 myeloma cases were identified. The primary analyses were restricted to first primary tumors diagnosed among residents of the cities or surrounding areas with Dosimetry Systems 1986 dose estimates between 0 and 4 Gy kerma (231 leukemias, 208 lymphomas and 62 myelomas). Analyses focused on time-dependent models for the excess absolute risk. Separate analyses were carried out for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and adult T-cell leukemia in this population. There was strong evidence of radiation-induced risks for all subtypes except ATL, and there were significant subtype differences with respect to the effects of age at exposure and sex and in the temporal pattern of risk. The AML dose-response function was nonlinear, whereas there was no evidence against linearity for the other subtypes. When averaged over the follow-up period, the excess absolute risk (EAR) estimates (in cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) for the leukemia subtypes were 0.6, 1.1 and 0.9 for ALL, AML and CML, respectively. The corresponding estimated average excess relative risks at 1 Sv are 9.1, 3.3 and 6.2, respectively. There was some evidence of an increased risk of lymphoma in males (EAR = 0.6 cases per 10[sup 4] PY Sv) but no evidence of any excess in females. 64 refs., 14 figs., 19 tabs.

Preston, D.L.; Izumi, Shizue; Kusumi, Shizuyo (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Tomonaga, Masao (A-bomb Institute of Nagasaki Univ. (Japan)); Ron, E. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Kuramoto, Atsushi; Kamada, Nanao (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)); Dohy, Hiroo (Hiroshima A-bomb Hospital (Japan)); Matsui, Tatsuki (Nagasaki City Hospital (Japan)); Nonaka, Hiroaki (George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Radiation-related posterior lenticular opacities in Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors based on the DS86 dosimetry system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the quantitative relationship of ionizing radiation to the occurrence of posterior lenticular opacities among the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki suggested by the DS86 dosimetry system. DS86 doses are available for 1983 (93.4%) of the 2124 atomic bomb survivors analyzed in 1982. The DS86 kerma neutron component for Hiroshima survivors is much smaller than its comparable T65DR component, but still 4.2-fold higher (0.38 Gy at 6 Gy) than that in Nagasaki (0.09 Gy at 6 Gy). Thus, if the eye is especially sensitive to neutrons, there may yet be some useful information on their effects, particularly in Hiroshima. The dose-response relationship has been evaluated as a function of the separately estimated gamma-ray and neutron doses. Among several different dose-response models without and with two thresholds, we have selected as the best model the one with the smallest x2 or the largest log likelihood value associated with the goodness of fit. The best fit is a linear gamma-linear neutron relationship which assumes different thresholds for the two types of radiation. Both gamma and neutron regression coefficients for the best fitting model are positive and highly significant for the estimated DS86 eye organ dose.

Otake, M.; Schull, W.J. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part I: Use of the tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for incidence studies  

SciTech Connect

More than 30 years ago, population-based tumor registries were established in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This report, the first of a series of papers on cancer incidence, describes methodological aspects of the tumor registries and discusses issues of data quality in the context of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, the major atomic bomb survivor population. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are characterized by active case ascertainment based on abstraction of medical records at area hospitals, augmented by tissue registries operational in the area and a number of clinical and pathological programs undertaken over the years among the atomic bomb survivors. Using conventional measures of quality, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries have a death certificate-only (DCO) rate of less than 9%, a mortality/incidence (M/I) ratio of about 50%, and a histological verification (HV) rate in excess of 70%, which place these registries among the best in Japan and comparable to many established registries worldwide. All tumor registry data pertaining to the LSS population were assembled, reviewed and handled with special attention given to the quality and uniformity of data based on standardized procedures. Special studies and monitoring programs were also introduced to evaluate the quality of the tumor incidence data in the LSS. Analyses were performed to examine the quality of incidence data overall and across various substrata used for risk assessment such as age, time and radiation dose groups. No significant associations were found between radiation dose and data quality as measured by various indices. These findings warrant the use of the present tumor registry-based data for studies of cancer incidence in the atomic bomb survivors. 41 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, D.L. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Ron, E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sumio (Hiroshima Perfectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)); Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Somatic cell mutations at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes of atomic bomb survivors: Implications for radiation carcinogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To clarify the relationship between somatic cell mutations and radiation exposure, the frequency of hemizygous mutant erythrocytes at the glycophorin A (GPA) locus was measured by flow cytometry for 1,226 heterozygous atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors in HIroshima and Nagasaki. For statistical analysis, both GPA mutant frequency and radiation dose were log-transformed to normalize skewed distributions of these variables. The GPA mutant frequency increased slightly but significantly with age at testing and with the number of cigarettes smoked. Also, mutant frequency was significantly higher in males than in females even with adjustment for smoking and was higher to Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. These characteristics of background GPA mutant frequency are qualitatively similar to those of background solid cancer incidence or mortality obtained from previous epidemiological studies of survivors. An analysis of the mutant frequency dose response using a descriptive model showed that the doubling dose is about 1.20 Sv [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-1.56], whereas the minimum dose for detecting a significant increase in mutant frequency is about 0.24 Sv (95% CI: 0.041-0.51). No significant effects of sex, city or age at the time of exposure on the dose response were detected. Interestingly, the doubling dose of the GPA mutant frequency was similar to that of solid cancer incidence in A-bomb survivors. This observation is in line with the hypothesis that radiation-induced somatic cell mutations are the major cause of excess cancer risk after radiation. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Kyoizumi, Seishi; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Tanabe, Kazumi; Hirai, Yuko; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Umeki, Shigeko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero or as young children, October 1950 - May 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer mortality for the period from October 1950 through May 1992 was analyzed in atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero. Risk estimates for this group were also compared to those for survivors who were less than 6 years old at the time of exposure. The cohorts studied include 807 in utero survivors and 5,545 persons exposed during childhood with all members of both groups having estimated doses of at least 0.01 Sv. The comparison group includes 10,453 persons with little (<0.01 Sv) or no exposure. Analyses were limited mainly to cancer deaths occurring between the ages of 17 and 46. Only 10 cancer deaths were observed among persons exposed in utero. However, there is a significant dose response with an estimate of excess relative risk per sievert (ERR/Sv) of 2.1 (90% confidence interval of 0.2 to 6.0). This estimate does not differ significantly from that for survivors exposed during the first 5 years of life. The cancer deaths among those exposed during the first 5 years of life. 23 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Delongchamp, R.R.; Preston, D.L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Prevalence rate of thyroid diseases among autopsy cases of the atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima, 1951-1985  

SciTech Connect

To examine the radiogenic risk of latent thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma, colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis, the date for 3821 subjects collected in the course of autopsies of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima from 1951 to 1985 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) were analyzed using a logistic model. About 80% of the autopsies were performed at RERF and the remainder at local hospitals. The frequencies of the above diseases were not associated with whether the underlying cause of death was cancer. However, note that our results may be influenced by potentially biasing factors associated with autopsy selection. The relative frequency of latent thyroid cancer (greatest dimension {le}1.5 cm but detectable on a routine microscopic slide of the thyroid gland) increased as the radiation dose increased and was about 1.4-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. The relative occurrence of thyroid adenoma also increased as radiation dose increased, and was about 1.5-fold greater at 1 Gy than in the 0-Gy dose group. Sex, age at the time of the bombing or period of observation did not significantly modify the radiogenic risks for thyroid adenoma or latent thyroid cancer. No statistically significant association was found between radiation exposure and the rates of colloid/adenomatous goiter and chronic thyroiditis. The possible late effect of atomic bomb radiation on the frequency of benign thyroid diseases is discussed on the basis of these data. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Ezaki, Haruo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Etoh, Ryozo [Fukuyama Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Toshio [Kawaishi Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Akiba, Suminori [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Studies of the mortality of atomic bomb survivors. Report 12, Part I. Cancer: 1950-1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This continues the series of periodic general reports on cancer mortality in the cohort of A-bomb survivors followed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The follow-up is extended by the 5 years 1986-1990, and analysis includes an additional 10,500 survivors with recently estimated radiation doses. Together these extensions add about 550,000 person-years of follow-up. The cohort analyzed consists of 86,572 subjects, of which about 60% have dose estimates of at least 0.005 Sv. During 1950-1990 there have been 3086 and 4741 cancer deaths for the less than and greater than 0.005 Sv groups, respectively. It is estimated that among these there have been approximately 420 excess cancer deaths during 19509-1990, of which about 85 were due to leukemia, For cancers other than leukemia (solid cancers), about 25% of the excess deaths in 1950-1990 occurred during the last 5 years; for those exposed as children this figure is nearly 50%. For leukemia only about 3% of the excess deaths in 1950-1990 occurred in th last 5 years. Whereas most of the excess for leukemia occurred in the first 15 years after exposure, for solid cancers the pattern of excess risk in apparently more like alife-long elevation of the natural age-specific cancer risk. 29 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

Pierce, D.A.; Shimizu, Y.; Preston, D.L. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Levels of parathyroid hormone and calcitonin in serum among atomic bomb survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To examines the potential causes of increased levels of calcium in serum with increasing dose of atomic bomb radiation, which was obtained from the previous preliminary analysis, levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitonin in serum were examined among 1459 subjects in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. A significant effect of radiation on levels of calcium, PTH and calcitonin in serum was found, even after patients with hyperparathyroidism were excluded. The level of calcium in serum increased with radiation dose; this can be explained partly by the increase in the level of PTH with radiation dose. However, the dose effect on calcium remained even after adjustment for PTH, calcitonin and confounding factors such as renal function, serum albumin level and medication. Parathyroid hormone increased initially by 6.8% per gray, but the dose response leveled off after about 1 Gy. The level of calcitonin increased with radiation dose, probably in part due to feedback mechanisms stimulated by the increase in calcium. However, after adjustment for the level of calcium, the increase in the level of calcitonin with dose was still found. Although the etiological mechanisms of the effect of radiation on serum levels of calcium, PTH and calcitonin are unclear, radiation exposure may affect secretion of PTH and calcitonin and regulation of calcium a long time after atomic bomb exposure. 21 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Fujiwara, Saeko; Yokoyama, Naokata; Sasaki, Hideo; Kodama, Kazunori; Sposto, R.; Shimaoka, Katsutaro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation (Japan); Shiraki, Mastaka [Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital (Japan)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Radiosensitivity of skin fibroblasts from atomic bomb survivors with and without breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

Fibroblasts were established in vitro from skin biopsies obtained from 55 women and 1 man with or without breast cancer and with or without exposure to radiation from the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima. The radiosensitivity of these cells was evaluated by clonogenic assays after exposure to X-rays or to fission neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf source. Data were fitted to a multitarget model, S/S0 = A (1 - (1 - ekD)N), for both X-ray and neutron dose-survival curves. A single hit model, S/S0 = AekD, fits the neutron dose-survival responses as well. There were no differences in the means or variances of radiosensitivity between exposed and nonexposed groups or between patients with or without breast cancer. Hence, although the sample is not large, it provides no support for the hypothesis that atomic bomb radiation preferentially induces breast cancer in women whose cells in vitro are sensitive to cell killing by radiation.

Ban, S.; Setlow, R.B.; Bender, M.A.; Ezaki, H.; Hiraoka, T.; Yamane, M.; Nishiki, M.; Dohi, K.; Awa, A.A.; Miller, R.C. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Departments of Medicine and Statistics, Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 25 years after the atomic bombings of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the late effects of radiation on the health of the survivors are still incompletely known. However, the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) continues to monitor moribidity and mortality of A-bomb survivors. The ABCC is a binational endeavor; the parent organizations are the U.S. National

Joseph L. Belsky; Kiyoshi Tachikawa; Seymour Jablon

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Prevalence of uterine myoma detected by ultrasound examination in the atomic bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Benign tumors of several organs have been demonstrated to occur as late effects of atomic bomb exposure, and a recent addition to the list of affected organs in the uterus. The increased incidence of uterine myoma noted in Radiation Effects Research Foundation (REFR) Adult Health Study Report 7, however, was based on self-reported information, optional gynecological examination and patient-requested ultrasound examination. Thus the possibility of dose-related bias in case detection was a serious concern. Therefore, the relationship between the prevalence of uterine myoma and dose to the uterus was examined after excluding as much bias as possible by asking all women who had undergone biennial examinations from December 1991 through December 1993 to undergo ultrasound examinations. Among 2506 female participants in Hiroshima, the uterus was visualized by ultrasound examination in 1190, and 238 were found to have uterine nodules. Multiple logistic analysis using Dosimetry System 1986 uterine doses revealed a significant dose response for the prevalence of uterine nodules. The odds ratio at 1 Gy was 1.61 (95% confidence interval: 1.12-2.31). It is unlikely that the observed relationship after adjusting for bladder filling, volume of the uterus, age and menopause status was the result of dose-related bias. These results support previous findings at RERF and provide further evidence that radiation exposure is one of the factors associated with uterine myoma. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Kawamura, Sachiko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Kodama, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Saeko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Relationship of five anthropometric measurements at age 18 to radiation dose among atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero  

SciTech Connect

Five body measurements-standing height, body weight, sitting height, chest circumference and intercristal diameter-of 18-year-old atomic bomb survivors exposed in utero in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were analyzed in relation to DS86 uterine dose. Age in utero was divided into four periods: 0-7, 8-15, 16-25 and [>=]26 weeks. This categorization is based upon the study of radiation-induced brain damage. The linear regression analyses for these five variables showed significant decreases with increasing dose. The regression coefficients were -2.65 cm/Gy for standing height, -2.46 kg/Gy for body weight, -0.92 cm/Gy for sitting height, -1.37 cm/Gy for chest circumference and -0.32 cm/Gy for intercristal diameter. The multivariate test statistic for the overall dose effect on five body measurements was significant, but the interaction between dose and gestational period was not significant. Principal-component analysis was applied to the five variables. For the first-component scores, the dose effect was significant, but the interaction between dose and gestational period was not significant. For the second-component scores, the dose effect was significant specifically at 0.7 weeks. The radiation dose effect on the second principal component found at 0-7 weeks of gestation suggests that malformation occur in this period. 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Nakashima, Eiji (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Minami-ku (Japan))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

Kerr, G.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sharing the atom bomb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shaken by the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and fearful that the American atomic monopoly would spark an arms race, Dean Acheson led a push in 1946 to place the bomb-indeed, all atomic energy-under international control. But as the memories of wartime collaboration faded, relations between the superpowers grew increasingly tense, and the confrontational atmosphere undid his proposal. Had Acheson succeeded, the Cold War might not have been. 2 figs.

Chace, J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survivors of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki asin Japanese atomic bomb survivors at Hiroshima was conductedin the atomic bomb victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 148

Harkewicz, Laura J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs.

Howe, G.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Radioepidemiology of the A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

Estimation of the risk of cancer and other health effects following exposure to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki remains largely empirical and the models used to adduce risk incorporate few, if any, of the advances in molecular biology of the past decade or so. These facts compromise the estimation of risk where the epidemiologic data are weakest, namely, at low doses and dose rates. Although the risk estimates may be sufficient for regulatory purposes, without a better understanding of the molecular and cellular events ionizing radiation initiates or promotes, it seems unlikely that the estimates will be as intellectually satisfying as they might be. Nor will the situation improve further without attention to the identification and estimation of the effects of these host and environmental factors that enhance or diminish risk of cancer or the effects on the developing brain. 14 refs., 1 tab.

Schull, W.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Increased frequency of CD4{sup -}8{sup -}T cells bearing T-cell receptor {alpha}{beta} chains in peripheral blood of atomic bomb survivors exposed to high doses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rare T-cell subpopulation, CD4{sup -z}8{sup -}{alpha}{beta} cells, may be differentiated through a pathway (or pathways) different from the pathway(s) of conventional CD4+ or CD8+ cells. In the present study, the frequencies of CD4{sup -}8{sup -} T cells in peripheral-blood {alpha}{beta} T cells in 409 atomic bomb survivors were determined to investigate late effects of radiation on the composition of human T-cell subpopulations. The frequency of CD4{sup -}8{sup -}{alpha}{beta} T-cell decreased significantly with the subject`s age and was higher in females than males. A significant increase in the frequency was found in the survivors exposed to more than 1.5Gy, suggesting that the previous radiation exposure altered differentiation and development of T cells. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Yoichiro Kusunoki; Seishi Kyoizumi; Yuko Hirai; Shoichiro Fujita; Mitoshi Akiyama [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiation-induced cancer and its modifying factor among A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, have conducted a long-term follow-up study of a cohort of 120,000 atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors and non-exposed controls since 1950. The most recent findings regarding cancer mortality and incidence in this cohort can be briefly summarized as follows: 1) An increase in leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors peaked 5-6 years after the bombing and has decreased with time thereafter. In addition to leukemia, the incidence of cancer of the lung, breast, esophagus, stomach, colon, thyroid, ovary, urinary tract, and multiple myeloma increases with dose. At present, there is no indication of an increase in cancer of the rectum or uterus among A-bomb survivors. In general, radiation-induced solid cancers begin to appear after the age at which they are normally prone to develop, and have continued to increase with time in proportion to the natural increase in mortality of the control group. 2) There are factors which modify the effects of radiation, such as age at the time of bombing (ATB) and sex. Sensitivity to radiation, in terms of cancer induction, is higher for persons who were young ATB in general, than for those who were older ATB. 3) There was no increase in childhood cancer among those exposed while in utero, but there is a recent indication of an increase in cancer incidence among these persons as they age. 4) There seems to be no interaction in a multiplicative way between radiation and smoking and lung cancer induction.

Kato, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Immune responses to epstein-barr virus in atomic bomb survivors: Study of precursor frequency of cytotoxic lymphocytes and titer levels of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precursor frequencies of cytotoxic lymphocytes to autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells and serum titers of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-related antibodies were measured in 68 atomic bomb survivors to clarify the immune mechanism controlling Epstein-Barr virus infection. The precursor frequency was negatively correlated with the titer of anti-early antigen lgG, which is probably produced at the stage of viral reactivation. A positive correlation between the precursor frequency and titer of anti-Epstein-Barr virus-associated nuclear antigen antibody was also observed, indicating that the precursor frequency reflects the degree of in vivo destruction by T cells of the virus-infected cells. These results suggest that T-cell memory specific to Epstein-Barr virus keeps the virus under control and that the precursor frequency assay is useful for the evaluation of immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus. However, no significant effect of atomic bomb radiation on the precursor frequency was observed in the present study, probably due to the limited number of participants. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Saito, Mayumi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Hirai, Yuko; Akiyama, Mitoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Fukuda, Yasuko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) Children's Hospital Medical Center of Northern California, Oakland, CA (United States)); Huang, Hua (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb This report is an account of work on the atomic bomb. The Manhattan Project: Making the...

48

Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The observed relationship between the occurrence of acute radiation effects and leukemia mortality among A-bomb survivors  

SciTech Connect

In an analysis of a follow-up study of a fixed population of 73,330 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the slope of an estimated dose response between ionizing radiation and leukemia mortality was found to be steeper (P less than 0.002), by a factor of 2.4, among those who reported epilation within 60 days of the bombings, compared to those who did not experience this sign of acute radiation exposure. The strength of this empirical finding as evidence of biological association in individual radiosensitivity for these two end points is studied here. The major factor complicating the interpretation of this finding as evidence of such an association is the degree of imprecision of the radiation dosimetry system used in assignment of radiation doses to the A-bomb survivors. Using models recently suggested for dealing with dosimetry errors in epidemiological analysis of the A-bomb survivor data, the sensitivity of the apparent association between leukemia mortality and severe epilation to the assumed level of dosimetry error is investigated.

Neriishi, K.; Stram, D.O.; Vaeth, M.; Mizuno, S.; Akiba, S. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Manhattan Project: Making of the Atomic Bomb | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home The Manhattan Project: Making of the Atomic Bomb The Manhattan Project: Making of the Atomic...

51

The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect

This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

Gosling, F.G.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

President Roosevelt Approves Production of Atomic Bomb | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Approves Production of Atomic Bomb | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

53

President Roosevelt Approves Production of Atomic Bomb | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Approves Production of Atomic Bomb | National Nuclear Approves Production of Atomic Bomb | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Roosevelt Approves Production of Atomic Bomb President Roosevelt Approves Production of Atomic Bomb January 19, 1942 Washington, DC President Roosevelt Approves Production of Atomic Bomb

54

Manhattan Project: The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF NAGASAKI Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF NAGASAKI (Nagasaki, Japan, August 9, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 The next break in the weather over Japan was due to appear just three days after the attack on Hiroshima, to be followed by at least five more days of prohibitive weather. The plutonium implosion bomb, nicknamed "Fat Man," was rushed into readiness to take advantage of this window. No further orders were required for the attack. Truman's order of July 25th had authorized the dropping of additional bombs as soon as they were ready. At 3:47 a.m. on August 9, 1945, a B-29 named Bock's Car lifted off from Tinian and headed toward the primary target: Kokura Arsenal, a massive collection of war industries adjacent to the city of Kokura.

55

Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb F.G. Gosling. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. DOE/MA-0002 Revised. Washington, D.C.: Department of Energy, 2010. 115 pp., with 38 pp. photo gallery). From the Forward to the 2010 Edition: "In a national survey at the turn of the millennium, journalists and historians ranked the dropping of the atomic bomb and the surrender of Japan to end the Second World War as the top story of the twentieth century. The advent of nuclear weapons, brought about by the Manhattan Project, not only helped bring an end to World War II but ushered in the atomic age and determined how the next war-the Cold War-would be fought. The Manhattan Project also became the organizational model behind

56

Manhattan Project: Order to Drop the Atomic Bomb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ORDER TO DROP THE ATOMIC BOMB Handy to Spaatz, National Archives (July 25, 1945) Resources > Library The document below is the order to attack Japanese cities with atomic bombs. In it, the Acting Army Chief of Staff, Thomas Handy, orders Commanding General Carl Spaatz, Army Strategic Air Forces, to "deliver [the] first special bomb as soon as weather will permit . . . after about 3 August 1945." The target list: "Hiroshima, Kokura, Niigata, and Nagasaki." Further attacks were also authorized: "additional bombs will be delivered on the above targets as soon as made ready." Handy was the acting chief of staff because George Marshall was with President Harry S. Truman at the Potsdam Conference. The letter explicitly notes that this order was approved by Marshall and Secretary of War Henry Stimson. Truman, of course, provided the ultimate authorization for dropping the bomb.

57

Thermoluminescence dosimetry of gamma rays from the atomic bomb at Hiroshima using the predose technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of gamma rays produced by the atomic bomb in Hiroshima were made by the predose technique using eight ceramic samples collected from five buildings located at distances between 1271 and 2051 m from the hypocenter. The results of our measurements are compared to both the newer dose estimates (Dosimetry System 1986) and older dose estimates (Tentative 1965 Doses) for survivors of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. In comparison with the older estimates, our results are larger by a factor of 2.3 at 1271 m and 3.9 at 2051 m. Our results and the newer estimates for Hiroshima differ by a factor of only 1.14 +/- 0.16 on the average.

Nagatomo, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ishii, H.; Hoshi, M.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Manhattan Project: The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA (Hiroshima, Japan, August 6, 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 In the early morning hours of August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber named Enola Gay took off from the island of Tinian and headed north by northwest toward Japan. The bomber's primary target was the city of Hiroshima, located on the deltas of southwestern Honshu Island facing the Inland Sea. Hiroshima had a civilian population of almost 300,000 and was an important military center, containing about 43,000 soldiers.

59

The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. 1999 edition.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

``The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb`` is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of the United States government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

Gosling, F.G.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Yale and the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission Consultant,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a description, based largely on personal discussions, of the contributions of men from the Yale University School of Medicine to the saga of the immediate and long-term studies on the medical effects of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They played key roles in the immediate studies of bomb effects, in the creation of long-term studies of delayed effects, and in elevating the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission after 1955 to a position of excellence in its studies and relations with the Japanese. The accumulation of the information presented in this paper derives from research for the preparation of the history of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. In 1975, the commission was passed to Japanese leadership as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Yale holds a rich tradition of involvement in the Orient, extending for one and a half centuries. An important contribution was a major role in the creation of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in 1946 and its resurgence to a position of major strength in the late 1950s. The significance of Yale in the Orient goes back to September 1834 when Peter Parker, who had trained in theology and medicine, arrived in Canton as the first

John Z. Bowers

1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Selection, follow-up, and analysis in the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission Study  

SciTech Connect

More is known about ionizing radiation as a cause of human cancer than about any other carcinogen. Most of this knowledge is derived from the studies conducted by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Radiation Effects Research Foundation on about 100,000 Japanese survivors of the atomic bombing in 1945. The importance of these studies is based on the large size of the exposed population and the fact that individual estimates of radiation dose were possible. These factors and the combined excellence of the centralized vital statistics reporting and population registration systems in Japan have made feasible the continuing longitudinal studies of cancer mortality by site in relation to radiation dose over a span of more than 30 years. Excellent voluntary cooperation by the survivors has enabled the continuation of a biennial physical examination program which has made possible the acquisition of blood for studies of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and mutations at the level of specific genes. Similarly, with the cooperation of local universities, hospitals, and physicians, tumor and tissue registries necessary for the study of cancer incidence have been developed. An autopsy pathology program has enabled study of the accuracy of cause of death certification.

