National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for atmospheric temperature temp

  1. Use of BasinTemp to Model Summer Stream Temperatures in the South Fork of Ten Mile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in basins where the data inputs are scarce. It assumes that direct solar radiation is the chief mechanism solar radiation and stream temperatures and that discharge has a growing effect in water temperatures that in mid-latitude regions, direct solar radiation is the most important mechanism driving summer stream

  2. A Temperature and Abundance Retrieval Method for Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhusudhan, Nikku

    We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. We run millions of one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models in order to cover the large ...

  3. Destruction mechanisms for formaldehyde in atmospheric temperature plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Destruction mechanisms for formaldehyde in atmospheric temperature plasmas Daniel G. Starch, Illinois 61801 (Received 4 June 1992; accepted for publication 15 September 1992) Formaldehyde (CH of formaldehyde from atmospheric pressure gas streams using plasmas generated by a dielectric barrier dis- charge

  4. Phase relation between global temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stallinga, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The primary ingredient of Anthropogenic Global Warming hypothesis is the assumption that atmospheric carbon dioxide variations are the cause for temperature variations. In this paper we discuss this assumption and analyze it on basis of bi-centenary measurements and using a relaxation model which causes phase shifts and delays.

  5. Automate avec sortie Automates et le temps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoras, .Romulus

    Automate avec sortie Automates et le temps Automates et l'inni Automates avec contrôle auxiliaire Généralisations Philippe Quéinnec 3 janvier 2011 1 / 26 #12;Automate avec sortie Automates et le temps Automates et l'inni Automates avec contrôle auxiliaire Plan 1 Automate avec sortie 2 Automates et le temps 3

  6. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venot, Olivia; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Hébrard, Eric; Larcher, Gwenaelle; Schwell, Martin; Dobrijevic, Michel; Selsis, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm....

  7. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current region-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from

  8. Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Ritsche, Michael

    Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

  9. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature received 25 October 2013, in final form 24 July 2014) ABSTRACT The wind speed response to mesoscale SST Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

  10. Stratospheric Temperatures and Water Loss from Moist Greenhouse Atmospheres of Earth-like Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasting, James F; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A radiative-convective climate model is used to calculate stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations for ozone-free atmospheres warmer than that of modern Earth. Cold, dry stratospheres are predicted at low surface temperatures, in agreement with recent 3-D calculations. However, at surface temperatures above 350 K, the stratosphere warms and water vapor becomes a major upper atmospheric constituent, allowing water to be lost by photodissociation and hydrogen escape. Hence, a 'moist greenhouse' explanation for loss of water from Venus, or some exoplanet receiving a comparable amount of stellar radiation, remains a viable hypothesis. Temperatures in the upper parts of such atmospheres are well below those estimated for a gray atmosphere, and this factor should be taken into account when performing 'inverse' climate calculations to determine habitable zone boundaries using 1-D models.

  11. Retrieval of cloud-cleared atmospheric temperature profiles from hyperspectral infrared and microwave observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, William Joseph, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of retrieving the temperature profile of the Earth's atmosphere from overhead infrared and microwave observations of spectral radiance in cloudy conditions. The contributions of the thesis ...

  12. track 1: Low Temp | geothermal 2015 peer review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    emp3.1CriticalMaterialswithSorbentStructuresAddleman.pdf Track1LowTemp3.2RareEarthMetalsTusaar.pdf Track1LowTemp3.3MicroorganismstoExtractMineralsCAF.pdf...

  13. Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-02-01

    Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

  14. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  15. Tempe, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Open Energy Information DixieGeothermalTelioTelventTempe,

  16. Property:GeofluidTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeTypeGeofluidTemp Jump to: navigation, search

  17. Soot surface temperature measurements in pure and diluted flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry Yelverton, T.L.; Roberts, W.L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Campus Box 7910, North Carolina State University, 3211 Broughton Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Soot surface temperature was measured in laminar jet diffusion flames at atmospheric and elevated pressures. The soot surface temperature was measured in flames at one, two, four, and eight atmospheres with both pure and diluted (using helium, argon, nitrogen, or carbon dioxide individually) ethylene fuels with a calibrated two-color soot pyrometry technique. These two dimensional temperature profiles of the soot aid in the analysis and understanding of soot production, leading to possible methods for reducing soot emission. Each flame investigated was at its smoke point, i.e., at the fuel flow rate where the overall soot production and oxidation rates are equal. The smoke point was chosen because it was desirable to have similar soot loadings for each flame. A second set of measurements were also taken where the fuel flow rate was held constant to compare with earlier work. These measurements show that overall flame temperature decreases with increasing pressure, with increasing pressure the position of peak temperature shifts to the tip of the flame, and the temperatures measured were approximately 10% lower than those calculated assuming equilibrium and neglecting radiation. (author)

  18. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    2004-02-19

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  19. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  20. Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Youn Moon, Se [High-enthalpy Plasma Research Center, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaeyoung [5771 La Jolla Corona Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000?nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popovi?. In 280–450?nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

  1. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  2. Effect of dielectric wall temperature on plasma plume in an argon atmospheric pressure discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jian; Huo, Yuxin; Wang, Youyin; Yu, Daren, E-mail: yudaren@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Jingfeng; Wei, Liqiu [Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-10-15

    In this letter, the effect of the dielectric wall temperature on the length and volume of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is investigated using a single-electrode configuration driven with an AC power supply. To distinguish the APPJ status from the argon flow rate, the three modes, laminar, transition, and turbulent, are separated. When the dielectric wall is heated, the APPJ length and volume are enhanced. Also, the transition regions remarkably expand over a large range of flow rates. The results indicate that different factors contribute to the expansion of the transition region. The increase in the radial and axial velocities is the main cause of the expansion of the transition region to the low-velocity region. The expansion to the high-velocity region is dominantly induced by a change in the viscosity.

