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1

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry and Physics Discussions Trace gas measurements from... ., Rinsland, C. P., Stiller, G. P., and Zander, R.: On the assessment and uncertainty of atmospheric trace gas......

2

Trace gas contaminant control in a space station atmosphere using adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace contaminants enter spacecraft atmospheres through offgassing of spacecraft materials and as products of crew metabolism. The consequences of fire or accidental release of toxic vapors from onboard systems is also a crew safety concern. The purpose of this work was to determine how these contaminants could be limited to safe concentrations in the atmosphere of the proposed space station. Contaminant source models were developed from spacecraft material offgassing and human metabolic production rate measurements. Contaminants were represented with a simplified model of 30 compounds by grouping similar species together. A trace contaminant control process, which consists of chemisorption of ammonia on phosphoric acid-impregnated activated carbon, ambient temperature catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, catalytic conversion of the sulfur in hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans to elemental sulfur, and adsorption of the other contaminants in a regenerable activated carbon adsorber, was proposed. Trace contaminant adsorption rate and equilibrium equations were derived. Various adsorbents were evaluated to determine the optimum sorbents for this application. Removal system performance limits were established, and optimum design ranges for process parameters were developed. Trace gas contaminants can be limited to safe concentrations by the process proposed under normal conditions using as little as 1 Kg/man-year of ammonia chemisorbent. The most likely accidental contaminant releases can be removed in {approximately}20 hours using frequent adsorber regenerations.

Winter, J.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Recent progress in high precision atmospheric trace gas instruments using mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report results from high precision spectroscopic instruments for atmospheric trace gases using with mid-IR quantum cascade lasers. Numerous gases can be measured with 1s absorption...

McManus, John B; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; McGovern, Ryan; Agnese, Mike

4

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O'Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

6

Trace analysis of atmospheric organic bases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of atmospheric organic bases were investigated; the study included (1) the analysis of submarine charcoal filter bed samples for nitrogen bases and (2) the use of metallic tetraphenylporphines (TPP) as specific adsorbents for atmospheric... gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The isolation procedure provided acceptable reproducibi lity in the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen bases in the submarine environment. Several metallic TPP adsorbents were...

Clark, Dwayne C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace element Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... 5 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals...

10

Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gas annual Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reactive trace gas with a current lifetime in the atmosphere of w... gas'. The greenhouse effect of one molecule of CH4 ... Source: USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine...

12

3, 20272058, 2003 Trace gas IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and on the climate forcing: H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4, CFCs, O3, and CO. The atmospheric abundances obtained from infrared satellite for chemistry and climate applications C. Clerbaux 1 , J. Hadji-Lazaro 1 , S. Turquety 1 gas abundances in the troposphere were obtained from10 sparsely distributed measurement sites

13

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust exhaust experiment It has previously been difficult to identify the emissions of diesel exhaust until reactive with organic compounds such as alkanes which are present in diesel exhaust emissions. The reaction

Collins, Gary S.

14

CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GASLAB Network GASLAB Network CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases (April 2003) data Data Investigators L.P. Steele, P.R. Krummel, and R.L. Langenfelds Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) DOI 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1021 Data are available for four atmospheric trace gases at nine stationary sites and one moving platform (aircraft over Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Bass Strait, between the Australian continent and Tasmania). The trace gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H2). Measurements of δ13C from CO2 are also included in this database. The nine stationary sites are, from north to south: Alert, Canada; Shetland Islands, Scotland; Estevan Point, Canada; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Ferguson,

15

Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

Hashemi, M. M. [Physics Department, Doctorate Technical Center of PNU, P.O. Box 19536-33511, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir; Moosakhani, A. [Physics Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A. [Physics Department, Imam Khomeini International University, P.O. Box 34149-16818, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Majdabadi, A. [Laser and Optics Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 11155-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abachi, S. [Physics Department, University of California, Irvin, CA 92697 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Static Dilution System to Produce Trace Level Gas Standards for Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......trace chromatographic analysis of extraneous gases...standards for quantitative analysis of O2, N 2 , and other...its versatility and reliability. Introduction High-purity...atmosphere), and in analysis (as a carrier gas for...dried in a silica gel reactor before being admitted......

N.P. Neves; Jr.; C.A. Gasparoto; C.H. Collins

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

Steidel, Chuck

18

Seven Data Sets Released from LBA Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gas Teams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Sets Released from LBA Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gas Teams Data Sets Released from LBA Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gas Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics teams and three data sets from the Trace Gas and Aerosol Fluxes science teams, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-02 C and N Isotopes in Leaves and Atmospheric CO2, Amazonas, Brazil . Data set prepared by A.C. de Araujo, J.P.H.B. Ometto, A.J. Dolman, B. Kruijt, M.J. Waterloo and J.R. Ehleringer. This data set reports delta 13C/12C results for leaf tissues and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), delta 15N/14N ratios for leaf tissue, and leaf carbon and nitrogen concentrations along a topographical gradient in old-growth forests near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Also included are coincident

19

Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

20

Gas Source Tracing With a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Source Tracing With a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy Achim Lilienthal, Denis,reiman,zell}@informatik.uni-tuebingen.de Abstract. As a sub-task of the general gas source localisation problem, gas source tracing is supposed to guide a gas-sensitive mobile system towards a source by using the cues determined from the gas

Zell, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluating fugacity models for trace components in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fugacity approach was evaluated to reconcile loadings of vinyl chloride (chloroethene), benzene, 1,3-butadiene and trichloroethylene in waste with concentrations observed in landfill gas monitoring studies. An evaluative environment derived from fictitious but realistic properties such as volume, composition, and temperature, constructed with data from the Brogborough landfill (UK) test cells was used to test a fugacity approach to generating the source term for use in landfill gas risk assessment models (e.g. GasSim). SOILVE, a dynamic Level II model adapted here for landfills, showed greatest utility for benzene and 1,3-butadiene, modelled under anaerobic conditions over a 10year simulation. Modelled concentrations of these components (95?300?gm?3; 43?gm?3) fell within measured ranges observed in gas from landfills (24?300180?000?gm?3; 2070?gm?3). This study highlights the need (i) for representative and time-referenced biotransformation data; (ii) to evaluate the partitioning characteristics of organic matter within waste systems and (iii) for a better understanding of the role that gas extraction rate (flux) plays in producing trace component concentrations in landfill gas.

Sophie Shafi; Andrew Sweetman; Rupert L. Hough; Richard Smith; Alan Rosevear; Simon J.T. Pollard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

23

LaserSPECks:: laser SPECtroscopic trace-gas sensor networks - sensor integration and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a novel laser spectroscopic trace-gas sensor platform, LaserSPECks that integrates recently developed miniature quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QE-PAS) gas sensing technology. This universal platform uses infrared laser spectroscopy ... Keywords: lasers, sensors, spectroscopy, trace gas sensing

Stephen So; Farinaz Koushanfar; Anatoliy Kosterev; Frank Tittel

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Trace gas measurements in the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report trace gas measurements made both inside and outside the Kuwait oil-fire smoke plume during a flight of an instrumented research aircraft on May 30, 1991. Concentrations of SO{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub x} averaged vertically and horizontally throughout the plume 80 km downwind of Kuwait City were 106, 127, and 9.1 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), respectively, above background concentrations. With the exception of SO{sub 2}, trace gas concentrations were far below typical US urban levels and primary national ambient air quality standards. Ambient ozone was titrated by NO in the dark, dense core of the smoke plume close to the fires, and photochemical ozone production was limited to the diffuse edge of the plume. Photochemical O{sub 3} production was noted throughout the plume at a distance of 160 km downwind of Kuwait City, and averaged 2.3 ppbv per hour during the first 3 hours of transport. Little additional photochemical production was noted at a downwind range of 340 km. The fluxes of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and reactive nitrogen from the roughly 520 fires still burning on May 30, 1991 are estimated at 1.4 x 10{sup 7} kg SO{sub 2}/d, 6.9 x 10{sup 6} kg CO/d, and 2.7 x 10{sup 5} kg N/d, respectively. Generally low concentrations of CO and NO{sub x} indicate that the combustion was efficient and occurred at low temperatures. Low total nonmethane hydrocarbon concentrations suggest that the volatile components of the petroleum were burned efficiently. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Luke, W.T.; Kok, G.L.; Schillawski, R.D.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Greenberg, J.P.; Kadavanich, M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. (Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor N. Petra1, J. Zweck1, S. E, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA E-mail: zweck@umbc.edu Abstract: A model for a resonant. At low concentrations, the molecular dynamics of the trace gas do not influence the signal. © 2010

Minkoff, Susan E.

27

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

3D-printed miniature gas cell for photoacoustic spectroscopy of trace gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new methodology for the development of miniature photoacoustic trace gas sensors using 3D printing is presented. A near-infrared distributed feedback (DFB) laser is used together...

Bauer, Ralf; Stewart, George; Johnstone, Walter; Boyd, Euan; Lengden, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

08ICES-0031 Advanced quartz-enhanced photoacoustic trace gas sensor for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

08ICES-0031 Advanced quartz-enhanced photoacoustic trace gas sensor for early fire detection A. A, overheating of electric wiring insulation, unintended release of chemicals, or malfunctions of the air

30

RAPID COMMUNICATION CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback diode laser will be described. The CW TEC DFB- moelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy

31

``Designing Lagrangian experiments to measure regional-scale trace gas fluxes''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

``Designing Lagrangian experiments to measure regional-scale trace gas fluxes'' J. C. Lin,1 C gas fluxes at the land surface is essential for understanding the impact of human activities as they travel over the landscape. Successful Lagrangian experiments depend critically on forecasts of air parcel

32

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy infrastructure. The graduate projects, fully funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. Samples of guiding questions as part of the projects include: � What can explain; (3) demonstrated computer skills (e.g., Linux, R, Matlab, Fortran, GIS); (4) excellent oral

Lin, John Chun-Han

33

Hydrodynamics of Embedded Planets' First Atmospheres. II. A Rapid Recycling of Atmospheric Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following Paper I we investigate the properties of atmospheres that form around small protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc by conducting hydrodynamical simulations. These are now extended to three dimensions, employing a spherical grid centred on the planet. Compression of gas is shown to reduce rotational motions. Contrasting the 2D case, no clear boundary demarcates bound atmospheric gas from disc material; instead, we find an open system where gas enters the Bondi sphere at high latitudes and leaves through the midplane regions, or, vice versa, when the disc gas rotates sub-Keplerian. The simulations do not converge to a time-independent solution; instead, the atmosphere is characterized by a time-varying velocity field. Of particular interest is the timescale to replenish the atmosphere by nebular gas, $t_\\mathrm{replenish}$. It is shown that the replenishment rate, $M_\\mathrm{atm}/t_\\mathrm{replenish}$, can be understood in terms of a modified Bondi accretion rate, $\\sim$$R_\\mathrm{Bondi}^2\\rho...

Ormel, Chris W; Kuiper, Rolf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution studies involve collection and anal- ysis of atmospheric aerosols and concurrent meteorol- ogy) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations

O'Brien, Timothy E.

35

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. [Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are requested in several fields such as applications [1], fuel cell [2], radioactive waste storage and diverse selectivity of a sensor includes the addition of a catalyst to the tin oxide powder. In the case of hydrogen1 SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION G

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Evolution of the geothermal fluids at Los Azufres, Mexico, as traced by noble gas isotopes, 18  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of the geothermal fluids at Los Azufres, Mexico, as traced by noble gas isotopes, 18 O, D: Noble gases Strontium isotopes Helium isotopes Geothermal energy Los Azufres Araró Mexico Isotopes of noble gases, CO2, H2O and Sr were measured in 10 geothermal wells and 8 hot springs, fumaroles and mud

Long, Bernard

38

Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

Liebowitz, B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ultrahigh?Frequency Discharge in Atmospheric?Pressure Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 2469 MHz discharge was generated at an open end of a coaxial waveguide through which atmospheric?pressure gas flowed. Argon served as a plasma?forming gas hydrogen and calcium as probe elements for the measurement of electron density and gas temperature respectively and sodium as a seed for increasing electron density. The density of excited hydrogen atoms the excitation temperature the electron density the ionizationtemperature and the gas temperature were measured at operating powers of 50 200 and 400 W. The plasma in the close vicinity of the electrode (0 to 0.5 mm from the terminus of the inner conductor) was not in the local thermal equilibrium at any power level investigated independently of the sodium seeding. At a distance between 1 and 3 mm from the electrode on the contrary the nonseeded plasma approached the local thermal equilibrium when the power was increased while the seeded plasma exhibited a deviation from the local thermal equilibrium. The deviation from the local thermal equilibrium in the nonseeded plasma can be interpreted to be due to inhomogeneity of the plasma. In the outer zone of the seeded plasma the excitation temperature was equal to the gas temperature but not to the ionizationtemperature. A separation of plasma components occurred which was depressed by the sodium seeding.

Seiichi Murayama

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Atmospheric-pressure gas breakdown from 2 to 100 MHz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a detailed study of breakdown voltage of atmospheric-pressure helium gas between two parallel-plate electrodes from 2 to 100 MHz. Experimental data show that the breakdown voltage reduces initially with increasing frequency due to a diminishing contribution of drift-dominated electron wall loss and then begins to increase with increasing frequency. The latter is contrary to the current understanding that relies largely on the electron wall loss mechanism. Particle-in-cell simulation suggests that rapid oscillation of the applied voltage prevents electrons from reaching their maximum achievable kinetic energy, thus compromising the ionization efficiency and increasing the breakdown voltage.

Walsh, J. L.; Zhang, Y. T.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Interplay of discharge and gas flow in atmospheric pressure plasma jets Nan Jiang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interplay of discharge and gas flow in atmospheric pressure plasma jets Nan Jiang,1 JingLong Yang,2 2011) Interplay of discharge and gas flow in the atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated with three:10.1063/1.3581067] I. INTRODUCTION The atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) that is nor- mally

Zexian, Cao

43

Broadband Femtosecond Sources for Greenhouse Gas Spectroscopy and Trace-Gas Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe several approaches for producing broadband femtosecond sources in the mid-infrared for applications in atmospheric spectroscopy. Using a 3.3 m source, measurements of CH4...

Neely, Tyler W; Johnson, Todd; Nugent-Glandorf, Lora; Adler, Florian; Diddams, Scott

44

Soft Plasma Polymerization of Gas State Precursors from an Atmospheric Pressure Corona Plasma Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soft Plasma Polymerization of Gas State Precursors from an Atmospheric Pressure Corona Plasma Discharge ... Application of nonequilibrium plasmas in organic chemistry ...

P. Anthony F. Herbert; Liam ONeill; Justyna Jaroszy?ska-Woli?ska

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace metals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 2 Chapter 1: Modelling Past Environmental Changes Using Lake Sediment Records Summary: of the anthropogenic fluxes of many potentially toxic trace metals...

46

Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 45754582 Conjugate mass transfer during gas absorption by falling liquid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 4575­4582 Conjugate mass transfer during gas absorption polluted air and gaseous streams by water drops is an important mass transfer operation in air pollution occurring phenomena and industrial processes involving sprays, e.g. atmospheric physics, wet deposition. Gas

Elperin, Tov

47

Forecast and Control Methods of Landfill Emission Gas to Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main component of landfill gas is CH4, its release is a potential hazard to the environment. To understand the gas law and landfill gas production are the prerequisite for effective control of landfill gas. This paper selects three kinds of typical ... Keywords: Landfill gas, German model, IPCC model, Marticorena dynamic model

Wang Qi; Yang Meihua; Wang Jie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace molecule Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or have currently low atmospheric mixing ratios. 2031 12... ., Rinsland, C. P., Stiller, G. P., and Zander, R.: On the assessment and ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

49

Integrated Study of MFRSR-derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facili...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Integrated Study of MFRSR-Derived Parameters of Atmospheric Aerosols and Trace Gases Over the ARM CART Site Extended Facilities - Comparison with Satellite and Other Ground-Based Measurements M. D. Alexandrov and B. Cairns Columbia University National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York A. A. Lacis and B. E. Carlson National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Comparison of SGP MFRSR Network Aerosol Retrievals with MODIS Aerosol Product The network of Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site consists of 21 instrument sites

50

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Industry, Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1580e/i1580e00.pdf Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Screenshot References: Forestry Industry Impacts[1] "This book examines the influence of the forest products (roundwood, processed wood products and pulp and paper) value chain on atmospheric greenhouse gases. Forests managed for natural conservation, for protection

51

Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric levels. Measurements in the free troposphere (FT) are particularly useful, because trace gas and particle

Honrath, Richard E.

53

Atmospheric Science The Earth's atmosphere, a layered sphere of gas extending  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

division study the composition, structure, chemical, and physical processes of the Earth's atmosphere. The division's four interrelated groups focus on satellite, airborne, and ground-based observations processes such as atmospheric dynamics, chemistry, and radiation on Earth and other planets. Our atmospheric

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

54

Storage characteristics of fresh fish packed in modified gas atmospheres containing carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF FRESH FISH PACKED IN MODIFIED GAS ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MICHEL LANNELONGUE FAVRE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology STORAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF FRESH FISH PACKED IN MODIFIED GAS ATMOSPHERES CONTAINING CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by MICHEL LANNELONGUE FAVRE Approved as to style...

Lannelongue-Favre, Michel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE, PROFESSOR MAC 503, Introduction to Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professors F. Millero and E. Atlas COURSE GOALS: Introduction to Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry. The course/Circulation/Transport 16. Trace Gas Exchanges and Biogeochemical Cycles;Biosphere-Atmosphere Exchanges 17. Biogeochem (cont

Miami, University of

56

A Cost-Effective Trace Gas Measurement Program for Long-Term Monitoring of the Stratospheric Circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stratospheric trace gas measurement program using balloon-based sonde and AirCore sampler techniques is proposed as a way to monitor the strength of the stratospheric mean meridional or BrewerDobson circulation. Modeling work predicts a strengthening ...