Jablon, S.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mutation, radiation, and species survival: The genetics studies of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan  

SciTech Connect

This is an analysis of the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, an American agency which studied the effects of radiation on survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, 1947-1975. Funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and directed by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, the ABCC was the largest and longest medical study of the estimated 300,000 survivors. The morphological genetics study dominated the ABCCs first decade. James Neel and his principal collaborator William J. Schull tracked more than 76,000 pregnancies. Their results (1956) suggested the bombs radiation had no detectable impact on the offspring of survivors. Though geneticists knew that radiation caused heritable mutations in experimental organisms such as Drosophila, and believed it caused mutations in humans, the Neel-Schull findings were not a surprise. The practical difficulties of the study, and the relatively small increase in abnormal births to be expected, made a finding of significant effects unlikely. The Neel-Schull approach reflected the scientific debate over genetic load, and the Muller-Dobzhansky classical-balance controversy. Yet the findings also reflected the post-war debate over atomic energy and weapons testing. Many extra-scientific forces militated against a finding of positive effects at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Negative findings were consistent with the needs of the Atomic Energy Commission, the State Department and the U.S. military. This dissertation explores how both the scientific debate about genetic load, and the political debate about atmospheric weapons testing, shaped this complex epidemiological study.

Lindee, M.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

none,

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Vital Legacy - Biological and Environmental Research in the Atomic Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, established in 1946 to follow the long-term consequences of radiation on the survivors of the Hiroshima

Vaughan editor, Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Combined effects of atomic radiation and other agents in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and possible application of fuzzy theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The survivors of atomic bombings and those who visited Hiroshima and Nagasaki immediately after the atomic bombing could have been subjected to many other possible noxious effects in addition to atomic radiation. Various toxic substances must have been ... Keywords: Hiroshima, Nagasaki, atomic bombing, dose-effects relationships, fuzzy relation, hybrid numbers, lethal dose, radiation effects

Yasushi Nishiwaki; Hiroshi Matsuoka

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Manhattan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Manhattan Project Speak of the Nation's History Atomic Bombs, Winning the War and Women in Pants: Voices of the Manhattan Project Speak of the Nation's History November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Manhattan Project veteran Ralph Gates (far right) celebrates Christmas in 1945. Gates contributed to the Voices of the Manhattan Project, a storytelling project launched by the Atomic Heritage Foundation and Los Alamos Historical Society. Manhattan Project veteran Ralph Gates (far right) celebrates Christmas in 1945. Gates contributed to the Voices of the Manhattan Project, a storytelling project launched by the Atomic Heritage Foundation and Los Alamos Historical Society. WASHINGTON, D.C. - A year out of high school in 1944, Nashville native

67

The development of the atomic bomb, Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

The historical presentation begins with details of the selection of Los Alamos as the site of the Army installation. Wartime efforts of the Army Corps of Engineers, and scientists to include the leader of Los Alamos, Robert Oppenheimer are presented. The layout and construction of the facilities are discussed. The monumental design requirements of the bombs are discussed, including but not limited to the utilization of the second choice implosion method of detonation, and the production of bomb-grade nuclear explosives. The paper ends with a philosophical discussion on the use of nuclear weapons.

Seidel, R.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Low dose radiation and cancer in A-bomb survivors: latency and non-linear dose-response in the 1950–90 mortality cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background: Analyses of Japanese A-bomb survivors ' cancer mortality risks are used to establish recommended annual dose limits, currently set at 1 mSv (public) and 20 mSv (occupational). Do radiation doses below 20 mSv have significant impact on cancer mortality in Japanese A-bomb survivors, and is the dose-response linear? Methods: I analyse stomach, liver, lung, colon, uterus, and all-solid cancer mortality in the 0 – 20 mSv colon dose subcohort of the 1950–90 (grouped) mortality cohort, by Poisson regression using a time-lagged colon dose to detect latency, while controlling for gender, attained age, and age-atexposure. I compare linear and non-linear models, including one adapted from the cellular bystander effect for ? particles. Results: With a lagged linear model, Excess Relative Risk (ERR) for the liver and all-solid cancers is significantly positive and several orders of magnitude above extrapolations from the Life Span Study Report 12 analysis of the full cohort. Non-linear models are strongly superior to the linear model for the stomach (latency 11.89 years), liver (36.90), lung (13.60) and all-solid (43.86) in fitting

Greg Dropkin; Greg Dropkin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The children of parents exposed to atomic bombs: Estimates of the genetic doubling dose of radiation for humans  

SciTech Connect

The data collected in Hiroshima and Nagasaki during the past 40 years on the children of survivors of the atomic bombings and on the children of a suitable control population are analyzed on the basis of the newly revised estimates of radiation doses. No statistically significant effects emerge with respect to eight different indicators. Since, however, it may confidently be assumed some mutations were induced, we have taken the data at face value and calculated the minimal gametic doubling doses of acute radiation for the individual indicators at various probability levels. An effort has also been made to calculate the most probable doubling dose for the indicators combined. The latter value is between 1.7 and 2.2 Sv. It is suggested the appropriate figure for chronic radiation would be between 3.4 and 4.5 Sv. These estimates suggest humans are less sensitive to the genetic effects of radiation than has been assumed on the basis of past extrapolations from experiments with mice.

Neel, J.V.; Schull, W.J.; Awa, A.A.; Satoh, C.; Kato, H.; Otake, M.; Yoshimoto, Y. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Perinatal loss and neurological abnormalities among children of the atomic bomb. Nagasaki and Hiroshima revisited, 1949 to 1989  

SciTech Connect

Studies of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were exposed to ionizing radiation in utero have demonstrated a significant increase in perinatal loss and the vulnerability of the developing fetal brain to injury. These studies have also helped to define the stages in the development of the human brain that are particularly susceptible to radiation-related damage. Exposure at critical junctures in development increases the risk of mental retardation, small head size, subsequent seizures, and poor performance on conventional tests of intelligence and in school. The most critical period, 8 through 15 weeks after fertilization, corresponds to that time in development when neuronal production increases and migration of immature neurons to their cortical sites of function occurs. The epidemiologic data are, however, too sparse to settle unequivocally the nature of the dose-response function and, in particular, whether there is or is not a threshold to damage. If a threshold does exist, it appears to be in the 0.10- to 0.20-Gy fetal-dose range in this vulnerable gestational period.

Yamazaki, J.N.; Schull, W.J. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermoluminescence dosimetry of gamma rays from the Hiroshima atomic bomb at distances of 1. 27 to 1. 46 kilometers from the hypocenter  

SciTech Connect

Sixteen ornamental tile samples were collected from 1982 to 1983 from the rooftops of two buildings at Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. Quartz grains 50-150 microns in size extracted from the samples were analyzed for their thermoluminescence (TL) intensities. Conversion of TL intensity to /sup 60/Co gamma exposure resulted in the following estimates: 40.5 to 27.6 mC kg-1 (157 to 107 R) for five samples (one each) collected from five sites at distances of 1.27 to 1.34 km from the hypocenter of the atomic bomb detonated in 1945; 23.7 +/- 1.4 mC kg-1 (92 +/- 5 R) for three samples from one site at a distance of 1.39 km; 21.4 to 17.0 mC kg-1 (83 to 66 R) for three samples (one sample per site) from three sites at distances of 1.40 to 1.43 km; 19.8 +/- 1.3 mC kg-1 (77 +/- 5 R) for four samples from one site at a distance of 1.45 km; and 13.2 mC kg-1 (51 R) for one sample at a distance of 1.46 km. At face value, these estimates are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than previous estimates based on the tentative 1965 radiation dose estimates for atomic bomb survivors (a tentative dosimetry model proposed in 1965), but agree within +32% to -13% (+15% on the average) with recent estimates using modern computational techniques using an improved model of the atomic bomb explosion.

Ichikawa, Y.; Nagatomo, T.; Hoshi, M.; Kondo, S.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evidence of radiation-induced reduction of height and body weight from repeated measurements of adults exposed in childhood to the atomic bombs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction of growth from exposure to atomic bomb radiation has been examined using individuals under 10 years old at the time of the bombing (ATB) and a growth curve analysis based on measurements of height and weight made in the course of the 4th-7th cycles of the Adult Health Study examinations (1964-1972). As expected, the largest difference in growth to emerge is between males and females. However, a highly significant reduction of growth associated with dose (DS86) was observed among those survivors for whom four repeated measurements of height and weight were available. Longitudinal analysis of a more extended data set (n = 821), using expected values based on simple linear regression models fitted to the three available sets of measurements of height and weight on the 254 individuals with a missing measurement, also indicates a significant radiation-related growth reduction. The possible contribution of such factors as poor nutrition and disruption of normal family life in the years immediately after the war is difficult to evaluate, but the effects of socioeconomic factors on the analysis of these data are discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Otake, Masanori; Funamoto, Sachiyo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Fujikoshi, Yasunori [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Schull, W.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Vital Legacy - Biological and Environmental Research in the Atomic Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ation of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, established inthe atomic bombs. The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commis- sion was

Vaughan editor, Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

LAWRENCE R. FREEDMAN Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, ROBERT J. KEEHN* * Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan URINARY FINDINGS OF CHILDREN WHO WERE IN UTERO DURING THE ATOMIC BOMBINGS OF HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renal damage is a serious complication of exposure of the kidneys to X-rays. ' The severity of detectable renal damage depends upon the dosage of X-rays and can vary from transient alterations of blood flow which are difficult to detect to severe renal insufficiency and hypertension leading to death.'2 Although the kidneys of adults are considered relatively radioresistant, experiments in animals have demonstrated a much greater susceptibility to radiation injury in the newborn.' Kidney damage resulting from the ionizing radiation emitted during the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been searched for in many studies of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC). Data from adults have shown no differences between groups exposed to high and low radiation levels in urinalyses or blood pressure measurements."4 There was a slightly higher number of cases of urinary tract infection in Hiroshima women who had been within 1,400 meters of the bomb hypocenter, but the differences were not statistically significant. ' A report of the urinary findings of a group of Hiroshima children, some of whom were exposed to the atomic bomb, including a small group exposed while in-utero, described a statistically significant increase in urinary abnormalities in girls, corresponding to their radiation exposure.8 These abnormalities were transient, however, and differences in persistent abnormalities were not significant among the comparison groups. A study of Nagasaki adolescents who were all in-utero at the time of the bombing did not reveal significant differences in urinary findings according to exposure to radiation, but the groups were small.9

Freedman Keehn

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Medical x-ray exposure doses as contaminants of atomic bomb doses  

SciTech Connect

Since 1967 at the times of their biennial ABCC/RERF radiological examinations, all Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects have been interviewed to determine the exposures to medical x-rays they experienced in institutions other than RERF in order to estimate the numbers of examinations and corresponding doses which they received. These data have been stored on computer tapes together with the doses these subjects received during their radiological examinations in the ABCC/RERF Department of Radiology. Thus, their medical x-ray doses are available along with their atomic bomb doses (tentative 1965 doses revised, T65DR) for assessment of the role of ionizing radiation in the development of diseases. The medical x-ray doses incurred at RERF were assessed by means of phantom dosimetry. Those at other institutions were determined using phantom dosimetry data and results of surveys for trends in radiological examinations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. By the end of 1982, the average medical x-ray doses to the active bone marrow were 12.04 mGy for A-bomb exposed groups and 8.92 mGy for control groups (not-in-cities); to the male gonads, 2.26 mGy and 1.89 mGy, respectively; and to the female gonads, 17.45 mGy and 12.58 mGy, respectively. Results for Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar. The main impact of medical x-ray doses was in the lowest T65DR group. Medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.05-500% (mean, 35%) of A-bomb doses in the 10-99 mGy T65DR group. In the 100-999 mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.005-50% (mean, 5%) of their T65DR. In the greater than 1000-mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray exposures were proportionally less. Medical x-ray exposures produced smaller doses to the gonads of males than to those of the females.

Yamamoto, O.; Antoku, S.; Russell, W.J.; Fujita, S.; Sawada, S.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Atomic Age: The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, 1947 –those of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC). 87investigation of human atomic bomb casualties; proposal for

Harkewicz, Laura J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

{sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect

Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Residual 152Eu and 60Co activities induced by neutrons from the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect

Specific activities of 152Eu:Eu in stone samples exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb were determined for 70 samples up to a 1,500-m slant range from the epicenter. The specific activities of 60Co:Co were also determined for six samples near the Hiroshima hypocenter. First, the 152Eu data were investigated to find out the directional dependence of neutron activation. Directional anisotropy was not definite; however, there was an indication that the activation in the west-southwest was lower than in other directions. Second, measured 152Eu and 60Co radioactivity data were compared with activation calculations based on DS86 neutrons. It is clearly shown that the measured data are lower than the calculation near the hypocenter and vice versa at long distances beyond 1,000 m. The calculated-to-measured ratios of 152Eu are 1.6 at the hypocenter, 1.0 at approximately 900 m, and 0.05 at a 1,500-m slant range. Present results indicate that systematic errors exist in the DS86 neutrons concerning the source-term spectrum, neutron transport calculations in air, and/or activation measurements.

Shizuma, K.; Iwatani, K.; Hasai, H.; Hoshi, M.; Oka, T.; Morishima, H. (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

KATSUHIKO YANO* Departments of Medicine and Statistics, the Atomic Bomb Casualty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coronary heart disease (CHD) has been a subject of intensive epidemiological study throughout the world during the past decade. Particular emphasis has been placed on the apparent and unexplained differences in the prevalence or incidence of this disease amongst various racial and geographically separate population groups. In 1954 Kimura1 reported that the death rate ascribed to CHD and the prevalence of severe coronary atherosclerosis found after autopsy in Japan were approximately onetenth those reported in the United States. This striking difference in the frequency of CHD between the two countries and its possible causes were further investigated by Keys and his co-workers. ' Recent reports,`8 on the other hand, have suggested an appreciable increase in the occurrence of this disease in Japan. One of the greatest difficulties in making such comparisons, however, is the paucity of comparable data on CHD available from well-organized and large-scale epidemiological studies in Japan. The purposes of this report are: (1) to present data on the prevalence of CHD in a large sample of a Japanese urban population; (2) to demonstrate the association of certain physiological and clinical factors with this disease; and (3) to compare the results with those obtained in a similar study on an American population. MATERIALS AND METHODS The data in the present report are based on the first-cycle examination (1958-1960) of a long-term epidemiological study of cardiovascular disease being conducted by the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC), Hiroshima, Japan. The ABCC is an organization in which the Japanese National Institute of Health and the U. S. National Academy of Science-National Research Council jointly investigate the late medical

unknown authors

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Monte Carlo calculations of doses to tiles irradiated by 60Co and 252Cf simulating atomic bomb gamma-ray fluences  

SciTech Connect

Dose calculations for tiles exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb radiations were undertaken. A Monte Carlo code, ABOMB, was developed which considers the characteristics of atomic bomb gamma-ray fluences and geometrical configurations. ABOMB was applied to tile dose calculations for the available photon sources with definite fluences. Its validity was tested by comparing the depth-dose curves calculated for /sup 60/Co and /sup 252/Cf beams with the equivalent experimental data obtained in the laboratory. Selection of parameters, contribution of backscattering, and computing time also were considered. Present calculations are considered to be accurate with uncertainties less than +/- 10%, and may be useful for correcting or reinforcing atomic bomb gamma-ray doses, together with tile dose measurements by thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry.

Uehara, S.; Hoshi, M.; Sawada, S.; Nagatomo, T.; Ichikawa, Y.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: delayed effects  

SciTech Connect

Results of controlled clinical and epidemiological studies of atomic bomb survivors are presented. Fewer than 100 children irradiated in utero suffered brain damage and microcephaly. Many persons who received more than 100 rads developed posterior lenticular cataracts. Up to 15% of lymphocytes of survivors showed some small chromosomal change, and the percentage and degree of abnormality were directly related to radiation dose. The cumulative rate of myelogenous leukemia was highly dose-related, with a 50-fold increase in those receiving 200 rads. Now, more than 35 years after the bombing, the solid tumor rate is still increasing. Data indicate that a dose as small as 10 rads is carcinogenic, making a so-called safe dose threshold unlikely. Psychologic damage has affected all aspects of life. (JMT)

Hollingsworth, J.W.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Age: The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, 1947 – 1956. ” Inthose of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC). 87

Harkewicz, Laura J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of beliefs of survivors of the 7/7 london bombings: application of a formal model for contagion of mental states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During emergency scenarios, the large number of possible influences inter se between cognitive and affective states of the individuals involved makes it difficult to analyse their (collective) behaviour. To study the behaviour of collectives of ... Keywords: London bombings, agent-based simulation, contagion

Tibor Bosse; Vikas Chandra; Eve Mitleton-Kelly; C. Natalie van der Wal

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Dresden Bombing as Portrayed in German Accounts, East and West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caused by the Atomic Bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Hi~Q§of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.l As ifthat of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Na~asaki

Corwin, Elizabeth C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A review of ground-based heavy-ion radiobiology relevant to space radiation risk assessment: Part II. Cardiovascular and immunological effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years study of hiroshima and nagasaki atomic bomb survivors.levels of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors

Blakely, Eleanor A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki,Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) Essay Contest --$500 Scholarship to the Winner! Inspired by her own survival of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, BGSU alumnus Ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

own survival of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, BGSU alumnus Ms. Hiroko Nakamoto has threat of nuclear weapons in our world in a lecture entitled: "Nuclear Alarmism from Hiroshima to Al

Moore, Paul A.

88

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incidence among atomic-bomb survivors Hiroshima and Nagasakiwith radiotherapy atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima anddash line) large The hiroshima atomic bomb contained a

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [ 2populations. Atomic-bomb data for Hiroshima show that thestudy. Hiroshima and Nagassaki Atomic Bomb Survivors. Eds.

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lack of effects of atomic bomb radiation on genetic instability of tandem-repetitive elements in human germ cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a pilot study to detect the potential effects of atomic bomb radiation on germ-line instability, we screened 64 children from 50 exposed families and 60 from 50 control families for mutations at six minisatellite loci by using Southern blot analysis with Pc-1, {lambda}TM-18, ChdTC-15, p{lambda}g3, {lambda}MS-1, and CEB-1 probes. In the exposed families, one or both parents received a radiation dose >0.01 Sv. Among the 64 children, only one child had parents who were both exposed. Thus, of a total of 128 gametes that produced the 64 children, 65 gametes were derived from exposed parents and 63 were from unexposed parents, the latter being included in a group of 183 unexposed gametes used for calculating mutation rates. The average parental gonadal dose for the 65 gametes was 1.9 Sv. We detected a total of 28 mutations at the p{lambda}g3, {lambda}MS-1, and CEB-1 loci, but no mutations at the Pc-1, {lambda}TM-18, and ChdTC-15 loci. We detected 6 mutations in 390 alleles of the 65 exposed gametes and 22 mutations in 1098 alleles of the 183 gametes from the unexposed parents. The mean mutation rate per locus per gamete in these six minisatellite loci was 1.5% in the exposed parents and 2.0% in the unexposed parents. We observed no significant difference in mutation rates in the children of the exposed and the unexposed parents (P = .37, Fisher`s exact probability test). 38 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiyama, Keiko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)]|[Hiroshima Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Women`s College, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Europium-152 depth profile of a stone bridge pillar exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb: /sup 152/Eu activities for analysis of the neutron spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The /sup 152/Eu activity depth profile of a granite pillar of the Motoyasu bridge located 132 m from the Hiroshima atomic bomb hypocenter was assessed. The pillars each measured 82 cm in depth, 82 cm in width and 193 cm in height. One of the pillars was bored and 6.8-cm-diameter core samples were removed and cut into 2-cm-thick disks. Two gamma rays of /sup 152/Eu, 122 keV and 344 keV, in each disk were measured using a low background, gamma-ray spectrometer, and the activity distribution was determined as a function of depth in the granite. A concentration of stable Eu in the granite was determined by activation analysis. The specific radioactivity of /sup 152/Eu and /sup 154/Eu at the pillar surface was determined to have been 117 and 24 Bq per mg Eu, respectively, at the time of detonation. The value of /sup 152/Eu agrees within 20% of that calculated by Loewe. The depth profile of /sup 152/Eu in granite demonstrates a distinct difference from the estimates made only by thermal neutrons. Present data provide valuable information for the analysis of the neutron spectrum of the Hiroshima atomic bomb and its intensity.

Hasai, H.; Iwatani, K.; Shizuma, K.; Hoshi, M.; Yokoro, K.; Sawada, S.; Kosako, T.; Morishima, H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Vannevar Bush backs the bomb  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with Vannevar Bush's role in controlling America's secret research on the atomic bomb from 1939 to 1942, concentrating on administrative/political/military aspects. This is one of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

Zachary, G.P.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES CONFRONTING THE BEIR III COMMITTEE---IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. to the Hiroshima atomic bomb. mental retardation. [42]Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [populations. Atomic-bomb data for Hiroshima show that the

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

{sup 137}Cs concentration in soil samples from an early survey of Hiroshima atomic bomb and cumulative dose estimation from the fallout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low background gamma-ray measurement has been performed to determine the {sup 137}Cs content in soil samples collected in a very early survey of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. These soil samples were collected just 3 d after the explosion within 5 km from the hypocenter and were not exposed to the global fallout from nuclear weapon tests. Out of 22 samples, {sup 137}Cs was detected for 11 samples, and their radionactivities ranged from 0.16-10.6mBq g{sup {minus}1} at the time of the measurement. A comparison of the {sup 137}Cs deposition with the rainfall area within Hiroshima city indicates that the rainfall area was wider than the previously proposed one. Cumulative exposure by the fallout has been estimated to be 0.31 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (0.12 R) 1.0 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (4 R) in the heavy fallout area. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi [Hiroshima Univ., Kagamiyama (Japan)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Highlights in Radiation Research - A Timeline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

survivors. 1947 Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) created to study the biological effects of radiation on Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Brookhaven National Laboratory...

97

Truman's decision to drop the bomb to be discussed at 70th anniversary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture July 10 about Truman, bomb 70th anniversary lecture July 10 about Truman, bomb Truman's decision to drop the bomb to be discussed at 70th anniversary lecture July 10 Noel Pugach will discuss Truman's decision to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities and explain how and why he made it July 3, 2013 70th anniversary lecture July 10 about Truman, bomb Noel Pugach will discuss Truman's decision to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities and explain how and why he made it Contact Nick Njegomir Communications Office (505) 667-5679 Email "Harry S. Truman considered the use of the atomic bomb on Japan among the most important and consequential actions of his presidency. Historians and journalists have concurred in that judgment, though some have condemned it," Pugach said. Truman's decision to drop the bomb to be discussed at 70th anniversary

98

THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Bomb survivors 1950-1974. Mortality Experience of L i f e Span Study Reportatomic bomb survivor studies). Furthermore, the 1980 BEIR-III Report [

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese atomic-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [Japanese atomic-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [2,32]. The atomic-bomb data for Hiroshima presently show

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

March 18, 2005 Page 1 of 6 Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Fact Sheet for Physicians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, the firefighters that first responded after

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Truman's decision to drop the bomb to be discussed at 70th anniversary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office (505) 667-5679 Email "Harry S. Truman considered the use of the atomic bomb on Japan among the most important and consequential actions of his presidency....

102

Bomb apologetics: Farm Hall, August 1945  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On hearing the news from Hiroshima, the incredulous internees came up with a self-serving story to explain their failures in nucleus research: To keep Hitler from winning, they had deliberately not developed the atomic bomb. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Bernstein, J. [Professor of Physics at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken New Jersey (United States); Cassidy, D. [Professor at Hofstra University, in Hempstead, New York (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Gas Pipelines:- long, thin, bombs? Gas pipelines attract substantial reseach to improve safety and cut costs. They operate ...

104

Perspectives of Decision-Making and Estimation of Risk in Populations Exposed to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1950-1972. Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission Report ABCC-15-of Atomic Bomb Survivors 1950-1974. Life Span Study Report

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Ghost of the Bomb : the Bravo Medical Program, scientific uncertainty, and the legacy of U.S. Cold War science, 1954-2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

John. “Genetics in the Atomic Age: The Atomic Bomb CasualtyCulture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age, 2nd edition. ChapelRadiobiology in the Atomic Age: Changing Research Practices

Harkewicz, Laura J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

BOMB STABILIZING STRUCTURE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilizinig structure capable of minimizing deviations of a falling body such as a bomb from desired trajectory is described. The structure comprises a fin or shroud arrangement of double-wedge configuration, the feeding portion being of narrow wedge shape and the after portion being of a wider wedge shape. The structure provides a force component for keeping the body on essentially desired trajectory throughout its fall. (AEC)

Kelley, J.L.; Runyan, C.E.