  3. On the magnetic field signal radiated by an atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S.; Huang, Q.; Wang, Z.; Lu, X. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-01-28

    In this paper, the magnetic field signal radiated from an atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma plume is measured. It's found that the magnetic field signal has similar waveform as the current carried by the plasma plume. By calibration of the magnetic field signal, the plasma plume current is obtained by measuring the magnetic field signal radiated by the plasma plume. In addition, it is found that, when gas flow modes changes from laminar regime to turbulence regime, the magnetic field signal waveforms appears different, it changes from a smooth curve to a curve with multiple spikes. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the plasma plume generated by a single electrode (without ground electrode) plasma jet device carries higher current than that with ground electrode.

  4. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Kewitz, T.; Sperka, J.

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

  5. LES TIC, TECHNOLOGIES DE GESTION DU TEMPS ET DE LA DISTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    LES TIC, TECHNOLOGIES DE GESTION DU TEMPS ET DE LA DISTANCE Gérard Valenduc Professeur UNamur et la problématique "impacts sociétaux des TIC" 2 · Le rapport au temps et la gestion du temps 3 · Le centres d'intérêt "TIC et ..." L'emploi (dès les années 1980) Inquiétude concernant le processus de

  6. Paradigmes objets et synchrones dans les systmes temps-rel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André, Charles

    les objets synchrones de F. Boulanger et les machines d'exécution pour langages synchrones. Les SyncParadigmes objets et synchrones dans les systèmes temps-réel Charles ANDR� Laboratoire I3S'équipe SPORTS (Synchronous Programming Of Real-Time Systems) s'intéresse à la conception de systèmes réactifs

  7. Design and fabrication of a data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, S; Rudra, Sharmili; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Sahu, P K

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient pa- rameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. These parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics such as gain of gas filled detectors like Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Propor- tional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device has been presented.

  8. Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 4: Method of test for ignition temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1966-01-01

    This Recommendation was prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31 , Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres. It forms one of a series of publications dealing with electrical apparatus for use in explosive gas ...

  9. Temperature Dependence of Evaporation Coefficient for Water Measured in Droplets in Nitrogen under Atmospheric Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Pressure D. JAKUBCZYK, M. ZIENTARA, K. KOLWAS, AND M. KOLWAS Institute of Physics, Polish Academy 277 to 289 K was found to be 0.7 0.2. 1. Introduction The processes of evaporation and condensation (condensation) or mass accommodation coefficient C. Likewise the ther- mal conductivity coefficient must

  10. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  11. Property:USGSMeanReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to:SpatialResolution JumpTypes ofUSGSMeanReservoirTemp

  12. Property:SanyalTempWellhead | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url Jump to:ProgrammableYear Jump to:SanyalTempWellhead Jump

  13. Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information PromotingPropertyAvgGeoFluidTemp Jump

  14. Property:FirstWellTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeType Jump to:FirstWellLog Jump to:FirstWellTemp

  15. Low-Temp Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014 | InternationalLandLiquefiedof EnergyLow-CostLow-Temp

  16. First supplement to Publication 79·4 (1966)Electrical apparatus for explosive gas atmospheres, Part 4: Method of test for ignition temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEC Technical Committee

    1970-01-01

    This Publication has been prepared by IEC Technical Committee No. 31, Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Atmospheres. It forms the first Supplement to IEC Publication 79-4 and gives a list of ignition temperatures determined ...

  17. ESPACE, TEMPS ET COGNITION A PARTIR DES MATHEMATIQUES ET DES SCIENCES DE LA NATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, Giuseppe

    1 ESPACE, TEMPS ET COGNITION A PARTIR DES MATHEMATIQUES ET DES SCIENCES DE LA NATURE Francis BAILLY et Giuseppe LONGO RESUME : La cognition humaine paraît étroitement liée à la structure de l'espace et pertinence pour la cognition elle-même. MOTS-CLES : espace, temps, cognition, théories scientifiques

  18. Temperature sensing, CCD and gra3ng loca3ons,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    CHIRON: Temperature sensing, CCD and gra3ng loca3ons, and sealing AJ Gra3ng (in box) CCD Temp sensor 2 Temp sensor 3 Hea3ng Strips (below collimator FOB Gra3ng (in box) CCD lid 4 flat Light path shown in orange

  19. Atmospheric methane during the last four glacial-interglacial cycles: Rapid changes and their link with Antarctic temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Atmospheric methane during the last four glacial-interglacial cycles: Rapid changes and their link; published 24 June 2004. [1] Atmospheric methane (CH4) recorded in Antarctic ice cores represents the closest and Atmospheric Dynamics: Ocean/atmosphere interactions (0312, 4504); KEYWORDS: climate, atmospheric methane, ice