Fred L. Moore; Eric A. Ray; Karen H. Rosenlof; James W. Elkins; Pieter Tans; Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photochemistry and land-system change using measurements...Coupling in the Earth System (OP3/ACES) campaign...guineensis Elaeis oleifera hybrids of the progeny...East Asian land-system change on atmospheric...and land cover: solar radiation is efficiently...based on the vertical wind. There is no consensus...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Exhaust gas treatment by an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microwave process for treating exhaust gases from internal combustion engines is presented. The exhaust gases are ionised by microwave energy at 2.45 GHz and the resultant plasma jet discharges into ambient air and exhaust gas environment. A gas analyser was used to measure the change in exhaust gas composition due to the influence of the plasma. Large decreases in CO2, CO and hydrocarbon levels, accompanied by an increase in NO levels, were found.

Carlos A. Destefani; Elias Siores

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Combined Atmospheric Photochemistry and Ion Tracing code: Reproducing the Viking Lander results and initial outflow results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Combined Atmospheric Photochemistry and Ion Tracing code (CAPIT) has been developed to explore ion loss into space at Mars. The CAPIT code includes the major photochemical reactions of Mars ionosphere, ion tracing in the presence of magnetic fields, and plasma wave heating of ions. In particular, we examine whether O+ escape from the day-side ionosphere is limited by ion production (UV input) or by external energy input to the ions. To verify the code, it is demonstrated that the CAPIT solutions reproduce the Viking 1 Landers ion density and temperature profiles. Using Viking 1 Lander conditions as a baseline, ion outflow rates are examined as function of solar wind energy input via plasma waves and UV ionization rates. The O+ outflow rates predicted by the simulation are comparable to the outflow rates estimated by observation. The results indicate that plasma waves are a viable source of energy to O+ ions and suggest that present-day O+ outflow rates at Mars are source limited by photochemical production (UV input) during periods of strong energy input (plasma wave activity), but otherwise regulated by both UV input and energy input. These results imply that ion heating by plasma waves can influence the present-day loss of O+.

L. Andersson; R.E. Ergun; A.I.F. Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A versatile integrating sphere based photoacoustic sensor for trace gas monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compact versatile photoacoustic (PA) sensor for trace gas detection is reported. The sensor is based on an integrating sphere as the PA absorption cell with an organ pipe tube attached to increase the sensitivity of the PA sensor. The versatility and enhancement of the sensitivity of the PA signal is investigated by monitoring specific ro-vibrational lines of CO2 in the 2 mm wavelength region and of NO2 in the 405 nm region. The measured enhancement factor of the PA signal exceeds 1200, which is due to the acoustic resonance of the tube and the absorption enhancement of the integrating sphere relatively to a non-resonant single pass cell. It is observed that the background absorption signals are highly attenuated due to the thermal conduction and diffusion effects in the polytetrafluoroethylene cell walls. This demonstrates that careful choice of cell wall materials can be highly beneficial to the sensitivity of the PA sensor. These properties makes the sensor suitable for various practical sensor applicati...

Lassen, Mikael; Brusch, Anders; Petersen, Jan C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Influence of oxygen traces on an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive argon plasma discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure capacitive discharge source driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz has been developed experimentally that is capable of producing a homogeneous and cold glow discharge in O2/Ar. With respect to the influence of oxygen component when diluted into argon plasmadischarge on the dischargecharacteristics the measurements of the electrical parameters (impedance phase angle resistance and reactance) are made systematically and the densities of the metastable and resonant state of argon are determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy(OES). It is shown that the admixture of oxygen into argon plasma not only changes the electric characteristics but also alters the optical emission spectra greatly due to strong interaction between the oxygen content and the argon in the plasma environment.

Shou-Zhe Li; Qi Wu; Wen Yan; Dezhen Wang; Han S. Uhm

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fluorine Gas Management Guidelines Fluorine is a highly toxic, pale yellow gas about 1.3 times as heavy as air at atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluorine Gas Management Guidelines Overview Fluorine is a highly toxic, pale yellow gas about 1.3 times as heavy as air at atmospheric temperature and pressure. Fluorine gas is the most powerful oxidizing agent known, reacting with practically all organic and inorganic substances. Fluorine gas

de Lijser, Peter

63

Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Semi-Volatile Compounds on Atmospheric Particulate Matters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermal desorption (TD) device was developed and coupled to gas chromatograph (GC) or gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds on atmospheric particulate matters (PM). The TD was operated by direct heating and placed on the top of GC injector, leading to high heating rate and easy transfer of analytes to GC without re-focusing of analytes by cold trap. The materials used for supporting PM samples, desorption temperature and time, and types of sample injection were investigated for the detection of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nine n-alkanes. The limits of detection of the proposed TD-GC method were in the range of 0.0140.094 ng for PAHs, and 0.0160.026 ng for n-alkanes, with coefficients of correlation above 0.9975. The TD-GC method was applied to the determination of trace \\{PAHs\\} and n-alkanes on PM10 samples from three cities. The recoveries were in the range of 95%135% (PAHs) and 95%115% (n-alkanes). Finally, the TD was coupled to GC-MS for comparison of the contents of \\{PAHs\\} and n-alkanes on \\{PMx\\} with different particulate size (x = 10, 5, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.1).

Hu MENG; Jing-Hong ZHAO; Chun-Feng DUAN; Liang HAO; Ya-Feng GUAN

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Tracing coalbed natural gas-coproduced water using stable isotopes of carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of hydrocarbons commonly is associated with coproduction of water. This water may be put to beneficial use or may be reinjected into subsurface aquifers. In either case, it would be helpful to establish a fingerprint for that coproduced water so that it may be tracked following discharge on the surface or reintroduction to geologic reservoirs. This study explores the potential of using {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) - coproduced water as a fingerprint of its origin and to trace its fate once it is disposed on the surface. Our initial results for water samples coproduced with CBNG from the Powder River Basin show that this water has strongly positive {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) (12 parts per thousand to 22 parts per thousand) that is readily distinguished from the negative {delta}{sup 13}C of most surface and ground water (-8 parts per thousand to -11 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the DIC concentrations in coproduced water samples are also high (more than 100 mg C/L) compared to the 20 to 50 mg C/L in ambient surface and ground water of the region. The distinctively high {delta}{sup 13}C and DIC concentrations allow us to identify surface and ground water that have incorporated CBNG-coproduced water. Accordingly, we suggest that the {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) and DIC concentrations of water can be used for long-term monitoring of infiltration of CBNG-coproduced water into ground water and streams. Our results also show that the {delta} {sup 13}C (DIC) of CBNG-coproduced water from two different coal zones are distinct leading to the possibility of using {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) to distinguish water produced from different coal zones.

Sharma, S.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma expansion into a background gas at atmospheric pressure is cru- cial for many engineeringDynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures Alexander Miloshevsky, Sivanandan S. Harilal, Gennady Miloshevsky

Harilal, S. S.

66

Laser-based trace gas detection with applications in biology and medical science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OPOs and QC-lasers in combination with off-axis ICOS are used to detect trace gases emitted from biological tissue. Ethylene and Nitric oxide emission are detected from plants and HCN...

Harren, Frans J M

67

XMM-Newton observations of the hot-gas atmospheres of 3C 66B and 3C 449  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......heating of an X-ray atmosphere by radio-lobe expansion...dissipated into the atmosphere. This could lead to...combined data, with 604-MHz radio contours overlaid...X-ray-emitting gas and radio plasma, present new images...physical conditions in the atmospheres, and discuss the possibility......

J. H. Croston; M. J. Hardcastle; M. Birkinshaw; D. M. Worrall

2003-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); [Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); [Liege Univ., Liege (Belgium); [NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modeling Io's Sublimation-Driven Atmosphere: Gas Dynamics and Radiation Emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma impact heating, planetary rotation, and inhomogeneous surface frost are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm subsolar region toward the colder night-side. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, including vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also presented. Io's rotation leads to an asymmetric surface temperature distribution which is found to strengthen circumplanetary flow near the dusk terminator. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both day- and night-sides. The plasma energy flux also causes high temperatures at high altitudes but permits relatively cooler temperatures at low altitudes near the dense subsolar point due to plasma energy depletion. To validate the atmospheric model, a radiative transfer model was developed utilizing the backward Monte Carlo method. The model allows the calculation of the atmospheric radiation from emitting/absorbing and scattering gas using an arbitrary scattering law and an arbitrary surface reflectivity. The model calculates the spectra in the {nu}{sub 2} vibrational band of SO{sub 2} which are then compared to the observational data.

Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, David B.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, Chris H.; Stewart, Benedicte [University of Texas at Austin, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 210 East 24. Street W. R. Woolrich Laboratories 1 University Station, C0600 Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gratiy, Sergey L.; Levin, Deborah A. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Aerospace Engineering, 229 Hammond, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gas breakdown in an atmospheric pressure radio-frequency capacitive plasma source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas breakdown is studied in an atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasma source developed for materials applications. At a rf frequency of 13.56 MHz breakdown voltage is largely a function of the product of the pressure and the discharge gap spacing approximating the Paschen curve. However breakdown voltage varies substantially with rf frequency due to a change in the electron loss mechanism. A large increase in breakdown voltage is observed when argon oxygen or nitrogen is added to helium despite their lower ionization potential. Discussion is given for optimal breakdown conditions at atmospheric pressure.

Jaeyoung Park; I. Henins; H. W. Herrmann; G. S. Selwyn

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Trace Analysis of Estradiol in Animal Chow by Electron-Capture Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......assay via EC-GC. Gas Chromatographic Assays...75% phenyl) on Gas Chrom Q (80-100...the DC mode with a nitrogen carrier gas flow of 160 ml...silica gel (20% water) or appropriately...because of the low solubility of estradiol in benzene......

Malcolm C. Bowman; Charles R. Nony

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Trace Analysis of Ethinyl Estradiol in Casein Diet Using Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and cervical mucus by gas chromatog- raphy (GC...was used as the carrier gas at a flow rate of 0...and the detector makeup gas was nitrogen flowing at...relatively simple, safe, and cost effective to perform...temperature to ensure production of a single derivative......

Ronald L. Evans; Larry G. Rushing; Stanley M. Billedeau; Claude L. Holder; Paul H. Siitonen

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Quantum cascade laser spectrometer for trace-gas detection of exhaled Carbonyl Sulfide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous concentration measurements of exhaled carbonyl sulfide and carbon dioxide were demonstrated using a pulsed quantum cascade laser based gas sensor. This sensor has...

Wysocki, Gerard; So, Stephen; McCurdy, Matt; Roller, Chad; Weidmann, Damien; Kosterev, Anatoliy a; Frantz, J Patrick; Curl, Robert F; Tittel, Frank K

75

Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Analysis with Single-Pass Fourier Transform Infrared Hollow Waveguide Gas Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hollow core optical fiber gas sensor has been developed in combination with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer operating in the spectral range of 4000500...

Kim, Seong-Soo; Menegazzo, Nicola; Young, Christina; Chan, James; Carter, Chance; Mizaikoff, Boris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Control of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure argon plasma characteristics by helium gas mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The control of plasma characteristics is one of the important issues in many atmospheric pressure plasma applications. In order to accomplish this control, a feasibility study was performed by investigating the role of helium gas in an argon glow plasma that were produced in ambient air by 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to measure rotational temperature and emission spectra acquired between 300 and 840 nm. Based on electrical and optical measurements, parameters such as gas temperature, breakdown voltage, power coupling efficiency, spatial uniformity of rotational temperature, and the sum of the emission intensity were controlled by varying the argon and helium gas mixing ratio. The addition of helium gas (from 0 to 10 lpm) to the argon flow (of 10 lpm) lowered the breakdown voltage (from 430 to 300 V{sub pk}) and the rotational temperature (from 465 to 360 K). However, an excessive addition of helium resulted in a reduction of the spatial uniformity and efficiency of power coupling. When the ratio of helium to argon flow was between 0.3 and 0.5, a high spatial uniformity with a relatively low gas temperature and breakdown voltage was achieved. This suggests that mixing of the supply gas is a useful way of controlling the plasma characteristics that may be utilized for applications with specific required discharge conditions.

Moon, Se Youn; Han, Jewoo; Choe, W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Trace Analysis in the Food and Beverage Industry by Capillary Gas Chromatography: System Performance and Maintenance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gas is of g o o d quality a n d that all gas...w o directions: increase the n u m b e r of...particular the limit for wines was set at 30 p p...t of a r o m a in wines a n d spirits. The...technique will either increase the confidence level...urethane) in wine. GC-N/TEA chromatograms......

M.A. Hayes

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Comparison of observed and predicted short-term tracer gas concentrations in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory is in the process of conducting a series of atmospheric tracer studies. The inert gas sulfurhexafluoride is released from a height of 62 m for 15 min and concentrations in air are measured on sampling arcs up to 30 km downwind of the release point. Maximum 15 min. air concentrations from 14 of these tracer tests have been compared with the ground-level, centerline air concentration predicted with a Gaussian plume atmospheric transport model using eight different sets of atmospheric dispersion parameters. Preliminary analysis of the results from these comparisons indicates that the dispersion parameters developed at Juelich, West Germany, based on tracers released from a height of 50 m, give the best overall agreement between the predicted and observed values. The median value of the ratio of predicted to observed air concentrations for this set of parameters is 1.3, and the correlation coefficient between the log of the predictions and the log of the observations is 0.72. For the commonly used Pasquill-Gifford dispersion parameters, the values of these same statistics are 4.4 and 0.68, respectively. The Gaussian plume model is widely used to predict air concentrations resulting from short-term radionuclide release to the atmosphere. The results of comparisons such as these must be considered whenever the Gaussian model is used for such purposes. 22 references, 3 tables.

Cotter, S.J.; Miller, C.W.; Lin, W.C.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, the upstream oil and gas industry has dealt with some of the most challenging metering applications. One of these is the measurement of water percentage at the point of allocation. It is an essential requirement when test separators...

Liu, Jin

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Gas temperature and electron temperature measurements by emission spectroscopy for an atmospheric microplasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microplasma suitable for material processing at atmospheric pressure in argon and argon-oxygen mixtures is being studied here. The microplasma is ignited by a high voltage dc pulse and sustained by low power (1-5 W) at 450 MHz. the mechanisms responsible for sustaining the microplasma require a more detailed analysis, which will be the subject of further study. Here it is shown that the microplasma is in nonequilibrium and appears to be in glow mode. The effect of power and oxygen content is also analyzed in terms of gas temperature and electron temperature. Both the gas temperature and the electron temperature have been determined by spectral emission and for the latter a very simple method has been used based on a collisional-radiative model. It is observed that power coupling is affected by a combination of factors and that prediction and control of the energy flow are not always straightforward even for simple argon plasmas. Varying gas content concentration has shown that oxygen creates a preferential energy channel towards increasing the gas temperature. Overall the results have shown that combined multiple diagnostics are necessary to understand plasma characteristics and that spectral emission can represent a valuable tool for tailoring microplasma to specific processing requirements.

Mariotti, Davide; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto [Nanoarchtectonics Research Center (NARC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

Laboratory scale studies of Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents for the removal of trace contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a promising technology for the use of coal in a clean and efficient manner. In order to maintain the overall efficiency of the IGCC process, it is necessary to clean the fuel gas of contaminants (sulfur, trace compounds) at warm (150540 C) to hot (>540 C) temperatures. Current technologies for trace contaminant (such as mercury) removal, primarily activated carbon based sorbents, begin to lose effectiveness above 100 C, creating the need to develop sorbents effective at elevated temperatures. As trace elements are of particular environmental concern, previous work by this group has focused on the development of a Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent for Hg removal. This paper extends the research to Se (as hydrogen selenide, H{sub 2}Se), As (as arsine, AsH{sub 3}), and P (as phosphine, PH{sub 3}) which thermodynamic studies indicate are present as gaseous species under gasification conditions. Experiments performed under ambient conditions in He on 20 wt.% Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} indicate the sorbent can remove the target contaminants. Further work is performed using a 5 wt.% Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent in a simulated fuel gas (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) in both single and multiple contaminant atmospheres to gauge sorbent performance characteristics. The impact of H{sub 2}O, Hg and temperature on sorbent performance is explored.

Rupp, Erik C.; Granite, Evan J. [U.S. DOE; Stanko, Dennis C. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CIRRICULUM VITAE: TOM BREIDER Atmospheric Chemistry Post-Doctoral Research Fellow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to changing anthropogenic and dynamic biogenic emissions of trace gases and aerosols. These chemistry and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles. Discuss., 3, 1185-1221, 2010 4) Hossani, R., M. P. Chipperfield, W. Feng, T. J. Breider, E. Atlas, S. A

Jacob, Daniel J.

84

Passive landfill gas emission Influence of atmospheric pressure and implications for the operation of methane-oxidising biofilters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A passively vented landfill site in Northern Germany was monitored for gas emission dynamics through high resolution measurements of landfill gas pressure, flow rate and composition as well as atmospheric pressure and temperature. Landfill gas emission could be directly related to atmospheric pressure changes on all scales as induced by the autooscillation of air, diurnal variations and the passage of pressure highs and lows. Gas flux reversed every 20h on average, with 50% of emission phases lasting only 10h or less. During gas emission phases, methane loads fed to a connected methane oxidising biofiltration unit varied between near zero and 247g CH4 h?1m?3 filter material. Emission dynamics not only influenced the amount of methane fed to the biofilter but also the establishment of gas composition profiles within the biofilter, thus being of high relevance for biofilter operation. The duration of the gas emission phase emerged as most significant variable for the distribution of landfill gas components within the biofilter.

Julia Gebert; Alexander Groengroeft

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evidence for large methane releases to the atmosphere from deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation during the last glacial episode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inductively coupled plasma optical emission...waters induced by the thermal dissociation of gas...large increases in atmospheric concentration...episode. | Past atmospheric methane-concentration...Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't...2006036403 Past atmospheric methane-concentration...

Thibault de Garidel-Thoron; Luc Beaufort; Franck Bassinot; Pierre Henry

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Plasma Polymerization in an Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in a Flowing Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The plasma of atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) has ... ozone generation by Siemens 1857. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure discharges are of considerable interest because...1, 2.... The DBD...