1963-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Manhattan Project: Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, James Conant, Karl Compton, and Alfred Loomis, Berkeley, 1940 DEBATE OVER HOW TO USE THE BOMB Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, James Conant, Karl Compton, and Alfred Loomis, Berkeley, 1940 DEBATE OVER HOW TO USE THE BOMB (Washington, D.C., Late Spring 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 J. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, and Ernest Lawrence In early May 1945, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, with the approval of President Harry S. Truman, formed an Interim Committee of top officials charged with recommending the proper use of atomic weapons in wartime and developing a position for the United States on postwar atomic policy. Stimson headed the advisory group composed of Vannevar Bush, James Conant, Karl T. Compton, Under Secretary of the Navy Ralph A. Bard, Assistant Secretary of State William L. Clayton, and future Secretary of State James F. Byrnes. Robert Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi, Arthur Compton, and Ernest Lawrence served as scientific advisors (the Scientific Panel), while General George Marshall represented the military. The committee met on May 31 and then again the next day with leaders from the business side of the Manhattan Project, including Walter S. Carpenter of DuPont, James C. White of Tennessee Eastman, George H. Bucher of Westinghouse, and James A. Rafferty of Union Carbide.

108

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Web DIrty Bomb.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Weapons Radioactive Weapons * Atomic bombs, such as those dropped over Japan in World War II, involve nuclear reactions and produce a sudden intense radiation exposure and large amounts of radiation exposure and large amounts of radiation contamination. * "Dirty bombs" are regular bombs which do not involve nuclear reactions, but contain radioactive material which can be dispersed by the explosion of the bomb. y p These weapons are NOT the same! Even though both contain radioactive material, the amount of the damage and exposure , g p they produce are different by many orders of magnitude. ATOMIC BOMB Radioactive materials are mixed with High initial neutron and gamma radiation Blast can wipe out square miles area Radioactive materials are mixed with debris which comes up from the blast

109

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Energy for Military Purposes: The Official Report on the Development of the Atomic Bomb member of the project, to draft a report about its activities. Smyth completed the report in the summer, in a censored version. On August 11, 1945, five days after the Allies dropped the first nuclear bomb on Japan

Landweber, Laura

110

THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [ 2 0 ] . There is an age-atomic bomb survivors [20] and Marshall Islanders [28] exposed to nuclear explosions. There is an age-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Bomb by Radiation Dose, Years Research Research after Survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71 Exposure, Age,atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (36), and the Japanese Here, 'here is an The latent age-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (17). Here, there is an age-atomic bomb survivors (17) and Marshall Islanders (18) exposed to nuclear explosions. Here, there is an age-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES CONFRONTING THE BEIR III COMMITTEE---IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki [20]. There is an age-atomic bomb survivors [20] and Marshall Islanders [28] exposed tc nuclear explosions. There is an age-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

THE BEIR-III CONTROVERSY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Negasaki [18]. Here, there is an age-atomic bomb survivors [18] and Marshall Inlanders [25] exposed to nuclear explosions. Here, there is an age-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

116

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM Thursday, February 23, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contrast published studies of about 80,000 Japanese survivors of the atomic bomb explosions at Hiroshima

Heller, Barbara

117

Childhood leukaemia and indoor radon concentration 1 Ecological Association between Indoor Radon Concentration and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and among survivors of the atomic bombs of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Preston et al., 1994). In contrast

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

jnci.oxfordjournals.org JNCI | Articles 1 DOI:10.1093/jnci/djq346 TheAuthor2010.PublishedbyOxfordUniversityPress.Allrightsreserved.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japanese atomic bomb survivors and from children exposed to radiation for medical reasons suggest analyses of Japanese atomic bomb survivors (1,5,6,14) have shed some light on this issue: As illustrated.Forexposuresinadulthood,however,therelativerisksofradiation-induced cancer in Japanese atomic bomb survivors generally do not decrease monotonically with increasing age

Brenner, David Jonathan

119

Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund Volume I Human Health...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies of the Mortality of A-Bomb Survivors. Report 7 Part 1, Cancer Mortality Among Atomic Bomb Survivors, 1950-78. Radiation Research 90:395-432. Kocher, D. 1981. Radioactive...

120

The new radiation dosimetry for the A-bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive work has been conducted over the past few years to reassess all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the A-bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This work has included reviews of the bomb yields, source terms, air transport of neutrons and gamma rays, neutron-induced radioactivity and thermoluminescence in exposed materials, shielding of individuals by buildings, and calculations of organ doses. The results of these theoretical and experimental activities have led to the development of a new dosimetry system which is designated as the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). New DS86 estimates of tissue kerma in air and absorbed dose to fifteen organs are available for 94,787 survivors who were either outside and unshielded, outside and shielded by houses, or inside and shielded by houses (64,408 in Hiroshima and 30,379 in Nagasaki). The organ doses are calculated on an age-dependent basis as follows: infants (less than 3 years old at the time of bombing, ATB), children (3 to 12 years old ATB), and adults (more than 12 years old ATB). Work in progress includes the extension of the DS86 system to Nagasaki survivors who were shielded either by terrain or by factory buildings.

Kerr, G.D.

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

atomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

theory and fundamental quantum mechanics In addition to research on hadronic and nuclear physics, we also conduct research in atomic physics, neutron physics, and quantum...

122

Manhattan Project: Potsdam and the Final Decision to Use the Bomb, July  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Joseph Stalin, Harry Truman, and Winston Churchill at the Potsdam Conference, July 1945 POTSDAM AND THE FINAL DECISION TO USE THE BOMB Joseph Stalin, Harry Truman, and Winston Churchill at the Potsdam Conference, July 1945 POTSDAM AND THE FINAL DECISION TO USE THE BOMB (Potsdam, Germany, July 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Potsdam, July 19, 1945. Truman wrote a note on the back of the photograph in which he states incorrectly that Stalin did not know about the atomic bomb. After President Harry S. Truman received word of the success of the Trinity test, his need for the help of the Soviet Union in the war against Japan was greatly diminished. The Soviet leader, Joseph Stalin, had promised to join the war against Japan by August 15th. Truman and his advisors now were not sure they wanted this help. If use of the atomic bomb made victory possible without an invasion, then accepting Soviet help would only invite them into the discussions regarding the postwar fate of Japan. During the second week of Allied deliberations at Potsdam, on the evening of July 24, 1945, Truman approached Stalin without an interpreter and, as casually as he could, told him that the United States had a "new weapon of unusual destructive force." Stalin showed little interest, replying only that he hoped the United States would make "good use of it against the Japanese." The reason for Stalin's composure became clear later: Soviet intelligence had been receiving information about the atomic bomb program since fall 1941.

123

Dismantling the Final B53 Bomb | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Final B53 Bomb Dismantling the Final B53 Bomb October 25, 2011 - 5:39pm Addthis Two Pantex Plant employees examine the final B53 bomb prior to its dismantling. | Photo...

124

Effects of atomic radiation: A half-century of studies from Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

SciTech Connect

This is a notable book. For the first time, a thoroughly experienced scientist has undertaken, as the author says, {open_quotes}to present the atomic bomb survivor story in all its complexity,{close_quotes} and to aid the reader, Prof. Schull has eschewed the use of technical terms. Where this could not be done, he has defined them in the text or the glossary. The task could only have been done by someone like Prof. Schull, who in various capacities has been involved in the Japanese studies since 1949. The book therefore is not a conventional epidemiological monograph. It is addressed to both the professional and nonprofessional reader, and it includes various elements of biology; it deals with history as well as science; and it considers some of its material as in a personal essay. This is an ambitious, difficult and useful undertaking that provides much information; its writing, however, is not always quite direct and incisive.

Schull, W.J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Curriculum connections: science, technology, ethics, Manhattan Project and the Cold War, military tactics and strategy, World War II and H-Bomb, radiation and its effects, terrorism, international arms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trinity and Beyond: The Atomic Bomb (DVD) On Order The Manhattan Project and the Cold War, military tactics and strategy, World War II and H-Bomb, radiation16.E5 S3285 2008 J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic

Rose, Annkatrin

126

A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating short- and long-term processes. Part II: second cancer risk estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Japanese atomic bomb survivors at age 70, as functionrelative risk by age at exposure in the Japanese atomic bombthe age/time dependencies suggested by Japanese atomic bomb

Shuryak, Igor; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EditorialnReviewsandCommentaRy 330 radiology.rsna.org n Radiology: Volume 265: Number 2--November 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Medicine (5) states the follow- ing: "Risks of medical imaging at effective doses below 50 mSv for single of exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors (8). Clearly, there are many differences between a CT scan and an atomic bomb exposure; however, about 30000 atomic bomb survivors who were located several miles from

Brenner, David Jonathan

128

Manhattan Project: A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb<!--Include title  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Franklin Roosevelt's note to Vannevar Bush giving Bush the tentative go-ahead to build the atomic bomb. A TENTATIVE DECISION TO BUILD THE BOMB President Franklin Roosevelt's note to Vannevar Bush giving Bush the tentative go-ahead to build the atomic bomb. A TENTATIVE DECISION TO BUILD THE BOMB Washington, D.C.(1941-1942) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 Vannevar Bush moved swiftly to take advantage of the positive MAUD Report. Without waiting for Arthur Compton's latest committee to finish its work confirming the MAUD Committee's conclusions, Bush on October 9, 1941, met with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Vice President Henry A. Wallace (who had been briefed on uranium research in July). Bush summarized the British findings, discussed cost and duration of a bomb project, and emphasized the uncertainty of the situation. He also received the President's permission to explore construction needs with the Army. Roosevelt instructed him to move as quickly as possible but not to go beyond research and development. Bush, then, was to find out if a bomb could be built and at what cost but not to proceed to the production stage without further presidential authorization. Roosevelt indicated that he could find a way to finance the project and asked Bush to draft a letter so that the British government could be approached "at the top.

129

Pure Nuclear Fusion Bomb Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent progress towards the non-fission ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions raises the prospect for a revival of the nuclear bomb propulsion idea, both for the fast transport of large payloads within the solar system and the launch into earth orbit without the release of fission products into the atmosphere. To reach this goal three areas of research are of importance: 1)Compact thermonuclear ignition drivers. 2)Fast ignition and deuterium burn. 3)Space-craft architecture involving magnetic insulation and GeV electrostatic potentials

Winterberg, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

RADIATION RESEARCH 145,501-507 (1996) 0033-7587196 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Significant Neutron Dose to Survivors of the HiroshimaAtomic Bomb David J. Brenner Centerfor Radiological Biological Evidence for a Significant Neutron Dose to Survivors of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb. Radiat. Res. 145,501-507 (1996). In the past few years much physical evidence has accumu- lated that the A-bomb

Brenner, David Jonathan

131

Manhattan Project: The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Oak Ridge THE URANIUM PATH TO THE BOMB Alpha Racetrack, Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant, Oak Ridge THE URANIUM PATH TO THE BOMB (1942-1944) Events > The Uranium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943 Y-12: Operation, 1943-1944 Working K-25 into the Mix, 1943-1944 The Navy and Thermal Diffusion, 1944 The uranium path to the atomic bomb ran through Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Only if the new plants built at Oak Ridge produced enough enriched uranium-235 would a uranium bomb be possible. General Groves placed two methods into production: 1) electromagnetic, based on the principle that charged particles of the lighter isotope would be deflected more when passing through a magnetic field; and 2) gaseous diffusion, based on the principle that molecules of the lighter isotope, uranium-235, would pass more readily through a porous barrier. Full-scale electromagnetic and gaseous diffusion production plants were built at Oak Ridge at sites designated as "Y-12" and "K-25", respectively.

132

Physicists and the 1945 Decision to Drop the Bomb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1943 fear that the German war machine might use atomic bombs was abating and among physicists another fear was taking its place - that of a postwar nuclear arms race with worldwide proliferation of nuclear weapons. Manhattan Project scientists and engineers began to discuss uses of nuclear energy in the postwar world. Niels Bohr, Leo Szilard, James A. Franck and others launched a concerted effort to lay groundwork for international control of the technology. Realizing the devastation nuclear weapons could cause and that they could be made and delivered much more cheaply than conventional weapons of the same power, they tried to persuade policy makers to take into account long range consequences of using atomic bombs and not base their decisions on short range military expediency alone. They met with little success. The scientists' main message, unheeded then and very relevant now, is that worldwide international agreements are needed to provide for inspection and control of nuclear weapons technology. Their memoranda and reports remain as historic documents eloquently testifying to their concern.

Nina Byers

2002-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Bomb: A New History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of weapons in the hands of other nations affect our own nuclear policy? Dr. Younger is a former member of the NIST Atomic Physics Division. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

The A-bomb, 50 years later: The evolution of nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the U.S. government began to invest heavily in its nuclear program. Nuclear medicine stood to gain from these postwar policies, but it also suffered some setbacks. Fifty years ago this month, two atomic bombs were dropped on Japan, killing thousands of civilians and ushering in a quick and final end to World War II. The beginning of the post-war era signaled the birth of nuclear medicine as it is widely applied today. In fact, the same nuclear reactor that produced elements for the A-bomb project was turned over for the mass production of radionuclides for medicine and industry. The link between the A-bomb and nuclear medicine, however, has always been a sensitive subject among nuclear physicians whose patients may associate radionuclide injections with mushroom clouds. Although this link is not justified, the government`s interest in developing nuclear technology following World War II did have a significant impact on nuclear medicine: on the upside, millions of federal dollars were funneled into the production of radionuclides for research and medicine. On the downside, Congress established the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)-which later became the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-to oversee safety issues, making nuclear medicine the only medical field regulated by a federal agency.

Kotz, D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Microsoft Word - Final Y12 Film Badge Dosimetry Evaluation.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the accurate assessment of individual worker doses. During this time the atomic bomb survivor study results began to provide initial information on the connection between...

137

TM Seed NIST Sponsored Workshop Gaithersburg, Maryland ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of acute ionizing radiation exposures in atomic bomb survivors” initiated October 2009 and continues to ... Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan is a private ...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

DOE/CF-0085  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; 2. Assess radiation health effects of ionizing radiation; and 3. Publish analyses of radiation health...

139

Radiation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki builds foundation for risk estimates  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of the international cooperation between Japan and the United States in documenting radiation exposure and its medical effects on atomic bomb survivors is present.

Ketchum, L.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The One Million U.S. Radiation Worker Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for chronic radiation exposure. Much knowledge has been gained from the study of atomic bomb survivors, but exposure was acute and 2 among a Japanese population living in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Manhattan Project: Early Bomb Design, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Little Boy at Tinian Island, August 1945 EARLY BOMB DESIGN Little Boy at Tinian Island, August 1945 EARLY BOMB DESIGN (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944) Events > Bringing it All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 Early work on the design of the atomic bomb began even as scientists continued to arrive at Los Alamos throughout 1943. The properties of uranium were reasonably well understood, those of plutonium less so, and knowledge of fission explosions entirely theoretical. That 2.2 secondary neutrons were produced when uranium-235 fissioned was accepted, but while Glenn Seaborg's team had proven in March 1941 that plutonium underwent neutron-induced fission, it was not known yet if plutonium released secondary neutrons during bombardment. Further, the exact sizes of the "cross sections" of various fissionable substances had yet to be determined in experiments using the various particle accelerators then being shipped to Los Alamos. The theoretical consensus was that fission Fission chain reaction chain reactions (left) did take place with sufficient speed to produce powerful releases of energy (and not simply result in the explosion of the critical mass itself), but only experiments could test this theory. The optimum size of the critical mass remained to be established, as did the optimum shape. When enough data were gathered to establish optimum critical mass, optimum effective mass still had to be determined. That is, it was not enough simply to start a chain reaction in a critical mass; it was necessary to start one in a mass that would release the greatest possible amount of energy before it was destroyed in the explosion.

142

Manhattan Project: The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Painting of CP-1 going critical THE PLUTONIUM PATH TO THE BOMB Painting of CP-1 going critical THE PLUTONIUM PATH TO THE BOMB (1942-1944) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 Plutonium, produced in a uranium-fueled reactor (pile), was the second path taken toward achieving an atomic bomb. Design work on a full-scale plutonium production reactor began at the Met Lab in June 1942. Scientists at the Met Lab had the technical expertise to design a production pile, but construction and management on an industrial scale required an outside contractor. General Groves convinced the DuPont Corporation to become the primary contractor for plutonium production. With input from the Met Lab and DuPont, Groves selected a site at Hanford, Washington, on the Columbia River, to build the full-scale production reactors.

143

First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested July 16, 1945 Los Alamos, NM First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested

144

First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested July 16, 1945 Los Alamos, NM First Plutonium Bomb Successfully Tested

145

Synoptic-Dynamic Climatology of the “Bomb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By defining a “bomb” as an extratropical surface cyclone whose central pressure fall averages at least 1 mb h?1 for 24 h, we have studied this explosive cyclogenesis in the Northern Hemisphere during the period September 1976–May 1979. This ...

Frederick Sanders; John R. Gyakum

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

WE?A?213AB?01: Second Cancers from Radiation Therapy Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Second Cancers are the most common late effect among long?term cancer survivors. Radiation has been a known risk factor for cancer induction based on atomic bomb survivor follow?up. Over the last few decades

S Kry; R Howell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Manhattan Project: Final Bomb Design, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The first 0.11 seconds of the nuclear age, Trinity, July 16, 1945. FINAL BOMB DESIGN The first 0.11 seconds of the nuclear age, Trinity, July 16, 1945. FINAL BOMB DESIGN (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1944-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 American troops approaching the beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944. Late in 1944, Los Alamos began to shift from research to development and bomb production. Increased production at Oak Ridge and Hanford seemed to promise that enough plutonium and enriched uranium would be available for at least one bomb using each. Germany no longer was the intended primary target. The war in Europe (left) appeared to be entering its final phase, and evidence uncovered by the ALSOS mission in November 1944 indicated that the German atomic program had not gone beyond the research phase. Already by summer 1944, Groves and his advisers had turned their sights toward Japan. The atomic bomb would justify the years of effort, including both the vast expenditures and the judgment of everyone responsible, by bringing the war in the Pacific to a fiery end. J. Robert Oppenheimer Ongoing problems continued to complicate the efforts of Robert Oppenheimer (right) to finalize bomb design. Foremost among these were continuing personnel shortages, particularly of physicists, and supply difficulties. The procurement system, designed to protect the secrecy of the Los Alamos project, led to frustrating delays and, when Herb Lehr, SED, holding the Gadget's core, July 1945. combined with persistent late war shortages, proved a constant headache. The lack of contact between the remote laboratory and its supply sources exacerbated the problem, as did the relative lack of experience the academic scientists had with logistical matters. Leslie Groves and James Conant were determined not to let mundane problems compromise the bomb effort, and in fall 1944 they made several changes to prevent this possibility. Conant shipped as many scientists as could be spared from the Met Lab and Oak Ridge to Los Alamos, hired every civilian machinist he could lay his hands on, and arranged for Army enlisted men to supplement the work force (these GIs were known as SEDS ("Special Engineering Detachment"). Hartley Rowe, an experienced industrial engineer, provided help in easing the transition from research to production. Los Alamos also arranged for a rocket research team at the California Institute of Technology to aid in procurement, test fuses, and contribute to component development. These changes kept Los Alamos on track as design work reached its final stages.

148

Sticky bomb detection with other implications for vehicle security.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 'sticky bomb' is a type of improvised explosive device (IED) placed on a motor vehicle by (for example) a terrorist. The bomb is typically attached with adhesive ('duct') tape, or with magnets. This paper reports some preliminary results for a very rudimentary demonstration of two techniques for detecting the placement of a sticky bomb on a motor vehicle. The two techniques are tire pressure and magnetic measurements. There are other possible security applications for these techniques as well.

Johnston, R. G.; Vetrone, J.; Warner, J. S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

EPA 402-R-93-076 ESTIMATING RADIOGENIC CANCER RISKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks 401 M Street S.W. Washington, DC 20460 #12;ii The scientific basis for this report has been reviewed

150

Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

principally on the cancer incidence found in survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki-induced cancer has traditionally been estimated from cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose

151

deriving risk estimates that are applicable to ageneralpopulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­Japan Joint Reassessment of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Radiation Effects Res,18 . So, despite individual errors, the collective data from the survivors of the atomic bomb are likely exist.For example, thebombsurvivors'recalloftheirpositionin the two cities at the times of the bombings

Stocker, Thomas

152

ORNL retiree recalls 1944 hospital bombing in Belgium | ornl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wounded from the D-Day invasion prior to moving on to Belgium -- would earn the Purple Heart for his heroics in the aftermath of the bombing. "It blew out all the windows in that...

153

October 25, 2011: Last B53 nuclear bomb dismantled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), at a ceremony at NNSA’s Pantex Plant outside Amarillo, Texas, announces that the last B53 nuclear bomb has been dismantled....

154

Number 23 1995 Los Alamos Science Radiation, Cell Cycle, and Cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dial painters during the early part of this century and the sobering epidemiological studies of the atomic-bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bear witness to the fact that ionizing radiation can insti- gate a variety of cancer types. The bomb survivors, for example, display a small but statistically significant

Massey, Thomas N.

155

Manhattan Project: Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Trinity, July 16, 1945 DAWN OF THE ATOMIC ERA (1945) Events The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 As the war entered its final phase, the Manhattan Project became an increasingly important and controversial element in American strategy. Debate over how to use the bomb began in earnest in early summer of 1945. The Trinity atomic test of July 16 (right) confirmed that the stakes for this decision were very high. With a blast equivalent of approximately 21 kilotons of TNT, the test explosion was greater than had been predicted, and the dispersal of radioactive fallout following the test made safety something of a near thing. News of the success at Trinity reached President Harry S. Truman at the Potsdam Conference.

156

IS downsizing survivor's career management attitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IS downsizing is a significant tool of management in the 1990's. A key element in downsizing success is how it is perceived by employees. Still, no widely published study has examined the attitudes of IS survivors to downsizing. Moreover, in the age ...

James J. Jiang; Stephen T. Margulis; Gary Klein

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement B53 Nuclear Bomb Dismantlement The elimination of the B53 by Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is consistent with the goal President Obama announced in his April 2009 Prague speech to reduce the number of nuclear weapons. The President said, "We will reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy, and urge others to do the same." The dismantlement of the last remaining B53 ensures that the system will never again be part of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. As a key part of its national security mission, NNSA is actively responsible for safely dismantling weapons that are no longer needed, and disposing of the excess material and components.

158

Atomic Dream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

huge amounts of radioactive fallout from the bomb tests, so really understand this fallout for a while.   Very rapidly the poison of radioactive fallout. DYSON, [on cam] So I had 

Lartaud, Derek Regnault

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Underwater Bomb Trajectory Prediction for Stand-off Assault (Mine/IED) Breaching Weapon Fuse to determine accurately underwater (full-size) bomb trajectory path so that the final detonation position of a six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) model to predict underwater high-speed bomb trajectory and orientation

Chu, Peter C.

160

Anticipating the atom: popular perceptions of atomic power before Hiroshima  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Before Hiroshima made the Bomb an object of popular concern, possible implications and applications of atomic physics had been discussed in the public forum. The new science of X-rays and radium promised the possibilities of unlimited energy and the transmutation of elements in the two decades leading up to World War 1. During the twenties, as scientific method struggled to keep pace with atomic theory, discussion centered on the feasibility of atomic disintegration as an energy source and the many uses of radium. The 1927 case of the New Jersey Radium Dial Painters, who sued their employers for compensation after contracting radium poisoning, revealed a dark side to the new science, that, along with the development of artificial radioactive isotopes by the Jollot-Curies in Paris, and, in Italy, Enrico Fenni's neutron bombardment experiments, sobered attitudes toward the ever-increasing probability of atomic power. When Otto Hahn finally split the atom in 1938, it opened the way to the practical industrial use of atomic fission, and stimulated a flurry of newspaper and magazine articles before World War 11 brought about censorship. Popular entertainment through 1945 reflects the extent to which atomic power had entered the public awareness. Atomic themes and motifs appeared in English language fiction as early as 1895, as did discussions of the social implications of the new science. Such popular culture imagery, including motion pictures and comic book superheroes, that presented the atom to mass audiences provide insight into the popular perceptions at the time, and to the shaping of attitudes toward the Bomb after Hiroshima.

d'Emal, Jacques-Andre Christian

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cancer survivorship : understanding the issues faced by cancer survivors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??International research on cancer survivorship has started to identify a range of issues that affect cancer survivors physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. These issues can… (more)

Hayward, Penelope Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

SHORT COMMUNICATION D. Nikezic B. M. F. Lau K. N. Yu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Japanese atomic bomb survivors and uranium miners, gives a value of approximately 4 mSv WLMÃ?1 dose per unit radon exposure. All other elements of the human respiratory tract from the reports

Yu, K.N.