  20. Response of atmospheric ground level temperatures to changes in the total solar irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlykin, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    The attribution of part of global warming to changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) is an important topic which is not, yet, fully understood. Here, we examine the TSI induced temperature (T) changes on a variety of time scales, from one day to centuries and beyond, using a variety of assumptions. Also considered is the latitude variation of the T-TSI correlations, where it appears that over most of the globe there is a small increase in the sensitivity of temperature to TSI in time. It is found that the mean global sensitivity (alpha)measured in K(Wm-2)-1 varies from about 0.003 for 1 day, via 0.05 for 11-years to about 0.2 for decades to centuries. We conclude that mean global temperature changes related to TSI are not significant from 1975 onwards. Before 1975, when anthropogenic gases were less important, many of the temperature changes can be attributed to TSI variations. Over much longer periods of time, from Kyear to Myear, the TSI changes are more efficient still, the sensitivity alpha increasing...

  1. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  2. Interaction of Plutonium with Diverse Materials in Moist Air and Nitrogen-Argon Atmospheres at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Haschke; Raymond J. Martinez; Robert E. Pruner II; Barbara Martinez; Thomas H. Allen

    2001-04-01

    Chemical and radiolytic interactions of weapons-grade plutonium with metallic, inorganic, and hydrogenous materials in atmospheres containing moist air-argon mixtures have been characterized at room temperature from pressure-volume-temperature and mass spectrometric measurements of the gas phase. A reaction sequence controlled by kinetics and gas-phase composition is defined by correlating observed and known reaction rates. In all cases, O{sub 2} is eliminated first by the water-catalyzed Pu + O{sub 2} reaction and H{sub 2}O is then consumed by the Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction, producing a gas mixture of N{sub 2}, argon, and H{sub 2}. Hydrogen formed by the reaction of water and concurrent radiolysis of hydrogenous materials either reacts to form PuH{sub 2} or accumulates in the system. Accumulation of H{sub 2} is correlated with the presence of hydrogenous materials in liquid and volatile forms that are readily distributed over the plutonium surface. Areal rates of radiolytic H{sub 2} generation are determined and applied in showing that modest extents of H{sub 2} production are expected for hydrogenous solids if the contact area with plutonium is limited. The unpredictable nature of complex chemical systems is demonstrated by occurrence of the chloride-catalyzed Pu + H{sub 2}O reaction in some tests and hydride-catalyzed nitriding in another.

  3. Multiple sample characterization of coals and other substances by controlled-atmosphere programmed temperature oxidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaCount, Robert B. (403 Arbor Ct., Waynesburg, PA 15370)

    1993-01-01

    A furnace with two hot zones holds multiple analysis tubes. Each tube has a separable sample-packing section positioned in the first hot zone and a catalyst-packing section positioned in the second hot zone. A mass flow controller is connected to an inlet of each sample tube, and gas is supplied to the mass flow controller. Oxygen is supplied through a mass flow controller to each tube to either or both of an inlet of the first tube and an intermediate portion between the tube sections to intermingle with and oxidize the entrained gases evolved from the sample. Oxidation of those gases is completed in the catalyst in each second tube section. A thermocouple within a sample reduces furnace temperature when an exothermic condition is sensed within the sample. Oxidized gases flow from outlets of the tubes to individual gas cells. The cells are sequentially aligned with an infrared detector, which senses the composition and quantities of the gas components. Each elongated cell is tapered inward toward the center from cell windows at the ends. Volume is reduced from a conventional cell, while permitting maximum interaction of gas with the light beam. Reduced volume and angulation of the cell inlets provide rapid purgings of the cell, providing shorter cycles between detections. For coal and other high molecular weight samples, from 50% to 100% oxygen is introduced to the tubes.

  4. La complexit du temps et la simplicit de l'action protensive du vivant Giuseppe Longo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, Giuseppe

    'un vécu qui permet de construire une géodésique relative à l'espace de l'action. Mais le temps du vivant

  5. Meteorological Tables for Determination of Precipitable Water, Temperatures and Pressures Aloft for a Saturated Pseudoadiabatic Atmosphere -- in the Metric System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eihle, W. O.; Powers, R. J.; Clark, R.A.

    1968-01-01

    The hydrometeorologist is often confronted with the problem of determination of precipitable water in the atmosphere based on surface dewpoints and the assumption of a saturated atmosphere with a pseudoadiabatic lapse rate. ...

  6. ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle size distribution ARM

  7. Mechanism of Na2SO4-induced corrosion of molybdenum containing nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures. I. Corrosion in atmospheres containing O2 only. II. Corrosion in O2 + SO2 atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, A.K.