Rdiger Foest; Martin Schmidt; Jrgen F. Behnke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of land use on surfaceatmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...27 November 2011 research-article Articles...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...boundary layer using a research aircraft in Sabah...exchange fluxes of energy and trace gases...Geophys. Res. Abstracts 12, EGU2010-15408...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development and Application of a Versatile Balloon-Borne DOAS Spectrometer for Skylight Radiance and Atmospheric Trace Gas Profile Measurements.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the framework of this thesis, a novel balloon-borne DOAS instrument was developed, characterized in the laboratory and employed during 5 stratospheric balloon flights. Its (more)

Weidner, Frank

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 3, 14951508, 2003 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/3/1495/ Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Physics Trace gas measurements from infrared satellite for chemistry and climate applications C. Clerbaux1 that impact on the chemical composi- tion of the atmosphere and on the climate forcing: H2O, CO2, N2O, CH4, CFCs, O3, and CO. The atmospheric abundances obtained from the analysis of IMG/ADEOS measurements

91

Greenhouse Gas Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect."

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pressure gas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3... . Gas % Composition ... Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy Cross Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Bio390...

93

Solid Sorbent Collection and Gas Chromatographic Determination of Bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide in Air at Trace Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mustard vapor from a vapor generator continuously through two sampling...vapor concentration in the generator was about 40 g/m3 . In addition...Dressier. Hydrocarbon and water quenching of the flame photometric...in monitoring devices for atmospheric oxidants. Anal. Lett. 14A......

William K. Fowler; Josiah E. Smith; Jr.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Atmospheric Methane at Cape Meares, Oregon, U.S.A.: A High-Resolution Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Methane » Atmospheric Trace Gases » Methane » Atmospheric Methane, Cape Meares Atmospheric Methane at Cape Meares, Oregon, U.S.A.: A High-Resolution Data Base for the Period 1979-1992 DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1007 data Data (DB1007) Investigators M. A. K. Khalil and R. A. Rasmussen Description This data base presents continuous automated atmospheric methane (CH4) measurements taken at the atmospheric monitoring facility in Cape Meares, Oregon, by the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology. The Cape Meares data represent some 119,000 individual atmospheric methane measurements carried out during 1979-1992. Analysis of ambient air (collected 12 to 72 times daily) was carried out by means of an automated sampling and measurement system, using the method of gas chromatography and

95

An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Mark H.L. A preliminary evaluation of gas air tracers. Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association (1965) 15(3):109-112...hygiene investigations. In: 12th AIVC Conference - Air Movement and Ventilation Control Within Buildings......

Edmund C. Jong; Paul V. Macek; Inoka E. Perera; Kray D. Luxbacher; Harold M. McNair

96

Open-Air, Broad-Bandwidth Trace-Gas Sensing with a Mid-Infrared Optical Frequency Comb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mid-Infrared frequency comb is produced via an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an amplified 100 MHz Yb:fiber mode-locked laser. We use this source to make measurements of the concentration of the atmospherically-relevant species of CH4 and H2O over a bandwidth of 100 nm centered at 3.25 um. Multiple absorption lines for each species are detected with millisecond acquisition time using a virtually-imaged phased array (VIPA) spectrometer. The measured wavelength-dependent absorption profile is compared to and fitted by a model, yielding quantitative values of the atmospheric concentration of both CH4 and H2O in a controlled indoor environment, as well as over a 26 m open air outdoor path.

Nugent-Glandorf, Lora; Diddams, Scott A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pb deposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Pollution... 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... ANTHROPOGENICNATURAL 12;Chapter 2: Sources and...

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric bulk deposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Atmospheric Pollution... 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... ANTHROPOGENICNATURAL 12;Chapter 2: Sources and...

99

An Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on a Chip Applied as a Molecular Emission Detector in Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A micromachined plasma chip has been developed. To investigate its performance as an optical emission detector it is coupled to a conventional gas chromatograph (GC). In the plasma chamber of 180 nL volume a d...

Jan C. T. Eijkel; Herbert Stoeri; Andreas Manz

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Simultaneous Gas Chromatographic Determination of Four Toxic Gases Generally Present in Combustion Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......determining these gases in mixtures...dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and...determining these gases in mixtures...dioxide, nitrogen, water vapor, and...to the solubility of A HCN in water, which was...thevariationin gas con- centrations......

Boyd R. Endecott; Donald C. Sanders; Arvind K. Chaturvedi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Single-QCL-based absorption sensor for simultaneous trace-gas detection of CH4 and N2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compact multipass gas cell (MGC). This sensor uses a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave­8]. A compact mid-infrared absorption spectrometer for N2O and CH4 was developed using thermoelectrically cooled.04 cm-1 ) and N2O (1274.61 cm-1 ) lines at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Wavelength modulation spec- troscopy

102

Headspace profiles of modified atmosphere packaged fresh red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) by gas liquid chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activity. Typical components found in the headspace were, butanal, ethanol, hexanal, dimethylamine and trimethylamine. During storage at 4 C, the microbial population within the packages containing C02 tended to shift from an initial gram negative... dioxide (CO2) enriched atmospheres and vacuum packaging have become important new technologies that will improve the quality and shelf-life of fresh seafood products. This type of packaging not only extends the shelf-life of seafoods, it also makes...

Scorah, Craig Darrell Allen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Engineering task plan for flammable gas atmosphere mobile color video camera systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of the mobile video camera systems. The color video camera systems will be used to observe and record the activities within the vapor space of a tank on a limited exposure basis. The units will be fully mobile and designed for operation in the single-shell flammable gas producing tanks. The objective of this tank is to provide two mobile camera systems for use in flammable gas producing single-shell tanks (SSTs) for the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program. The camera systems will provide observation, video recording, and monitoring of the activities that occur in the vapor space of applied tanks. The camera systems will be designed to be totally mobile, capable of deployment up to 6.1 meters into a 4 inch (minimum) riser.

Kohlman, E.H.

1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

104

Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N2 and N2/O2 gas mixture plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet driven by high frequency alternating current and operating on N2 and N2/O2 gas mixture is investigated. The plasma jet can reach 55?mm in length at a gas flow rate of 2500?l/h. The gas temperature at a distance of 4?mm from the nozzle is close to room temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the important plasma parameters such as the excited species rotational temperature vibrational temperature and excitation temperature under different discharge conditions. The results show that the plasma source operates under non-equilibrium conditions. The absolute irradiance intensity of the vibrational band N2(C-B) in the active region is measured. Taking into account the irradiance intensity of N2(C-B 0-0) and N2(B-X 0-0) as well as measured current the electron density which is determined by considering direct and step-wise electron impact excitation of nitrogen emission reaches a maximum value of 5.6??1020/m3.

Dezhi Xiao; Cheng Cheng; Jie Shen; Yan Lan; Hongbing Xie; Xingsheng Shu; Jiangang Li; Paul K. Chu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

MS2 Virus Inactivation by Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Using Different Gas Carriers and Power Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences...Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences...28 Watts) and gas carriers [ambient air, Ar/O2 (2 vol %), and He/O2...

Yan Wu; Yongdong Liang; Kai Wei; Wei Li; Maosheng Yao; Jue Zhang; Sergey A. Grinshpun

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...abundance, as compared to an ambient run (i.e., gas-phase and particle-phase...carbon number. Because n-alkanes are straight chained, and have very low polarity, they do not enter the particle...Diurnal and seasonal variability of gasoline-related volatile organic compound emissions...

Brent J. Williams; Allen H. Goldstein; Nathan M. Kreisberg; Susanne V. Hering

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On the potential of the EChO mission to characterise gas giant atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space telescopes such as EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory) and JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) will be important for the future study of extrasolar planet atmospheres. Both of these missions are capable of performing high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements at moderate resolutions in the visible and infrared, which will allow the characterisation of atmospheric properties using primary and secondary transit spectroscopy. We use the NEMESIS radiative transfer and retrieval tool (Irwin et al. 2008, Lee et al. 2012) to explore the potential of the proposed EChO mission to solve the retrieval problem for a range of H2-He planets orbiting different stars. We find that EChO should be capable of retrieving temperature structure to ~200 K precision and detecting H2O, CO2 and CH4 from a single eclipse measurement for a hot Jupiter orbiting a Sun-like star and a hot Neptune orbiting an M star, also providing upper limits on CO and NH3. We provide a table of retrieval precisions for these quantities in ...

Barstow, Joanna K; Irwin, Patrick G J; Bowles, Neil; Fletcher, Leigh N; Lee, Jae-Min

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ARM - Evolution of the Atmosphere  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

provides clues as to the composition of the early atmosphere. Volcanic emissions include nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and trace gases such as argon. Although oxygen,...

111

Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non-thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non-thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators, including bacteria sterilization, cell apoptosis, and blood coagulation, among others. The mechanisms of the plasma-biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: 'What plasma-generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects?' Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper, we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then, we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma-biomaterial interaction.

Sakiyama, Yukinori; Graves, David B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Modeling and Data Needs of Atmospheric Pressure Gas Plasma and Biomaterial Interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non?thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have received considerable attention recently. One promising application of non?thermal plasma devices appears to be biomaterial and biomedical treatment. Various biological and medical effects of non?thermal plasmas have been observed by a variety of investigators including bacteria sterilization cell apoptosis and blood coagulation among others. The mechanisms of the plasma?biomaterial interaction are however only poorly understood. A central scientific challenge is therefore how to answer the question: What plasma?generated agents are responsible for the observed biological effects? Our modeling efforts are motivated by this question. In this paper we review our modeling results of the plasma needle discharge. Then we address data needs for further modeling and understanding of plasma?biomaterial interaction

Yukinori Sakiyama; David B. Graves

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Shreds:? Influence of Fluorescent Light Exposure and Gas Type on Color and Production of Volatile Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Shreds:? Influence of Fluorescent Light Exposure and Gas Type on Color and Production of Volatile Compounds ... The cheese block was shredded with a hand shredder. ... Aldehydes were the major constituent of the volatile fraction of shredded Cheddar cheese packaged under CO2. ...

Llori M. Colchin; Sandra L. Owens; Galina Lyubachevskaya; Elizabeth Boyle-Roden; Estelle Russek-Cohen; Scott A. Rankin

2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

The impacts of permafrost thaw on land-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Permafrost thaw and the subsequent mobilization of carbon stored in previously frozen soil organic matter (SOM) would be a strong positive feedback to climate1. As the northern permafrost region experiences double the rate of warming as the rest of the Earth2, the vast amount of carbon in permafrost soils3 is vulnerable to thaw, decomposition and release as atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG). Here, we employ a process-based model simulation experiment to assess the net effect of this so-called permafrost carbon feedback (PCF) in recent decades. Results show a wide-spread increase in the depth to permafrost between 1990 and 2006, with simulated active layer thickness (ALT) capturing the mean and spatial variability of the observational data. Analysis of the simulation experiment provides an estimate of a 2.8 mm/yr increase in permafrost depth, which translates to 281 TgC/yr thawed from previously frozen SOM. Overall, we estimate a net GHG forcing of 534 MtCO2eq/yr directly tied to ALT dynamics, while accounting for CO2 (562 MtCO2eq/yr) and CH4 (52 MtCO2eq/yr) release as well as CO2 uptake by vegetation (-80 MtCO2eq/yr). This net forcing represents a significant factor in the estimated 640 MtCO2eq/yr pan-arctic GHG source4, and an additional 6.9% contribution on top of the combined 7792 MtCO2eq/yr fossil fuel emissions from the eight Arctic nations over this time period5.

Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Chen, Min [Purdue University] [Purdue University; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University] [Purdue University; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gasification kinetics of six eastern shales in steam and synthesis gas atmospheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification reactivities have been determined for six Eastern shales with conversions described by a model incorporating fast and slow gasification reactions. A simple model, based on Indiana New Albany shale, was developed to describe the fast and slow weight loss as well as the slow sulfur and organic carbon gasification rates. The slow sulfur and organic carbon reactions are described by rate equations that are first order in sulfur and organic carbon and include the steam pressure. Terms in the organic carbon rate expression account for hydrogen and carbon monoxide inhibition of the steam-carbon reaction. The fraction of shale species lost by fast and slow gasification and the rate of slow sulfur gasification are similar (and assumed to be equal) for the six Eastern shales studied. Eastern shale organic carbon reactivities are different and have been described with different kinetic parameters in the slow organic carbon gasification rate equation. The kinetic expressions developed for Eastern shale gasification are valid in steam and steam; synthesis gas mixtures and for residence times of more than 3 minutes. Gasification is described for temperature and pressure ranges of 1144 to 1311 K and 0.20 to 3.55 MPa, respectively.

Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Design, Fabrication, and Application of a Dynamic Chamber for Measuring Gas Emissions from Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of the emission of trace gases and VOCs from soils to the atmosphere is essential for studying the behavior of gas movement and its fate in the subsurface, for evaluating existing theories and models of trace gas and VOC emissions, for estimating masses of trace gases and VOCs emitted into the atmosphere, and thus, for assessing the effects of such emissions upon the environment. ... (6) The outside surface of the chamber should be able to reflect solar radiation so that the radiant heating or the greenhouse effect can be effectively reduced. ... This flow rate was monitored every 1 s using a turbine-wheel gas flow sensor (McMillan Co., Georgetown, TX), averaged over a 5-min interval and recorded by an on-site computer. ...

Fang Gao; S. R. Yates; M. V. Yates; Jianying Gan; F. F. Ernst

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Trenbolone Acetate and Trenbolone: Trace Analysis in Animal Chow, Wastewater and Human Urine by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography and Electron Capture Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......amount of compounds. Gas Chromatographic...containing 5% OV-101 on Gas-Chrom Q (80...the dc mode with a nitrogen carrier gas flow of 160 ml...gas chromatograph. Solubility, p-Values, and...5 ml of distilled water in the manner described......

Claude L. Holder; William M. Blakemore; Malcolm C. Bowman

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Greenhouse Gas Basics October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction.

119

Simultaneous determination of nine trace mono- and di-chlorophenols in water by ion chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel analytical method was proposed for the rapidly simultaneous determination of nine mono-chlorophenols (MCPs) and di-chlorophenols (DCPs) in water samples using eluent generator ion chromatography (IC) coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) in the negative mode. The IC separation was carried out on an IonPac AS11 analytical column (250mmנ4.0mm) using gradient KOH containing 15% acetonitrile as organic modifier at a constant flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The molecular ions m/z [M?H]? 127 and 161 were selected for the quantification in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode for \\{MCPs\\} and DCPs, respectively. The average recoveries were between 80.6% and 92.6%. Within-day and day-to-day relative standard deviations were less than 12.1% and 13.3%, respectively. The method allowed the nine objective compounds in water samples to be determined at ?g/L levels. It was confirmed that this method could be used in routine analysis.

Micong Jin; Yiwen Yang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

Tarasenko, Victor F. [Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634021, pr. Akademicheskii 2/3 (Russian Federation)

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Site Atmospheric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and Retrieval Validation Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Moy, Leslie University of Wisconsin-Madison Lesht, Barry Argonne National Laboratory Cress, Ted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Strow, Larrabee Hannon, Scott Fetzer, Eric Jet Propulsion Laboratory The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua platform is the first of a new generation of advanced hyperspectral atmospheric sounders with the capability of retrieving temperature and trace gas profiles with high vertical resolution and absolute accuracy. In the past few years ARM has played a major role in the validation of AIRS, including the launch of

123

Application of a Microwave-Induced Helium Plasma Detector at Atmospheric Pressure for Gas Chromatographic Capillary Columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......microwave-induced plasma emission detector...microwave- induced plasma that operates at atmospheric pressure using helium...to within 1 cm of the plasma discharge. The quartz...Raytheon PGM-10X2 2450 MHz microwave power supply......

Stanley P. Wasik; Frederick P. Schwarz

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Concept for a Gas-Filter Correlation Radiometer to Remotely Sense the Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Column from Space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concern about the climatic effects of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 has resulted in a growing need, both scientifically and politically, to monitor atmospheric CO2. The development of a satellite instrument that could measure the global ...

Boyd T. Tolton

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Lead Isotopic Composition of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Residues from Municipal Solid Waste Combustors in France: Implications for Atmospheric Lead Source Tracing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types contain hundreds to thousands of micrograms of metals per gram. Leaching experiments showed that metals are present in condensed phases, probably as sulfates and chlorides, and suggest that Cd, Pb and Zn are highly fractionated from one another during volatilization/condensation processes occurring

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Trace Analysis of Diethylstilbestrol [DES] in Animal Chow by Parallel High-Speed Liquid Chromatography, Electron-Capture Gas Chromatography, and Radioassays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......helium carrier gas flowed at 100...directly into the gas chromatograph...using a 60 C water bath and water...injected for HSLC. Solubility, p-Values...9). The solubility of DES in water at that temperature...stream of dry nitrogen and assaying......

Jimmie R. King; Charles R. Nony; Malcolm C. Bowman

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Application of a Microwave-Induced Helium Plasma Detector at Atmospheric Pressure for Gas Chromatographic Capillary Columns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......to initiate the plasma by directing a...end. After the plasma was initiated...PGM-10X2 2450 MHz microwave power...emitted from the plasma was focused through...chromatograph and the peak area was recorded...evaluate the MPD at atmospheric pressure for capillary...rate, but in large concentration......

Stanley P. Wasik; Frederick P. Schwarz

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas1 emissions into the atmosphere2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ppm in the pre-industrial revolution to 37942 ppm in 2005, rising faster in the last 10 years (average atmospheric CO2 concentration doubles the pre-industrial revolution concentration (IPCC,49 2007a 36 insu-00351929,version1-12Jan2009 #12;1. Introduction37 38 Coal caused the first industrial

Boyer, Edmond

129

Studies on Optimal Gas Supply For a Maskless Etching System with Micro- Discharge Plasma Operated at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimal gas supply method for the micro discharge plasma generated along a quartz glass electrode, which was useful for the maskless fabrication of electrode grooves for surface electrodes on solar cells, w...