163

For personal use only. Not to be reproduced without permission of The Lancet. THE LANCET Vol 355 June 10, 2000 2071  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radiation- induced breast cancer derived from studies of atom-bomb survivors.5 For example, a fractionated in the contralateral breast reported in the radiation arm of the EORTC DCIS study is unlikely to be a consequence

Brenner, David Jonathan

164

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acknowledged the need to continue the research activities at RERF as related to the atomic-bomb survivors, and reiterated its intention to work closely with the U.S. Government...

165

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 1: Chapter 4; Assessment Approach and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of people historically exposed to large doses of radiation, such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The factors used for the analysis in this PEIS were 0.0004 LCFperson-rem of...

166

Microsoft Word - SRR-CWDA-2012-00026_R1_Text.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high acute doses (more than 10,000 millirem) of radiation, such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Radiological risks at low doses (less than 10,000 millirem) are theoretical...

167

Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 97, No. 1, pp. 6973 (2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation in the atomic bomb survivors at Hiroshima. Because the neutron component of the overall dose' preferentially pro- duced by high LET radiation. An expert report on methods to arrive at risk estimates

Brenner, David Jonathan

168

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Suresh H. Moolgavkar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cohort with low-LET low-dose radiation exposure, and comparison with Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Hazelton, W.D., Krewski, D., Moolgavkar, S.H. 2001 Workshop:...

169

IN PERSPECTIVE REVIEW Cyclooxygenase-2 as a Signaling Molecule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

found in survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan, the International Commission on Radiation Protection millisievert, radia- tion-induced cancer risk can be estimated using the atomic bomb survival data by earlier reports that, following a low dose of alpha-particles, a larger proportion of cells showed

170

David J. Brenner, PhD, DSc Carl D. Elliston, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cancer mortality in atomic bomb survivors. Total doses for repeated examinations are correspondingly higher. The authors used estimated cancer risks in a U.S. population derived from atomic bomb, no studies have yet been reported to indicate a life-prolonging benefit of full-body screening CT (6). While

Brenner, David Jonathan

171

NASA -Exploration Systems -Can People Go to Mars? http://exploration.nasa.gov/articles/17feb_radiation.html 1 of 3 09/22/2006 08:23 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radiation--e.g., Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors and, ironically, cancer patients who have undergone, for good reason. Space radiation is a unique mix of gamma-rays, high-energy protons and cosmic rays. Atomic bomb blasts and cancer treatments, the basis of many studies, are no substitute for the "real thing

Shepherd, Simon

172

Manhattan Project: Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ernest Rutherford (and James Chadwick, on the far right) EXPLORING THE ATOM Ernest Rutherford (and James Chadwick, on the far right) EXPLORING THE ATOM (1919-1932) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 The road to the atomic bomb began in earnest in 1919 with the first artificial transmutation of an element. The New Zealander Ernest Rutherford, working in the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University in England, changed several atoms of nitrogen into oxygen. The final addition to the atomic "miniature solar system" first proposed by Niels Bohr came in 1932 when James Chadwick, Rutherford's colleague at Cambridge, identified the third and final basic particle of the atom: the neutron.

173

Determination of Uncertainty in Gross Calorific Value of Coal Using Bomb Calorimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bomb calorimeter is an apparatus used for measuring the performance of coal in term of heat of combustion. Recent awareness has been created regarding uncertainty of measurement, due to mainly two reasons. Laboratory accreditation, which has steadily ... Keywords: Bomb Calorimeter, Gross Calorific Value, Heat, Uncertainty, Water Equivalent

N.K. Mandavgade; S.B. Jaju; R.R. Lakhe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Method for cleaning bomb-reduced uranium derbies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The concentration of carbon in uranium metal ingots induction cast from derbies prepared by the bomb-reduction of uranium tetrafluoride in the presence of magnesium is effectively reduced to less than 100 ppm by removing residual magnesium fluoride from the surface of the derbies prior to casting. This magnesium fluoride is removed from the derbies by immersing them in an alkali metal salt bath which reacts with and decomposes the magnesium fluoride. A water quenching operation followed by a warm nitric acid bath and a water rinse removes the residual salt and reaction products from the derbies.

Banker, John G. (Boulder, CO); Wigginton, Hubert L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beck, David E. (Knoxville, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Birds prefer to breed in sites with low radioactivity in Chernobyl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the final report on mutations in children of atomic bomb survivors showed little or no effect (Neel et al consider- able attention by scientists since the Hiroshima and Nagasaki nuclear bombs in 1945. However. 1988). Likewise, a recent report on the biological consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl

Mousseau, Timothy A.

176

Environment International, Vol.18,pp. 117-151, 1992 0160-4120/9255.00 +.00 Printed in the U.S.A.All rights reserved. Copyright01992 Pergamon Press plc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-rays, the widespread public fear did not arise until 1945 when the first atomic bomb exploded. Fear is a common at risk, average dose, and the number of cancers expected. Of these, only the cohort of A-bomb survivors of this paper will be published as Argonne National Laboratory Report. **Present address: UNESCO/ROSTAS, 8 Abdul

Shlyakhter, Ilya

177

Manhattan Project: Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Werner Heisenberg, the leader of the German atomic weapons program. ATOMIC RIVALS AND THE ALSOS MISSION Werner Heisenberg, the leader of the German atomic weapons program. ATOMIC RIVALS AND THE ALSOS MISSION (Germany and Japan, 1938-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 For most of the Second World War, scientists and administrators of the Manhattan Project firmly believed that they were in a race with Germany to develop the atomic bomb. As it turns out, the German atomic program did not come close to developing a useable weapon. Allied planners were only able to confirm this, however, through the ALSOS intelligence mission to Europe toward the end of the war. Atomic research was also conducted in Japan, but as was suspected by the Allies, it did not get very far.

178

Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Brodzinski, R.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Marcum, J. (R and D Associates, Marina del Rey, CA (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Oscillatory thermal instability - the Bhopal disaster and liquid bombs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal runaway reactions were involved in the Bhopal disaster of 1984, in which methyl isocyanate was vented from a storage tank of the liquid, and occur in liquid peroxide explosions, yet to date there have been few investigations into the mechanism of thermal runaway in such liquid thermoreactive systems. Consequently protocols for storing thermally unstable liquids and deactivating liquid bombs may be suboptimal. In this work the hydrolysis of methyl isocyanate and the thermal decomposition of triacetone triperoxide were simulated using a gradientless, continuous-flow reactor paradigm. This approximation enabled stability analyses on the steady state solutions of the dynamical mass and enthalpy equations. The results indicate that thermal runaway in both systems is due to the onset of a large amplitude, hard thermal oscillation initiated at a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. This type of thermal misbehaviour cannot be predicted using classical ignition theory, and may be typical of liquid thermoreactive syst...

Ball, Rowena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Sandia grew out of America's World War II atomic bomb development...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

that will help maintain U.S. strategic deterrence far into the 21st century Q A solar machine capable of converting air pollutants to liquid fuel ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The LoveBomb: Encouraging the Communication of Emotions in Public Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are exploring the use of persuasive computational technology as an instrument for the communication of human emotions. Our current focus is on encouraging such communication between strangers. We present the concept of the LoveBomb- a mobile and persuasive device that allows people to anonymously communicate feelings of love (happiness) and sadness. The device contains a radio transceiver that the user can employ to send out shock waves of love, affecting people in the proximity carrying a LoveBomb device. The device also lets its users cry for compassion, quietly signaling to others that they are sad. The LoveBomb is intended to encourage people to express themselves emotionally when situated amongst strangers in public spaces. Focus group studies have provided us with an initial understanding regarding the LoveBomb’s potential social impact.

Rebecca Hansson; Tobias Skog

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Crisis information concerns: Information needs of domestic violence survivors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The personal crisis of coping with or escaping from a violent relationship requires that survivors have accurate, current, appropriate, and contextually-useful information. Police and shelter staff, who are the governmental and private sector first-responders, ... Keywords: Domestic violence, ELIS model, Formal help information system, Human information behavior, Informal help information system, Intimate partner violence

Lynn Westbrook

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Atomic History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These Data Centers, one on Atomic Energy Levels and one on Atomic Transition ... After a few years Kessler went on to higher management at NIST. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

the White House between President Harry Truman, Secretary of State Dean Acheson, Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It had been only five-and-a-half years since the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but during the previous year the Soviets had detonated their first fission bomb. A small number of influential voices were pressuring the President to authorize the development of hydrogen bombs. That decision was the purpose of the January 31 meeting at the White House. Truman listened as Lilienthal described the reasons for not building the H-bomb. He had barely started when the President cut him off with the question, “Can the Russians do it? ” When his visitors nodded yes, Truman said, “In that case, we have no choice. We’ll go ahead. ” Upon leaving the White House, Lilienthal glanced at his watch. The President had given him seven minutes. Lilienthal wrote in his diary that Truman was, “clearly set on what he was going to do before we set foot inside the door.”[1] The first hydrogen bomb was detonated by the USA on November 1, 1952, vaporizing

Chairman David Lilienthal; Defense Secretary; Louis Johnson

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fluid-filled bomb-disrupting apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for disarming improvised bombs are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a fluid-filled bottle or container made of plastic or another soft material which contains a fixed or adjustable, preferably sheet explosive. The charge is fired centrally at its apex and can be adjusted to propel a fluid projectile that is broad or narrow, depending upon how it is set up. In one embodiment, the sheet explosive is adjustable so as to correlate the performance of the fluid projectile to the disarming needs for the improvised explosive device (IED). Common materials such as plastic water bottles or larger containers can be used, with the sheet explosive or other explosive material configured in a general chevron-shape to target the projectile toward the target. In another embodiment, a thin disk of metal is conformably mounted with the exterior of the container and radially aligned with the direction of fire of the fluid projectile. Depending on the configuration and the amount of explosive and fluid used, a projectile is fired at the target that has sufficient energy to penetrate rigid enclosures from fairly long stand-off and yet is focused enough to be targeted to specific portions of the IED for disablement.

Cherry, Christopher R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Manhattan Project: Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES Excerpt from the comic book "Adventures Inside the Atom." Click on this image or visit the "Library" to view the whole comic book. ATOMIC DISCOVERIES (1890s-1939) Events A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 Philosophers of Ancient Greece reasoned that all matter in the universe must be composed of fundamental, unchangeable, and indivisible objects, which they called "atoma" ("ατoµα"). The exact nature of these atoms remained elusive, however, despite centuries of attempts by alchemists to create a "philosopher's stone" that could transmute atoms of lead to gold, prove the Greeks wrong, and make its inventors Modern model of an atom very rich. It was only in the late 1890s and the early twentieth-century that this view of a solid atom, bouncing around the universe like a billiard ball, was replaced by an atom that resembled more a miniature solar system, its electrons orbiting around a small nucleus. Explorations into the nature of the atom from 1919 to 1932 confirmed this new model, especially with Ernest Rutherford's 1919 success in finally transmuting an atom of one substance into another and with James Chadwick's 1932 discovery of the elusive final basic particle of the atom, the neutron. From 1932 to 1938, scientists around the world learned a great deal more about atoms, primarily by bombarding the nuclei of atoms and using a variety of particle accelerators. In 1938, word came from Berlin of the most startling result of them all: the nucleus of an atom could actually be split in two, or "fissioned." This breakthrough was quickly confirmed in the United States and elsewhere. According to the theories of Albert Einstein, the fission of an atom should result in a release of energy. An "atomic bomb" was now no longer just science fiction -- it was a distinct possibility.

187

Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)  

SciTech Connect

There is an ongoing disagreement regarding the aging of the shortfin mako due to a difference of interpretation in the periodic deposition of vertebral growth band pairs, especially for the larger size classes. Using analysis of length-month information, tagging data, and length-frequency analysis, concluded that two band pairs were formed in the vertebral centrum every year (biannual band-pair interpretation). Cailliet et al. (1983), however, presented growth parameters based on the common assumption that one band pair forms annually (annual band-pair interpretation). Therefore, growth rates obtained by Pratt & Casey (1983) were twice that of Cailliet et al. (1983) and could lead to age discrepancies of about 15 years for maximum estimated ages on the order of 30 from the annual band-pair interpretation. Serious consequences in the population dynamics could occur for this species if inputs are based on an invalid age interpretation. The latest Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Highly Migratory Species (HMS), for example, adopted the biannual band pair deposition hypothesis because it apparently fit the observed growth patterns best (Pacific Fishery Management Council 2003). However, the ongoing uncertainty about the aging of the shortfin mako was acknowledged and it was recommended that an endeavor to resolve this issue be made. Since 1983, five additional studies on the age and growth of the shortfin mako have been conducted (Chan 2001, Campana et al. 2002, Hsu 2003, Ribot-Carballal et al. 2005, Bishop et al. 2006). Using Marginal Increment Ratio (MIR), Hsu (2003) indicated the formation of annual translucent bands from July to September in western North Pacific Ocean shortfin makos. Using Marginal Increment Analysis (MIA) Ribot-Carballal et al. (2005) supported the annual band-pair interpretation for 109 shortfin makos collected in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Although the study provided support for annual band-pair deposition, no statistical test was performed and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for otoliths, bivalves and corals. In the same study by Campana et al. (2002), a single vertebra fro

Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Risk Factors Associated With Secondary Sarcomas in Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of secondary sarcomas. To better identify those at risk, the relationship between therapeutic dose of chemotherapy and radiation and secondary sarcoma should be quantified. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of secondary sarcomas (105 cases, 422 matched controls) in a cohort of 14,372 childhood cancer survivors. Radiation dose at the second malignant neoplasm (SMN) site and use of chemotherapy were estimated from detailed review of medical records. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Excess odds ratio (EOR) was modeled as a function of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and host factors. Results: Sarcomas occurred a median of 11.8 years (range, 5.3-31.3 years) from original diagnosis. Any exposure to radiation was associated with increased risk of secondary sarcoma (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.8-9.5). A dose-response relation was observed, with elevated risks at doses between 10 and 29.9 Gy (OR = 15.6, 95% CI = 4.5-53.9), 30-49.9 Gy (OR = 16.0, 95% CI 3.8-67.8) and >50 Gy (OR = 114.1, 95% CI 13.5-964.8). Anthracycline exposure was associated with sarcoma risk (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.7) adjusting for radiation dose, other chemotherapy, and primary cancer. Adjusting for treatment, survivors with a first diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR = 10.7, 95% CI = 3.1-37.4) or primary sarcoma (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 3.2-22.3) were more likely to develop a sarcoma. Conclusions: Of the risk factors evaluated, radiation exposure was the most important for secondary sarcoma development in childhood cancer survivors; anthracycline chemotherapy exposure was also associated with increased risk.

Henderson, Tara O., E-mail: thenderson@peds.bsd.uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rajaraman, Preetha [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Olive, Aliza [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Smith, Susan A. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)] [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Mertens, Ann [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meadows, Anna [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Hammond, Sue [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)] [Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States); Whitton, John [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Inskip, Peter D. [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Robison, Leslie L. [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Diller, Lisa [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Children's Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The carcinogenic risks of low-LET and high-LET ionizing radiations  

SciTech Connect

New information is available concerning the carcinogenic effects of radiation and the implications for risk assessment and risk management. This information comes from further follow-up of the epidemiological studies of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, patients irradiated medically for cancer and allied conditions, and workers exposed in various occupations. In the Japanese atomic bomb survivors the carcinogenic risks are estimated to be somewhat higher than previously, due to the reassessment of the atomic-bomb dosimetry, further follow-up with increase in the number of excess cancer deaths, particularly in survivors irradiated early in life, and changes in the methods of analysis to compute the age-specific risks of cancer. Because of the characteristics of the atomic bomb survivor series as regards sample size, age and sex distribution, duration for follow-up, person-years at risk, and type of dosimetry, the mortality experience of the atomic bomb survivors was selected by the UNSCEAR Committee and the BEIR V Committee as the more appropriate basis for projecting risk estimates for the general population. In the atomic bomb survivors, the dose-effect relationship for overall cancer mortality other than leukemia is consistent with linearity below 3 Gy, while the dose-effect relationship for leukemia, excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia, conforms best to a linear-quadratic function. The shape of the dose-incidence curve at low doses still remains uncertain, and the data do not rule out the possible existence of a threshold for an neoplasm. The excess relative risk of mortality from all cancers combined is estimated to be 1.39 per Gy (shielded kerma), which corresponds to an absolute risk of 10.0 excess cancer deaths per 10,000 PYGy; the relative risks is 1.41 at 1 Gy (organ-absorbed dose), and an absolute risk of 13.07 excess cancer deaths per 10,000 PYGy. 19 refs.

Fabrikant, J.I. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

David J. Brenner, PhD, DSc Index terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there is direct evidence of increased cancer risk in atomic bomb survivors. Estimated dose-, sex-, and smoking), radiation exposure Lung, effects of irradiation on, 60.47 Special Reports Published online 10.1148/radiol status­dependent excess relative risks of lung cancer were derived from cancer incidence data for atomic

Brenner, David Jonathan

191

Increased cardiovascular mortality more than fifteen years after radiotherapy for breast cancer: a population-based study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version. References 1. Shimizu Y, Pierce DA, Preston DL, Mabuchi K: Studies of the mor- tality of atomic bomb survivors: non-cancer mortality 1950– 1990. Radiat Res 1999, 152:374-389. (Report 12, part II) 2... ://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/7/9 Background Studies of survivors of atomic bomb irradiation reveal a radiation dose-related cardiovascular risk [1]. An overview of randomised trials on the effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients showed an excess mortality from...

Roychouduri, Rahul; Robinson, David; Putcha, Venkata; Cuzick, Jack; Darby, Sarah; Moller, Henrik

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Chapter 16: Log-linear regression for Poisson counts Exposure to ionizing radiation is recognized as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the past few decades. These estimates have been based largely on data for survivors of the atomic bombings of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombs. -3-2-10 0-7 12-1 20-2 28-3 0-7 12-1 20-2 28-3 0-7 12-1 20-2 28-3 -3 to the incidence of cancer. The data dis- cussed below report the number of cancer deaths among the survivors

Bardsley, John

193

Small-scale cookoff bomb (SSCB) tests on solutions of DMSO/LX-10-1 and DMSO/PBX-9404  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The small-scale cookoff bomb test was developed by the Navy at China Lake as a method for evaluation of the violence of thermal decomposition of explosives and propellants. The UN {open_quotes}Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Tests and Criteria{close_quotes} (ST/SG/AC.10/11) have accepted the small-scale cookoff bomb test as a test for classification of a substance as an explosive (class 1 substance) for storage and shipment. The US Departments of Transportation and Defense have agreed to use the UN tests as US criteria for storage and shipment. The UN scheme is designed to assess the relative hazard of explosives so that an appropriate classification for transport can be made by the competent authority (DOT). Three thermal tests have been approved: the Koenen test, the internal ignition test and the small-scale cookoff bomb (SSCB) test. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed a dissolution work station for removal of the plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) LX-10-1 and PBX-9404 from two artillery fired atomic projectiles (AFAPs) using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the solvent. The DOE Explosives Safety Manual allows up to 33% solutions of explosives to be handled as non-explosive in the laboratory and 25% solutions to be stored as non-explosives unless the explosive precipitates out. In order to ship solutions of LX-10-1 or PBX-9404 in DMSO on US highways for waste or recycling as non-explosives, these solutions must be approved for shipping by the DOT based on the results of UN test series 1. The compositions of LX-10-1 and PBX-9404 are given in Table 1. The shock sensitivity of solutions of these two plastic bonded explosives in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been evaluated using the UN series 1 gap test for liquids as described in a previous report. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the SSCB tests on pure DMSO and 25% PBX solutions in DMSO to assist in the classification of these solutions.

Helm, F.; Hoffman, D.M.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Case Study: Iran, Islam, the NPT, and the Bomb  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this case study are: (1) To examine the correlation between Iran's nuclear program and clerical statements; (2) To evaluate the importance of these statements; (3) To understand the relationship between policy and fatwas (Islamic decrees); (4) To address the issue of a 'nuclear fatwa'; and (5) To examine how, if at all, Sharia (Islamic law) has influenced Iran's actions or inactions with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Iran's adherence to its IAEA Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol. The Islamic Republic of Iran (hereinafter Iran) is one of two theocracies in the world, the second being Vatican City. Iran's government derives its constitutional, moral, and political legitimacy from Islam. As a result of this theocratic culture, rules are set and interpreted with a much different calibrator than that of the Western world. Islam affects all aspects of Iranian life. This is further complicated by the fact that Islam is not a nationalistic faith, in that many people all over the world believe in and adhere to Islamic principles. As a result, a political system that derives much of its fervor from being nationalistic is caught between two worlds, one within the land boundaries of Iran and the other within a faith that transcends boundaries. Thus, any understanding of Islamic law must first be understood within this delicate balance of nationalism and transcendence. Iran has found itself on the international stage concerning its nuclear program. Because Iran is a theocratic state, it is imperative to examine its political moves, speeches, rights, and obligations through the lens of Islam. This study will examine how Islam plays a role in Iran's dealing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its understanding of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), including parties obligations under Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol, and also provide a recommendation on how to move forward in dealings with Iran based in part on an understanding of Islamic principles.

Saunders, E .

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Living in the Question? The Berlin Nuclear Crisis Critical Oral History, Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to drop the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima. Bundy was laterto drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Stimson had chairedof the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Nitze

Gould, Benina Berger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ORIGINAL RESEARCH Health Behaviors and Quality of Life of Cancer Survivors in Massachusetts, 2006: Data Use for Comprehensive Cancer Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pierre S. Health behaviors and quality of life of cancer survivors in Massachusetts, 2006: data use for comprehensive cancer control. Prev Chronic Dis 2010;7(1).

Temeika L. Fairley; Phd Helen Hawk; Phd Snaltze Pierre; Peer Reviewed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Manhattan Project: Final Approval to Build the Bomb, Washington, D.C.,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Roosevelt signs declaration of war with Japan, December 8, 1941. FINAL APPROVAL TO BUILD THE BOMB President Roosevelt signs declaration of war with Japan, December 8, 1941. FINAL APPROVAL TO BUILD THE BOMB (Washington, D.C., December 1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 Anxious as he was to get moving, Leslie Groves decided to make one final quality control check. On November 18, 1942, Groves appointed Warren K. Lewis of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to head a final review committee, comprised of himself and three DuPont representatives. During the final two weeks of November, the committee traveled from New York to Chicago to Berkeley and back again through Chicago. It endorsed the work on gaseous diffusion at Columbia, though it made some organizational recommendations; in fact, the Lewis committee advocated elevating gaseous diffusion to first priority and expressed reservations about the electromagnetic program despite an impassioned presentation by Ernest Lawrence in Berkeley. Upon returning to Chicago, Crawford H. Greenewalt, a member of the Lewis committee, was present at Stagg Field when CP-1 (Chicago Pile #1) first went critical. (For more on CP-1, skip ahead to "Early Pile Design, 1942.") Significant as this moment was in the history of physics, it came after the Lewis committee endorsed moving piles to the pilot stage and one day after Groves instructed DuPont to move into pile design and construction.

198

HRP-EVALUATION OF HEAT REMOVAL METHODS FOR CONTROLLING TEMPERATURES OF AN ORR SLURRY BOMB  

SciTech Connect

Two methods were evaluated for removal of 1 to 5 kilowatts from a 1-in.- diam. by 10 in. long bomb to be (W-7405-eng-261. 8O(ph OTS); 70(mf OTS). maintained at 250 to 300 deg C. Conductance control, varying the composition of a helium--air mixture in a 8 mil annulus to give a controlled conduction heat transfer resistance, gave a simple, smooth, flexible control method. Use of water sprayed into air gave the required range of heat fluxes, but sometimes gave uncontrollable instabilities due to progressive vapor binding. (auth)

Holmes, J.M.

1958-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Glossary Term - Atomic Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Previous Term (Alpha Particle) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Avogadro's Number) Avogadro's Number Atomic Number Silver's atomic number is 47 The atomic number is equal to...