    1986-05-01

    Kinetics of the Na2SO4-induced corrosion of the molybdenum-containing nickel-base superalloys, B-1900 and Udimet 700, coated with Na2MoO4, has been studied in oxygen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 750 to 950 C. Because the gas turbine atmosphere always contains some SO2 and SO3, the effect of atmospheric SO2 content on corrosion of Udimet-700 has also been studied. It was found that in the O2 atmosphere the melt in the catastrophic corrosion phase consists of Na2MoO4 plus MoO3, with the onset of the catastrophic corrosion coinciding with the appearance of MoO3. In the presence of low levels of atmospheric SO2 (below 0.24 percent), the melt during catastrophic corrosion contains, in addition to Na2MoO4 and MoO3, some quantities of Na2SO4. At the levels of SO2 above 1 percent, no catastrophic corrosion was observed. At these SO2 levels, internal sulfidation appears to be the primary mode of degradation. 40 references.

  8. Long-term trends observed in the middle atmosphere temperatures using ground based LIDARs and satellite borne measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    lower thermosphere region: 2. Solar response, J. Geo- phys.of the 27-day and 11-year solar cycles: Radiative and/orD. M. : Long-term and solar cycle changes in the atmospheric

  9. Correlations of the first and second derivatives of atmospheric CO2 with global surface temperature and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation respectively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leggett, L M W

    2014-01-01

    Understanding current global climate requires an understanding of trends both in Earth's atmospheric temperature and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a characteristic large-scale distribution of warm water in the tropical Pacific Ocean and the dominant mode of year-to-year climate variability (Holbrook et al. 2009. However, despite much effort, the average projection of current climate models has become statistically significantly different from the observed 21st century global surface temperature trend (Fyfe 2013)and has failed to reflect the statistically significant evidence that annual-mean global temperature has not risen in the 21st century (Fyfe 2013, Kosaka 2013). Modelling also provides a wide range of predictions for future ENSO variability, some showing an increase, others a decrease and some no change (Guilyardi, et al. 2012; Bellenger, 2013). Here we present correlations which include the current era and do not have these drawbacks. The correlations arise as follows. First it has been sho...

  10. SAGEO'2007, pages 00 00 Service Web de constitution en temps rel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAGEO'2007, pages 00 à 00 Service Web de constitution en temps réel de mini-cubes SOLAP pour solution, basée sur les architectures orientées services et les technologies des services Web, pour adapter architectures and Web services technologies, designed to adapt SOLAP data cubes to the requirements

  11. REGULATION POLITIQUE ET REGULATION D'USAGE DANS LE TEMPS DE TRAVAIL1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 REGULATION POLITIQUE ET REGULATION D'USAGE DANS LE TEMPS DE TRAVAIL1 : par G. de Terssac, J REGULATION AND REGULATION OF USE OVER WORKING TIME In this paper we discuss « social regulations » as defined by Reynaud (1999). These regulations, in our case (working)-time regulations, are multiple. Their combination

  12. 4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.5 Rock Coatings RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA r 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 4.5.1 Introduction to Rock Coatings 70 4.5.2 Interpreting Rock Coatings through a Landscape: Subaerial Exposure of Subsurface Coatings 73 4.5.2.3 Third-Order Control: Competition from Lithobionts 78 4

  13. 4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorn, Ron

    4.4 Nanoscale: Mineral Weathering Boundary RI Dorn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA SJ-scattered detector. Biotic weathering Mineral weathering caused by life, including bacteria, fungi, algae, plants of elements such as silica or iron. Etching of minerals Mineral dissolution is not an even produce; areas

  14. WELL KNOWN . . . TO A FEW PEOPLE: ATTRIBUTION OF EXCESS ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND RESULTING GLOBAL TEMPERATURE CHANGE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    century the major source of incremental atmospheric CO2 was not FF emissions but emissions from so to deforestation. LUC CO2 emissions have been a substantial fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions throughout the industrial period and even at present are about a third as great as FF emissions. Cumulative LUC CO2

  15. DESIGN OF DUAL PHASE Fe/Mn/C STEEL FOR LOW TEMPERATURE APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nack-Joon

    2013-01-01

    I Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Annealing temp (°C) Oy eu eTa+ y) phase annealing for dual phase steels when good impactphase annealing temperatures. The boron-treated steel shows

  16. Heat engines and heat pumps in a hydrostatic atmosphere: How surface pressure and temperature control wind power output and circulation cell size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Shearman, P L; Li, B -L

    2015-01-01

    The gross spatial features of the atmospheric kinetic energy budget are analytically investigated. Kinetic energy generation is evaluated in a hydrostatic atmosphere where the axisymmetric circulation cells are represented by Carnot cycles. The condition that kinetic energy generation is positive in the lower atmosphere is shown to limit the poleward cell extension via a relationship between the meridional differences in surface pressure and temperature $\\Delta p_s$ and $\\Delta T_s$: an upper limit to cell size exists when $\\Delta p_s$ increases sublinearly with $\\Delta T_s$. This is the case for the Hadley cells as demonstrated here using data from MERRA re-analysis. The limited cell size necessitates the appearance of heat pumps -- circulation cells with negative work output where the low-level air moves towards colder areas. These cells consume the positive work output of heat engines -- cells where the low-level air moves towards the warmer areas -- and can in principle drive the global efficiency of atmo...