Toshiyuki Hamada; Takuya Arimura; Tatsuya Sakoda

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981, CSIRO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » CO2 » Concentrations from Aircraft for Atmospheric Trace Gases » CO2 » Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981 Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations from Aircraft for 1972-1981, CSIRO Monitoring Program DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.ndp007 data Data (NDP-007) PDF PDF Investigators D. J. Beardsmore and G. I. Pearman Methods From 1972 through 1981, air samples were collected in glass flasks from aircraft at a variety of latitudes and altitudes over Australia, New Zealand, and Antarctica. The samples were analyzed for CO2 concentrations with nondispersive infrared gas analysis. The resulting data contain the sampling dates, type of aircraft, flight number, flask identification number, sampling time, geographic sector, distance in kilometers from the listed distance measuring equipment (DME) station, station number of the

131

U.S. Natural Gas System Methane Emissions: State of Knowledge from LCAs, Inventories, and Atmospheric Measurements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas (NG) is a potential "bridge fuel" during transition to a decarbonized energy system: It emits less carbon dioxide during combustion than other fossil fuels and can be used in many industries. However, because of the high global warming potential of methane (CH4, the major component of NG), climate benefits from NG use depend on system leakage rates. Some recent estimates of leakage have challenged the benefits of switching from coal to NG, a large near-term greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunity. During this presentation, Garvin will review evidence from multiple perspectives - life cycle assessments (LCAs), inventories and measurements - about NG leakage in the US. Particular attention will be paid to a recent article in Science magazine which reviewed over 20 years of published measurements to better understand what we know about total methane emissions and those from the oil and gas sectors. Scientific and policy implications of the state of knowledge will be discussed.

Heath, G.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

In vitro Determination of Oxidation of Atmospheric Tritium Gas in Vegetation and Soil in Ibaraki and Gifu, JAPAN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......amounts of tritium gas (HT) as fuel. When HT from a nuclear facility...use. In a 12.5 ml glass vessel, 100 mg (fresh weight) of...water was introduced into each vessel and the supernatant was obtained...catalyze the production or consumption of molecular hydrogen with......

Michiko Ichimasa; Masatomo Suzuki; Haruo Obayashi; Youichi Sakuma; Yusuke Ichimasa

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

Ma Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu Jin [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon, France, Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, CNRS, UMR5579, LASIM (France); Lei Wenqi; Bai Xueshi; Zheng Lijuan; Zeng Heping [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai (China)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evolution of the geothermal fluids at Los Azufres, Mexico, as traced by noble gas isotopes, ?18O, ?D, ?13C and 87Sr/86Sr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isotopes of noble gases, CO2, H2O and Sr were measured in 10 geothermal wells and 8 hot springs, fumaroles and mud volcanoes at Los Azufres, the second most important geothermal field in Mexico. The aim of this study is to provide additional information on fluid circulation in the field and surrounding areas (Arar hot springs), as well as on physical processes such as boiling, steam separation and invasion of re-injected brines following over 25years of geothermal fluid exploitation. Mantle helium dominates in fluids from the northern production zone of Martaro, with measured 3He/4He ratios up to 7 Ra (where Ra is the atmospheric ratio of 1.386נ10?6). 3He/4He ratios are positively correlated with 87Sr/86Sr ratios and with ?D and ?18O. These relationships suggest that Los Azufres fluids represent a mixing between primary magmatic 3He-rich fluids and groundwater currently discharging at Arar hot springs and enriched in radiogenic 4He acquired from Miocene andesites. Unusually high He ratios together with radiogenic Sr isotopic ratios suggest that thermal waters acquired mantle He from deep-seated parent magmas and radiogenic Sr possibly during their uprising through the metamorphic basement. 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 366 to 429 measured in two wells indicate either mantle-derived argon or a radiogenic 40Ar in situ component, suggesting the local presence of an older crustal fluid component in the northern part of the field. Ne, Kr and Xe are entirely of atmospheric origin, but processes of boiling, steam separation and re-injection of used brines have led to fractionation of their elemental abundances. Comparison with previous studies suggests that the boiling zone in the northern production zone is currently extending further north (Martaro hot springs). In the southwestern productive zone, re-injected brines might account for more than 90% of the exploited fluids.

D.L. Pinti; M.C. Castro; O. Shouakar-Stash; A. Tremblay; V.H. Garduo; C.M. Hall; J.-F. Hlie; B. Ghaleb

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Atmospheric Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

139

Meteorology and Atmospheric ISSN 0177-7971  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of precipitation scav- enging are calculated for wet removal of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ammonia (NH3) using of soluble trace gas in gaseous and liquid phases, mole l-1 c(G) Concentration of soluble trace gas Raindrop diameter, m DG Coefficient of diffusion in a gaseous phase, cm2 s-1 HA Henry's law constant, mole

Elperin, Tov

140

Export of Asian pollution during two cold front episodes of the TRACE-P experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Asian outflow by fragmenting the pollution plume. INDEX TERMS: 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Atmospheric Dynamics: Mesoscale meteorology; KEYWORDS: warm conveyor belt, TRACE-P, pollution Citation: MariExport of Asian pollution during two cold front episodes of the TRACE-P experiment C. Mari

Palmer, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lightning, atmospheric electricity and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature records indicate that a global warming of 0.5{minus}0.7{degrees}C has occurred over the past century (Hansen and Lebedeff, 1987). Whether this trend is a result of increased trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere, or simply a result of natural variability; is still not known. These temperature trends are derived from thousands of observations worldwide. However, these observations are concentrated largely over continental areas, and then mainly in the northern hemisphere`s populated regions. This northern hemisphere continental bias results in large uncertainties in estimates of global temperature trends. Due to the increasing evidence that the present buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may result in an additional global warming of 1-5{degrees}C by the year 2050 (IPCC, 1990), it is increasingly important to find afternative methods to monitor fluctuations in global surface temperatures. As shown by two recent studies (Williams, 1992; Price, 1993), the global atmospheric electric circuit may provide a promising afternative for monitoring future climate change.

Price, C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LBA (Amazon) LBA (Amazon) The Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) Overview [LBA Logo] The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA) is an international research initiative conducted from 1995-2005 and led by Brazil. The LBA Project encompasses several scientific disciplines, or components. The LBA-ECO component focuses on the question: "How do tropical forest conversion, regrowth, and selective logging influence carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, trace gas fluxes, and the prospect for sustainable land use in Amazonia?" The Amazon rain forest or Amazonia, is the largest remaining expanse of tropical rain forest on Earth, harboring approximately one-third of all Earth's species. Although the rain forest's area is so large that it

143

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

144

EMSL - trace metals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trace-metals en Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

145

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction. Greenhouse gases correlate directly to global warming, which impacts arctic sea ice. This image shows current arctic sea ice formation. The red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate.

146

New Technique for the Direct Analysis of Food Powders Confined in a Small Hole Using Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser-Induced Gas Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for...

Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Lessons from Loscoe: the uncontrolled migration of landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the uncontrolled migration of landfill gas G. M. Williams 1 N. Aitkenhead...Environment, 1989. The Control of Landfill Gas. HMSO, London. Doelle, H...1988. Trace constituents in landfill gas. Gas Research Institute. Frost...

G. M. Williams; N. Aitkenhead

148

8, 1190911965, 2008 Reactive Trace Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Effective phase control of silicon films during high-rate deposition in atmospheric-pressure very high-frequency plasma: Impacts of gas residence time on the performance of bottom-gate thin film transistors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) and microcrystalline silicon (?c-Si) films were grown in atmospheric-pressure (AP) He/H2/SiH4 plasma excited by a 150-MHz very high-frequency (VHF) power at a temperature of 220C. The variations in thickness and crystallinity of the deposited Si films along the gas flow direction were studied as functions of gas residence time in the plasma, VHF power density and H2 flow rate. Furthermore, the electrical characteristics of bottom-gate thin film transistors (TFTs) were investigated to evaluate the film quality. The results revealed that the chemical reactions both in gas phase and on the growing film surface were significantly enhanced in AP-VHF plasma, promoting phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline in a time of the order of 0.1ms. The performance of the \\{TFTs\\} showed that a-Si layers formed in the upstream portion of the plasma zone had reasonably good electrical property (field-effect mobility of approximately 2cm2/Vs) despite very high deposition rates around 20nm/s. While ?c-Si layers deposited in the downstream portion were very defective, which might come from the insufficient passivation of grain boundaries with a-Si tissues due to a too long gas residence time in the plasma. The precise control of gas residence time by adjusting the length of plasma will be effective for the phase control of Si films with desired quality.

H. Kakiuchi; H. Ohmi; T. Yamada; A. Hirano; T. Tsushima; W. Lin; K. Yasutake

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Small Interannual Variability of Global Atmospheric Hydroxyl  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Nicosia 1645, Cyprus. The oxidizing capacity...air pollution and natural influences. We show...methane and other trace gases oxidized primarily...observations of additional gases oxidized primarily...from a variety of natural and anthropogenic...changes in trace-gas emissions with smoothed...

S. A. Montzka; M. Krol; E. Dlugokencky; B. Hall; P. Jckel; J. Lelieveld

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric deposition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals 2.1 Main Sources of Atmospheric Pollution...7 Summary: 5 Chapter 2: Sources and...

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis atmospheric deposition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals 2.1 Main Sources of Atmospheric Pollution...7 Summary: and dry deposition analysis...

153

Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is the United States most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coals availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

Trembly, J.P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Warm Gas Cleanup  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Cleanup Warm Gas Cleanup NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 5 Project Description The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established strict regulations for the trace contaminant emissions from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) performance goals for trace contaminant removal were selected to meet or exceed EPA's standard limits for contaminants, as well as to avoid poisoning of: the catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas the electrodes in fuel cells selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts The objective of the NETL's ORD Warm Gas Cleanup project is to assist in achieving both DOE and EPA targets for trace contaminant capture from coal gasification, while preserving the high thermal efficiency of the IGCC system. To achieve this, both lab and pilot-scale research is underway to develop sorbents capable of removing the following contaminants from high temperature syngas (up to 550°F):

156

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

An improved approach for hydrogen analysis in metal samples using single laser-induced gas plasma and target plasma at helium atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report in this paper the results of an experimental study on hydrogen analysis of solid samples in high pressure helium ambient gas employing the basic scheme of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)....

S.N. Abdulmadjid; M.M. Suliyanti; K.H. Kurniawan; T.J. Lie; M. Pardede

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi...

You, Kehua

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comparative study of laser-induced plasma emission of hydrogen from zircaloy-2 samples in atmospheric and low pressure ambient helium gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study has been performed to demonstrate the advantage of employing ambient helium gas in the spectral quality improvement of hydrogen emission in laser-induced plasma from zircaloy-2 samples at...

M. Pardede; R. Hedwig; M.M. Suliyanti; Z.S. Lie; T.J. Lie

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric-pressure photoionization source...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Physics 47 Photoionization of atmospheric gases studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy Summary: with the examined gas at atmospheric pressure. The THz...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Deriving emissions time series from sparse atmospheric mole fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A growth-based Bayesian inverse method is presented for deriving emissions of atmospheric trace species from temporally sparse measurements of their mole fractions. This work is motivated by many recent studies that have ...

Rigby, Matthew

162

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.4.1 Rotated Take-Off Angle Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.4.2 Rotated Cubed Sphere Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.4.3 Ray Tube Interpolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.5 Theoretical Model..., the ray parameters are defined as ?1 = ?(declination), ?2 = ?(azimuth), and ?3 = ?(travel-time). (b) Suppose we have a unit cube centered at the source point, then a ray can be traced from the source point through an evenly discretized point on the face...

Jain, Tarun K

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

164

SIO 217a Atmospheric and Climate Sciences I: Atmospheric Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Radiant Energy. Radiative Transfer. Transport.) 10-Oct W 3 More Transfer Processes 15-Oct M 4 4 Gas. Equation of State. Hydrostatic Equilibrium.) 3-Oct W 2 2.11 First and Second Laws and Characteristics. Precipitation Processes. Radiative Transfer in a Cloudy Atmosphere. Fogs, Stratus

Russell, Lynn

165

A SEARCH FOR MAGNESIUM IN EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

Hoerst, S. M. [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, M. E., E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the O{sub x}, HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

Moraes, F.P. Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric Chemistry of the Tropical Brazilian Partner Organizations National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA)1 The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere by the atmospheric oxidation of trace gases to low volatility compounds (Chen et al. 2009). These products can

168

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

Peterson, S

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Heat-Traced Fluid Transfer Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses basic considerations in designing a heat tracing system using either team or electrical tracing. Four basic reasons to heat trace are dealt with: water freeze protection, chemical freeze protection, viscosity maintenance...

Schilling, R. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Trace 700 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace 700 Trace 700 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 References: http://www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 Detailed HVAC design tool. Can provide heating and cooling load calculation, system sizing, and energy use. A fairly thorough understanding of HVAC is necessary to use this tool. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

172

Enhanced membrane gas separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

Prasad, R.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A sun glint heliostat for atmospheric spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple arrangement based upon sun glint the brilliant image of the sun behind a convex reflecting surface is used to produce a nearly stationary image of the sun. Using a telescopemirror this image is directed into a spectrometer and is spectrally analyzed for the purpose of remote sensing of trace species in our atmosphere. Typical data using a reflecting sphere are reported and discussed qualitatively in relation to the atmospheric absorbers between the sun and detector. The over?all uses of the system are described and some cautions concerning its limitations are discussed. Alternate geometries and possible variations of the system are described.

A. E. S. Green; R. A. Sutherland; G. Ganguli

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Atmospheric pressure gas plasma-induced colorectal cancer cell death is mediated by Nox2ASK1 apoptosis pathways and oxidative stress is mitigated by SrxNrf2 anti-oxidant system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pressure gas plasma (AGP) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that induce apoptosis in cultured cancer cells. The majority of cancer cells develop a ROS-scavenging anti-oxidant system regulated by Nrf2, which confers resistance to ROS-mediated cancer cell death. Generation of ROS is involved in the AGP-induced cancer cell death of several colorectal cancer cells (Caco2, HCT116 and SW480) by activation of ASK1-mediated apoptosis signaling pathway without affecting control cells (human colonic sub-epithelial myofibroblasts; CO18, human fetal lung fibroblast; MRC5 and fetal human colon; FHC). However, the identity of an oxidase participating in AGP-induced cancer cell death is unknown. Here, we report that AGP up-regulates the expression of Nox2 (NADPH oxidase) to produce ROS. RNA interference designed to target Nox2 effectively inhibits the AGP-induced ROS production and cancer cell death. In some cases both colorectal cancer HT29 and control cells showed resistance to AGP treatment. Compared to AGP-sensitive Caco2 cells, HT29 cells show a higher basal level of the anti-oxidant system transcriptional regulator Nrf2 and its target protein sulfiredoxin (Srx) which are involved in cellular redox homeostasis. Silencing of both Nrf2 and Srx sensitized HT29 cells, leads to ROS overproduction and decreased cell viability. This indicates that in HT29 cells, Nrf2/Srx axis is a protective factor against AGP-induced oxidative stress. The inhibition of Nrf2/Srx signaling should be considered as a central target in drug-resistant colorectal cancer treatments.

Musarat Ishaq; Margaret D.M. Evans; Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

of SOHO `Waves, Oscillations SmallScale Transient in Solar Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of SOHO `Waves, Oscillations Small­Scale Transient in Solar Atmosphere: A Joint from SOHO TRACE identified from SUMER Atlas Curdt (2001). studied shifts widths 703.87 ? 8 ? 4 coronal ## 706.02 ?(# 6

177

Microstreamer dynamics during plasma remediation of NO using atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microstreamer dynamics during plasma remediation of NO using atmospheric pressure dielectric- ate toxins from atmospheric pressure gas streams. Plasma remediation is one technique which has been methods for the removal of oxides of nitrogen NxOy from atmospheric gas streams and among those techniques

Kushner, Mark

178

1 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and mL/L; and in terms of Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(Latm); mg real gas/(LmmHg); and mg real gas/(LkPa) for 040C and freshwater conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390?atm) and for 2030 (440?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentrations of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Conversion factors are presented to convert these concentrations to other commonly used units. Equations and tabular information are provided to compute air saturation concentration for moist air at local barometric pressure for the four atmospheric gases. Because of the importance of dissolved oxygen in biological processes, the air solubility concentration is also presented as a function of elevation for both metric and English elevations. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, freshwater, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Carbon dioxide removal and capture for landfill gas up-grading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the frame of an EC financially supported project - LIFE05 ENV/IT/000874 GHERL (Greenhouse Effect Reduction from Landfill)a pilot plant was set up in order to demonstrate the feasibility of applying chemical absorption to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas. After proper upgrading - basically removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and other trace gas compoundthe gas might be fed into the distribution grid for natural gas or used as vehicle fuel, replacing a fossil fuel thus saving natural resources and carbon dioxide emissions. Several experiences in Europe have been carried out concerning the landfill gas - and biogas from anaerobic digestion - quality up-grading through CO2 removal, but in all of them carbon dioxide was vented to the atmosphere after separation, without any direct benefit in terms of greenhouse gases reduction. With respect to those previous experiences, in this work the attention was focused on CO2 removal from landfill gas with an effective capture process, capable of removing carbon dioxide from atmosphere, through a globally carbon negative process. In particular, processes capable of producing final solid products were investigated, with the aim of obtaining as output solid compounds which can be either used in the chemical industry or disposed off. The adopted absorption process is based on using aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide, with the final aim of producing potassium carbonate. Potassium carbonate is a product which has several applications in the chemical industry if obtained with adequate quality. It can be sold as a pulverised solid, or in aqueous solution. Several tests were carried out at the pilot plant, which was located at a landfill site, in order to feed it with a fraction of the on-site collected landfill gas. The results of the experimental campaign are reported, explained and commented in the paper. Also a discussion on economic issues is presented.

Lidia Lombardia; Andrea Corti; Ennio Carnevale; Renato Baciocchi; Daniela Zingaretti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gas ChromatographyMicrowave-Induced Plasma for the Determination of Halogenated Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Spectroscopic Microwave generator: Applied Research...helium and argon at atmospheric pressures. Spec...plasma in helium at atmospheric pressure as an element-selective...organic compounds in water by gas chromatography (atmospheric pres sure helium......

M.M. Abdillahi

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Trace element behavior in the fluidized bed gasification of solid recovered fuels A thermodynamic study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of biomass and recycled fuels is of particular interest for the efficient production of power and heat. Trace elements present as impurities in the product gas should be removed very efficiently. The objective of this work has been to develop and test thermodynamic models for the reactions of trace elements with chlorine and sulfur in the gasification processes of recycled fuels. In particular, the chemical reactions of trace elements with main thermochemical conversion products, main ash components, and bed and sorbent material are implemented into the model. The possibilities of gas cleaning devices in condensing and removing the trace element compounds are studied by establishing the volatilization tendency of trace element compounds in reducing gases. The results obtained with the model are compared with the measured data of trace elements of gasification experiments using solid recovered fuel as feedstock. Some corresponding studies in the literature are also critically reviewed and compared. The observed discrepancies may be attributed to differences in thermodynamic databases applied and experimental arrangements. The method of removing gaseous trace elements by condensation is already in use in the 160MWth waste gasification plant in Lahti, Finland.