200

Modifying EPA Radiation Risk Models Based on BEIR VII  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for internal lung dose in Mayak Workers and external lung dose in the Life Span Study Cohort of Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors exposed between the ages of 15 and 60 Figure 12-1A Age-time patterns in radiation. Introduction In 1994, EPA published a report, referred to as the "Blue Book," which lays out EPA's current

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

JPP 2008, 60: 943950 2008 The Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on epidemiological data from survivors of the Japanese atomic bombs, is estimated to be 0.05 per sievert (ICRP 2005 in this effect was sparked by earlier reports demonstrating that, following a low dose of a-particles, a larger

Brenner, David Jonathan

202

736 EXTENDED ABSTRACTS linear regressions of the data obtained with exposures at high and low  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for total cancers as a function of dose in the atomic bomb survivors raised the question in some minds rates. Variations on the Theme For many years there have been sporadic reports of increased effec of the reports are for genetic effects), is an enigma unless it represents one aspect of the complex dose

Brenner, David Jonathan

203

For personal use. Only reproduce with permission from The Lancet Publishing Group. 2192 THE LANCET Vol 363 June 26, 2004 www.thelancet.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range? The individuals in the lowest dose group of atomic-bomb survivors that showed a significant rise expatriate medical personnel as a short-term measure or hiring medical professionals from the brain drain countries have changed dramatically and paradigm shifts are called for to come up with effective strategies

Brenner, David Jonathan

204

ORIGINAL PAPER A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- induced second malignancies, on Japanese atomic bomb survivors, and on background US cancer incidence and carcin- ogenic agent. As such, it is effective as a treatment for cancer, but can also induce secondary (&) Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th St., New York, NY

Brenner, David Jonathan

205

Eric J. Hall, DSc David J. Brenner, DSc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studied atomic bomb survivors, where the control populations are well defined. The mean life expectancy: 0.92, 1.15) compared with that of all medical consultants. No sign of increased longevity here. Why population were used and were supplemented with census-based standard mortality ratio data for medical

Brenner, David Jonathan

206

Questions and Answers About Female Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the radiation from a mammogram? Should I worry about this? Data from the atomic bomb survivors and other groups. The single most effective way a woman can detect early breast cancer is through routine mammography medical history · Physical exam which includes palpation of the breast and nearby lymph nodes · Imaging

207

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: New doses, risks, and their implications  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes the recent re-evaluations of the dose and risk of cancer among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It addresses briefly their limitations, and describes some of their implications for the lifetime projection of the risk of a fatal cancer following exposure to ionizing radiation.

Schull, W.J.; Shimizu, Y.; Kato, H. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center. Summary: ... Atomic Spectroscopy Data Webpage. End Date: ongoing. Lead Organizational Unit: physlab. Contact. ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Impact of Preoperative Radiotherapy on General and Disease-Specific Health Status of Rectal Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To date, few studies have evaluated the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (pRT) on long-term health status of rectal cancer survivors. Using a population-based sample, we assessed the impact of pRT on general and disease-specific health status of rectal cancer survivors up to 10 years postdiagnosis. The health status of older ({>=}75 years old at diagnosis) pRT survivors was also compared with that of younger survivors. Methods and Materials: Survivors identified from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry treated with surgery only (SU) or with pRT between 1998 and 2007 were included. Survivors completed the Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Colorectal 38 (EORTC QLQ-CR38) questionnaire. The SF-36 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 (sexuality subscale) scores of the survivors were compared to an age- and sex-matched Dutch normal population. Results: A total of 340 survivors (response, 85%; pRT survivors, 71%) were analyzed. Overall, survivors had similar general health status. Both short-term (<5 years) and long-term ({>=}5 years) pRT survivors had significantly poorer body image and more problems with gastrointestinal function, male sexual dysfunction, and defecation than SU survivors. Survivors had comparable general health status but greater sexual dysfunction than the normal population. Older pRT survivors had general and disease-specific health status comparable to that of younger pRT survivors. Conclusions: For better survivorship care, rectal cancer survivors could benefit from increased clinical and psychological focus on the possible long-term morbidity of treatment and its effects on health status.

Thong, Melissa S.Y., E-mail: M.Thong@uvt.nl [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mols, Floortje [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lemmens, Valery E.P.P. [Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rutten, Harm J.T. [Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Roukema, Jan A. [Department of Surgery, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Martijn, Hendrik [Department of Radiotherapy, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de [Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University (Netherlands); Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Atomic magnetometer  

SciTech Connect

An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

Schwindt, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Cort N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

QUESTION 894: How far is it from Denver to Aspen? DOCNO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ANSWER: miniaturization of atomic structures QUESTION ... QUESTION 1198: When was Hiroshima bombed? ... dropped the atom bomb on Hiroshima ...

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Beyond Two Homelands: Migration and Transnationalism of Japanese Americans in the Pacific, 1930-1955  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that an atomic bomb had been dropped on Hiroshima. The newstrapped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the atomic bombs were

Jin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

TIGER -- A technology to improve the delivery capability of nuclear bombs and the survivability of the delivery aircraft  

SciTech Connect

The TIGER (Terminal guided and Extended-Range) Program was initiated in 1972 to study improved delivery capabilities for stockpiled tactical nuclear bombs. The Southeast Asia conflict fostered the development of air-delivered standoff conventional weapons utilizing terminal guidance systems. SNL initiated the TIGER program to determine if current nuclear bombs could be provided with a similarly accurate standoff capabilities. These conventional weapon delivery techniques, while allowing highly accurate attack, generally require entering the target area at high altitude to establish line of sight to the target. In parallel with the TIGER program, system studies analyzed this concept and showed marked improvement in aircraft and weapon survivability with moderate standoff (10--20 km) if low level deliveries (60 m) could be accomplished. As a result of this work, the TIGER program was redirected in early 1974 to demonstrate a standoff bomb with good accuracy (90 m CEP) when delivered from low flying aircraft. This program redirection resulted in the selection of an inertial guidance system to replace the earlier terminal guidance systems. This program was called the Extended-Range Bomb (ERB). In May 1974, a joint Air Force/DOE study identified the desirability of having a single tactical weapon which could be employed against either fixed, preselected targets, or mobile battlefield targets. Studies conducted on the ERB system showed that the inertially guided weapon could fly not only the standoff mission but also a return-to-target mission against the mobile battlefield targets whose locations are not known accurately enough to use a standoff delivery. The ERB program evolved from these initial investigations into an exploratory program to develop the hardware and demonstrate the technology required to fly standoff and return-to-target trajectories. The application of this technology in the form of field retrofit kits to the B61 bomb is called TIGER II.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects  

SciTech Connect

Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

1997-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sensitivity of the Simulated Distributions of Water Masses, CFCs, and Bomb 14C to Parameterizations of Mesoscale Tracer Transports in a Model of the North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A basinwide ocean general circulation model of the North Pacific Ocean is used to study the sensitivity of the simulated distributions of water masses, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and bomb carbon-14 isotope (14C) to parameterizations of mesoscale ...

Yongfu Xu; Shigeaki Aoki; Koh Harada

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The socio-technical construction of precision bombing : a study of shared control and cognition by humans, machines, and doctrine during World War II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the creation and initial use of the precision bombing system employed by the United States Army Air Forces during World War II in the opening phase of the Combined Bomber Offensive against Germany. ...

O'Mara, Raymond P. (Raymond Patrick)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Legacy of a Bomb: The Manhattan Project’s Impact on the Scientific Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993. Atomic Harvest: Hanford and the Lethal Toll ofs technological innovations. Hanford Site remained a nucleartechnology. Some in Hanford and most of the structures were

Gao, Jany Huan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Universe Adventure - Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matter and Atoms Matter and Atoms Richard Feynman "If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generations of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is that...all things are made of atoms." -Richard P. Feynman, winner of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics All is atoms Matter is made of atoms, and atoms are comprised of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Everything in the Universe is made of matter. Though matter exists in many different forms, each form is made out of the same basic constituents: small particles called atoms. Atoms themselves are made of smaller particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of even smaller particles called quarks.

219

Reading Comprehension - Atomic History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic History Atomic History A Greek philosopher named Democritus said that all atoms are small, hard particles. He thought that atoms were made of a single material formed into different shapes and sizes. The word " _________ element compound mixture atom " is derived from the Greek word "atomos" which means "not able to be divided." In 1803, John Dalton, a school teacher, proposed his atomic theory. Dalton's theory states that elements (substances composed of only one type of _________ molecules ions atom ) combine in certain proportions to form _________ compounds atoms mixtures elements . In 1897, a British scientist named J. J. Thomson experimented with a cathode-ray tube which had a positively charged plate. The plate attracted negatively charged particles that we now call _________ protons neutrons

220

Atomic and Molecular Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DG, * SRD 105 Physic Laboratory's Elemental ... Nuclear Physics SRD 144 Atomic Weights & ... Physical Constants SRD 121 Fundamental Physical ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Atomizing nozzle and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Calibrated Atomic Force Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vorburger, SL Tan, NG Orji, J. Fu, “Interlaboratory Comparison of Traceable Atomic Force Microscope Pitch Measurements,” SPIE Proceedings Vol. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

A failure to communicate Is God A Scientist? A Dialogue between Science and Religion by Robert Crawford, Palgrave MacMillan, 2004. 45.00 hbk (192 pages)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to demonstrate the power of the atomic bomb in 1949, before it was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the bomb

Mangel, Marc

224

Number: 1394 Description: In what ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1752 Description: When was the Oklahoma City bombing? ... name of the plane that dropped the Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima? ...

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mercury (Hg) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Mercury (Hg). ...

226

Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plutonium (Pu) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Plutonium (Pu). ...

227

Atomic Data for Uranium (U )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Uranium (U) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Uranium (U). ...

228

Atomic Data for Thorium (Th)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thorium (Th) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Thorium (Th). ...

229

Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen (H) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Hydrogen (H). ...

230

Atomic Data for Tungsten (W )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tungsten (W) Homepage - Introduction Finding list Select element by name. Select element by atomic number. ... Atomic Data for Tungsten (W). ...

231

ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATOMS ATOMS PEACE WAR Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission Richard G. Hewlett and lack M. Roll With a Foreword by Richard S. Kirkendall and an Essay on Sources by Roger M. Anders University of California Press Berkeley Los Angeles London Published 1989 by the University of California Press Berkeley and Los Angeles, California University of California Press, Ltd. London, England Prepared by the Atomic Energy Commission; work made for hire. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Hewlett, Richard G. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961. (California studies in the history of science) Bibliography: p. Includes index. 1. Nuclear energy-United States-History. 2. U.S. Atomic Energy Commission-History. 3. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969.

232

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

234

Atomic Spectroscopy: An Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 60. A. de-Shalit and I. Talmi, Nuclear Shell Theory (Academic, New York, 1963). ... CE Moore, Atomic Energy Levels, Natl. Stand. Ref. ...

235

NIST Atomic Spectra Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ground states and ionization energies of atoms ... the US Department of Energy, by the ... SRDP), and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Cold Atoms News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the first time caused a gas of atoms ... mysterious data in ultracold gases of rubidium ... Material May Demonstrate Long-Sought 'Liquid' Magnetic State ...

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Harnessed Atom  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased,...

238

Atomic Collapse Observed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collapse State Observed Aided by Simulations, Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 |...

239

Structure of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Bound to An Antibody From a Human Survivor  

SciTech Connect

Ebola virus (EBOV) entry requires the surface glycoprotein (GP) to initiate attachment and fusion of viral and host membranes. Here we report the crystal structure of EBOV GP in its trimeric, pre-fusion conformation (GP1+GP2) bound to a neutralizing antibody, KZ52, derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak. Three GP1 viral attachment subunits assemble to form a chalice, cradled by the GP2 fusion subunits, while a novel glycan cap and projected mucin-like domain restrict access to the conserved receptor-binding site sequestered in the chalice bowl. The glycocalyx surrounding GP is likely central to immune evasion and may explain why survivors have insignificant neutralizing antibody titres. KZ52 recognizes a protein epitope at the chalice base where it clamps several regions of the pre-fusion GP2 to the amino terminus of GP1. This structure provides a template for unraveling the mechanism of EBOV GP-mediated fusion and for future immunotherapeutic development.

Lee, J.E.; Fusco, M.L.; Hessell, A.J.; Oswald, W.B.; Burton, D.R.; Saphire, E.O.

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

High-energy gamma rays in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Implications for risk and W{sub R}  

SciTech Connect

Based on the DS86 dosimetry system, nearly all of the dose to survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was due to unusually high-energy gamma rays, predominantly in the 2- to 5-MeV range. These high energies resulted in part from neutron capture gamma rays as the bomb neutrons penetrated large distances of air. Because of the inverse relationship between energy and biological effectiveness, these high-energy gamma rays are expected to be substantially less effective in producing biological damage than the radiations commonly used in radiobiology and risk assessment. This observation has implications for radiation protection and risk assessment.

Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

All Articles Diplomacy and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Atomic Bomb Atomic War Hiroshima and Nagasaki Email The Unprecedented Shift in Japan's Population

Smil, Vaclav

242

Urethral Pain Among Prostate Cancer Survivors 1 to 14 Years After Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how treatment-related and non-treatment-related factors impact urethral pain among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Men treated for prostate cancer with radiation therapy at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Goeteborg, Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were approached with a study-specific postal questionnaire addressing symptoms after treatment, including urethral burning pain during urination (n=985). The men had received primary or salvage external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (BT). Prescribed doses were commonly 70 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions for primary and salvage EBRT and 50 Gy plus 2 Multiplication-Sign 10.0 Gy for EBRT + BT. Prostatic urethral doses were assessed from treatment records. We also recruited 350 non-pelvic-irradiated, population-based controls matched for age and residency to provide symptom background rates. Results: Of the treated men, 16% (137 of 863) reported urethral pain, compared with 11% (27 of 242) of the controls. The median time to follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-14.3 years). Prostatic urethral doses were similar to prescription doses for EBRT and 100% to 115% for BT. Fractionation-corrected dose and time to follow-up affected the occurrence of the symptom. For a follow-up {>=}3 years, 19% of men (52 of 268) within the 70-Gy EBRT + BT group reported pain, compared with 10% of men (23 of 222) treated with 70 Gy primary EBRT (prevalence ratio 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.0). Of the men treated with salvage EBRT, 10% (20 of 197) reported urethral pain. Conclusions: Survivors treated with EBRT + BT had a higher risk for urethral pain compared with those treated with EBRT. The symptom prevalence decreased with longer time to follow-up. We found a relationship between fractionation-corrected urethral dose and pain. Among long-term prostate cancer survivors, the occurrence of pain was not increased above the background rate for prostatic urethral doses up to 70 Gy{sub 3}.

Pettersson, Niclas, E-mail: niclas.pettersson@vgregion.se [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Olsson, Caroline [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alsadius, David; Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

U.S. NAVY STRUCTURES. ANNEX 3.2 OF SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR'S REPORT OF ATOMIC WEAPON TESTS AT ENIWETOK, 1951  

SciTech Connect

Structures are subjected to a 50-kt blast, in order to obtain fundamental data on structures subjected to blast loading, to observe the response of the structures under this loading, and to determine the relative blast-resistance merits of several structural types. Modes of failure are determined. Shaped structures are found to be superdor to rectangular structures. Earth cover for the structures is also found to increase the blast resistance. It is found that standard Navy heavy bomb-proof structures with modifications can withstand a near-surface atomic burst at ground zero. (T.F.H.)

Hayen, C.L.

1952-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Studies of human mutation. Final report, [November 1, 1987--May 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report on this grant, covering the period November 1, 1987 through May 31, 1996. This program was devoted to developing better technologies for the study of mutations in human populations. Work included studies on the radiation effects on genetic mutations in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors, development of new methods for detecting mutations, collection of data on the genetic population structure of native Central Americans, and other miscellaneous related activities.

Neel, J.V.; Hanash, S.M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Materials' Deformation Dynamics at Atomic Scale In situ Atomic .... What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

246

general_atomics.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

former former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level. The General Atomics site is in the center of Torrey Mesa Science Center, a 304-acre industrial

247

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Discussions between DOE and General Atomics led to an agreed cost-sharing and no-fee arrangement for the decontamination and site...

248

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

Huxford, Theodore J. (Harriman, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Metal atomization spray nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

Huxford, T.J.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

Atomizing nozzle and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

251

Atomic Data for Americium (Am)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Atomic Number = 95. Atomic Weight = (243). Reference E95. Isotope, Mass, Abundance, Spin, Mag Moment, 241 Am, 241.056823, 0, 5/2, +1.61. ...

252

Questions and Answers - How do atoms form?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Biggest and smallest atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Does gravity affect atoms?) Does gravity affect atoms? How do atoms form? The current view is that...

253

Questions and Answers - Can you crush atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does gravity affect atoms? Previous Question (Does gravity affect atoms?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Parts and weights of atoms?) Parts and weights of atoms?...

254

“The Annual Coulter Lecture: Reflections of a Wandering Bookman,” California State Library Foundation Bulletin volume 90 (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

August 6, 1945 atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima. Obviouslyfirst atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima in southwesternuse of an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima on August 6,

Gary E. Strong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Peaceful Uses of the Atom and Atoms for Peace  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Peaceful Uses of the Atom Peaceful Uses of the Atom Fermi and Atoms for Peace · Understanding the Atom · Seaborg · Teller Atoms for Peace Atoms for Peace + 50 - Conference, October 22, 2003 Celebrating the 50th anniversary of President Eisenhower's "Atoms for Peace" speech to the UN General Assembly Atoms for Peace (video 12:00 Minutes) Atoms for Peace Address given by Dwight D. Eisenhower before the General Assembly of the United Nations, New York City, December 8, 1953 Documents: Atomic Power in Space: A History A history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States from the mid-1950s through 1982; interplanetary space exploration successes and achievements have been made possible by this technology. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

256

NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center. ... Responds to user requests for data, literature references, and technical information. ...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

Lesson 3- Atoms and Isotopes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

You’ve probably heard people refer to nuclear energy as “atomic energy.” Why? Nuclear energy is the energy that is stored in the bonds of atoms, inside the nucleus. Nuclear power plants are designed to capture this energy as heat and convert it to electricity. This lesson looks closely at what atoms are and how atoms store energy.

258

general_atomics.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

former General former General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was constructed in 1959 and operated until 1991. The site encompassed approximately 7,400 square feet of laboratory and remote operations cells. Licensed operations at the facility included receipt, handling, and shipment of radioactive materials; remote handling, examination, and storage of previously irradiated nuclear fuel materials; pilot-scale tritium extraction operations; and development, fabrication, and inspection of uranium oxide-beryllium oxide fuel materials. General Atomics performed most of the work for the federal government. The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility was located in a 60-acre complex 13 miles northwest of downtown San Diego, 1 mile inland from the Pacific Ocean, and approximately 300 feet above sea level.

259

JILA Researchers Discover Atomic Clock Can Simulate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Artist's conception of interactions among atoms in JILA's strontium atomic clock during a quantum simulation experiment. ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

260

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

themanhattanproject2010pdf Download Gosling, The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb F.G. Gosling. The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb. DOEMA-0002 Revised....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atomic Bomb Radiation Effects Life Span Study Report 8.reports derive mainly from the epidemiological studies of the Japanese atomic bomb

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eis-0225-sa-05-supplement-analysis Download The Manhattan Project: Making of the Atomic Bomb http:energy.govmanagementdownloadsmanhattan-project-making-atomic-bomb...

263

THE IMPACT OF THE 1980 BEIR-III REPORT ON LOW-LEVEL RADIATION RISK ASSESSMENT, RADIATION PROTECTION GUIDES, AND PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

populations. Atomic-bomb data for Hiroshima show that thethe Japanese atomic bomb s u r v i v o r s i n Hiroshima and

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

U.S. racial imaginaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

memories of pre-and post-atomic bomb Hiroshima to comment onMasao survived the atomic bomb in Hiroshima before returning

Kim, Jinah

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 16540 of 28,560 results. Download The Manhattan Project: Making the Atomic Bomb http:energy.govdownloadsmanhattan-project-making-atomic-bomb Download Waste Processing...

266

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 At The Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation Of Previous Conflicting Results And Collection Of New Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride ({sup 36}Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) at Yucca Mountain as the tunnels were excavated. The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing 'bomb-pulse' {sup 36}Cl reached the repository horizon in the {approx}50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Moreover, the data support the concept that so-called fast pathways for infiltration not only exist but are active, possibly through a combination of porous media, faults and/or other geologic features. Due to the significance of {sup 36}Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow and transport, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and implement a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS chose to drill new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for {sup 36}Cl/Cl using both active and passive leaches, with the USGS/LLNL concluding that the active leach extracted too much rock-Cl and the passive leach did not show bomb-pulse ratios. Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points, including the conceptual strategy for sampling, interpretation and use of tritium ({sup 3}H) data, and the importance and interpretation of blanks, in addition to the presence or absence of bomb-pulse {sup 36}Cl, an evaluation by an independent entity, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), using new samples was initiated. This report is the result of that study. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source or sources of the conflicting results from the previous validation study, and to obtain additional data to determine whether or not there are bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. To that en4 we have engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. We have also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of Yucca Mountain, and opportunistic samples of seep water from inside the south ramp of the ESF.

J. Cizdziel

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte, E-mail: ann-charlotte.waldenstrom@oncology.gu.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olsson, Caroline [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Al-Abany, Massoud [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tucker, Susan [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden) [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Tenth Atomic Physics Program workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains short papers and abstracts on the following main topics: Ion-atom collision theory; laser physics; spectroscopy of atoms; spectroscopy of ions; and high velocity collisions.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Nuclear effects in atomic transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

Pálffy, Adriana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Atomic Devices and Instrumentation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2001 and 2005, demonstrated an atomic clock physics package with ... magnetometers for magnetic anomaly detection, nuclear magnetic resonance ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

Atom-Based Dimensional Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Awarded a five year, three phase DARPA contract to conduct collaborative research in atomically precise positioning, patterning and metrology ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bomb-Pulse Chlorine-36 at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository Horizon: An Investigation of Previous Conflicting Results and Collection of New Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) found elevated ratios of chlorine-36 to total chloride (36Cl/Cl) in samples of rock collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain (YM). The data were interpreted as an indication that fluids containing “bomb-pulse” 36Cl reached the repository horizon in the ~50 years since the peak period of above-ground nuclear testing. Due to the significance of 36Cl data to conceptual models of unsaturated zone flow, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) implemented a study to validate the LANL findings. The USGS drilled new boreholes at select locations across zones where bomb-pulse ratios had previously been identified. The drill cores were analyzed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Because consensus was not reached between the USGS/LLNL and LANL on several fundamental points including the presence or absence of bomb-pulse 36Cl, an evaluation by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), was initiated. The overall objectives of the UNLV study were to investigate the source of the validation study’s conflicting results, and to obtain additional data on bomb-pulse isotopes at the repository horizon. UNLV engaged in discussions with previous investigators, reviewed reports, and analyzed archived samples. UNLV also collected new samples of rock from the ESF, soil profiles from the surface of YM, and samples of seep water from inside the ESF. Samples were analyzed for 36Cl/Cl ratios, and 99Tc and 129I in select samples. A column experiment was conducted mimicking the passage of bomb-pulse 36Cl through YM tuff. The work faced several obstacles including an extended shutdown of the tunnel. Only one sample yielded a background corrected 36Cl/Cl ratio that was higher than the accepted bomb-pulse threshold (1250 x 10-15). Specimen 01034214 obtained from the Drill Hole Wash fault (19+33) had a ratio of 1590 ± 80 (1?) x10-15, whereas the other separate sample from this fault zone yielded 1160 ± 50 (1?) x 10-15. Three samples collected from Alcove 6 averaged 490 ± 100 (1?) x10-15; a sample from Sundance Fault resulted in a ratio of 920 ± 60 (1?) x10-15, and a sample from the Bow Ridge Fault produced 530 ± 20 (1?) x10-15. The results are significant because: 1) they tend to be lower than LANL data for comparable samples, albeit in agreement with the range of data produced in the area, and 2) they show that a bomb-pulse 36Cl/Cl ratio was measured in rock collected at the repository horizon level by a second and independent group of investigators (UNLV). Because of time UNLV was not able to replicate the results, and these few data points are insufficient to draw major and definitive conclusions. Leachates of soil samples collected from the surface above the ESF yielded several ratios with bomb-pulse 36Cl, particularly for samples encompassing the wetting front. Soil samples collected above the south ramp, where there was limited soil coverage due to a large amount of rock outcrop, had relatively large ratios ranging from 2170 ± 110 (1?) x10-15 to 5670 ± 350 (1?) x10-15. Soil samples from profiles from above the north ramp ranged from 820 ± 70 (1?) x10-15 to 2390 ± 160 (1?) x10-15, which compare favorably with previous measurements near the site. Water seepage into the ESF south ramp and 36Cl standards made from NIST material were also analyzed. The standards were produced to have nominal 36Cl/Cl ratios (10-15) of 500, 2,500 and 10,000 and the results showed good agreement with the calculated ratios. The seepage samples ranged between 680 ± 40 (1?) x10-15 to 1110 ± 40 (1?) x10-15, consistent with that found for modern meteoric water, with a small bomb-pulse component. Bomb-pulse 36Cl may not have been incorporated in this fast-path water because the surface above the infiltration zone consists mostly of outcrop and the flow pathways have probably mostly been leached. 99Tc was measured in five of nine leaches of ESF rock but poor analytical recoveries and lack of data overlap with 36Cl limit interpretations of these data

Cizdziel, James

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Why is hydrogen's atomic number 1?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the number of protons in an atom's nucleus. Hydrogen's atomic number is 1 because all hydrogen atoms contain exactly one proton. Author: Steve Gagnon, Science Education Specialist...

274

NIST: Phys. Lab. Brochure; Atomic Physics Div.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ultra-cold atoms and investigate atom optics for innovative instrumentation. Measure and analyze spectra of highly ionized atoms for fusion energy ...