  17. Partial SOP for Tube Anneal Furnace, EML: 9/04 Instructions for temp controller for Anneal furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Partial SOP for Tube Anneal Furnace, EML: 9/04 Instructions for temp controller for Anneal furnace the boat into the center of the furnace and replace the quartz and ceramic end caps, carefully aligning

  18. Impact de la configuration de KVM sur les temps de rponse (exemple simple)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menichi, Luc

    second : OS : Fedora 9 64 bits Kernel : 2.6.26 KVM : kvm-75 Les VM Les VM créées sont : une Fedora 9 32 bits une Fedora 9 64 bits une CentOS 5 64 bits Ces VM sont recopiées sur les 2 hosts et lancées,68 23,92 83,76 Les temps de réponses sont mesurés sur une VM Fedora 9 32 bits, une VM Fedora 9 64 bits

  19. High electron mobility thin-film transistors based on Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown by atmospheric ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Stuart R. E-mail: thomas.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Lin, Yen-Hung; Faber, Hendrik; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: thomas.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Adamopoulos, George; Sygellou, Labrini; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Pliatsikas, Nikos; Patsalas, Panos A.

    2014-09-01

    We report on thin-film transistors based on Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films grown by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis in ambient atmosphere at 400–450?°C. The elemental, electronic, optical, morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the films and devices were investigated using a range of complementary characterisation techniques, whilst the effects of post deposition annealing at higher temperature (700?°C) were also investigated. Both as-grown and post-deposition annealed Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are found to be slightly oxygen deficient, exceptionally smooth and exhibit a wide energy bandgap of ?4.9?eV. Transistors based on as-deposited Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} films show n-type conductivity with the maximum electron mobility of ?2?cm{sup 2}/V s.

  20. Finite Temperature Field Theory Joe Schindler 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    energy spectrum. #12;Field Thermodynamics Example For a free boson field at thermal equilibrium, calculate energy spectrum. #12;Field Thermodynamics Example For a free boson field at thermal equilibriumFinite Temperature Field Theory Joe Schindler 2015 #12;Part 1: Basic Finite Temp Methods #12

  1. Role of sea surface temperature, Arctic sea ice and Siberian snow in forcing the atmospheric circulation in winter of 2012–2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peings, Y; Magnusdottir, G

    2015-01-01

    the atmosphere through heat flux exchanges (Bjerknes 1964).energy flux exchanges (radiative and turbulent heat fluxes).

  2. File:TempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages RecentTempCampApplicationWorksheet 2011.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File

  3. Property:Building/MeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices JumpMeanAnnualTempCalculationPeriod Jump

  4. track 1: Low Temp | geothermal 2015 peer review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotion to Withdraw | DepartmentSuite 600, 1901THE6,test test1: Low Temp |

  5. AcuTemp Expands as Appliances Become More Energy Efficient | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomic Dialogue |Energy AcuTemp

  6. Atmospheric Environment ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    that the influence of the urban region on wind patterns and atmospheric stability could be studied. HeightAtmospheric Environment ] (

  7. Temperature measurement of an atmospheric pressure arc discharge plasma jet using the diatomic CN (B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}, violet system) molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Se Youn; Kim, D. B.; Gweon, B.; Choe, W.

    2009-03-01

    The CN (B {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}-X {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}) molecular emission spectrum is used to measure both the vibrational and rotational temperatures in atmospheric pressure arc jet discharges. The vibrational and rotational temperature effects on the synthetic diatomic molecular spectra were investigated from the (v{sup '},v{sup ''})=(0,0) band to the (5,5) band. The temperatures obtained from the synthetic spectra compared with the experimental result of a low-frequency arc discharge show a vibrational temperature of (4250-5010) K and a rotational temperature of (3760-3980) K for the input power in the range of (80-280) W. As the (0,0) band is isolated from other vibrational transition bands, determination of the rotational temperature is possible based only on the (0,0) band, which simplifies the temperature measurement. From the result, it was found that the CN molecular spectrum can be used as a thermometer for atmospheric pressure plasmas containing carbon and nitrogen.

  8. Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Arthur P

    2008-01-01

    A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

  9. J Low Temp Phys (2008) 151: 684689 DOI 10.1007/s10909-008-9728-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golwala, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    whose output power is coupled to MKIDs via in-line color-defining bandpass filters. A prototype software · Submillimeter and millimeter wave detectors PACS 95.55.Jz · 85.25.Pb J. Schlaerth ( ) · J. Glenn Center Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, M/S: 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA #12;J Low Temp

  10. ITALY DAILY, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2001 PAGE 3 temp min c/f max c/f

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frischer, Bernard

    Hunting for Horace's Humble Home Did the Poet Live as Modestly as He Said He Did? An Archaeological TeamDISCOVER ITALY DAILY, WEDNESDAY, JULY 25, 2001 PAGE 3 Weather temp min c/f max c/f SUNNY PARTLY in his writing than many of his contemporaries, he left clues as to where he made his home. He wrote

  11. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-07-15

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  12. An ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system for the martian atmosphere: Implementation and simulation experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    , United States h Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 variables (such as temperature and winds) using observations from only one or two observed fields) of Hunt et al. (2007), a powerful and efficient assimilation scheme which has performed very well

  13. The PMMA opal film was infiltrated with SiO2 using a homemade CVD setup operating at atmospheric pressure and room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The PMMA opal film was infiltrated with SiO2 using a homemade CVD setup operating at atmospheric. HRSEM was used to observe the alterations in the opal structure. Before examination, samples had been