Jukka Konttinen; Rainer Backman; M. Hupa; Antero Moilanen; Esa Kurkela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mechanistic, sensitivity, and uncertainty studies of the atmospheric oxidation of dimethylsulfide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The global-scale emissions and reactivity of dimethylsulfide (CH3SCH3, DMS) make it an integral component in the atmospheric sulfur cycle. DMS is rapidly oxidized in the atmosphere by a complex gas-phase mechanism involving ...

Lucas, Donald David, 1969-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Radon in atmospheric studies: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

Wilkening, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Birth and Life of Our Atmosphere Nature Bulletin No. 554-A February 15, 1975 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BIRTH AND LIFE OF OUR ATMOSPHERE In Bulletin No. 542-A we described the atmosphere that surrounds the earth, held there by the pull of gravity, including the canopy of air immediately above us. That canopy is responsible for our weather and climates, shields us from the killing rays of the sun, and furnishes substances necessary for all life: oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Astronomers believe that none of the other planets -- excepting Mars, perhaps -- has an atmosphere anything like ours. The principal elements, free nitrogen (78 percent) and free oxygen (21 percent), apparently are rare in the universe. On the other hand, the earth's atmosphere contains only traces of free hydrogen and helium -- the two lightest gases -- whereas they are by far the most common elements elsewhere in the universe.

186

Specifying API Trace Birthmark by Abstract Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API trace birthmark is a major class of software birthmarks, where API sequences are defined as software birthmarks to ... , an abstract interpretation-based method for specifying API trace birthmark is proposed ...

Ying Zeng; Fenlin Liu; Jian Chen; Bin Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Distributed trace using central performance counter memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

Measurements and Analyses of Urban Metabolism and Trace Gas Respiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human society has well defined metabolic processes that can be characterized and quantified in the same way that an ecosystems metabolism can be defined and understood [Fischer-Kowalski, 1998.] The study of industrial ...

McManus, J.B.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Critical issues in trace gas biogeochemistry and global change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and terrestrial plants, into earth system models remains a major research priority...and terrestrial plants, into earth system models remains a major research priority...and terrestrial plants, into earth system models remains a major research priority...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

191

Privacy vulnerability of published anonymous mobility traces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobility traces of people and vehicles have been collected and published to assist the design and evaluation of mobile networks, such as large-scale urban sensing networks. Although the published traces are often made anonymous in that the true identities ... Keywords: mobility traces, privacy, security and protection

Chris Y. T. Ma; David K. Y. Yau; Nung Kwan Yip; Nageswara S. V. Rao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Ray Tracing JELLO Brand Paul S. Heckbert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ray Tracing JELL­O ® Brand Gelatin Paul S. Heckbert Dessert Foods Division Pixar San Rafael, CA ABSTRACT Ray tracing has established itself in recent years as the most general image synthesis algorithm for ray tracing Jell­O ® brand gelatin. We believe the method may have application to other brands

Treuille, Adrien

193

Point-to-curve ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Point-to-curve Ray Tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-surface exchange processes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atmospheric surface layer during CBLAST, in 16th Symposium on Boundary Layers... on heat, gas, and momentum transport, infrared remote sensing, upper-ocean processes,...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric polycyclic aromatic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

burning of coal, oil, gas... called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... by atmospheric currents and ocean currents...

197

Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen (O2) from Scripps Institution of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Oxygen » Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen Atmospheric Trace Gases » Oxygen » Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen (O2) from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Modern Records of Atmospheric Oxygen (O2) from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric oxygen (O2) concentrations at nine currently active stations. Records since 1989 are available from Scripps Pier and Alert, Alaska, although these are not continuous. Continuous records from seven stations extend back to 1993, and data for the other two stations (Cold Bay, Alaska and Palmer Station, Antarctica) are available back to the mid 1990s. These data are from remote locations or other locations situated so that they represent averages over large portions of the globe rather than local background sources.

198

Measurement of Gas Concentration by Wavelength Shift Method with an EDFA Fiber Laser Loop  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method for trace gas detection is presented and developed. A fiber laser with a gas cell in the loop is constructed, whose output spectrum is changed with the concentration of...

Zhou, Haojiang; Guo, Kaikai; Yan, Chunsheng

199

Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International Climate Agreements AgencyCompany Organization: Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Sector: Energy, Land...

200

Estimation of atmospheric deposition in coastal Jalisco, western Mexico, using an epiphytic plant (Tillandsia recurvata L. Bromeliaceae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ttllandsia recurvata was used as a biomonitor to ographics. estimate the trace element atmospheric deposition in a tropical dry forest of the Pacific coast of Jalisco, in western Mexico. The plant samples were initially collected gem a population...

Sahagun Godinez, Eduardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Multi-Gas Assessment of the Kyoto Protocol John Reilly,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Gas Assessment of the Kyoto Protocol John Reilly,* Ronald G. Prinn,* Jochen Harnisch,* Jean in the protocol appear to be an adequate representation of trace gas climatic effects. The principal reason for the success of this simplified GWP approach in our calculations is that the mix of gas emissions resulting

202

Analysis of Changes in Landfill Gas Output and the Economic Potential for Development of a Landfill Gas Control Prototype.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The relationship between changes in local atmospheric conditions and the performance of the landfill gas collection system installed at the Rockingham County (NC) municipal solid (more)

Harrill, David Justin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nitrogen dioxide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 7 Bio390 Problem: Gas Laws thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Summary: atmosphere has the following composition, all on a dry gas basis:...

204

Density Perturbations in the Upper Atmosphere Caused by the Dissipation of Solar Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upper atmosphere constitutes the outer region of the terrestrial gas envelope above about 100km altitude. The energy budget of this outer gas layer is partly controlled by the dissipation of solar wind energy

Gerd W. Prlss

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

206

Atmospheric Plasma Deposited Dense Silica Coatings on Plastics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Plasma Deposited Dense Silica Coatings on Plastics ... (8) Finally, some plasma techniques including atmospheric plasmas work at low gas temperature, are suitable for treating plastics with low glass transition temperatures, and can even be used on biological samples. ... These results suggest that the mechanism in the atm.-pressure plasma is the same as that in low-pressure plasmas. ...

Linying Cui; Alpana N. Ranade; Marvi A. Matos; Liam S. Pingree; Theo J. Frot; Geraud Dubois; Reinhold H. Dauskardt

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

208

Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

Crawford, T.V.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

8, 10691088, 2008 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the atmosphere (Molina et al., 1974; Farman et al., 1985) has led to an interna- tional effort to replace

Boyer, Edmond

211

Structure and function of gas vacuoles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...overlying gas phase to atmospheric pressure. Volume...film of surrounding water. From the results...to force liquid water in- side the structure...would also prevent water from accumulating inside by condensation (105). FORMATION...

A E Walsby

1972-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

214

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

215

HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO): fine-grained, global-scale measurements of climatically important atmospheric gases and aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions to human activity or natural processes, in a variety...new features of trace gas and aerosol emissions...surface fluxes of trace gases and aerosols. 2. HIAPER...sensor drift. The quantum cascade laser spectrometer (QCLS...CO2 sensor using an IR gas analyser (IRGA), which...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Measurements of Trace Uranium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements of Trace Uranium at the Bismuth Film Electrode. Abstract: Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping...

217

Accelerated Ray Traced Animations Exploiting Temporal Coherence.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ray tracing is a well-know technique for producing realistic graphics. However, the time necessary to generate images is unacceptably long. When producing the many frames (more)

Baines, Darwin Tarry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A {gamma}-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250 C at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region there between. A jet of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

Selwyn, G.S.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

219

Coal Beneficiation by Gas Agglomeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

Thomas D. Wheelock; Meiyu Shen

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Atmospheric reactivity of gaseous dimethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric reactivity of dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with a series of atmospheric species has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DMS with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by using FTIR spectroscopy and are <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and <1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}23} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The reactivity of DMS toward ON radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques, and the rate constants for those reactions are <5 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} and (4.2 {plus minus} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from >23 days with respect to reaction with OH radicals to >33 years with respect to reaction with ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, for which the calculated lifetime of DMS is >2 days, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DMS is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmosphere species studied.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

1CAItUS69, 519--531 (1987) Magnetospheric Plasma Sputtering of Io's Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1CAItUS69, 519--531 (1987) Magnetospheric Plasma Sputtering of Io's Atmosphere M. A. Mc be used as knowledge of both the plasma flow and atmospheric composition improve. © 1987Academic Press, ln of material from Io to the plasma torus (Kumar, 1984), although the amount of atmospheric gas required

Johnson, Robert E.

223

13C and 18O from Carbon Mono-and Dioxide, two proxies for tracing combustion sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion Biomass burning Hydrocarbon oxydation Different isotope signals 18O-signal of CO in the atmosphere13C and 18O from Carbon Mono- and Dioxide, two proxies for tracing combustion sources Rolf Siegwolf #12;· Consequences of a traffic accident: Different sources of combustion products, a case study · Air

224

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after@kom.aau.dk Abstract-- Currently available video traces for scalable en- coded video with more than one layer are a convenient repre- sentation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video

Reisslein, Martin

225

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after video traces for scalable encoded video with more than one layer are a convenient representation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video distortion (RMSE) or quality (PSNR

Reisslein, Martin

226

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

228

Trace gases, CO2, climate, and the greenhouse effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weather is driven by the suns energy input and the difference between insolation per unit area of the poles and the equator. The energy flux of the Earth is in long?term balanceas much is radiated away by the Earth as is absorbed or the mean temperature would have to increase or decrease steadily (and of course this is not observed). CO2 and other trace gases can cause the Earths mean temperature to rise through the Greenhouse Effect. The mean temperature in the Little Ice Age was only 1?C cooler but large effects were felt especially toward the poles. The CO2 which stays in the atmosphere will raise Earths mean temperature with effects which are relatively certain: a lot of warming at the poles and a very small amount of warming at the equator.

Gordon J. Aubrecht II

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

230

Greenhouse Gases (GHG) Emissions from Gas Field Water in Southern Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to assess correctly the gases emissions from oil/gas field water and its contributions to the source of greenhouse gases (GHG) at the atmospheric temperature and pressure, ... first developed to study th...

Guojun Chen; Wei Yang; Xuan Fang; Jiaai Zhong

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

233

Definition: Liquid natural gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Liquid natural gas Liquid natural gas Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Liquid natural gas Natural gas (primarily methane) that has been liquefied by reducing its temperature to -260 degrees Fahrenheit at atmospheric pressure.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Liquefied natural gas or LNG is natural gas that has been converted to liquid form for ease of storage or transport. Liquefied natural gas takes up about 1/600th the volume of natural gas in the gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia. The liquefaction process involves removal of certain components, such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons, which could cause difficulty downstream. The natural gas is then condensed into a

234

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

236

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

237

Atmospheric chemistry of gaseous diethyl sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmospheric reactivity of diethyl sulfate (DES) has been investigated. Upper limits to the rate constants (in cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) for the homogeneous gas-phase reactions of DES with O{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, and H{sub 2}O have been determined by FTIR spectroscopy and are <3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, <1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}21}, and {le}2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}23}, respectively. The reactivity of DES toward OH radicals and Cl atoms has been determined by using relative rate techniques. These rate constants correspond to atmospheric lifetimes ranging from {ge}1 day with respect to reaction with water to >12 years with respect to ozone. With the possible exception of its reaction with water, these results indicate that the atmospheric fate of DES within an urban air parcel is not determined by its homogeneous gas-phase reactions with any of the atmospheric species studied. No evidence has been found for the formation of DES or related compounds during the ozonolysis of olefins in the presence of SO{sub 2} and ethanol.

Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Ball, J.C. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Conference on Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE half-yearly Conference of representatives of local authorities and other organisations co-operating with the Department of Scientific ... of atmospheric pollution was held in the offices of the Department on May 25. The Conference received from Dr. G. M. B. Dobson, chairman of the Atmospheric Pollution ...

1936-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

242

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

CP-violating CFT and trace anomaly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is logically possible that the trace anomaly in four dimension includes the Hirzebruch-Pontryagin density in CP violating theories. Although the term vanishes at free conformal fixed points, we realize such a possibility in the holographic renormalization group and show that it is indeed possible. The Hirzebruch-Pontryagin term in the trace anomaly may serve as a barometer to understand how much CP is violated in conformal field theories.

Yu Nakayama

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...has been used by atmospheric modelers as a vertical...Ackerman, in Atmospheric Physics from Spacelab...shut-tle allows recovery of the film, we...dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. To avoid water condensation on the optical...

M. HERS

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - ar-rich source gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

argon (Ar)-rich atmosphere... in natural gas bubble plumes: observations from the Coal Oil Point marine hydrocarbon ... Source: California at Santa Barbara, University of -...

250

Material balance in atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion of North Dakota lignite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cyclone/fabric filter system limited particulate emissions to extremely low levels of only 0.00026 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu to 0.00040 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu. Emissions, in the flue gas, of trace and minor elements were very low when compared to a well controlled conventional boiler and to environmental goals. The majority of the trace and minor elements left the FBC system in the primary cyclone catch and the bed drain. Emissions in the flue gas of many trace and minor elements were less than 0.1 percent of the total input to the FBC system. Trace and minor element material balance in FBC systems can be difficult to close unless problems with changes in bed inventory are minimized by long periods of steady state operation.

Hall, R.R.; McCabe, M.M.; McGrath, D.; Sears, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comparison of Gas Chromatographic and Pyrolytic Methods for the Determination of Total Oxygen in Gasolines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gasoline; and low water solubility. A number of...inert carrier gas, and the products...used in the nitrogen gas delivery line...LECO FP-428 nitrogen analyzer. Figure...place to avoid gas leaks. All...remove traces of water. ETBE and TAME......

R.E. Pauls; J.D. Northing; G.J. Weight

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

254

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

255

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

256

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

257

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

258

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

259

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

260

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

262

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

263

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

264

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

265

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

266

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

267

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the intermittent operation of the PSDF gasifier (due to the difficulties in the handling of the low quality lignite), only a small fraction of the sorbent capacity was utilized (we measured a mercury capacity of 3.27 mg/kg, which is only a fraction of the 680 mg/kg Hg capacity measured for the same sorbent used at our bench-scale evaluations at TDA). Post reaction examination of the sorbent by chemical analysis also indicated some removal As and Se (we did not detect any significant amounts of Cd in the synthesis gas or over the sorbent). The tests at UNDEERC was more successful and showed clearly that the TDA sorbent can effectively remove Hg and other trace metals (As and Se) at high temperature. The on-line gas measurements carried out by TDA and UNDEERC separately showed that TDA sorbent can achieve greater than 95% Hg removal efficiency at 260 C ({approx}200g sorbent treated more than 15,000 SCF synthesis gas). Chemical analysis conducted following the tests also showed modest amounts of As and Se accumulation in the sorbent bed (the test durations were still short to show higher capacities to these contaminants). We also evaluated the stability of the sorbent and the fate of mercury (the most volatile and unstable of the trace metal compounds). The Synthetic Ground Water Leaching Procedure Test carried out by an independent environmental laboratory showed that the mercury will remain on the sorbent once the sorbent is disposed. Based on a preliminary engineering and cost analysis, TDA estimated the cost of mercury removal from coal-derived synthesis gas as $2,995/lb (this analysis assumes that this cost also includes the cost of removal of all other trace metal contaminants). The projected cost will result in a small increase (less than 1%) in the cost of energy.

Gokhan Alptekin

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Gas Chromatographic Determination of Aviation Gasoline and JP-4 Jet Fuel in Subsurface Core Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......capillary column gas chromatography...subsurface material. Water samples from...have a higher water solubility than the other...aroma- tics in water and solid wastes...jars inside a nitrogen atmosphere glovebox...subsequent analysis. Gas chromatography......

Steve A. Vandegrift; Don H. Kampbell

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Oxidation of No to No2 in Flue Gas Plumes of Power Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation of NO to NO2 in flue gas plumes takes place after release in the ... function of the turbulent mixing rate of flue gas plume and atmospheric air. The effects of ... are illustrated with the measurin...

A. J. Elshout; Dr. S. Beilke

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - argon gas pressure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure of each gas in the chamber atmosphere... Bio390 Problem: Gas Laws thanks to Dr. J.F. Anderson, Dept. ... Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy...

275

Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Barrels per Calendar Day) (Barrels per Calendar Day) Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

276

Carbon project-atmosphere "BL meteorology along route  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2 Mixing heightEddie/coherent structure mixing Atmospheric CO2 gas CO2 gas layer and why is it important in a CO2 context · What are we doing onboard · What are we looking for and why · Interesting messurements from Coast of Namibia #12;What is a boundary layer ? CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2 CO

277

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas ? one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

Anderson, Diana

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

Anderson, Diana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis Trace Element Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Trace Element Analysis Details Activities (8) Areas (8) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Reconstructing the fluid circulation of a hydrothermal system Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / element Median Estimate (USD): 18.001,800 centUSD 0.018 kUSD 1.8e-5 MUSD 1.8e-8 TUSD / element High-End Estimate (USD): 106.0010,600 centUSD 0.106 kUSD 1.06e-4 MUSD 1.06e-7 TUSD / element

280

Ray tracing of Jovian kilometric radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of computer ray tracing of Jovian kilometric from 56.2 kHz to 1 MHz in a model Jovian magnetosphere with an Io torus are presented. Ray tracing calculations indicate that the Io torus presents a propagation barrier to the radiation and that the Jovian kilometric radiation must be generated in the L-O mode from a source near Jupiter on field lines passing through the Io torus. One effect of the Io torus is to refract the rays away from the magnetic equator forming a shadow zone at radial distances beyond the torus. In general, at radial distances greater than 10 Jovian radii, as the wave frequency increases (>200 kHz) so does the magnetic latitude of the shadow zone. These and other features of the ray tracing calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the observations from the plasma wave receiver and planetary radio astronomy experiment on board both Voyager 1 and 2.