275

CSU -Spring 2012 ART 492A: ART HISTORY SEMINAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and culture. Atomic tourism started at the beginning of the Cold War when televised atomic bomb detonations swept the nation into an atomic craze. Miss Atomic Bomb beauty contests became media spectacles while to Chernobyl and Fukushima Watching the Bombs go off: Nuclear Test Sites and the Spectacle Miss Atomic Bomb

Stephens, Graeme L.

276

Atomic data for fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.) [eds.; Barnett, C.F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Vital Legacy - Biological and Environmental Research in the Atomic Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Islanders exposed to fallout from a 1954 atmos- pheric testexposed to radioactive fallout during a 1954 U.S. bomb testingested or inhaled radioactive fallout and of radioactivity

Vaughan editor, Douglas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Questions and Answers - Does gravity affect atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Answers Main Index Next Question (Can you crush atoms?) Can you crush atoms? Does gravity affect atoms? Gravity affects atoms the same way it affects all other matter. Every...

279

Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic ...

Cronin, Alexander D.

280

Magnetometry with entangled atomic samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a theory for the estimation of a scalar or a vector magnetic field by its influence on an ensemble of trapped spin polarized atoms. The atoms interact off-resonantly with a continuous laser field, and the measurement of the polarization rotation of the probe light, induced by the dispersive atom-light coupling, leads to spin-squeezing of the atomic sample which enables an estimate of the magnetic field which is more precise than that expected from standard counting statistics. For polarized light and polarized atoms, a description of the non-classical components of the collective spin angular momentum for the atoms and the collective Stokes vectors of the light-field in terms of effective gaussian position and momentum variables is practically exact. The gaussian formalism describes the dynamics of the system very effectively and accounts explicitly for the back-action on the atoms due to measurement and for the estimate of the magnetic field. Multi-component magnetic fields are estimated by the measurement of suitably chosen atomic observables and precision and efficiency is gained by dividing the atomic gas in two or more samples which are entangled by the dispersive atom-light interaction.

Vivi Petersen; Lars Bojer Madsen; Klaus Molmer

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Atomic Energy Commission Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Takes Over Responsibility for all Atomic Energy Programs | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

282

Atomic total energies: Atomic Ref.Data Elec Struc Cal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These tables contain the atomic total energies and orbital eigenvalues, for the ground electronic configuration of the elements H ... Definition of format ...

283

Atomic total energies: Atomic Ref. Data Elec. Struc. Cal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These tables contain the atomic total energies and orbital eigenvalues, for the ground electronic configuration of the elements H ... Definition of format ...

284

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Cooling and Cold Atomic Matter: to advance the understanding and applications of cold atomic matter, including ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

NIST - Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra Bibliographic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in this database are from Bibliography on Atomic Energy Levels and ... references to atomic transition probabilities, line intensities, or broadening. ...

286

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Frank K. Pittman, Director, bivisioa of Waste &&gement and s- portation, Headquarters j CONTAMItUTED RX-AEC-OWNED OR LEASED FACILITIES' This memorandum responds to your TWX certain information on the above subject. the documentation necessary to answer your available due to the records disposal vailing at the time of release or From records that are available and from disc&ions with most familiar with the transfer operations, &have the current radiological conditibn of transferred property is adequate under present standards. The following tabulations follow the format suggested in your TWX and are grouped to an operations or contract r+ponsibility. A,I Ex-AEC Storage Sites - I r:/ National Stockpile Site '(NSS) and OperatEonal

287

NIST Atomic Spectra Bibliographic Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Atomic Energy Levels Data Center and Data Center on ... Reference Data Program (SRDP) and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Atomic Devices and Instrumentation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ten millionths of a second over the course of one day, and are paving the way for atomic-level timekeeping in portable, battery-operated systems ...

289

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The program in atomic spectroscopy at NIST provides accurate reference data on spectral lines and energy levels for a wide variety of important ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Technical Highlights Atomic Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physics Division is to develop and apply atomic physics research methods ... community, and to produce and critically compile physical reference data ...

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

291

Radon concentrations in residential housing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to assess the variability of exposure expected among atomic bomb survivors. Two hundred dwellings, mostly belonging to members of the fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors under study by the Radiation Effects Research Foundations, were selected for this measurement. The geometric mean values of the radon concentrations for 100 dwellings in Hiroshima and 99 dwellings in Nagasaki measured by Track-Etcho Type SF detectors were 56.8 Bq m{sup {minus}3} and 28.5 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed between lung cancer mortalities in the low-dose range in the two cities. However, apparent values of the mortality rate for low dose range in Hiroshima are consistently greater than those in Nagasaki. The exposure to radon and its progeny and the atomic bomb radiation effect might have some cooperative effects on the lung cancer incidence.

Yonehara, Hidenori; Aoyama, Takashi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science (Japan); Radford, E.P. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 21, No. 6, pp. 12491254, 2002 Printed in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- posure to ionizing radiation resulting from atomic bomb ex- plosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan

Baker, Robert J.

293

Number: 894 Description: How far is it ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Number: 1198 Description: When was Hiroshima bombed? ... 1264 Description: What is the atomic weight of ...

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 81, NO. 6, 25 SEPTEMBER 2001 625 CURRENTSCIENCECURRENTSCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformed into an atomic bomb. Hiroshima and Nagasaki were instantly erased and immortalized in the history

Balaram , P.

295

Ionic Liquids as New Solvents for Improved Separation of ...  

•Graphite reactor, plutonium (Pu) pilot plant, proved the feasibility of Pu separation for the atomic bomb.

296

4. Machine Tr,ansUation Martin Kay, Chairperson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slocum, University of Texas A Manhattan project could produce an atomic bomb, and the heroic efforts

297

AtomicNuclear Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTML_PAGES HTML_PAGES This AtomicNuclearProperties page is under intermittent development. Suggestions and comments are welcome. Please report errors. Chemical elements: For entries in red, a pull-down menu permits selection of the physical state. Cryogenic liquid densties are at the boiling point at 1 atm. 0n 1Ps 1H 2He 3Li 4Be 5B 6C 7N 8O 9F 10Ne 11Na 12Mg 13Al 14Si 15P 16S 17Cl 18Ar 19K 20Ca 21Sc 22Ti 23V 24Cr 25Mn 26Fe 27Co 28Ni 29Cu 30Zn 31Ga 32Ge 33As 34Se 35Br 36Kr 37Rb 38Sr 39Y 40Zr 41Nb 42Mo 43Tc 44Ru 45Rh 46Pd 47Ag 48Cd 49In 50Sn 51Sb 52Te 53I 54Xe 55Cs 56Ba 57La 72Hf 73Ta 74W 75Re 76Os 77Ir 78Pt 79Au 80Hg 81Tl 82Pb 83Bi 84Po 85At 86Rn 87Fr 88Ra 89Ac 104Rf 105Db 106Sg 107Bh 108Hs 109Mt 110Ds 111Rg 112 113 114 115 116 mt 118

298

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATOMIC LAW  

SciTech Connect

Since a uniform federal statute hss not been passed in the German Federal Republic, the development of atomic law has centered around the formation of the Federal Ministry for Atomic Affairs, appeal to the German Commission, and the enactment of temporary laws in several of the states. (J.S.R.)

Fischerhof, H.

1958-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Atomic, Molecular & Optical Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences The goal of the program is to understand the structure and dynamics of atoms and molecules using photons and ions as probes. The current program is focussed on studying inner-shell photo-ionization and photo-excitation of atoms and molecules, molecular orientation effects in slow collisions, slowing and cooling molecules, and X-ray photo-excitation of laser-dressed atoms. The experimental and theoretical efforts are designed to break new ground and to provide basic knowledge that is central to the programmatic goals of the Department of Energy (DOE). Unique LBNL facilities such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ECR ion sources at the 88-inch cyclotron, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) are

300

Spectral Emission of Moving Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A renewed analysis of the H.E. Ives and G.R. Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215) concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2006-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Manhattan Project: Adventures Inside the Atom  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM ADVENTURES INSIDE THE ATOM General Electric, National Archives (1948) Resources > Library Below is Adventures Inside the Atom, a comic book history of nuclear energy that was produced in 1948 by the General Electric Company. Scroll down to view the full-size images of each page. This publication was produced at the request of the the Assistant Manager for Public Education, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Atomic Energy Commission. It is reproduced here via the National Archives. Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 1 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 2 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 3 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 4 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 5 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 6 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 7 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 8 Adventures Inside the Atom, p. 9

302

In-situ control system for atomization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

In-situ control system for atomization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Figliola, Richard S. (Central, SC); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

304

Bomb squad diary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It¿s late January, about 3:00 on a cloudy, humid, windless afternoon. We¿re on the edge of the city of Tikrit. A couple donkeys stand in the muddy median nearby. Half a dozen similarly priced and armored U.S. Army vehicles are scattered around us, pulling ...

G. Zorpette

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

sticky bomb 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C O N TA C T > Roger G. Johnston, Ph.D., CPP | 6 3 0 - 2 5 2 - 6 1 6 8 | r o g e r j @ a n l . g o v | Nuclear Engineering Division | www.anl.gov Argonne National Laborator y,...

306

Oklahoma City Bombing 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The east end wall suffered significant damage. The blast removed some of the granite panels of the infill walls from the third through the sixth floor. ...

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Dirty Bomb Fallout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, there is a significant need to develop decontamination agents that can be used effectively after detonation of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) in an urban environment. There is also a need for the development of reproducible test surfaces to be used to determine the efficacy of the agent being developed. Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), under the auspices of the US Department of Energy (DoE), conducted a field study to evaluate the deposition of an explosively dispersed radionuclide surrogate (CsCl) on grime-bearing and non-grime-bearing urban surfaces. The goal was to investigate the preparation and contamination of urban surfaces that closely mimic what one would expect to encounter following the detonation of an RDD. Migration of Cs into concrete surfaces was investigated in detail. Many non-proliferation, security and response organizations that have modeled RDD scenarios use cesium-137, as well as cobalt-60, strontium-90, americium-241 as the most likely RDD agents. Cesium-137 is an isotope of concern for possible use in an RDD due to its potential availability resulting from its widespread legitimate use in construction, geotechnical and medical industrial devices. In some Cs-containing instruments the Cesium-137 is present as the highly dispersible and water soluble salt, cesium chloride (CsCl). In this form Cs is able to rapidly disperse in the environment, as witnessed in the 1987 Goiania accident in Brazil, when inadvertent dispersal of a radiotherapy source resulted in fatalities and injuries.

Gates-Anderson, D; Rasmussen, C; Fischer, R; Viani, B; Hu, Q; Sutton, M; McNab, W

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Securing the Bomb 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.nti.org/securingthebomb © 2007 President and Fellows of Harvard College Printed in the United States of America The co-sponsors of this report invite liberal use of the information provided in it for educational

Matthew Bunn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Bombs for Bataan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to rid the Pacific of nuclear weapons and nuclear plants.considered the use of nuclear weapons some seven times Sixthe use of tactical nuclear weapons. Clark Air Field, while

Schirmer, Daniel Boone

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Questions and Answers - Does an atom smasher really smash atoms?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is an accelerator? is an accelerator? Previous Question (What is an accelerator?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Where and how do you get your electrons for your accelerator?) Where and how do you get yourelectrons for your accelerator? Does an atom smasher really smash atoms? Well, yes, they do, but we now prefer to call them by their less aggression-centered name, "particle harmony disrupters." Of course some atom smashers do much more smashing than others. We use electrons in our accelerator to study the nucleus of an atom. Remember that electrons are negative, as are the electrons surrounding the target. Since like charged particles repel each other, our particles have to have enough energy to blast through that electron cloud to get to the nucleus. The electrons then

312

Timeline of Events: 1938-1950 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enters the war. January 19, 1942 President Roosevelt approves production of the atomic bomb following receipt of a National Academy of Sciences report determining that a bomb is...

313

“The Annual Coulter Lecture: Reflections of a Wandering Bookman,” California State Library Foundation Bulletin volume 90 (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima on Augustatomic bomb attack on Nagasaki as not being as destructive because the city

Gary E. Strong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

producing uranium for the Mo"hz,t,a, Projec, can best be qwtcd Irom the Smyth official report - Atomic Energy - . ' .: CCL, + NaCl - ."-l Figure 6. apparatus used in electrcdytic...

315

Single artificial-atom lasing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid-state superconducting circuits are versatile systems in which quantum states can be engineered and controlled. Recent progress in this area has opened up exciting possibilities for exploring fundamental physics as well as applications in quantum information technology; in a series of experiments it was shown that such circuits can be exploited to generate quantum optical phenomena, by designing superconducting elements as artificial atoms that are coupled coherently to the photon field of a resonator. Here we demonstrate a lasing effect with a single artificial atom - a Josephson-junction charge qubit - embedded in a superconducting resonator. We make use of one of the properties of solid-state artificial atoms, namely that they are strongly and controllably coupled to the resonator modes. The device is essentially different from existing lasers and masers; one and the same artificial atom excited by current injection produces many photons.

O. Astafiev; K. Inomata; A. O. Niskanen; T. Yamamoto; Yu. A. Pashkin; Y. Nakamura; J. S. Tsai

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

u. S. Atomic Energy Commission  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

October 31, 1949 Manager of Operations u. S. Atomic Energy Commission R. 0. Box 30, Ansonia Station New York ES, N. Y. MATERIALS 5+k& hJf Reference: SK:BL Attention: Mr. R. J....

317

Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 6. 6. Evaluation of filter material  

SciTech Connect

Four types of standard and developmental filter materials used in individual and collective-protective devices and one type of developmental filter material used for sampling of air for particulate matter were evaluated against the contamination produced by the detonation of an atomic bomb and present in the resulting radioactive cloud. These filter materials were evaluated in multilayer pads at the standard flow-rate conditions used by the Chemical Corps in evaluation studies of filter materials. This permitted correlation of results of laboratory data. Analysis of the materials was made by counting the gross beta activity collected on successive layers of the same filter material and the efficiency of the materials was calculated from the data obtained.

Engquist, E,H.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Exotic atoms and leptonic conservations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major 1989 efforts have been on two aspects of experiments at TRIUMF. One effort was production of muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium into a vacuum. We study rates relevant to muonic catalyzed fusion, and if there are found an adequate number of muons in the 2s state then we plan to measure precision energies. The second effort was to develop plans for kaonic atoms at the kaon factory. We also completed analyses from the experiments with pionic atoms at LAMPF.

Kunselman, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Transition from LEDCOP to ATOMIC  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the development of the ATOMIC code, a new low to mid Z opacity code, which will replace the current Los Alamos low Z opacity code LEDCOP. The ATOMIC code is based on the FINE code, long used by the Los Alamos group for spectral comparisons in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and for non-LTE calculations, both utilizing the extensive databases from the atomic physics suite of codes based on the work of R.D. Cowan. Many of the plasma physics packages in LEDCOP, such as line broadening and free-free absorption, are being transferred to the new ATOMIC code. A new equation of state (EOS) model is being developed to allow higher density calculations than were possible with either the FINE or LEDCOP codes. Extensive modernization for both ATOMIC and the atomic physics code suites, including conversion to Fortran 90 and parallelization, are underway to speed up the calculations and to allow the use of expanded databases for both the LTE opacity tables and the non-LTE calculations. Future plans for the code will be outlined, including considerations for new generation opacity tables.

Magee, N. H. (Norman H.); Abdallah, J. (Joseph); Colgan, J. (James); Hakel, P. (Peter); Kilcrease, D. P. (David P.); Mazevet, S. (Stephane); Sherrill, M. E. (Manolo E.); Fontes, C. J. (Christopher J.); Zhang, H. (Honglin)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Atomic Physics Division 1999 - Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lying Rydberg states constitute a "frozen" Rydberg gas. ... of atom interactions in cold atomic gases and Bose ... or optical fields and tight confinement of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics with Ultracold Atoms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Wechselwirkung ultrakalter Atome mit der Mode eines optischen Resonators hoher Gu?te. Die Atome sind dabei in einem periodischen… (more)

Habibian, Hessam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

NIST: Atomic Spectros. - Spectral Continuum Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Spectroscopy: home page. 21. Spectral Continuum Radiation. Hydrogenic Species. Precise quantum-mechanical ...

324

SCHROEDINGER'S CAT IN AN ATOMIC CAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gov SCHROEDINGER'S CAT IN AN ATOMIC CAGE. They ... conditions. Schroedinger cat states are extremely fragile. Any ...

325

Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Degeneracy Breaking of Hydrogen Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The three dimensional rotation group, SO(3), is a symmetry group of the normal hydrogen atom. Each reducible representation of this group can be associated with a degenerate energy level. If this atom is placed in an external magnetic field, the interaction between the orbital magnetic moment with this field will lead to a symmetry breaking where the symmetry group of the atom is a new group distinct from the SO(3) group. This phenomenon describes the normal Zeeman effect, where a degenerate energy level splits into several new energy levels. It is explicitly shown that each of the new energy levels can be associated with an irreducible representation of the new symmetry group.

Agung Trisetyarso; Pantur Silaban

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

Supercomputers and atomic physics data  

SciTech Connect

The advent of the supercomputer has dramatically increased the possibilities for generating and using massive amounts of detailed fine structure atomic physics data. Size, speed, and software have made calculations which were impossible just a few years ago into a reality. Further technological advances make future possibilities seem endless. The cornerstone atomic structure codes of R.D. Cowan have been adapted into a single code CATS for use on Los Alamos supercomputers. We provide a brief overview of the problem; and report a sample CATS calculation using configuration interaction to calculate collision and oscillator strengths for over 300,000 transitions in neutral nitrogen. We also discuss future supercomputer needs. 2 refs.

Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities. 3 figs.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.S.; Balsavich, J.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activities of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), has a long history and the specific time period supported by this contract is but a small piece of the long-term continuing program. As a background, in August 1945, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima (6 August) and Nagasaki (9 August). Shortly after the bombings, US medical teams joined forces with their Japanese counterparts to form a Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic Bombs. As a result of the Joint Commission's investigations, it was determined that consideration should be given to the establishment of a long-term study of the potential late health effects of exposure of the survivors to radiation from the bombs. The results obtained from RERF studies contribute the vast majority of information that provides a better understanding of radiation effects on humans. This information has been used extensively by national organizations and international committees for estimating risks associated with radiation exposures. The estimated risks developed by these independent organizations are used by government agencies around the world to establish standards for protection of individuals exposed in the occupational, medical, and general environment. Some of these results are described briefly in this report.

Edington, C.W.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Dynamical polarization in pionic atoms  

SciTech Connect

Dynamical nuclear polarization occurs in pionic atoms when a nuclear excitation of appropriate multipolarity is nearly degenerate with de-excitation of a pion atomic level. This phenomenon has been studied in several nuclei, one goal being to test the pion optical potential for pion atomic states normally ''hidden'' because of pion absorption. We find that, in addition to Coulomb mixing of the atomic and nuclear levels, strong interaction mixing and nuclear excitations above the lowest collective quadrupole mode are important for understanding the experimental results. All cases except /sup 110/Pd can then be understood. For /sup 110/Pd, additional nuclear structure information is needed to determine whether or not the conventional pion optical potential will suffice again. We discuss the sensitivity of dynamical polarization measurements to the parameters of the optical potential and to various aspects of nuclear structure. In particular, we find that pionic /sup 150/Sm provides a test of the interacting boson model and that the difference in neutron and proton radii predicted by Hartree-Fock calculations affects the mixing appreciably.

Dubach, J.F.; Moniz, E.J.; Nixon, G.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Lesson 6- Atoms to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Most power plants make electricity by boiling water to make steam that turns a turbine. A nuclear power plant works this way, too. At a nuclear power plant, splitting atoms produce the heat to boil the water. This lesson covers inside the reactor, fission control and electricity generation.

332

The human myeloproliferative disorders: molecular pathogenesis and clonal heterogeneity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of IMF has been reported in survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki9, although the incidence of PV appeared unaffected10. Although an increased risk of PV was reported in a cohort of nuclear weapons workers11, the numbers affected were... in MPL were identified in 4% of ET and 7% of IMF but not in PV. Three different acquired MPL mutations were identified, one of which had been reported as an inherited allele. Although MPL mutations did not delineate a distinct clinical...

Beer, Philip

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

The study of human mutation rates  

SciTech Connect

We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

Neel, J.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The study of human mutation rates. Progress report, 1989--1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

Neel, J.V.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Areawide chemical contamination  

SciTech Connect

Nine case histories illustrate the mounting problems owing to chemical contamination that often extends beyond the workplace into the community. The effects include not only carcinogenesis and teratogenesis, so much in the public's mind, but also severe neurological and gonadal disabilities immediately after exposure. Recognition of causal relationships is often made by astute clinicians. The experience of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in studying Japanese survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki serves as a model for future studies of communities exposed to unusual environmental contamination.

Miller, R.W.

1981-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Magneto-Optical Cooling of Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power and reduced complexity.

Raizen, Mark G; Rochester, Simon; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Atomic physics and non-equilibrium plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three lectures comprise the report. The lecture, Atomic Structure, is primarily theoretical and covers four topics: (1) Non-relativistic one-electron atom, (2) Relativistic one-electron atom, (3) Non-relativistic many-electron atom, and (4) Relativistic many-electron atom. The lecture, Radiative and Collisional Transitions, considers the problem of transitions between atomic states caused by interactions with radiation or other particles. The lecture, Ionization Balance: Spectral Line Shapes, discusses collisional and radiative transitions when ionization and recombination processes are included. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

Weisheit, J.C.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

“The Annual Coulter Lecture: Reflections of a Wandering Bookman,” California State Library Foundation Bulletin volume 90 (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report then described the August 9th atomic bomb attackreport given to Davis containing the Radio Tokyo broadcast following the August 6, 1945 atomic bombreport, 3. 10 “Radio Tokyo 12, 13 August 1945: Atomic Bomb,”

Gary E. Strong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Current Issues Involving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Ionizing Radiation A-Bombs Atomicarchive.com Hiroshima Peace site History of the Atomic Bomb & The Manhattan Project The Atomic Testing Museum The Race to Build the Atomic...

340

UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I(S.0 -01: I(S.0 -01: SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL LlCEWSE Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 70, "Special Nuclear Material Regulations," o. license is hereby issued authorizing the licensee to receive and possess the special nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear material for the purpose(s) and at the place(s) designated below; and to transfer such material to persons' authorized to receive it in accordance with the regulations in said Port. This license shall be deemed to contain the conditions specified in Section 70.32(a) of said regulations, and is subject to all applicable rules, regtdations, and orders of the Atomic Energy Commission now or hereafter in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

1985-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Future of Atomic Energy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

Fermi, E.

1946-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

343

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Role of atomic collisions in fusion  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general discussion of the present role of atomic processes in both magnetic and inertial controlled fusion work is presented.

Post, D.E.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Summary of uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... element. This "H92 - 3/5CL" value is 1.09 e/atom for uranium or 0.002 e/atom for Z = 6 (ie, 40 % of the dipole correction). ...

346

Laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 m/s, any gas in equilibrium (other than spin-polarized atomic hydro- ... lattice-trapped atoms, a physical picture with the simplicity and power of the ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

348

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - Past News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics of the American Physical Society (DAMOP) in ... and Determination of Relative Nuclear Charge Radius.". ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

349

Towards a high-precision atomic gyroscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I report on the design and construction of the Rubidium Atomic Gyroscope Experiment (RAGE) at Draper Lab.

Van Camp, Mackenzie A. (Mackenzie Anne)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Institute for Atom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis & Energy Conversion Electrochemical Energy Storage Nuclear & Environmental Processes National Security Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Center for...

351

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene under Tensile Loading · Atomistic Predictions of Age Hardening in Al-Cu Alloys.

352

NIST: Atomic Spectroscopy Group - John Curry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... chemical equilibrium and deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium. I am also interested in the acquisition and compilation of basic atomic data. ...

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

NIST Atomic Physics Division 2000 - Technical Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Astrophysical Quantities," a handbook widely used ... and single-atom chemistry, where controlled ... understanding of fundamental processes occurring ...

354

Collisionally Induced Atomic Clock Shifts and Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts and blackbody radiation effects for atomic clock transitions using a density matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Results for a finite temperature ${}^{87}$Sr ${}^1S_0$ ($F = 9/2$) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

Y. B. Band; I. Osherov

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 2 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 2.1 Atomic mass: mass of an individual atom Atomic;Chapter 3 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key 3.1 Atomic Structure: relates the # of protons and neutrons of intercepts 2 2 1 Reduction not necessary Enclosure (221) #12;Chapter 12 Suggested Problems: Final Answer Key

Grunlan, Melissa A.

356

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New Spin on Understanding Plasma Confinement American Fusion News Category: General Atomics (GA) Link: General Atomics (GA) Fusion News: A New...