  14. Mathematical Analysis of High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of CO2 and O2 Production in a Closed-Loop Atmosphere Revitalization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael G. McKellar; Manohar S. Sohal; Lila Mulloth; Bernadette Luna; Morgan B. Abney

    2010-03-01

    NASA has been evaluating two closed-loop atmosphere revitalization architectures based on Sabatier and Bosch carbon dioxide, CO2, reduction technologies. The CO2 and steam, H2O, co-electrolysis process is another option that NASA has investigated. Utilizing recent advances in the fuel cell technology sector, the Idaho National Laboratory, INL, has developed a CO2 and H2O co-electrolysis process to produce oxygen and syngas (carbon monoxide, CO and hydrogen, H2 mixture) for terrestrial (energy production) application. The technology is a combined process that involves steam electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis, and the reverse water gas shift (RWGS) reaction. A number of process models have been developed and analyzed to determine the theoretical power required to recover oxygen, O2, in each case. These models include the current Sabatier and Bosch technologies and combinations of those processes with high-temperature co-electrolysis. The cases of constant CO2 supply and constant O2 production were evaluated. In addition, a process model of the hydrogenation process with co-electrolysis was developed and compared. Sabatier processes require the least amount of energy input per kg of oxygen produced. If co-electrolysis replaces solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrolysis within the Sabatier architecture, the power requirement is reduced by over 10%, but only if heat recuperation is used. Sabatier processes, however, require external water to achieve the lower power results. Under conditions of constant incoming carbon dioxide flow, the Sabatier architectures require more power than the other architectures. The Bosch, Boudouard with co-electrolysis, and the hydrogenation with co-electrolysis processes require little or no external water. The Bosch and hydrogenation processes produce water within their reactors, which aids in reducing the power requirement for electrolysis. The Boudouard with co-electrolysis process has a higher electrolysis power requirement because carbon dioxide is split instead of water, which has a lower heat of formation. Hydrogenation with co-electrolysis offers the best overall power performance for two reasons: it requires no external water, and it produces its own water, which reduces the power requirement for co-electrolysis.

  15. Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, D. S.; Dutton, Bryan C.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. and furnace temperature versus timein air-based atmospheres and furnace temperature versus time2 -based atmospheres and furnace temperature versus time for

  16. 1. General description The NXP Semiconductors SE97 measures temperature from -40 C and +125 C and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    the Temp Sensor (TS) on DIMM allows accurate monitoring of the DIMM module temperature to better estimate1. General description The NXP Semiconductors SE97 measures temperature from -40 °C and +125 °C on a Dual In-Line Memory Module (DIMM) measuring the DRAM temperature in accordance with the new JEDEC (JC

  17. Steamboat-Springs:Internet:Internet Applications:Outlook Express 4.5 Folder:Outlook Express Temp:final-masanori.doc 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gerhard

    Steamboat-Springs:Internet:Internet Applications:Outlook Express 4.5 Folder:Outlook Express Temp for Collaborative, Evolutionary Design____________11 #12;Steamboat-Springs:Internet:Internet Applications

  18. J Low Temp Phys (2015) 179:914 DOI 10.1007/s10909-014-1240-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majós, Antonio Badía

    2015-01-01

    J Low Temp Phys (2015) 179:9­14 DOI 10.1007/s10909-014-1240-3 In Plane Vortex Dynamic Anisotropy with the direction in which the dissipation due to vortex movement is minimum, evidencing the existence of pinning with a platelet shape (typical dimensions: 0.7mm2 × 0.02mm) and others as tubes (3.6 × 10-3 mm2 × 0.2mm). Figure 1

  19. Potential of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and AMSU-B measurements for atmospheric temperature and humidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    Potential of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and AMSU-B measurements for atmospheric. The retrieval approach has been evaluated by comparison with available in situ measurements. Citation: Karbou, F., F. Aires, C. Prigent, and L. Eymard (2005), Potential of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU

  20. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP) concentrations and sea- surface temperatures (SSTs). These integrations enable the relative role of ozone

  1. Low GWP Working Fluid for High Temperature Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Low GWP Working Fluid for High Temperature Heat Pumps: DR-2 Chemical Stability at High Temperatures Temp Heat Pumps: DR-2 Very Low GWP AND Non-Flammable HFC-245fa DR-2 Chemical Formula CF3CH2CHF2 HFO 171.3 Pcr [MPa] 3.65 2.9 Kontomaris-DuPont; European Heat Pump Summit, Nuremberg, October 15th, 2013

  2. Autumn 2012 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    wind, and accumulated precipitation at a designated city. Forecasts are made over a two-week period Department 1 The UW Atmospheric Sciences spring forecast contest has been an annual tradition there will be a marine push or a convergence zone wrecking their forecast for maximum temperature and precipitation

  3. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  4. On the use of the double floating probe method to infer the difference between the electron and the heavy particles temperatures in an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, L. Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.; Instituto de Física del Plasma , Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires

    2014-05-15

    Sweeping double probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current vortex-stabilized plasma jet are reported (plasma conditions: 100 A discharge current, N{sub 2} gas flow rate of 25 Nl/min, thoriated tungsten rod-type cathode, copper anode with 5 mm inner diameter). The interpretation of the double probe characteristic was based on a generalization of the standard double floating probe formulae for non-uniform plasmas coupled to a non-equilibrium plasma composition model. Perturbations caused by the current to the probe together with collisional and thermal processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Radial values of the average electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. The calculation of the temperature values did not require any specific assumption about a temperature relationship between different particle species. An electron temperature of 10?900 ± 900 K, a heavy particle temperature of 9300 ± 900 K, and an electron density of about 3.5 × 10{sup 22} m{sup ?3} were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found toward the outer border of the plasma jet. These results showed good agreement with those previously reported by the authors by using a single probe technique. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma torches operated at power levels of about 15 kW.