Green, J.L.; Gurnett, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

282

2 - Solubility of Atmospheric Gases in Brackish and Marine Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents tabular information on the standard air saturation concentration (moist air at 1atm) for oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide gas in terms of ?mol/kg, mg/L, and as Bunsen coefficients L real gas/(Latm) and mg real gas/(LmmHg) for 040C in marine waters. Values are given at coarse salinity intervals for 040g/kg (which embraces the range likely to be encountered in most common nearshore conditions) and at finer intervals for 3337g/kg for open water conditions. Because the mole fraction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is changing, solubility information is provided for 2010 (390?atm) and for 2030 (440?atm) based on projected atmospheric values. Tabular information is also provided to allow computation of standard air saturation concentration of carbon dioxide gas directly as a function of atmospheric mole fraction. Equations and tabular information are provided to allow conversion of concentrations in mg/L to partial pressures in mmHg. Using the equations presented in Chapter 1, air saturation concentrations (at local barometric pressure) and solubility of arbitrary gas composition mixtures can be computed. Sample problems are included for representative examples. Keywords gas solubility, marine waters, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, standard air solubility, air solubility, Bunsen coefficients, partial pressures

John Colt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRACE 700  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

700 700 TRACE 700 logo. Trane's TRACE 700 software - the latest version of Trane Air Conditioning Economics - brings the algorithms recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) to the familiar Windows operating environment. Use it to assess the energy and economic impacts of building-related selections such as architectural features, comfort-system design, HVAC equipment selections, operating schedules, and financial options. Flexible data entry, coupled with multiple views and "drag-and-drop" load assignments, simplify the modeling process and help you identify optimal zoning and plant configurations. Compare up to four alternatives for a single project by modeling various air distribution and mechanical

284

Trace fossil assemblages in selected shelf sandstones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with progradation of the delta. The presence of trace fossils throughout the section, as compared to the lack of burrows in the upper unit of the True Watt A-1 section, can be attributed to the marginal location of the deposits. Santa Fe 13 and Santa Fe 10... with progradation of the delta. The presence of trace fossils throughout the section, as compared to the lack of burrows in the upper unit of the True Watt A-1 section, can be attributed to the marginal location of the deposits. Santa Fe 13 and Santa Fe 10...

Locke, Kathleen Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment of Fused Silica, Related Surface and Near-Surface Effects and Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on an atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment of fused silica and its related surface and near-surface effects. Such treatment was performed in order to improve laser ... process gas was used. By th...

Christoph Gerhard; Tobias Weihs; Daniel Tasche

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Chemistry of Methane Remediation by a Non?thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The destruction of methane by a non?thermal plasma in atmospheric pressure gas streams of nitrogen with variable ... determined by on?line FTIR spectroscopy and the plasma chemistry is interpreted using kinetic m...

Kirsty J. Pringle; J. Christopher Whitehead

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Decontamination of VX Surrogate Malathion by Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decontamination of the VX surrogate (malathion) by the atmospheric pressure radio-frequency plasma jet (APPJ) was investigated. Optical emission ... the neutral gas temperature. The effects of RF input power and ...

Wen-Chao Zhu; Bai-Rong Wang; Hai-Ling Xi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inactivation of microbes and macromolecules by atmospheric-pressure plasma jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma is ionized gas, which is found in ... be generated artificially. A variety of cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas are currently being investigated for their clinical ... reporting on the treatment of patient...

Jan-Wilm Lackmann; Julia Elisabeth Bandow

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Eddy-covariance observations of the atmosphere-biosphere exchange of nitrogen oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Kesselmeier, J. : Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) uptake byM. : Leaf uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) in a tropicalMorikawa, H. : Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide gas is a plant

Min, Kyung-Eun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Article Atmospheric Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

291

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

292

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

293

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

294

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

295

Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brown Dwarfs are the coolest class of stellar objects known to date. Our present perception is that Brown Dwarfs follow the principles of star formation, and that Brown Dwarfs share many characteristics with planets. Being the darkest and lowest mass stars known makes Brown Dwarfs also the coolest stars known. This has profound implication for their spectral fingerprints. Brown Dwarfs cover a range of effective temperatures which cause brown dwarfs atmospheres to be a sequence that gradually changes from a M-dwarf-like spectrum into a planet-like spectrum. This further implies that below an effective temperature of atmospheres of objects marking the boundary between M-Dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Recent developments have sparked the interest in plasma processes in such very cool atmospheres: sporadic and quiescent radio emission has been observed in combination with decaying Xray-activity indicators across the fully convective boundary.

Helling, Christiane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Chapter 4 - Natural Gasfired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Improving UK greenhouse gas emission estimates using tall tower observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gases in the Earths atmosphere play an important role in regulating surface temperatures. The UK is signatory to international agreements that legally commit the UK to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, and ...

Howie, James Edward

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

299

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

300

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tracing compressed curves in triangulated surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple path or cycle in a triangulated surface is normal if it intersects any triangle in a finite set of arcs, each crossing from one edge of the triangle to another. We describe an algorithm to "trace" a normal curve in O(min set{X, n2log ... Keywords: computational topology, geodesics, normal coordinates

Jeff Erickson; Amir Nayyeri

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods T. Ueda * M. Nakahara...H. Suzuki ** * Division of Marine Radioecology, National Institute...Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Cooperation, Tokyo...Co and Cs in 5 species of marine cephalopods were determined......

T. Ueda; M. Nakahara; T. Ishii; Y. Suzuki; H. Suzuki

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Magnetic field inclination and atmospheric oscillations above solar active regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......deltanu (typically 1 mHz centred at either 3, 4 or 5 mHz). The hats indicate...of the penumbra has a plasma beta [beta=p gas...z eq, at least at 3 mHz and above. Further...introduces the model atmosphere we will use throughout......

H. Schunker; P. S. Cally

2006-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

304

*Corresponding author. Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 1921}1957  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of O , O -precursors (including the odd-hydrogen free radicals), the oxidation products*Corresponding author. Atmospheric Environment 34 (2000) 1921}1957 Methods for gas concludes with a brief discussion of calibration methods and standards and tests that should be routinely

Sillman, Sanford

305

ESA SP-587 -2nd International Workshop on Radiation of High Temperature Gases in Atmospheric Entry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1, is presented in this paper. An inductively coupled plasma torch, work- ing at atmospheric are 64 MHz and 3 kW respectively. This kind of apparatus allows obtaining plasma in chem- ical and quasi level of test case 1 proposes a spectroscopic study of plasma formed with a Martian-like atmosphere gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure (bars) N2 82%; Ar 12%; CH4 6%CO2 96.5%; N2 3.5%Atmospheric composition 26177Orbital inclination (1992) orbiter ­ Winds from cloud-tracking and probe drifts ­ IR temperatures, solar-fixed tides, polar-Huygens mission (from 2005) ­ Doppler wind descent profile ­ IR temperature and composition maps ­ Visible, IR

Read, Peter L.

307

Volcanism and the atmosphere: the potential role of the atmosphere in unlocking the reactivity of volcanic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...destruction (and BrO generation) is only limited...occurring in the gas phase with light...atmospheric gases, even passively...large coal-fired power plants (Stith...from coal-fired electric power plants and their...Eltgroth1982Particles and gases in the emissions...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

309

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

310

T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks...

311

Atmospheric Environment 38 (2004) 49414956 Ground-based and aircraft measurements of trace gases in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 815E, Rutherford St., Upton, NY 11973, USA b Chemistry/Physics, downtown Phoenix Super Site, and downwind Usery Pass surface stations. Air masses entering the metropolitan in the region. Calculated ozone production rate and efficiency varied from 1 to 7 ppbv h?1 , and 1­3 molecules

312

The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is hilly, having peaks above 500 m a.s...The ground-based oil palm plantation measurements...ToF-MS). The m/z 82 peak is greater over regions of oil palm, which is consistent...nearby Sabahmas oil palm plantation. Peaks are assigned, as...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ATMOSPHERIC ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud hydrometeors (water drops, ice particles, and, particularlyATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch40 (1996) 223-259 Simulations of drop fall turbulence. The model permits us to generate different realizations of the random velocity field component

Mark, Pinsky

314

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

315

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

316

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

317

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

318

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

319

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

320

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

322

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

323

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

324

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

325

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

326

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

327

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

330

Liquid Phases Used in Packed Gas Chromatographic Columns. Part II. Use of Liquid Phases Which Are Not Polysiloxanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......as well as trace water, be removed from the carrier gas by using suitable...in the carrier gas lines. There is...bottles out with nitrogen and seal the filled...liquid phases in gas chromatography...Superoxes show low solubility in the common organic......

Joel A. Yancey

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri and Eduardo Jose Maguino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri methodology to be developed for hazardous gas dispersion connecting Disaster Simulation and Trace with GIS of Gas Dispersion Affected Area Overlaid on Satellite Image (using ArcGIS 9.2) Scenario-based Simulation

Shinozuka, Masanobu

332

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

Walter, M.Todd

333

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning: Supplies LDPE 60ml bottles (nalgene) ACS grade Hydrochloric acid Trace metal grade nitric acid Day 1 1. Submerge 60ml bottles for up to three uses) 2. Rinse 3x in milli-q (DI) water 3. Fill bottles with 2% trace metal grade nitric

Paytan, Adina

334

Transport coefficients of a massive pion gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review or main results concerning the transport coefficients of a light meson gas, in particular we focus on the case of a massive pion gas. Leading order results according to the chiral power-counting are presented for the DC electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and bulk viscosity. We also comment on the possible correlation between the bulk viscosity and the trace anomaly in QCD, as well as the relation between unitarity and a minimum of the quotient $\\eta/s$ near the phase transition.

D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Removal of trace olefins from aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a hydrocarbon process stream by converting trace quantities of olefinic impurities to nonolefinic hydrocarbons. The process comprises contacting the process stream, which contains trace olefins in an amount of from about 50 to about 2000 as measured by Bromine Index and at least 80% by weight of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons having from 6 to 20 carbon atoms per molecule, at reaction conditions which ensure liquid phase operation with a solid catalyst composite comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a refractory inorganic oxide. A catalytic olefin-consuming alkylation reaction then produces an essentially olefinfree product stream with approximately the same quantity and distribution of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons as contained in the process stream.

Sachtler, J.W.A.; Barger, P.T.

1989-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

336

Improve reformer operation with trace sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern bimetallic reforming catalysts typically have feed specifications for sulfur of 0.5 to 1 wppm in the reformer naphtha carge. Sulfur in the raw naphtha is reduced to this level by naphtha hydrotreating. While most naphtha hydrotreating operations can usually obtain these levels without substantial problems. It is difficult to obtain levels much below 0.5 to 1 wppm with this process. Revamp of a constrained existing hydrotreater to reduce product sulfur slightly can be extremely costly typically entailing replacement or addition of a new reactor. At Engelhard the authors demonstrated that if the last traces of sulfur remaining from hydrotreating can be removed, the resulting ultra-low sulfur feed greatly improves the reformer operation and provides substantial economic benefit to the refiner. Removal of the remaining trace sulfur is accomplished in a simple manner with a special adsorbent bed, without adding complexity to the reforming operation.

McClung, R.G.; Novak, W.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

338

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

339

The changing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemistry of the atmosphere is changing, in large measure because of gases emitted by such human activities as farming, manufacturing, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The deleterious effects are increasingly evident; they may well become worse in the years ahead. This paper discusses the pollutants and the environmental perturbations with which they are associated. The authors believe the solution to the earth's environmental problems lies in a truly global effort.

Graedel, T.E.; Crutzen, P.J.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

Zevenhoven, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

Ahluwalia, R. K. (6440 Hillcrest Dr., Burr Ridge, IL 60521); Im, K. H. (925 Lehigh Cir., Naperville, IL 60565)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Solubility of Nitrogen in Water at 50, 75 and 100 from 25 to 1000 Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solubility of Nitrogen in Water at 50, 75 and 100 from 25 to 1000 Atmospheres ... Use of Supercritical CO2 and N2 as Dissolved Gases for the Atomization of Ethanol and Water ... Supercritical dissolved gas atomization (SDGA) is an atomization process in which a gas at temperatures and pressures above the critical point is used as the atomizing medium. ...

R. Wiebe; V. L. Gaddy; Conrad Heins Jr.

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Measurement of Radon in Soil Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CONCENTRATIONS of the order of 100,000-1,000,000 pc. radon/m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation ... m3 are found in the gases trapped in common soils and rock1. The estimation of radon in the soil gas and the free atmosphere has been suggested as a tool for ...

K. G. VOHRA; M. C. SUBBARAMU; A. M. MOHAN RAO

1964-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

345

Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base superalloys for gas turbines and strategies for manufacture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for better gas turbine operating efficiency and reliability has resulted in tightening of specification and acceptance standards. It has been realized that some elements even at trace level, can have ...

O. P. Sinha; M. Chatterjee; V. V. R. S. Sarma; S. N. Jha

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Shale Gas and Climate Targets: Can They Be Reconciled?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives. Second, because industry must incur the cost of CO2 separation as part of the production process this strategy creates for its GHG objectives. In recent years, natural gas exploration and development have is normally vented to the atmosphere as the gas is processed to market standards. While the expansion of B

347

Measurements of Laminar Flame Velocity for Components of Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas in combustion engines and power generation systems. The main hydrocarbon included in natural gas, BP 20451, 1 Rue Grandville, 54001 Nancy, France 2 Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University performed by the heat flux method using a newly built flat flame adiabatic burner at atmospheric pressure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

Substrate-Free Gas-Phase Synthesis of Graphene Sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Substrate-Free Gas-Phase Synthesis of Graphene Sheets Albert Dato,*, Velimir Radmilovic, Zonghoon graphene sheets in the gas phase using a substrate-free, atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor. Graphene sheets were synthesized by passing liquid ethanol droplets into an argon plasma. The graphene

Frenklach, Michael

349

MFR PAPER 1191 Effect of Atmospheric Gas Supersaturation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Columbia River fish are affected by the huge dams built for hydroelectric power, CANADA I --·---------j

350

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

351

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

352

Characteristics of radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges with air using bare metal electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this letter, an induced gas discharge approach is proposed and described in detail for obtaining a uniform atmospheric-pressure glow discharge with air in a {gamma} mode using water-cooled, bare metal electrodes driven by radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power supply. A preliminary study on the discharge characteristics of the air glow discharge is also presented in this study. With this induced gas discharge approach, radio-frequency, atmospheric-pressure glow discharges using bare metal electrodes with other gases which cannot be ignited directly as the plasma working gas, such as nitrogen, oxygen, etc., can also be obtained.

Wang Huabo; Sun Wenting; Li Heping; Bao Chengyu; Zhang Xiaozhang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

Multipass optical device and process for gas and analyte determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A torus multipass optical device and method are described that provide for trace level determination of gases and gas-phase analytes. The torus device includes an optical cavity defined by at least one ring mirror. The mirror delivers optical power in at least a radial and axial direction and propagates light in a multipass optical path of a predefined path length.

Bernacki, Bruce E. (Kennewick, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

354

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

356

Measurement of particulate matter and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant with electrostatic precipitators equipped the low temperature economizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The particulate matter and trace elements from a 660MW coal-fired power plant boiler which equipped with a novel electrostatic precipitator were sampled and analyzed. To promote the thermal efficiency of power plants, a low temperature economizer was installed at the inlet of electrostatic precipitator to collect the heat generated from flue gas. The low temperature economizer can reduce flue gas temperature, and then affect the operation of electrostatic precipitator. Therefore, this experiment was carried out to investigate the collection characteristics of this novel electrostatic precipitator on particulate matter. In addition, the distribution of trace elements in solid combustion residues was also studied. The results indicate that the low temperature economizer can markedly decrease the amount of particulate matter at the outlet of electrostatic precipitator. The collection efficiency of electrostatic precipitator on particulate matter is significantly improved by the low temperature economizer, whereby the collection efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM1.0 can reach 99.7% and 99.2%, respectively. Most of the trace elements remain in the fly ash collected by the electrostatic precipitator, and less than 10% remain in the bottom ash, but very rare emit from the electrostatic precipitator. The low temperature economizer not only reduces the emission of particulate matter, but also diminishes the emissions of trace elements in flue gas. The enrichment characteristics of trace elements in submicron particles were also studied.

Chao Wang; Xiaowei Liu; Dong Li; Junping Si; Bo Zhao; Minghou Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Status and potential of atmospheric plasma processing of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the current status and potential of atmospheric plasma technology for materials processing. The main focus is the recent developments in the area of dielectric barrier discharges with emphasis in the functionalization of polymers, deposition of organic and inorganic coatings, and plasma processing of biomaterials. A brief overview of both the equipment being used and the physicochemical reactions occurring in the gas phase is also presented. Atmospheric plasma technology offers major industrial, economic, and environmental advantages over other conventional processing methods. At the same time there is also tremendous potential for future research and applications involving both the industrial and academic world.

Pappas, Daphne [United States Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

Postma, Arlin K. (Halfway, OR)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Chemistry of Dichlorvos ... In the positive ion mode, protonated water hydrates (H3O+(H2O)n) generated by the corona discharge in the chamber diluent air were responsible for the protonation of analytes, and the ions that were mass analyzed were mainly protonated molecules ([M + H]+) and their protonated homo- and heterodimers. ... Methyl nitrite, 2-propyl nitrite and N2O5 were prepared and stored as described previously,(8, 10) and O3 in O2 diluent was generated using a Welsbach T-408 ozone generator. ...

Sara M. Aschmann; Ernesto C. Tuazon; William D. Long; Roger Atkinson

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861 and Arrhenius 1896 and is still supported in global climatology essentially describes a fictitious mechanism in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, ...

Gerlich, Gerhard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Use of Combusted Natural Gas to Cultivate the Anaerobic Bacterial Flora from the Cecum Contents of Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of an inert gas generator, the gas-to-air...of the inert gas generator. A small compressor...pressure of 250 mm water gauge (WG). By...of changes in the atmospheric pressure. With...temperature ofthe cooling water in the cooling jacket...of the inert gas generator. Parts: 1, stopcock...