357

Pages that link to "Atomic City, Idaho" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Atomic City, Idaho" Atomic City, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search What links here Page: Atomic City,...

358

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

359

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - General Atomics (GA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

general-atomics-ga General general-atomics-ga General Atomics en The Scorpion's Strategy: "Catch and Subdue" http://www.pppl.gov/node/1132

American Fusion News Category: 
atomics-ga">General Atomics (GA)
360

The Atomic Energy Commission By Alice Buck  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atomic Energy Atomic Energy Commission By Alice Buck July 1983 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Office of the Executive Secretariat Office of History and Heritage Resources 1 Introduction Almost a year after World War II ended, Congress established the United States Atomic Energy Commission to foster and control the peacetime development of atomic science and technology. Reflecting America's postwar optimism, Congress declared that atomic energy should be employed not only in the Nation's defense, but also to promote world peace, improve the public welfare, and strengthen free competition in private

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Precision spectroscopy of the helium atom.  

SciTech Connect

Persistent efforts in both theory and experiment have yielded increasingly precise understanding of the helium atom. Because of its simplicity, the helium atom has long been a testing ground for relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects in few-body atomic systems theoretically and experimentally. Comparison between theory and experiment of the helium spectroscopy in 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub J} can potentially extract a very precise value of the fine structure constant a. The helium atom can also be used to explore exotic nuclear structures. In this paper, we provide a brief review of the recent advances in precision calculations and measurements of the helium atom.

Hu, S.-M.; Lu, Z.-T.; Yan, Z.-C.; Physics; Univ. of Science and Technology of China; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of New Brunswick

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Test of the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a bosonic gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the quantumness of atom-atom correlations in a trapped bosonic gas can be made observable. Application of continuous feedback control of the center of mass of the atomic cloud is shown to generate oscillations of the spatial extension of the cloud, whose amplitude can be directly used as a characterization of atom-atom correlations. Feedback parameters can be chosen such that the violation of a Schwarz inequality for atom-atom correlations can be tested at noise levels much higher than the standard quantum limit.

D. Ivanov; S. Wallentowitz

2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Monitoring atom-atom entanglement and decoherence in a solvable tripartite open system in cavity QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve exactly the dynamics of two strongly-driven two-level atoms resonantly coupled to a dissipative cavity field mode. Starting with the cavity field vacuum state, we show that the entanglement of the atom-atom subsystem cannot be created or increased. On the other hand, when the atoms are initially entangled the atomic Hilbert space divides into two subspaces. One of them is decoherence free so that the initial atomic entanglement remains available for applications, even in presence of a low enough atomic decay rate. In the other subspace a measure of entanglement, decoherence, and also purity, are described by a similar functional behavior that can be monitored by joint atomic measurements. Furthermore, we show the possible generation of Schr\\"odinger-cat-like states for the whole system in the transient regime, as well as of entanglement for the cavity field and the atom-atom subsystems conditioned by measurements on the complementary subsystem.

Bina, Matteo; Lulli, Alfredo; Solano, Enrique

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogen Atom in Relativistic Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lorentz contraction of bound states in field theory is often appealed to in qualitative descriptions of high energy particle collisions. Surprisingly, the contraction has not been demonstrated explicitly even in simple cases such as the hydrogen atom. It requires a calculation of wave functions evaluated at equal (ordinary) time for bound states in motion. Such wave functions are not obtained by kinematic boosts from the rest frame. Starting from the exact Bethe-Salpeter equation we derive the equal-time wave function of a fermion-antifermion bound state in QED, i.e., positronium or the hydrogen atom, in any frame to leading order in alpha. We show explicitly that the bound state energy transforms as the fourth component of a vector and that the wave function of the fermion-antifermion Fock state contracts as expected. Transverse photon exchange contributes at leading order to the binding energy of the bound state in motion. We study the general features of the corresponding fermion-antifermion-photon Fock states, and show that they do not transform by simply contracting. We verify that the wave function reduces to the light-front one in the infinite momentum frame.

M. Jarvinen

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

CSU -Fall 2013 ART 496H: ART HISTORY SEMINAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, to Cold War weapons testing and research that led to an environment culture started at the beginning of the Cold War when televised atomic bomb detonations swept the nation into an atomic craze. Miss Atomic Bomb beauty contests became media spectacles while American citizens learned

Stephens, Graeme L.

366

Monitoring atom-atom entanglement and decoherence in a solvable tripartite open system in cavity QED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a fully analytical solution of the dynamics of two strongly-driven atoms resonantly coupled to a dissipative cavity field mode. We show that an initial atom-atom entanglement cannot be increased. In fact, the atomic Hilbert space divides into two subspaces, one of which is decoherence free so that the initial atomic entanglement remains available for applications, even in presence of a low enough atomic decay rate. In the other subspace a measure of entanglement, decoherence, and also purity, are described by a similar functional behavior that can be monitored by joint atomic measurements. Furthermore, we show the possible generation of Schr\\"odinger-cat-like states for the whole system in the transient regime, as well as of entanglement for the cavity field and the atom-atom subsystems conditioned by measurements on the complementary subsystem.

Matteo Bina; Federico Casagrande; Alfredo Lulli; Enrique Solano

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

CTrigger: Exposing Atomicity Violation Bugs from Their Hiding Places  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the two molecules, broken down by atom, helps the user to understand which atoms of the drug and protein

Lu, Shan

368

Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope  

SciTech Connect

A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Higgins, Steven R. (Laramie, WY); Eggleston, Carrick M. (Laramie, WY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Atomic force microscope: Enhanced sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are a recent development representing the state of the art in measuring ultrafine surface features. Applications are found in such fields of research as biology, microfabrication, material studies, and surface chemistry. Fiber-optic interferometer techniques developed at LLNL offer the potential of improving the vertical resolution of these instruments by up to 2 orders of magnitude. We are attempting to replace the current AFM measurement scheme, which consists of an optical beam deflection approach, with our fiber-optic interferometer scheme, a much more sensitive displacement measurement technique. In performing this research, we hope to accomplish two important goals; (1) to enhance the sensitivity of the AFM, and (2) to achieve important improvements in our fiber-optic interferometer technology.

Davis, D.T.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Harnessed Atom | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » The Harnessed Atom Services » The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom The Harnessed Atom is a new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum extension that focuses on nuclear science and energy. It offers teachers accurate, unbiased, and up-to-date information on the roles that energy and nuclear science play in our lives. The curriculum includes essential principles and fundamental concepts of energy science. This teacher's kit is an updated and expanded edition of the acclaimed 1985 Harnessed Atom curriculum from the U.S. Department of Energy. It was developed with extensive input from classroom teachers across the country in pilot test reviews and workshops, as well as technical reviews from scientists and experts at universities, professional societies, and

371

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism res...

Maunz, P; Schuster, I; Syassen, N; Pinkse, P W H; Rempe, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Manhattan Project: Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, October 1933 ATOMIC BOMBARDMENT (1932-1938) Events > Atomic Discoveries, 1890s-1939 A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 M. Stanley Livingston and Ernest O. Lawrence in front of a 27-inch cyclotron, Rad Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 1934. In the 1930s, scientists learned a tremendous amount about the structure of the atom by bombarding it with sub-atomic particles. Ernest O. Lawrence's cyclotron, the Cockroft-Walton machine, and the Van de Graaff generator, developed by Robert J. Van de Graaff at Princeton University, were particle accelerators designed to bombard the nuclei of various elements to disintegrate atoms. Attempts of the early 1930s to split atoms, however, required huge amounts of energy because the first accelerators used proton beams and alpha particles as sources of energy. Since protons and alpha particles are positively charged, they Albert Einstein met substantial resistance from the positively charged target nucleus when they attempted to penetrate atoms. Even high-speed protons and alpha particles scored direct hits on a nucleus only approximately once in a million tries. Most simply passed by the target nucleus. Not surprisingly, Ernest Rutherford, Albert Einstein (right), and Niels Bohr regarded particle bombardment as useful in furthering knowledge of nuclear physics but believed it unlikely to meet public expectations of harnessing the power of the atom for practical purposes anytime in the near future. In a 1933 interview, Rutherford called such expectations "moonshine." Einstein compared particle bombardment with shooting in the dark at scarce birds, while Bohr, the Danish Nobel laureate, agreed that the chances of taming atomic energy were remote.

373

Theory of atomic motion in resonant radiation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic motion in resonant and near resonant electromagnetic radiation is investigated theoretically. The exposition begins with a study of atomic motion in a resonant standing light wave, with a view toward isotope separation by selective photodeflection, and proceeds to the investigation of more general problems of atomic motion in resonant radiation. The body of the work consists of six chapters, each of which was prepared as a manuscript for publication in the open literature.

Cook, R.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Method for enhanced atomization of liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process for atomizing a slurry or liquid process stream in which a slurry or liquid is passed through a nozzle to provide a primary atomized process stream, an improvement which comprises subjecting the liquid or slurry process stream to microwave energy as the liquid or slurry process stream exits the nozzle, wherein sufficient microwave heating is provided to flash vaporize the primary atomized process stream.

Thompson, Richard E. (27121 Puerta del Oro, Mission Viejo, CA 92691); White, Jerome R. (44755 Wyandotte, Hemet, CA 92544)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

NIST Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). ... Access the Data. ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

376

NIST Atomic Form Factors: Concerns with standard ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... pair production cross-section in the nuclear field (? n ... upon angle (in f 0 ) and energy (in f ... All general theories make the isolated atom approximation ...

377

Atom Manipulation with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nanostructure from an unknown random collection of atoms without human intervention. ... a set of extensible rules, and allows for error correction. ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission - written by Alice L. BuckWashington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, July 1983. 41 pp. 

379

Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atom probe tomography (APT) and analytical transmission .... of a Leaking Type 316 Socket Weld in a Boron Injection Tank Sampling Line.

380

Quantization of Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the atomic and nuclear rest masses. Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes.

F. A. Gareev; G. F. Gareeva; I. E. Zhidkova

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Prospects for Atomic-Scale Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Atomic-scale tomography (AST) may be defined as any technique that ... Initial Age Hardening and Nanostructural Evolution in a Cu-Ni-P Alloy.

382

Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to produce unique single crystals and epitaxial structures that are deposited with atomic-level precision is critical for many applications, such as thermoelectrics,...

383

NIST Unveils Chip-Scale Atomic Clock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 times smaller than any other atomic clock—has ... precise timekeeping in portable, battery-powered devices ... to be operated on batteries) and are ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

Schroedinger's Cat in an Atomic Cage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Schroedinger's Cat in an Atomic Cage. ... ``Schroedinger's cat'' soon became a shorthand way to refer to a whole class of superposed states. ...

385

Primary Atomic Frequency Standards at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a set of four quartz oscillators calibrated against the mean solar second [4 ... The cesium oven, operated near 100 C, creates a vapor of atoms that are ...

2001-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

386

NIST Atomic Physics Division 2000 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Although these data are needed for magnetic fusion research, astronomy, and industry, there is ... Physics of Cold, Trapped Gases of Neutral Atoms. ...

387

Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FW96 JR Fuhr and WL Wiese, NIST Atomic Transition Probability Tables, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th ed., DR Lide, ed. CRC ...

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

388

Critically Evaluated Atomic Transition Probabilities for Sulfur ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this new work all ionization stages (except for hydro- genic) are covered. The data are presented in separate tables for each atom and ion. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates.

Gilbert, E.S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hiroshima and Nagasaki initial radiations: delayed neutron contributions and comparison of calculated and measured cobalt activations  

SciTech Connect

Calculated estimates of neutron doses received by atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki have not included contributions from delayed neutrons emitted by fission products in the debris cloud, although the possibility of a significant contribution from this source has been suggested. In the present work, an established model accounting for gamma-ray kermas from these fission products is adapted to provide the desired neutron kerma estimates. Adaptations include use of explicit time dependence of neutron emitters, properly folded with the time-dependent phenomenology of the explosion itself, and detailed air-over-ground neutron transport with a source having an energy spectrum characteristic of these delayed neutrons. Results show that delayed neutrons are indeed negligible contributors to atomic-bomb survivor dosimetry, as well as to neutron activations at Hiroshima. About half the activation at Nagasaki, however, is due to the delayed component. Calculated activation of cobalt, a revision of previous estimates, is compared to measured values at Hiroshima and at Nagasaki. The causes of the substantial discrepancies are discussed and compared to previously reported discrepancies for sulfur activation. Additional investigation is recommended.

Loewe, W.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Office of Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the South Pacific. DOE Office of Health and Safety supports studies of the Japanese A-Bomb survivors, the Russian nuclear weapons workers at Mayak and in the community around...

392

NERC corporate Planet Earth online Grants Studentships Science benefits Research papers Contact us | Log in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling schemes Atomic bombs date fake drams MOST POPULAR NEWS 1. Atomic bombs date fake drams 2 | Log in SEARCH Search term(s) HOME LATEST NEWS FEATURES & SPECIAL REPORTS MULTIMEDIA BLOGS

Cambridge, University of

393

Archiving Disaster: A Comparative Study of September 11, 2001 and Hurricane Katrina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The Ibid. http://Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II”, was designed to place the Enola Gay alongside artifacts from Hiroshima

Rivard, Courtney J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Power to Hurt: Costly Conflict with Completely Informed States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two events: The atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima on August 6atomic bomb moved Emperor Hirohito toward decisive action but the army still would not budge, claiming that Hiroshima

Slantchev, Branislav L

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electronic energy transfer between state selected metastable argon atoms and ground state krypton atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1007 Electronic energy transfer between state selected metastable argon atoms and ground state that the relative populations of the N2 (C, 3nu) product vibrational and rotational substates were dependent,0) atoms to ground state Kr atoms, which also shows large differences between the two metastable Ar states

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

396

Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Shape coexistence in atomic nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shape coexistence in nuclei appears to be unique in the realm of finite many-body quantum systems. It differs from the various geometrical arrangements that sometimes occur in a molecule in that in a molecule the various arrangements are of the widely separated atomic nuclei. In nuclei the various ''arrangements'' of nucleons involve (sets of) energy eigenstates with different electric quadrupole properties such as moments and transition rates, and different distributions of proton pairs and neutron pairs with respect to their Fermi energies. Sometimes two such structures will ''invert'' as a function of the nucleon number, resulting in a sudden and dramatic change in ground-state properties in neighboring isotopes and isotones. In the first part of this review the theoretical status of coexistence in nuclei is summarized. Two approaches, namely, microscopic shell-model descriptions and mean-field descriptions, are emphasized. The second part of this review presents systematic data, for both even- and odd-mass nuclei, selected to illustrate the various ways in which coexistence is observed in nuclei. The last part of this review looks to future developments and the issue of the universality of coexistence in nuclei. Surprises continue to be discovered. With the major advances in reaching to extremes of proton-neutron number, and the anticipated new ''rare isotope beam'' facilities, guidelines for search and discovery are discussed.

Heyde, Kris; Wood, John L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Atomic Data Needs for Modeling Photoionized Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many of the fundamental questions in astrophysics can be addressed using spectroscopic observations of photoionized cosmic plasmas. However, the reliability of the inferred astrophysics depends on the accuracy of the underlying atomic data used to interpret the collected spectra. In this paper, we review some of the most glaring atomic data needs for better understanding photoionized plasmas.

Daniel Wolf Savin

2001-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of Bose condensates, which are destroyed by randomly directed recoil kicks. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of single rubidium atoms stored in an intracavity dipole trap. The cooling mechanism results in extended storage times and improved localization of atoms. We estimate that the observed cooling rate is at least five times larger than that produced by free-space cooling methods, for comparable excitation of the atom.

P. Maunz; T. Puppe; I. Schuster; N. Syassen; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Texture of atomic layer deposited ruthenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ruthenium films were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si(100) and ALD TiN. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the as-deposited films on Si(100) were polycrystalline, on TiN they were (002) oriented. After annealing at 800^oC ... Keywords: Ammonia plasma, Atomic layer deposition, Ruthenium, Silicide, Texture

J. Musschoot; Q. Xie; D. Deduytsche; K. De Keyser; D. Longrie; J. Haemers; S. Van den Berghe; R. L. Van Meirhaeghe; J. D'Haen; C. Detavernier

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Implementing Synchronous Coordinated Atomic Actions Based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the execution of action participants. A very important decision was to structure any atomic action as a package: concurrent systems, atomicity, coordinated error recovery, fault tolerant software structuring, conversations to improve the structuring of cooperative concurrent systems and to incorporate fault tolerance

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

402

Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fast Access to Distributed Atomic Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study efficient and robust implementations of an atomic read-write data structure over an asynchronous distributed message-passing system made of reader and writer processes, as well as a number of servers implementing the data structure. We determine ... Keywords: Byzantine failures, atomic registers, distributed algorithms, fault-tolerance, shared-memory emulations, time-complexity

Partha Dutta; Rachid Guerraoui; Ron R. Levy; Marko Vukoli?

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

NONE

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Instead of splitting the atom --the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Instead of splitting the atom - - the principle behind the 1940s Manhattan Project that build of the Sun and the stars. BACK STAR POWER: ITER, BOLDEST NUCLEAR INITIATIVE SINCE MANHATTAN PROJECT Received infinite. Instead of splitting the atom -- the principle behind the 1940s Manhattan Project that build

406

Cavity cooling of a single atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All conventional methods to laser-cool atoms rely on repeated cycles of optical pumping and spontaneous emission of a photon by the atom. Spontaneous emission in a random direction is the dissipative mechanism required to remove entropy from the atom. However, alternative cooling methods have been proposed1, 2 for a single atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity; the role of spontaneous emission is replaced by the escape of a photon from the cavity. Application of such cooling schemes would improve the performance of atom cavity systems for quantum information processing3, 4. Furthermore, as cavity cooling does not rely on spontaneous emission, it can be applied to systems that cannot be laser-cooled by conventional methods; these include molecules2 (which do not have a closed transition) and collective excitations of

P. Maunz; I. Schuster; N. Syassen; P. W. H. Pinkse; G. Rempe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene  

SciTech Connect

We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Windl, Wolfgang [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Beyond Two Homelands: Migration and Transnationalism of Japanese Americans in the Pacific, 1930-1955  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb? Amo drove to a church outside Manila, knelt before the altar, and wondered whether his report

Jin, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Long-Term Planning for Nuclear Energy Systems Under Deep Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic energy for bombs are in much of their course inter- changeable and interdependent. ” – Acheson-Lilienthal Report[

Kim, Lance Kyungwoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Supreme Triumph of the Surgeon's Art': Narrative History of Endocrine Surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bombs dropped on Japan by the United States seemed to have an eye-opening effect on the medical

Zeiger, Martha A.; Shen, Wen T.; Felger, Erin A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Risk Estimation; Background Radiation (Natural and Artificial )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb exposures and the exposures from the Chernobyl disaster. #12;Relative

Massey, Thomas N.

412

ICANCERRESEARCH56, 4267"4274,September 15, 1996] Letters to the Editor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and the limitation of increased breast cancer risk among Hiroshima women exposed to the atomic bomb to those who were

Gold, Lois Swirsky

413

Nippon Foundation Book Donation Collection Century Japanese Management: New Systems, Lasting Values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Political-Economic Analysis: A Vision for the Next Century Atomic Bomb: Voices from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Li, X. Rong

414

13The MIT Press discount offer!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and atomic weapons, including the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. In 2002, George W. Bush claimed that Saddam

Jackson, Daniel

415

28 JANUARY 2011 VOL 331 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org416 ASSOCIATION AFFAIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a decade earlier, the end of World War II, brought about by dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Cooper, John

416

The sensitivity of children to electromagnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atomic bomb during puberty, al- though the risk also increased in women who were ?10 years old (an age

Kheifets, Leeka; Repacholi, M; Saunders, R; van Deventer, E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nukes (notes on PFFP) Chain reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponds to 300 million kg of TNT = 300 ktons Energetics But the Hiroshima bomb (10 kg) only release 20 Clouds" Nagasaki Atomic Bomb 1945 Volcanic Eruption (Mount Redoubt) Not characteristic of nuclear bombs weapons and nuclear power reactors. #12;Chain reactions in nuclear fission bomb Note the number

Browder, Tom

418

Hewlett and Duncan - Atomic Shield | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duncan - Atomic Shield Duncan - Atomic Shield Hewlett and Duncan - Atomic Shield Hewlett, Richard G. and Francis Duncan. Atomic Shield, 1947-1952. U.S. Atomic Energy Comission, 1972. The second volume of the three volume A History of the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Text in each PDF is fully searchable. "Hewlett and Duncan - Atomic Shield (complete).pdf" contains the complete text and images from Atomic Shield. 12mb "Hewlett and Duncan - Atomic Shield (figures only).pdf" contains hi-res (600dpi) scans of the images from Atomic Shield. 30mb Hewlett and Duncan - Atomic Shield (complete).pdf Hewlett and Duncan - Atomic Shield (figures only).pdf More Documents & Publications A History of the Atomic Energy Commission Hewlett and Duncan, Nuclear Navy, 1946-1962

419

On the energy of electric field in hydrogen atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that hydrogen atom is a unique object in physics having negative energy of electric field, which is present in the atom. This refers also to some hydrogen-type atoms: hydrogen anti-atom, atom composed of proton and antiproton, and positronium.

Yuri Kornyushin

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Instrument Series: Microscopy Atom Probe The LEAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Atom Probe The LEAP ® 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first- ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical imaging studies of low electrical conductivity materials, such as ceramics, semiconductors and oxides. The LEAP capability is assisting EMSL's efforts to further scientific advancements in interface analysis and microstructural characterization, providing a new tool for understanding the relationship between the nanoscale structure of materials and their macroscopic properties. Research Applications Geochemistry - Studying chemical processes that compose rocks and soils has long been used to determine matter cycles and transport in the environment, which supports critical EMSL research in areas including bioremediation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ATOMIZATION METHOD OF MAKING URANIUM POWDER  

SciTech Connect

Atomized U powder was produced by forming an electric arc between two U electrodes in an inert atmosphere and sending a high velocity stream of inert gas through the arc. Uranium particles obtained by this method were of spherical shape; smaller particles contained mostly small grains, and larger particles wore characterizcd by larger grains. The particles were ductile and could be hotpressed to a compact of high density. The temporary equipment used for those preliminary tests on atomization was not adequate to control particle size. Suggestions for the production of atomized U powder of controllable quality are included. (arth)

Hausner, H.H.; Mansfield, H.

1950-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Atom-photon entanglement generation and distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend an earlier model by Law {\\it et al.} \\cite{law} for a cavity QED based single-photon-gun to atom-photon entanglement generation and distribution. We illuminate the importance of a small critical atom number on the fidelity of the proposed operation in the strong coupling limit. Our result points to a promisingly high purity and efficiency using currently available cavity QED parameters, and sheds new light on constructing quantum computing and communication devices with trapped atoms and high Q optical cavities.

B. Sun; M. S. Chapman; L. You

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

Lister, Graeme [OSRAM SYLVANIA, CRSL, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA (United States); Curry, John J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howard, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

1985 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes  

SciTech Connect

This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1985. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howald, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

20. Ruhm, W. et al. The dosimetry system DS86 and the neutron discrepancy in Hiroshima--historical review, present status, and future options. Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 37, 293310 (1998).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Collection of Investigative Reports on Atomic Bomb Disaster 34­35 (Science Council of Japan, Tokyo, 1953). 22. Yamasaki, F. & Sugimoto, A. Collection of Investigative Reports on Atomic Bomb Disaster 18­19 (Science of Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry in Hiroshima And Nagasaki-Final Report Vol. 2 (ed. Roesch, W. C.) 283

Leal, Manuel S.

427

HON 201, Three Plays F 1-1:50, BH B21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Hiroshima and Nagasaki are bombed in 1945. It turns out that the Germans never built an atomic bomb. Third, and meets Bohr. In 1943 Bohr escapes to Sweden. Meanwhile the atomic bomb is developed in America that Heisenberg was directing the Nazi atomic research program. So what did he tell Bohr? Some of the past history

Srinivasan, Bhama

428

The risk of leukemia from low doses of low-LET radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this communication, we examine the evidence (if any) for a nonlinear dose response in relation to leukemia mortality in the Japanese A-bomb population. Specifically, we seek an estimate of the probability that, at low doses of radiation, the relative ... Keywords: A-bomb survivors, Hormesis, Leukemia risk, Low doses of radiation

M. Zaider

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

How long is the life span of an atom?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How long is the life span of an atom? Atoms are forever But let me explain. Atoms are made of a central core containing a collection of protons and neutrons. Almost all of the...

430

Studying coherence in ultra-cold atomic gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis will discuss the study of coherence properties of ultra-cold atomic gases. The atomic systems investigated include a thermal cloud of atoms, a Bose-Einstein condensate and a fermion pair condensate. In each ...

Miller, Daniel E. (Daniel Edward)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Buried Interface Analysis Using Atom Probe Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels · Control of p-n ... Relationships in a Series of Co-Cr-Cu-Fe-Ni-Al High Entropy Alloys.