  5. "Peak Oil"Paper Revised and Temperature Analysis Code (1) The paper"Implications of`Peak Oil'for Atmospheric CO2 and Climate", recently revised and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    "Peak Oil"Paper Revised and Temperature Analysis Code (1) The paper"Implications of`Peak Oil is phased out except where the CO2 is captured and stored, and use of unconventional fossil fuels

  6. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2-H2 pairs in the fundamental band at temperatures from 20 to 300 K. [Planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The 20-300 K free-free rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2-H2 pairs are presently obtained by a numerical method which, in addition to closely matching known CIA spectra of H2-H2, can reproduce the results of the quantum-mechanical computations to within a few percent. Since the spectral lineshape parameters are derivable by these means from the lowest three quantum-mechanical spectral moments, these outer-planet atmosphere-pertinent model spectra may be computed on even small computers. 35 refs.

  7. Steam gasification of coal at low-medium (600-800{sup o}C) temperature with simultaneous CO{sub 2} capture in a bubbling fluidized bed at atmospheric pressure. 2. Results and recommendations for scaling up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corella, J.; Toledo, J.M.; Molina, G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-19

    A gasification gas with an H{sub 2} content as high as 80 vol %, dry basis has been obtained by gasification of coal with pure steam at 600-800{sup o}C. The gasifier used was an atmospheric and bubbling fluidized bed operating with CaO in the bed as the CO{sub 2} sorbent. The research was carried out at a small pilot plant scale with continuous feeding of coal and batch mode introduction of the CaO. The gas composition and gas quality (tar content) is given for the following variables of operation: (a) type of in-bed sorbent used, (b) the amount of CaO in the bed related to the amount of coal fed, (c) temperature in the gasifier bed, (d) weight hourly space velocity (h{sup -1}) of the coal in the gasifier, and (e) time(-on-stream). To capture CaO at atmospheric pressure, the gasification with in-bed CaO had to be carried out at low-medium (600-800{sup o}C) gasification temperatures. For this reason, the tar content in the gasification gas was high (up to 52 g/Nm{sup 3}), which lowered the value of the H{sub 2}-rich gasification raw gas. It is demonstrated that a gas rich in H{sub 2} (80 vol % H{sub 2}, dry basis), and with very low CO{sub 2} and tar contents, can be obtained only if the coal gasification, at atmospheric pressure and with pure steam, is carried out at (CaO/coal) ratios above 10-15.

  8. APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS--FOCUSED REVIEW Negative bias temperature instability: Road to cross in deep submicron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    in deep submicron silicon semiconductor manufacturing Dieter K. Schrodera) Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Low Power Electronics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 Jeff A, nitride, water, fluorine, boron, gate material, holes, temperature, electric field, and gate length

  9. Spatiotemporal temperature and density characterization of high-power atmospheric flashover discharges over inert poly(methyl methacrylate) and energetic pentaerythritol tetranitrate dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, V.; Grant, C. D.; McCarrick, J. F.; Zaug, J. M.; Glascoe, E. A.; Wang, H.

    2012-03-01

    A flashover arc source that delivered up to 200 mJ on the 100s-of-ns time-scale to the arc and a user-selected dielectric surface was characterized for studying high-explosive kinetics under plasma conditions. The flashover was driven over thin pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) dielectric films and the resultant plasma was characterized in detail. Time- and space-resolved temperatures and electron densities of the plasma were obtained using atomic emission spectroscopy. The hydrodynamics of the plasma was captured through fast, visible imaging. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the films pre- and post-shot for any chemical alterations. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR) provided PETN depletion data during the plasma discharge. For both types of films, temperatures of 1.6-1.7 eV and electron densities of {approx}7-8 x 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}{approx}570 ns after the start of the discharge were observed with temperatures of 0.6-0.7 eV persisting out to 15 {mu}s. At 1.2 {mu}s, spatial characterization showed flat temperature and density profiles of 1.1-1.3 eV and 2-2.8 x 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} for PETN and PMMA films, respectively. Images of the plasma showed an expanding hot kernel starting from radii of {approx}0.2 mm at {approx}50 ns and reaching {approx}1.1 mm at {approx}600 ns. The thin films ablated or reacted several hundred nm of material in response to the discharge. First TRIR data showing the in situ reaction or depletion of PETN in response to the flashover arc were successfully obtained, and a 2-{mu}s, 1/e decay constant was measured. Preliminary 1 D simulations compared reasonably well with the experimentally determined plasma radii and temperatures. These results complete the first steps to resolving arc-driven PETN reaction pathways and their associated kinetic rates using in situ spectroscopy techniques.