J. P. Koopman; J. P. Van Oeveren; F. G. J. Janssen

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

363

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

364

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

365

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

366

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

367

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

368

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

369

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

370

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

371

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

372

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

373

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

374

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

375

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

376

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

377

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Atmospheric propagation of THz radiation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this investigation, we conduct a literature study of the best experimental and theoretical data available for thin and thick atmospheres on THz radiation propagation from 0.1 to 10 THz. We determined that for thick atmospheres no data exists beyond 450 GHz. For thin atmospheres data exists from 0.35 to 1.2 THz. We were successful in using FASE code with the HITRAN database to simulate the THz transmission spectrum for Mauna Kea from 0.1 to 2 THz. Lastly, we successfully measured the THz transmission spectra of laboratory atmospheres at relative humidities of 18 and 27%. In general, we found that an increase in the water content of the atmosphere led to a decrease in the THz transmission. We identified two potential windows in an Albuquerque atmosphere for THz propagation which were the regions from 1.2 to 1.4 THz and 1.4 to 1.6 THz.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma for Preparation of High Performance Pt/TiO2 Photocatalyst and Its Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) cold plasma was employed to fabricate Pt/TiO2 photocatalyst using the mixture of Ar and H2 as working gas. X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS) and transmis...

Lanbo Di; Xiuling Zhang; Zhijian Xu; Kai Wang

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate absracts were prepared for the 15 sections of this progress report which is a description of atmospheric research at PNL organized in terms of the following energy technologies: coal, gas and oil; fission and fusion; and oil shale. (KRM)

Elderkin, C.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines Measurements of the Infrared Spectral Lines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures P. Varanasi and Q. Zou Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres State University of New York at Stony Brook Stony Brook, New York Introduction Water vapor is undoubtedly the most dominant greenhouse gas in the terrestrial atmosphere. In the two facets of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program research, atmospheric remote sensing (air-borne as well as Cloud and Radiation Testbed [CART] site-based) and modeling of atmospheric radiation, the spectrum of water vapor, ranging from the microwave to the visible wavelengths, plays a significant role. Its spectrum has been the subject of many studies throughout the last century. Therefore, it is natural to presume it should be fairly well established by now. However, the need for a

385

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

386

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

388

Determination of O6-Butylguanine in DNA by Immunoaffinity Extraction/Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high resolution gas chromatography...chromatography; GC. gas chromatography...30 min under a dry nitrogen atmosphere. After...10 ml of distilled water, which was pooled...possible concentration. gas chromatography...their very low buffer solubility, O6MeG, guanosine...

Marina Bonfanti; Cinzia Magagnotti; Alessandra Galli; Renzo Bagnati; Massimo Moret; Pierluigi Gariboldi; Roberto Fanelli; and Luisa Airoldi

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Noble gas temperature control of metal clusters: A molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noble gas temperature control of metal clusters: A molecular dynamics study Jan Westergren a noble gas atmosphere. The simulations are performed using a many-body interaction scheme for the intra-cluster potential, while a pairwise Lennard-Jones potential is used to model the interaction between the noble gas

390

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

391

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

392

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Correlation of mineralogy and trace element leaching behavior in modified in situ spent shales from Logan Wash, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale retorting induces mineral and chemical reactions to occur on the macroscopic and microscopic levels in the kerogen-bearing marlstone. The nature and extent of the reactions is dependent upon process variables such as maximum temperature, time at temperature, atmosphere, and raw shale composition. This report describes the investigation of the mineral, chemical, and trace element release properties of spent shales retrieved from an experimental in situ retort at Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site in Garfield County, Colorado. Correlation between mineralogy of the spent materials and the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements are indicated, and relationships with important process parameters are discussed. The progress of carbonate decomposition reactions and silication reactions is indicative of the processing conditions experienced by the shale materials and influences the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements when the solids are contacted by water. Shale minerals that are exposed to the extreme conditions reached in underground retorting form high temperature product phases including akermanite-gehlenite and diopside-augite solid solutions, kalsilite, monticellite, and forsterie. The persistence of relatively thermally stable phases, such as quartz, orthoclase, and albite provide insight into the extremes of processing conditions experienced by the spent shales. Leachate compositions suggest that several trace elements, including vanadium, boron, fluoride, and arsenic are not rendered immobile by the formation of the high-temperature silicate product phase akermanite-gehlenite.

Peterson, E.J.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Trace element content of magnetohydrodynamic coal combustion effluents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element contents from effluents of a simulated coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) combustion process have been determined using thermal neutron activation analysis techniques. The quality control consi...

M. S. Akanni; V. O. Ogugbuaja; W. D. James

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Effects of Trace Contaminants on Catalytic Processing of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks . Abstract: Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to...

396

Towards a Ubiquitous Semantics of Interaction: phenomenology, scenarios and traces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Ubiquitous Semantics of Interaction: phenomenology, scenarios and traces Alan Dix does not attempt to address the whole question, but focuses on a phenomenological semantics

Dix, Alan

397

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, However, understanding the net effect of multi-source emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is

398

Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

Wordsworth, Robin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion, 2001, Ed. Z. Boybeyi, WIT Publications, Southampton, UK, Advances in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surface­atmosphere exchanges in mesoscale air pollution systems Devdutta S. Niyogi & Sethu Raman NorthMesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion, 2001, Ed. Z. Boybeyi, WIT Publications, Southampton, UK, Advances in Air Pollution, Vol 9, p. 424. Chapter 9 Numerical modeling of gas deposition and bi- directional

Raman, Sethu

400

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g. organic and medical waste, drying, calcining and the like.

Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

403

Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

Johnson, Robert E.

406

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Tracing The Largest Seasonal Migration on Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is estimated that over 3.6 billion passengers are travelling during the Chinese Spring Festival travel season. They leave their working cities and return their hometowns to enjoy annual family time, and back to cities after the holiday. In this study, with the massive location-based data collected from millions of smartphone users, we propose a novel method to trace the migration flow and explore the migration patterns of Chinese people. From the temporal perspective, we explore the migration trend over time during a 34-days period, about half a month before and after the Spring Festival. From the spatial perspective, the migration directions and routes are estimated and quantified, and the migration flow is visualized. The spatial range of influence of developed regions could be reflected with the destinations of migration, the migration destinations and originations have obvious characteristic of geographical proximity.

Wang, Xianwen; Mao, Wenli; Hu, Zhigang; Gu, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

410

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

412

Insect Trace Fossil Associations in Paleosols: The Coprinisphaera Ichnofacies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Namibia Sossus Sand (Khommabes Car-bonates) Late Pleistocene...from the Pleistocene Khommabes Car-bonates of Namibia are not...1993, Trace fossils from a Car-boniferous turbiditic lake...1985, Trace fossils from the Panther Member, Star Point Formation...

JORGE F. GENISE; M. GABRIELA MNGANO; LUIS A. BUATOIS; JOS H. LAZA; MARIANO VERDE

413

Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1. Wang,6 D. R. Blake,7 E. Atlas,8 A. Fried,8 B. Potter,9 M. A. Avery,10 G. W. Sachse,10 S. T. Sandholm,11 the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment are used in conjunction

Clarke, Antony

414

Reasoning by Assumption: Formalisation and Analysis of Human Reasoning Traces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the traces acquired in experiments undertaken. 1 Introduction Practical reasoning processes are often not limited to single reasoning steps, but extend to traces or trajectories of a number of interrelated by assumption'. This (non-deductive) practical reasoning pattern in- volves a number of interrelated reasoning

Treur, Jan

415

Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water By Daniel D. Snow, Ph.D. Director traces of drugs in the public drinking water supplies of 24 major U.S. metropolitan areas. This has in drinking water supplies is not new, but the classes of contaminants being tested for are. Pharmaceuticals

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

416

The propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methods to map artificial night sky brightness and stellar visibility across large territories or their distribution over the entire sky at any site are based on the computation of the propagation of light pollution with Garstang models, a simplified solution of the radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere which allows a fast computation by reducing it to a ray-tracing approach. We present here up-to-date Extended Garstang Models (EGM) which provide a more general numerical solution for the radiative transfer problem applied to the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere. We also present the LPTRAN software package, an application of EGM to high-resolution DMSP-OLS satellite measurements of artificial light emissions and to GTOPO30 digital elevation data, which provides an up-to-date method to predict the artificial brightness distribution of the night sky at any site in the World at any visible wavelength for a broad range of atmospheric situations and the artificial radiation density in the atm...

Cinzano, Pierantonio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

418

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Trace element partitioning in Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), but collected from the one of the secondary tanks which contains the slurry that exits the scrubber tower and is either recycled or sent to the thickener tank. 10. Bag house FGD (flue gas desulfurization system) fly ash fines (BHA): white-gray, dry, fine... Station. Concentrations of 41 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis. The particle size distribution was determined by Coulter counter analysis for the fly ash collected from the electrostatic precipitator outlets and from the flue...

Acevedo, Lillian Esther

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Observing chemistry of atmospheric particles Review article reached the International Reviews in Physical Chemistry most read list NULL...

423

Radon Content of the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... preliminary work. The absence of levels of a higher order suggests that the contribution of radon from this source does not represent a significant addition to the total atmospheric level. ... Domestic 0.70

W. ANDERSON; R. C. TURNER

1956-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

Larval Behavior and Natural Trace Element Signatures as Indicators of Crustacean Population Connectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variability in an atlas of trace element signatures forin creating a trace element atlas, our results show thatstage to create a trace element atlas in 2009 (Table 4.2),

Miller, Seth Haylen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Exoplanet atmospheres with EChO: spectral retrievals using EChOSim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the effectiveness of the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory mission concept for constraining the atmospheric properties of hot and warm gas giants and super Earths. Synthetic primary and secondary transit spectra for a range of planets are passed through EChOSim (Waldmann & Pascale 2014) to obtain the expected level of noise for different observational scenarios; these are then used as inputs for the NEMESIS atmospheric retrieval code and the retrieved atmospheric properties (temperature structure, composition and cloud properties) compared with the known input values, following the method of Barstow et al. (2013a). To correctly retrieve the temperature structure and composition of the atmosphere to within 2 {\\sigma}, we find that we require: a single transit or eclipse of a hot Jupiter orbiting a sun-like (G2) star at 35 pc to constrain the terminator and dayside atmospheres; 20 transits or eclipses of a warm Jupiter orbiting a similar star; 10 transits/eclipses of a hot Neptune orbiti...

Barstow, Joanna K; Aigrain, Suzanne; Fletcher, Leigh N; Irwin, Patrick G J; Varley, Ryan; Pascale, Enzo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Multifrequency Diagnostics of a Vibrationally Equilibrium CO2-Containing Gas Mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a technique which makes it possible to simultaneously determine the temperature T and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in a vibrationally equilibrium gas mixture at atmospheric pressure by using ...

K. I. Arshinov; N. S. Leshenyuk; V. V. Nevdakh

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Syngas Production from Coal Gasification with CO2 Rich Gas Mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal gasification with CO2 rich gas mixture is one of several promising new technologies associated with CO2 reduction in the atmosphere. Coal gasification with high CO2 concentration is suitable for producing la...

M. S. Alam; A. T. Wijayanta; K. Nakaso

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Carbon dioxide sequestration in petrochemical industries with the aim of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions to acceptable levels is arguably the greatest...2 increase in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide sequestration that consists of separation, transportation and...2..., is one...

Maryam Takht Ravanchi; Saeed Sahebdelfar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Spatially Resolved STIS Spectroscopy of Betelgeuse's Outer Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present spatially resolved spectra observed with HST-STIS of the upper chromosphere and dust envelope of Alpha Orionis (M2 Iab). In the fall of 2002 a set of five high-resolution near-UV spectra was obtained by scanning at intensity peak-up position and four off-limb target positions up to one arcsecond, using a small aperture, to investigate the thermal conditions and flow dynamics in the outer atmosphere of this important nearby cool supergiant star. Based on Mg II h & k, Fe II 2716 A, C II 2327 A, and Al II ] 2669 A emission lines we provide the first evidence for the presence of warm chromospheric plasma at least 1 arcsecond away from the star at ~40 R* (1 R*~700 Rsun). The STIS spectra reveal that Betelgeuse's upper chromosphere extends far beyond the circumstellar H alpha envelope of ~5 R*, determined from previous ground-based imaging. The flux in the broad and self-absorbed resonance lines of Mg II decreases by a factor of ~700 compared to the flux at chromospheric disk center. We observe strong asymmetry changes in the Mg II h and Si I resonance line profiles when scanning off-limb, signaling the outward acceleration of gas outflow in the upper chromosphere. From the radial intensity distributions of Fe I and Fe II emission lines we determine the radial non-LTE iron ionization balance. We compute that the local kinetic gas temperatures of the warm chromospheric gas component in the outer atmosphere exceed 2600 K, when assuming local gas densities of the cool gas component we determine from radiative transfer models that fit the 9.7 um silicate dust emission feature. The spatially resolved STIS spectra directly demonstrate that warm chromospheric plasma co-exisists with cool gas in Betelgeuse's circumstellar dust envelope.

A. Lobel; J. Aufdenberg; A. K. Dupree; R. L. Kurucz; R. P. Stefanik; G. Torres

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

431

Doubling of atmospheric methane supported  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric methane over the past 27,000 years was measured by analyzing air trapped in glacial ice in Greenland and Antarctica. Atmospheric concentrations were stable over that period until about 200 years b.p. In the last 200 years they have more than doubled. This change in concentration is correlated with the increase in human population; the implications for climate modification are discussed. 1 figure, 3 references.

Kerr, R.A.

1984-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

Elderkin, C.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

Chappell, W R

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Determination of Trace Mercaptans and Sulfides in Natural Gas by a Gas Chromatography-Flame Photometric Detector Technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......choice for the analysis of tetrahydrothiophene, one of the organic sulfur...SCIENCE VOL. 14 Figure 4A. Tetrahydrothiophene peak with Teflon lined column (140 C). Figure 4B. Tetrahydrothiophene peak with stainless steel......

C. David Pearson

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Polygeneration of Liquid Fuels and Electricity by the Atmospheric Pressure Hybrid Solar Gasification of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(16, 17, 29, 30) The technical viability of the atmospheric pressure, windowed solar vortex reactor to gasify petroleum coke (petcoke) has been demonstrated on a small scale,(16, 29, 31) and a 300 kW pilot scale reactor has also been tested successfully. ... Inputs to the reactor were the model coal (as discussed above), nitrogen used for the carrier gas for the coal feed, steam used as a gasifying agent, and oxygen that is needed when ? gas turbine for electricity generation. ...

Ashok A. Kaniyal; Philip J. van Eyk; Graham J. Nathan; Peter J. Ashman; Jonathan J. Pincus

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at high wind speeds in the Southern Ocean: Implications for global parameterizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2006. [1] The SOLAS Air-Sea Gas Exchange (SAGE) Experiment was conducted in the western Pacific of air-sea gas exchange. Globally, the dominant control of air-sea gas exchange is turbulent energy as the primary source of energy for the atmospheric and oceanic molecular boundary layers have been derived from

Ho, David

439

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine

442

Time Series of Trace Element Concentrations Calculated from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a). A total of 120 samples were collected at sites within the Bay, outside the Golden Gate receives many waste water discharges, especially in areas south of the Dumbarton Bridge, that contain trace

443

A graphics architecture for ray tracing and photon mapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, methods were developed to render various global illumination e?ects with rasterization GPUs. Among those were hardware based ray tracing and photon mapping. However, due to current GPU??s inherent architectural limitations, the e...

Ling, Junyi

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A study on some trace elements in Chilean seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Levels of essential and toxic trace elements in six marine species greatly in demand in the international market (canned pink clams, razor clams, clams, king crab, sardines, and frozen albacore tuna fish) were...

N. Gras; L. Munoz; M. Thieck

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Complex ray tracing study of electron cyclotron resonance heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the up-to-date ray tracing study of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of fusion plasmas, energy absorption ... side of the tokamak plasmas approach the electron cyclotron resonance surface step by st...

Liu Hongxiu; Zhao Changlin

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Understanding reservoir mechanisms using phase and component streamline tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explored. The power and utility of the phase and component streamlines have been demonstrated using synthetic examples and two field cases. The new formulation of streamline tracing provides additional information about the reservoir drive mechanisms...

Kumar, Sarwesh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

448

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

449

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

450

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

451

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

452

HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGING OF THE 2004 TRANSIT OF VENUS AND ASYMMETRIES IN THE CYTHEREAN ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the only space-borne optical-imaging observations of the 2004 June 8 transit of Venus, the first such transit visible from Earth since AD 1882. The high-resolution, high-cadence satellite images we arranged from NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) reveal the onset of visibility of Venus's atmosphere and give further information about the black-drop effect, whose causes we previously demonstrated from TRACE observations of a transit of Mercury. The atmosphere is gradually revealed before second contact and after third contact, resulting from the changing depth of atmospheric layers refracting the photospheric surface into the observer's direction. We use Venus Express observations to relate the atmospheric arcs seen during the transit to the atmospheric structure of Venus. Finally, we relate the transit images to current and future exoplanet observations, providing a sort of ground truth showing an analog in our solar system to effects observable only with light curves in other solar systems with the Kepler and CoRoT missions and ground-based exoplanet-transit observations.

Pasachoff, Jay M. [Williams College-Hopkins Observatory, 33 Lab Campus Drive, Williamstown, MA 01267 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Widemann, Thomas [Observatoire de Paris-LESIA, 92190 Meudon (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Fidelity and Trace Norm Distances for Quantifying Coherence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the coherence measures induced by fidelity and trace norm, based on the recent proposed coherence quantification in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401, 2014]. We show that the fidelity of coherence does not in general satisfy the monotonicity requirement as a measure of coherence under the subselection of measurements condition. We find that the trace norm of coherence can act as a measure of coherence for qubit case and some special class of qutrits.

Lian-He Shao; Zhengjun Xi; Heng Fan; Yongming Li

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

454

Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

Anderson, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rothganger, Fredrick (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIAs Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids 1 Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids 1 June 14, 2013 EIA's Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids Term Current Definition Proposed Definition Note Lease condensate Condensate (lease condensate): A natural gas liquid recovered from associated and non associated gas wells from lease separators or field facilities, reported in barrels of 42 U.S. gallons at atmospheric pressure and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Lease condensate: Light liquid hydrocarbons recovered from lease separators or field facilities at associated and non-associated natural gas wells. Mostly pentanes and heavier hydrocarbons. Normally enters the crude oil stream after production. Includes lease condensate as part of the crude oil stream, not an NGL. Plant condensate Plant condensate: One of the

457

Analytical Method for Determination of Trace Organics in Gas Samples Collected by Canister  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......usage of the 5 mL of water causes a great deal...analysis of highly water soluble compounds...dioxane. Liquid nitrogen (b.p. -196 C...their polarity or solubility in water. Therefore, with...reasonably good except the gases, which have overly......