432

Atom Probe Tomography for Industrial Applications - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contributions of Atom Probe Tomography to the Understanding of Steels · Control of p-n ... Relationships in a Series of Co-Cr-Cu-Fe-Ni-Al High Entropy Alloys.

433

Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical studies of electron correlations of doubly excited electrons in hyperspherical coordinates, and differential and total electron transfer cross sections in fast ion-atom collisions are reported. (GHT)

Lin, C.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A History of the Atomic Energy Commission  

SciTech Connect

This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations.

Buck, A.L.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Radioactive Background Evaluation by Atom Counting  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new method of measuring 85Kr background levels by direct counting of impurity atoms. The beta-decay of 85Kr is a significant radioactive background for experiments that use liquified noble gases to search for dark matter and measure the low-energy solar neutrino flux. While there are several proposed methods for reducing Kr levels in these experiments, an independent technique is needed for measuring very low Kr levels. By selectively exciting Kr atoms to a metastable state, capturing them in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and detecting fluorescence from the trapped atoms, individual Kr atoms can be counted with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This approach offers both higher sensitivity and shorter measurement times than more conventional techniques, with an estimated sensitivity of 3 x 10-14 in only 3 hours of integration.

Orzel, Chad [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States); McKinsey, Daniel [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

436

CHIANTI: An Atomic Database for Astrophysical Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Processes in Fusion, September 4-7, 2012, Daejeon, Republic of Korea

E. Landi; K. P. Dere; P. R. Young; G. Del Zanna; H. E. Mason

437

Assessment of Atomic Data: Problems and Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Material Interaction Processes in Fusion, September 4-7, 2012, Daejeon, Republic of Korea

Kanti M. Aggarwal; Francis P. Keenan

438

Atomic Biology, Electrostatics, and Ionic Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I believe an atomic biology is needed to supplement present day molecular biology, if we are to design and understand proteins, as well as define, make, and use them.

Eisenberg, R S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Local Atomic Density of Microporous Carbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the structure of two disordered carbons: activated carbon fibers (ACF) and ultramicroporous carbon (UMC). These carbons have highly porous structure with large surface areas and consequently low macroscopic density that should enhance adsorption of hydrogen. We used the atomic pair distribution function to probe the local atomic arrangements. The results show that the carbons maintain an in-plane local atomic structure similar to regular graphite, but the stacking of graphitic layers is strongly disordered. Although the local atomic density of these carbons is lower than graphite, it is only {approx}20% lower and is much higher than the macroscopic density due to the porosity of the structure. For this reason, the density of graphene sheets that have optimum separation for hydrogen adsorption is lower than anticipated.

Dmowski, Wojtek; Contescu, Cristian I.; Llobet, Anna; Gallego, Nidia C.; Egami, Takeskhi (Tennessee-K); (ORNL); (LANL)

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

ac-driven atomic quantum motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We invent an ac-driven quantum motor consisting of two different, interacting ultracold atoms placed into a ring-shaped optical lattice and submerged in a pulsating magnetic field. While the first atom carries a current, the second one serves as a quantum starter. For fixed zero-momentum initial conditions the asymptotic carrier velocity converges to a unique non-zero value. We also demonstrate that this quantum motor performs work against a constant load.

A. V. Ponomarev; S. Denisov; P. Hanggi

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ac-driven atomic quantum motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We invent an ac-driven quantum motor consisting of two different, interacting ultracold atoms placed into a ring-shaped optical lattice and submerged in a pulsating magnetic field. While the first atom carries a current, the second one serves as a quantum starter. For fixed zero-momentum initial conditions the asymptotic carrier velocity converges to a unique non-zero value. We also demonstrate that this quantum motor performs work against a constant load.

Ponomarev, A V; Hänggi, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Neutrino Spectroscopy with Atoms and Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a comprehensive account of our proposed experimental method of using atoms or molecules in order to measure parameters of neutrinos still undetermined; the absolute mass scale, the mass hierarchy pattern (normal or inverted), the neutrino mass type (Majorana or Dirac), and the CP violating phases including Majorana phases. There are advantages of atomic targets, due to the closeness of available atomic energies to anticipated neutrino masses, over nuclear target experiments. Disadvantage of using atomic targets, the smallness of rates, is overcome by the macro-coherent amplification mechanism. The atomic or molecular process we use is a cooperative deexcitation of a collective body of atoms in a metastable level |e> emitting a neutrino pair and a photon; |e> -> |g> + gamma + nu_i nu_j where nu_i's are neutrino mass eigenstates. The macro-coherence is developed by trigger laser irradiation. We discuss aspects of the macro-coherence development by setting up the master equation for the target quantum state and propagating electric field. With a choice of heavy target atom or molecule such as Xe or I_2 that has a large M1 x E1 matrix element between |e> and |g>, we show that one can determine three neutrino masses along with the mass hierarchy pattern by measuring the photon spectral shape. If one uses a target of available energy of a fraction of 1 eV, Majorana CP phases may be determined. Our master equation, when applied to E1 x E1 transition such as pH_2 vibrational transition Xv=1 -> 0, can describe explosive PSR events in which most of the energy stored in |e> is released within a few nanoseconds. The present paper is intended to be self-contained explaining some details related theoretical works in the past, and further reports new simulations and our ongoing experimental efforts of the project to realize the neutrino mass spectroscopy using atoms/molecules.

Atsushi Fukumi; Susumu Kuma; Yuki Miyamoto; Kyo Nakajima; Itsuo Nakano; Hajime Nanjo; Chiaki Ohae; Noboru Sasao; Minoru Tanaka; Takashi Taniguchi; Satoshi Uetake; Tomonari Wakabayashi; Takuya Yamaguchi; Akihiro Yoshimi; Motohiko Yoshimura

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

Resonant spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atom  

SciTech Connect

The spectra of the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in the presence of an external electric field are compared. It is shown that the nonresonant corrections to the transition frequency may contain terms linear in the electric field. The existence of these terms does not violate space and time parity and leads to a difference in the resonant spectroscopic measurements for the hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms in an external electric field.

Labzowsky, Leonti [St. Petersburg State University, 198504 Petrodvorets, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation); Solovyev, Dmitri [St. Petersburg State University, 198504 Petrodvorets, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Atomic scale electron vortices for nanoresearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron vortex beams were only recently discovered and their potential as a probe for magnetism in materials was shown. Here we demonstrate a method to produce electron vortex beams with a diameter of less than 1.2 Angst . This unique way to prepare free electrons to a state resembling atomic orbitals is fascinating from a fundamental physics point of view and opens the road for magnetic mapping with atomic resolution in an electron microscope.

Verbeeck, J.; Van Tendeloo, G. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Schattschneider, P.; Loeffler, S. [Institute for Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Lazar, S. [FEI Electron Optics, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Main Street West, Hamilton Ontario, L8S4M1 (Canada); Stoeger-Pollach, M.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A. [USTEM, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

445

Scanning magnetoresistance microscopy of atom chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface based geometries of microfabricated wires or patterned magnetic films can be used to magnetically trap and manipulate ultracold neutral atoms or Bose-Einstein condensates. We investigate the magnetic properties of such atom chips using a scanning magnetoresistive (MR) microscope with high spatial resolution and high field sensitivity. By comparing MR scans of a permanent magnetic atom chip to field profiles obtained using ultracold atoms, we show that MR sensors are ideally suited to observe small variations of the magnetic field caused by imperfections in the wires or magnetic materials which ultimately lead to fragmentation of ultracold atom clouds. Measurements are also provided for the magnetic field produced by a thin current-carrying wire with small geometric modulations along the edge. Comparisons of our measurements with a full numeric calculation of the current flow in the wire and the subsequent magnetic field show excellent agreement. Our results highlight the use of scanning MR microscopy as a convenient and powerful technique for precisely characterizing the magnetic fields produced near the surface of atom chips.

Volk, M.; Whitlock, S.; Wolff, C. H.; Hall, B. V.; Sidorov, A. I. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Charge It: Neutral Atoms Made to Act Like Electrically ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... atoms (BEC) immersed in a constant magnetic field (B0). Using lasers (red arrows), the team alters the atoms' energy-momentum relationship ...

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Well Collimated Quasi-Continuous Atom Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quasi-continuous Atom Laser. ... We can develop a rather complete analogy between the so-called "atom laser" and the traditional photon laser. ...

448

Integrated Sustainability Analysis of Atomic Layer Deposition for Microelectronics Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Manufacturing and Sustainability Improvement of Nano-Integrated Sustainability Analysis of Atomic Layergrowth at atomic scale. Sustainability of ALD technology

Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

August 1, 1946: Atomic Energy Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 1947, all atomic energy activities are transferred to the newly created Atomic Energy Commission in accordance with the Act. Energy.gov Careers & Internships For Staff &...

450

Bon MOT: Innovative Atom Trap Catches Highly Magnetic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a cloud of erbium atoms trapped and cooled and a ... all the while extracting energy and cooling them ... only a single laser and can cool erbium atoms ...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

451

U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference September 19, 2011 -...

452

Energy Department and French Commission on Atomic Energy and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department and French Commission on Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Sign New Research and Development Agreement Energy Department and French Commission on Atomic...

453

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Gen_Atomics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, California, Site A Oakland Operations Office site genatomicsmap The General Atomics Hot Cell Facility site was a research laboratory formerly...

454

EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility, San Diego, California EA-1053: Decontaminating and Decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell...

455

Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies, Inc. America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 6067 likes Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies, Inc. Ames Laboratory Iowa Powder...

456

Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful Uses of ... Atomic Energy Commission Explores Peaceful...

457

Observation of Lithium Ions at Atomic Resolution Using an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Observation of Lithium Ions at Atomic Resolution Using an ... at atomic resolution in several important electrode materials for Li-ion batteries.

458

Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Power Laboratories Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories DE-NR0000031 Managed and Operated by Bechtel Marine Propulsion...

459

Theoretical Atomic Physics code development IV: LINES, A code for computing atomic line spectra  

SciTech Connect

A new computer program, LINES, has been developed for simulating atomic line emission and absorption spectra using the accurate fine structure energy levels and transition strengths calculated by the (CATS) Cowan Atomic Structure code. Population distributions for the ion stages are obtained in LINES by using the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) model. LINES is also useful for displaying the pertinent atomic data generated by CATS. This report describes the use of LINES. Both CATS and LINES are part of the Theoretical Atomic PhysicS (TAPS) code development effort at Los Alamos. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Abdallah, J. Jr.; Clark, R.E.H.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961: Eisenhower and the Atomic Energy Commission  

SciTech Connect

This third volume in the official history of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission covers the years of the Eisenhower Administration.

Hewlett, Richard G.; Holl, Jack M.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atomic bomb survivors" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research  

SciTech Connect

Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

Strom, Daniel J.

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

462

Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities.

Miller, R.W. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Method and apparatus for atomic imaging  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for three dimensional imaging of the atomic environment of disordered adsorbate atoms are disclosed. The method includes detecting and measuring the intensity of a diffuse low energy electron diffraction pattern formed by directing a beam of low energy electrons against the surface of a crystal. Data corresponding to reconstructed amplitudes of a wave form is generated by operating on the intensity data. The data corresponding to the reconstructed amplitudes is capable of being displayed as a three dimensional image of an adsorbate atom. The apparatus includes a source of a beam of low energy electrons and a detector for detecting the intensity distribution of a DLEED pattern formed at the detector when the beam of low energy electrons is directed onto the surface of a crystal. A device responsive to the intensity distribution generates a signal corresponding to the distribution which represents a reconstructed amplitude of a wave form and is capable of being converted into a three dimensional image of the atomic environment of an adsorbate atom on the crystal surface.

Saldin, Dilano K. (Milwaukee, WI); de Andres Rodriquez, Pedro L. (Madrid, ES)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

85More Atomic Fractions The single electron inside an atom can exist in many  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

85More Atomic Fractions The single electron inside an atom can exist in many different energy states. The lowest energy an electron can have is called the Ground State: this is the bottom rung on the ladder marked with an energy of '1' in the figure to the left. The electron must obey the Ladder Rule

466

An atom---molecule platform for quantum computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a combined atom---molecule system for quantum information processing in individual traps, such as provided by optical lattices. In this platform, different species of atoms--one atom carrying a qubit and the other enabling the interaction--are ... Keywords: Dipole-dipole interaction, Neutral atom quantum computing, Optical lattices, Polar molecules

Elena Kuznetsova; S. F. Yelin; Robin Côté

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Atomic Scale Characterization of Compound Semiconductors using Atom Probe Tomography: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Internal interfaces are critical in determining the performance of III-V multijunction solar cells. Studying these interfaces with atomic resolution using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and density functional calculations enables a more fundamental understanding of carrier dynamics in photovoltaic (PV) device structures. To achieve full atomic scale spatial and chemical resolution, data acquisition parameters in laser pulsed APT must be carefully studied to eliminate surface diffusion. Atom probe data with minimized group V ion clustering and expected stoichiometry can be achieved by adjusting laser pulse power, pulse repetition rate, and specimen preparation parameters such that heat flow away from the evaporating surface is maximized. Applying these improved analysis conditions to III-V based PV gives an atomic scale understanding of compositional and dopant profiles across interfaces and tunnel junctions and the initial stages of alloy clustering and dopant accumulation. Details on APT experimental methods and future in-situ instrumentation developments are illustrated.

Gorman, B. P.; Guthrey, H.; Norman, A. G.; Al-Jassim, M.; Lawrence, D.; Prosa, T.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass L. Tetard a,b , A. Passian a,b,n , R.H. Farahi a , U.C. Kalluri c , B.H. Davison c , T. Thundat a,b a Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA b Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Atomic force microscopy Spectroscopy Plant cells Biomass Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass

469

Atomic hydrogen cleaning of semiconductor photocathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) semiconductor photocathodes are widely used for the production of polarized electron beams, and are also useful for the production of high brightness electron beams which can be modulated at very high frequencies. Preparation of an atomically clean semiconductor surface is an essential step in the fabrication of a NEA photocathode. This cleaning step is difficult for certain semiconductors, such as the very thin materials which produce the highest beam polarization, and those which have tightly bound oxides and carbides. Using a small RF dissociation atomic hydrogen source, the authors have reproducibly cleaned GaAs wafers which have been only degreased prior to installation in vacuum. They have consistently prepared very high quantum efficiency photocathodes following atomic hydrogen cleaning. Details of their apparatus and most recent results are presented.

Sinclair, C.K.; Poelker, B.M.; Price, J.S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

Crosse, J A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Atomic multipole relaxation rates near surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spontaneous relaxation rates for an atom in free space and close to an absorbing surface are calculated to various orders of the electromagnetic multipole expansion. The spontaneous decay rates for dipole, quadrupole and octupole transitions are calculated in terms of their respective primitive electric multipole moments and the magnetic relaxation rate is calculated for the dipole and quadrupole transitions in terms of their respective primitive magnetic multipole moments. The theory of electromagnetic field quantization in magnetoelectric materials is used to derive general expressions for the decay rates in terms of the dyadic Green function. We focus on the decay rates in free space and near an infinite half space. For the decay of atoms near to an absorbing dielectric surface we find a hierarchy of scaling laws depending on the atom-surface distance z.

J. A. Crosse; Stefan Scheel

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

Kaonic Atom X?ray Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In kaonic atoms energy displacement and broadening of states result from the strong interaction. The most simple kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium open the possibility to measure this strong interaction induced shift and width by x?ray spectroscopy. In the SIDDHARTA experiment al LNF (Frascati) the DA?NE electron?positron collider delivers nearly mono?energetic negatively charged kaons from ? meson decay. This unique kaon source is used to form kaonic atoms. New high performance x?ray detectors (silicon drift detectors) arranged in an array allow x?ray spectroscopy with high energy resolution combined with timing capability. High precision x?ray measurements like SIDDHARTA at LNF will open the way to study the low energy regime of the strong force in the antikaon?nucleon interaction. The experiment and its current status is presented in this talk.

J. Marton; on behalf of the SIDDHARTA Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF THE ATOMIC BATTERY  

SciTech Connect

Electron-voltaic effects in diffased p-n junctions of Ge were obtained by diffusing As at 210 deg C in 10/sup -5/ Hg vacuum on a p-type Ge, doped with In, of 3 OMEGA /cm resistivity. A thin Au wire was attached to the surface of this junction by soldering. The p-n junction was irradiated with a 50mc Sr/sup 90/-Y/sup 90/ source, and the electron-voltaic effect was measured from room temperature down to -78 deg C. The general condition of an atomic battery was similar to that of a solar battery except that the atomic battery offers the possibility of current multiplication but presents the problem of radiation damage in the crystal lattice. At room temperature no radiation damage was observed. The junction and radiation damage of a Si-based atomic battery was also studied. (OID)

Yamanaka, C.; Wada, H.; Yamamura, Y.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the progress made in our continuing study of strongly correlated atomic systems within the last year. We have examined the shape of three-body systems in hyperspherical coordinates by studying the evolution of the density functions with the mass ratio of the particles in the system. We have calculated the ejected electron spectra from the autoionizing states formed in double capture processes in collisions of multiply charged ions with atoms. We have investigated the systematics and the propensity rules of radiative and Auger decay rates of high-lying doubly excited states. We have also studied ion-atom collisions for processes which pose great challenges to detailed theories, by looking into processes where the cross sections are small such as the excitation process in He{sup ++} + H collisions, or by looking into fine details such as the orientation parameters in excitation and charge transfer processes.

Lin, Chii-Dong.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Detecting Topological Phases in Cold Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chern insulators are band insulators which exhibit a gap in the bulk and gapless excitations in the edge. Detection of Chern insulators is a serious challenge in cold atoms since the Hall transport measurements are technically unrealistic for neutral atoms. By establishing a natural correspondence between the time-reversal invariant topological insulator and quantum anomalous Hall system, we show for a class of Chern insulators that the topology can be determined by only measuring Bloch eigenstates at highly symmetric points of the Brillouin zone (BZ). Furthermore, we introduce two experimental schemes including the spin-resolved Bloch oscillation to carry out the measurement. These schemes are highly feasible under realistic experimental conditions. Our results may provide a powerful tool to detect topological phases in cold atoms.

Xiong-Jun Liu; K. T. Law; T. K. Ng; Patrick A. Lee

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

Kazmerski, L.L.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

Carroll, Malcolm S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Feedback Cooling of a Single Neutral Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate feedback cooling of the motion of a single rubidium atom trapped in a high-finesse optical resonator to a temperature of about 160 \\mu K. Time-dependent transmission and intensity-correlation measurements prove the reduction of the atomic position uncertainty. The feedback increases the 1/e storage time into the one second regime, 30 times longer than without feedback. Feedback cooling therefore rivals state-of-the-art laser cooling, but with the advantages that it requires less optical access and exhibits less optical pumping.

Markus Koch; Christian Sames; Alexander Kubanek; Matthias Apel; Maximilian Balbach; Alexei Ourjoumtsev; Pepijn W. H. Pinkse; Gerhard Rempe

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

480

Feedback Cooling of a Single Neutral Atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate feedback cooling of the motion of a single rubidium atom trapped in a high-finesse optical resonator to a temperature of about 160 \\mu K. Time-dependent transmission and intensity-correlation measurements prove the reduction of the atomic position uncertainty. The feedback increases the 1/e storage time into the one second regime, 30 times longer than without feedback. Feedback cooling therefore rivals state-of-the-art laser cooling, but with the advantages that it requires less optical access and exhibits less optical pumping.

Koch, Markus; Kubanek, Alexander; Apel, Matthias; Balbach, Maximilian; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Pinkse, Pepijn W H; Rempe, Gerhard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Cavity Loss Induced Generation of Entangled Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the generation of entangled states of two two-level atoms inside an optical resonator. When the cavity decay is continuously monitored, the absence of photon-counts is associated with the presence of an atomic entangled state. In addition to being conceptually simple, this scheme could be demonstrated with presently available technology. We describe how such a state is generated through conditional dynamics, using quantum jump methods, including both cavity damping and spontaneous emission decay, and evaluate the fidelity and relative entropy of entanglement of the generated state compared with the target entangled state.

M. B. Plenio; S. F. Huelga; A. Beige; P. L. Knight

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

482

Cavity Loss Induced Generation of Entangled Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the generation of entangled states of two two-level atoms inside an optical resonator. When the cavity decay is continuously monitored, the absence of photon-counts is associated with the presence of an atomic entangled state. In addition to being conceptually simple, this scheme could be demonstrated with presently available technology. We describe how such a state is generated through conditional dynamics, using quantum jump methods, including both cavity damping and spontaneous emission decay, and evaluate the fidelity and relative entropy of entanglement of the generated state compared with the target entangled state.

Plenio, M B; Beige, A; Knight, P L

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Nuclear medium effects from hadronic atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state of the art in the study of pionic, kaonic and Sigmionic atoms, along with the in-medium nuclear interactions deduced for these hadrons, is reviewed. A special emphasis is placed on recent developments in antikaon-nuclear physics, where a strongly attractive density dependent antikaon-nuclear potential of order 150-200 MeV in nuclear matter emerges by fitting K^- atom data. This has interesting repercussions on antikaon quasibound nuclear states, on the composition of strange hadronic matter and on kaon condensation in self bound hadronic systems.

Friedman, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The ORNL Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center  

SciTech Connect

The principal mission of the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center is the collection evaluation, and dissemination of atomic collision data relevant to fusion energy development. With the advent of the widespread use of the World Wide Web, the data center`s resources are being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users (cf. http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/). As this development continues, initially disparate, individually compiled resources will be transformed into integrated tools for retrieving recommended data, or displaying and manipulating the information available. The data center`s present capabilities, recent data production/evaluation efforts, and goals for future development are highlighted here.

Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.; Ownby, F.M.; Meyer, F.W.; Havener, C.C.; Bannister, M.E.; Liu, W.; Jeffery, D.J.; Stancil, P.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Human Radiation Experiments: Roadmap to the Project: ACHRE Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research involving healthy subjects: human experimentation conducted in conjunction with atomic bomb tests. More than 200,000 service personnel--now known as atomic...

486

CURRENT SCIENCE, VOL. 86, NO. 8, 25 APRIL 2004 1051 CURRENTSCIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and the world woke up to the power of atomic energy' (Lala, p

Balaram , P.

487

The Effects of Mercury Contamination on Tree, Fungal, and Soil Composition along East Fork Poplar Creek, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Oak Ridge Reservation established under The Atomic Energy Commission was the site for uranium enrichment and the construction of the atomic bomb during the… (more)

Jean-Philippe, Sharon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Harold M. Agnew  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

joining the Experimental Physics Division. He participated in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, flying as a scientific member of the first atomic strike mission. After completing...

489

Vision in Ruins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dropping of the Atomic Bomb in the city of Hiroshima. Forthe "the Atomic Dome" in the center of the city. But rather

Dizon, Michelle Yap

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

The Vertical Turn: Topographies of Metropolitan Modernism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1948: “In an atomic war, congested cities would become deathcrashes down on the city like an atomic bomb. The heat is

Haacke, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Atomic clocks with suppressed blackbody radiation shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a nonstandard concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift (BBRS) and its temperature fluctuations can be dramatically suppressed (by one to three orders of magnitude) independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies $\

Yudin, V I; Okhapkin, M V; Bagayev, S N; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Huntemann, N; Mehlstaubler, T E; Riehle, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Atomic power in space: A history  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

''Atomic Power in Space,'' a history of the Space Isotope Power Program of the United States, covers the period from the program's inception in the mid-1950s through 1982. Written in non-technical language, the history is addressed to both the general public and those more specialized in nuclear and space technologies. 19 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. The feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed.

Eugene Chudakov; Vladimir Luppov

2003-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

494

Atomic physics with highly charged ions  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

Richard, P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nano-soldering to single atomic layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

Girit, Caglar O. (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

497

Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

1989-02-00T23:59:59.000Z

498

Entangling strings of neutral atoms in 1D atomic pipeline structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a string of neutral atoms with nearest neighbor interaction in a 1D beam splitter configuration, where the longitudinal motion is controlled by a moving optical lattice potential. The dynamics of the atoms crossing the beam splitter maps to a 1D spin model with controllable time dependent parameters, which allows the creation of maximally entangled states of atoms by crossing a quantum phase transition. Furthermore, we show that this system realizes protected quantum memory, and we discuss the implementation of one- and two-qubit gates in this setup.

U. Dorner; P. Fedichev; D. Jaksch; M. Lewenstein; P. Zoller

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

499

Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H/sub 2/ /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ /minus/> C/sub 2/HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs.

Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

6. Sedimentation rates Frank et al. 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers will have no tritium · Slow travelling aquifers will have a reduced amount Reported in units of tritium units (TU): 1 TU = 1 atom of tritium per 1018 atoms of hydrogen 7. Water dating ­ Tritium #12 was released in the northern hemisphere, and entered the oceans. Bomb Tritium bomb spike bomb spike rainfall

Siebel, Wolfgang