J.P. Hsu; Greg Miller; Victor Moran; III

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Gas Chromatographic Measurement of Trace Oxygen and Other Dissolved Gases in Thermally Stressed Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......additional light hydrocarbon gases (e.g...stream, and the data can be obtained...system. The output data from this analytical...F33615-87-C-2714 and the Combustion and Heat Transfer Studies...from deoxygenated hydrocarbons: I. General features......

Wayne A. Rubey; Richard C. Striebich; Michael D. Tissandier; Debra A. Tirey; Steven D. Anderson

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Solar Coronal Structures and Stray Light in TRACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the 2004 Venus transit of the Sun to constrain a semi-empirical point-spread function for the TRACE EUV solar telescope, we have measured the effect of stray light in that telescope. We find that 43% of 171A EUV light that enters TRACE is scattered, either through diffraction off the entrance filter grid or through other nonspecular effects. We carry this result forward, via known-PSF deconvolution of TRACE images, to identify its effect on analysis of TRACE data. Known-PSF deconvolution by this derived PSF greatly reduces the effect of visible haze in the TRACE 171A images, enhances bright features, and reveals that the smooth background component of the corona is considerably less bright (and hence much more rarefied) than commonly supposed. Deconvolution reveals that some prior conlclusions about the Sun appear to have been based on stray light in the images. In particular, the diffuse background "quiet corona" becomes consistent with hydrostatic support of the coronal plasma; feature contrast is greatly increased, possibly affecting derived parameters such as the form of the coronal heating function; and essentially all existing differential emission measure studies of small features appear to be affected by contamination from nearby features. We speculate on further implications of stray light for interpretation of EUV images from TRACE and similar instruments, and advocate deconvolution as a standard tool for image analysis with future instruments such as SDO/AIA.

C. E. DeForest; P. C. H. Martens; M. J. Wills-Davey

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

460

Water Structure at Aqueous Solution Surfaces of Atmospherically Relevant Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Methanesulfonic Acid Revealed by Phase-Sensitive Sum Frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer (MBL), the sulfur cycle dominates in the gas-to-particle conversion process and in the growth-containing aerosols play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and climate.1-3 Especially in the marine boundary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

463

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

464

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

465

Chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The past twenty years have revealed the diversity of planets that exist in the Universe. It turned out that most of exoplanets are different from the planets of our Solar System and thus, everything about them needs to be explored. Thanks to current observational technologies, we are able to determine some information about the atmospheric composition, the thermal structure and the dynamics of these exoplanets, but many questions remain still unanswered. To improve our knowledge about exoplanetary systems, more accurate observations are needed and that is why the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory (EChO) is an essential space mission. Thanks to its large spectral coverage and high spectral resolution, EChO will provide exoplanetary spectra with an unprecedented accuracy, allowing to improve our understanding of exoplanets. In this work, we review what has been done to date concerning the chemical modeling of exoplanet atmospheres and what are the main characteristics of warm exoplanet atmospheres, which a...

Venot, Olivia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

467

MeTAGeM-Trace: Improving trace generation in model transformation by leveraging the role of transformation models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the context of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE), generation of traces can be automated using the implicit traceability relationships contained in any model transformation. Besides, if transformations are developed adopting a Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) approach, i.e. promoting the role of models and the level of automation, model transformation will benefit from the promised advantages of MDE in terms of less costly software development while reducing the inherent complexity of coding model transformations. To put these ideas into practice, this work introduces MeTAGeM-Trace, the first prototype of an EMF-based toolkit for the MDD of model-to-model transformations which supports trace generation, i.e. it allows developing model transformations that produce not only the corresponding target models, but also a trace model between the elements of the source and target models involved in the transformation.

lvaro Jimnez; Juan M. Vara; Vernica A. Bollati; Esperanza Marcos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Simulating Random Natural Variability in Time-Varying Atmospheric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simulating Random Natural Variability in Time-Varying Atmospheric Simulating Random Natural Variability in Time-Varying Atmospheric Concentrations of Toxic Gas from Pipeline Ruptures Speaker(s): David J. Wilson Date: February 4, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Jeiwon Deputy Random time series are found everywhere in nature. The Brownian motion of small particles; the price of assets (stocks) in financial markets; the diffusion of individual molecules through a membrane; the ballistic deposition of nano-particles onto a lattice substrate; and the time-varying concentration fluctuations at a point downwind from a pollution source all have a common dynamic description. All are stochastic processes where the local rate of change of the variable has a natural drift back to some equilibrium state, combined with a random fluctuating component. We will

469

Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery Linked Environments for Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unidata Program Center #12;Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery The Team: 9 institutions and 105 MethodologyTraditional NWP Methodology STATIC OBSERVATIONS Radar Data Mobile Mesonets Surface Observations Satellites The Process is Entirely Prescheduled and Serial; It Does NOT Respond to the Weather! The Process

470

Composition of a thermal plasma formed from PTFE with copper in non-oxidant atmosphere.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Composition of a thermal plasma formed from PTFE with copper in non-oxidant atmosphere. Part I the minimization of given thermodynamic functions or mass action laws even with plasmas out of thermal equilibrium- . Key Words: circuit breakers, SF6, PTFE, carbon formation, copper, dielectric gas, plasma composition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

471

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

472

Atmospheric emissions from the Deepwater Horizon spill constrain airwater partitioning, hydrocarbon fate, and leak rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

releases of gas and oil mixtures is initially determined by solubility and volatility of individual bioavailability of different fractions of the gasoil mixture, and to develop a comprehensive picture of the fate of leaked hydrocarbons in the marine environ- ment. Analysis of airborne atmospheric data shows massive

Toohey, Darin W.

473

On-line SiOx coating of extruded polystyrene sheets utilizing atmospheric pressure plasma treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coating of polystyrene sheets with SiOx layer was performed by employing an atmospheric pressure plasma device. Mixtures of hexamethyldisiloxane with different compositions of carrier gas based on synthetic air, oxygen, and/or nitrogen were ... Keywords: atmoshperic pressure plasma, coating deposition, hexamethyldisiloxane, polystyrene, sheet extrusion, surface treatment

O. Hudecek; T. Sedlacek; A. Minarik; P. Saha

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

478

Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17431758 Impact of urban heat island on regional atmospheric pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and spatial distribution of atmospheric pollutants over the Paris region. One anticyclonic episode from Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Regional atmospheric pollution; Urban area micrometeorology are large sources of atmospheric pollutants. Their spatial distribution and their temporal evolution can

Ribes, Aurélien

479

HIPPO_MEDUSA_data_users_guide_20121130 1 Revision Date: November 30, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trace Gas and Isotope Data (R_20121129) Summary: This data set provides atmospheric trace gas, K. H. Rosenlof, E. A. Ray, B. Hall, M. A. Zondlo, M. Diao, R. Keeling, J. Bent, E. L. Atlas, R. Lueb, M. J. Mahoney. 2012. HIPPO MEDUSA Flask Sample Trace Gas and Isotope Data (R_20121129). Carbon

480

Determination of Phenolic Constituents of Cigarette Smoke by Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......one week under these atmospheric conditions. Preparation...created when 35 ml of water drains from a buret...Low- temperature condensation effec- tively removed...condensables, in- cluding water. Provided reasonable...of gas chromatography recoveries found for the other......

Richard H. Crouse; John W. Garner; Hugh J. O'Neill

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric trace gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Gas Phase Electrodeposition: A Programmable Multimaterial Deposition Method for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma induced synthesis,11 and arc discharge12,13 can produce nanoparticles and nanow- ires of various-phase deposition process produces charged tungsten, and platinum and uses externally electrodeposition, arc discharge, atmospheric pressure gas phase deposition, nanoparticle nanostructured electrodes

Jacobs, Heiko O.

482

Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to a lower pressure destination...atmospheric pressure tank, rather...This lower pressure end point allows more gas to flow...such as a combustor. The nine unloading...population of high emitting wells...Americas Natural Gas Alliance...

David T. Allen; Vincent M. Torres; James Thomas; David W. Sullivan; Matthew Harrison; Al Hendler; Scott C. Herndon; Charles E. Kolb; Matthew P. Fraser; A. Daniel Hill; Brian K. Lamb; Jennifer Miskimins; Robert F. Sawyer; John H. Seinfeld

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HICKS, B.B., A SIMULATION OF THE EDDY ACCUMULATION...CLOSURES IN 2ND-ORDER MODELING, JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC...Their advantag-es are rapid response, linear output...the measurement and modeling of surface fluxes are...the appli-cation of automated conditional sampling...

W. F. Dabberdt; D. H. Lenschow; T. W. Horst; P. R. Zimmerman; S. P. Oncley; A. C. Delany

1993-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

484

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 2014-2015 Graduate Student Handbook followed a Code of Honor, which is stated in this very simple verse: An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal that knowledge for the benefit of society. Our most fundamental mission is to help students at all levels, from

485

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

487

Study of a dual frequency atmospheric pressure corona plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radio frequency mixing of 2 and 13.56 MHz was investigated by performing experimental measurements on the atmospheric pressurecoronaplasma. As a result of the dual frequency length current density and electron excitation temperature of the plasma were increased while the gas temperature was maintained at roughly the same level when compared to the respective single frequency plasmas. Moreover observation of time-resolvedimages revealed that the dual frequency plasma has a discharge mode of 2 MHz positive streamer 2 MHz negative glow and 13.56 MHz continuous glow.

Dan Bee Kim; S. Y. Moon; H. Jung; B. Gweon; Wonho Choe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Study of a dual frequency atmospheric pressure corona plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio frequency mixing of 2 and 13.56 MHz was investigated by performing experimental measurements on the atmospheric pressure corona plasma. As a result of the dual frequency, length, current density, and electron excitation temperature of the plasma were increased, while the gas temperature was maintained at roughly the same level when compared to the respective single frequency plasmas. Moreover, observation of time-resolved images revealed that the dual frequency plasma has a discharge mode of 2 MHz positive streamer, 2 MHz negative glow, and 13.56 MHz continuous glow.

Kim, Dan Bee; Moon, S. Y.; Jung, H.; Gweon, B.; Choe, Wonho [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Title Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5236-5250 Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, atria, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, indoor pollutant dispersion, mixed convection, turbulence model

490

No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

Cieslukowski, R.E.

1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

Global Thermodynamic Atmospheric Modeling: Search for NewHeterogeneous Reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article demonstrates quantitatively how far reactions are from chemical equilibrium over the full space of a two-dimensional atmospheric model. This method could be used with data where an instrument-equipped aircraft measures numerous species simultaneously, An atmospheric reaction is displaced from equilibrium by solar radiation and relocation of species by atmospheric motions. One purpose of this study is to seek additional stratospheric or tropospheric gas-phase chemical reactions that might undergo heterogeneous catalysis. Hypothetical cases can be rapidly screened in terms of their thermodynamic potential to react under measured or modeled atmospheric conditions of temperature and local species concentrations. If a reaction is interesting, is slow in the gas phase, and has a high thermodynamic tendency to react, it is a good candidate for a laboratory study to seek a heterogeneous catalyst, if the reaction is thermodynamically unfavorable, there is no catalyst that can cause the reaction to occur. If a reaction is thermodynamically favored to occur but also endothermic, it will tend to be slow at stratospheric temperatures. We find, as expected, that four heterogeneous reactions important in causing the Antarctic ''ozone hole'' have high thermodynamic tendencies to occur under atmospheric conditions, but one of these is only weakly thermodynamically allowed in some regions of the atmosphere. The reaction of SO2 and HNO3 to form HONO has a high thermodynamic potential to occur, is a well-known laboratory reaction at ice temperature, and may occur in nitric acid-rich sulfate aerosols. Throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, we find that formaldehyde has an extremely high thermodynamic potential to reduce nitric acid. Formaldehyde is known to stick to and remain in sulfuric acid solution, where it adds water to form H2C(OH)(2). Near room-temperature H2C(OH)(2) reacts with nitric acid in a two-step mechanism to form two molecules of HONO, but the rate of this process under conditions of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols is unknown.

Fairbrother, D.H.; Sullivan, D.S.D.; Johnston, H.S.

1997-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

492

Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today, coal supplies over 55% of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being developed for advanced electric power generation is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system that converts coal to a combustible gas, cleans the gas of pollutants, and combusts the gas in a gas turbine to generate electricity. The hot exhaust from the gas turbine is used to produce steam to generate more electricity from a steam turbine cycle. The utilization of advanced hot-gas particulate and sulfur control technologies together with the combined power generation cycles make IGCC one of the cleanest and most efficient ways available to generate electric power from coal. One of the strategic objectives for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) IGCC research and development program is to develop and demonstrate advanced gasifiers and second-generation IGCC systems. Another objective is to develop advanced hot-gas cleanup and trace contaminant control technologies. One of the more recent gasification concepts to be investigated is that of the transport reactor gasifier, which functions as a circulating fluid-bed gasifier while operating in the pneumatic transport regime of solid particle flow. This gasifier concept provides excellent solid-gas contacting of relatively small particles to promote high gasification rates and also provides the highest coal throughput per unit cross-sectional area of any other gasifier, thereby reducing capital cost of the gasification island.

Swanson, M.L.; Hajicek, D.R.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Numerical study on microwave-sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical study on microwave sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure is reported in this paper. The purpose of this study is to investigate both the process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited gas discharge under atmospheric pressure, thereby aiding improvements in the design of the discharge system, setting the appropriate working time, and controlling the operating conditions. A 3D model is presented, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron transport, heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The results can be obtained by means of the fluid approximation. The maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.96??10{sup 18} m{sup ?3} and 2514.8?K, respectively, and the gas pressure remains almost unchanged for typical operating conditions with a gas flow rate of 20 l/min, microwave power of 1000 W, and initial temperature of 473?K. In addition, the conditions (microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial temperature) of discharge are varied to obtain deeper information about the electron density and gas temperature. The results of our numerical study are valid and clearly describe both the physical process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited argon discharge.

Yang, Y.; Hua, W., E-mail: huaw@scu.edu.cn; Guo, S. Y. [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)] [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

494

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and greenhouse gas studies. These instruments will provide more accurate, detailed global observations of weather and atmospheric parameters that will, in turn, improve the accuracy and quality of weather forecasts. A satellite-based instrument is cost-effective because it can provide continuous global measurements, eliminating isolated yet costly weather balloon releases. Aqua, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (Figure 2), carries six state-of-the-art instruments that measure various water vapor parameters: (1) AIRS, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity, land and sea surface temperatures, cloud properties, and radiative energy flux; (2) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity during both cloudy and cloud-free periods; (3) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation rates, land surface wetness, sea ice, snow cover, sea surface temperature, and wind fields; (4) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, which measures radiative energy flux; (5) Humidity Sounder for Brazil, which measures atmospheric humidity by using a passive scanning microwave radiometer; and (6) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, aerosol properties, land cover and land use change, vegetation dynamics, land surface temperature, fire occurrence, volcanic effects, sea surface temperature, ocean color, snow cover, atmospheric temperature and humidity, and sea ice. The data-gathering capabilities of the Aqua instruments will provide an unprecedented view of atmosphere-land interactions (Figure 3). The availability of more frequent, more accurate global measurements of important atmospheric parameters will both improve our capabilities for short-term weather forecasting and lead to a better understanding of climate variability and climate change. Simultaneous measurements of many parameters will allow scientists to study complicated forcings and feedbacks of the atmosphere, which can be

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

495

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

496

Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

497

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Title Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Brostoff, Lynn B., Jhanis J. Gonzalez, Paul Jett, and Richard E. Russo Journal Journal of Archeological Science Volume 36 Start Page 461 Issue 2 Pagination 461-466 Date Published 02/2009 Keywords Ancient gold, femtosecond, la-icp-ms, Trace element Abstract In this collaborative investigation, femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the study of a remarkable group of ancient Chinese gold objects in the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Taking advantage of the superior ablation characteristics and high precision of a femtosecond 266 nm Ti:sapphire laser at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, major, minor and trace element concentrations in the gold fragments were quantified. Results validate use of femtosecond LA-ICP-MS for revealing ''fingerprints'' in minute gold samples. These fingerprints allow us to establish patterns based on the association of silver, palladium and platinum that support historical, technical and stylistic relationships, and shed new light on these ancient objects.

498

Field-dependent collision frequency of the two-dimensional driven random Lorentz gas Christoph Dellago*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Utrecht, Postbus 80006, Utrecht 3508 TA, The Netherlands-driven, thermostated Lorentz gas the collision frequency increases with the magnitude of the applied field due to long exponents on the applied field strength. These nonanalytic terms can be traced back to logarithmic terms

Dellago, Christoph

499

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory Title Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors McMeeking, Gavin R., Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Stephen Baker, Christian M. Carrico, Judith C. Chow, Jeffrey Collett L. Jr., Wei Min Hao, Amanda S. Holden, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, William C. Malm, Hans Moosmuller, Amy P. Sullivan, and Cyle E. Wold Journal Journal of Geophysical Research Volume 114 Abstract We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern United States (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO2, CO, CH4, C2-4 hydrocarbons, NH3, SO2, NO, NO2, HNO3, and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO4 2, NO3, Cl, Na+, K+, and NH4 + generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed emission factors for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions for individual fuels.

500

Microsoft PowerPoint - Microwave Off-gas srnlTechBriefp1.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microwave Off-Gas Treatment Microwave Off-Gas Treatment System at a glance  simple design  compact and portable  easy to operate  can be remotely operated  low cost, low maintenance  scalable for large and small volume operations  U.S. patent 6,534,754 The Microwave Off-Gas Treatment System uses microwave energy and high temperatures to treat off- gas emissions to reduce contaminants to acceptable or nondetectable levels. This allows the treated gaseous waste stream to be safety discharged to the atmosphere. New method Scientists at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), working with colleagues from the University of Florida (UF), have invented a unique system to treat off-gas emissions from safe discharge into the atmosphere. The compact and portable Microwave Off-Gas Treatment System is designed to