  10. Multiple current peaks in room-temperature atmospheric pressure homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma excited by high-voltage tunable nanosecond pulse in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen

    2013-05-13

    Room temperature homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma with high instantaneous energy efficiency is acquired by using nanosecond pulse voltage with 20-200 ns tunable pulse width. Increasing the voltage pulse width can lead to the generation of regular and stable multiple current peaks in each discharge sequence. When the voltage pulse width is 200 ns, more than 5 organized current peaks can be observed under 26 kV peak voltage. Investigation also shows that the organized multiple current peaks only appear in homogenous discharge mode. When the discharge is filament mode, organized multiple current peaks are replaced by chaotic filament current peaks.

  11. The middle Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaquin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of scattered light above the planetary limb from 116 Viking Orbiter images are used to constrain the temporal and spatial behavior of aerosols suspended in the Martian atmosphere. The data cover a wide range of seasons, locations, and viewing geometry, providing information about the aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution. The typical atmospheric column contains one or more discrete, optically thin, ice-like haze layers between 30 and 90 km elevation whose composition is inferred to be water ice. Below the detached hazes, a continuous haze, interpreted to have a large dust component, extends from as much as 50 km to the surface. The haze distribution exhibits an annual variation that reflects a seasonally driven circulation in the middle atmosphere. The potential role of stationary gravity waves in modifying the middle atmosphere circulation is explored using a linear theory applied to a realistic Martian environment. Martian topography derived from radar observations is decomposed into Fourier harmonics and used to linearly superpose gravity waves arising from each component. The larger amplitude topography on Mars combined with the absence of extended regions of smooth topography like oceans generates larger wave amplitudes than on the Earth. The circulation of the middle atmosphere is examined using a two-dimensional, linearized, axisymmetric model successfully employed in the study of the terrestrial mesosphere. Illustrations of temperature and wind speeds are presented for the southern summer solstice and southern spring equinox.

  12. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Modeling and Analysis of Semiconductor Manufacturing, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA, May, 2000.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manufacturing, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA, May, 2000. HIGH-FIDELITY RAPID PROTOTYPING OF THE REAL manufacturing in- dustry has been driven by continuous technological advancement of the underlying production results in Dis- crete Event Systems theory. Furthermore, in addition to the development of the formal

  13. C:\\DOCUME~1\\MARYEL~1\\LOCALS~1\\Temp\\Outside Access to the Sun Network.doc Outside Access to the Sun Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Califf, Mary Elaine

    C:\\DOCUME~1\\MARYEL~1\\LOCALS~1\\Temp\\Outside Access to the Sun Network.doc Outside Access to the Sun_of_host> Congratulations, you are now logged into a host on the Sun network. NOTE: sadok should only be used when\\Outside Access to the Sun Network.doc Note: The SUN workstations have been updated over Christmas break and new

  14. Stellar Atmospheres, Ht 2007 Problem Set 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korn, Andreas

    Stellar Atmospheres, Ht 2007 Problem Set 1 Due date: Monday, 24 September 2007 at 10.15 1. LTE of how temperature is defined. (b) Where in the solar atmosphere would you expect the strongest for the photosphere? (c) How does the relation between matter and radiation differ between LTE and NLTE? What must

  15. THE ATMOSPHERE IN Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sectoral Applications Research Project #12;Factor 1: Our Energy Source Hi, I'm the Sun! I provide 99.9999+ percent of the energy that drives the Earth's weather and climate patterns. In other words, I pretty much intense) vs. oblique (less intense) energy Equator Less direct energy: Colder temps! Less direct energy

  16. Understanding oxygen photochemistry in CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    of confidence in forecasting the temperature profile for the Martian atmosphere over the aerobraking region temperature, dust load, water concentrations, etc., on the vertical ii #12;structure of the emissions the NO airglow emission in the Mars atmosphere from the SPICAM instrument. The method is tested with one year

  17. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  18. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  19. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the monsoon forecasting models, which many times do not represent the heat energy available to the atmosphere, have a great demand for accurate, long range forecast (LRF) of mon- soon rainfall, which has always. We studied the impacts of ocean mean temperature (OMT), representing the heat energy of the upper

  20. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  1. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  2. Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences 1959­2009 WayneBurt. #12;Oceanography and Atmospheric in Oceanography (TENOC). Wayne Burt immediately responds with proposal to President Strand of Oregon State College to start a graduate Department of Oceanography. 1959 Oregon State Board of Higher Education approves

  3. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  4. Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A process for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750.degree. C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5-3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite.

  5. Controlled atmosphere for fabrication of cermet electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, S.P.; Woods, R.W.

    1998-08-11

    A process is disclosed for making an inert electrode composite wherein a metal oxide and a metal are reacted in a gaseous atmosphere at an elevated temperature of at least about 750 C. The metal oxide is at least one of the nickel, iron, tin, zinc and zirconium oxides and the metal is copper, silver, a mixture of copper and silver or a copper-silver alloy. The gaseous atmosphere has an oxygen content that is controlled at about 5--3000 ppm in order to obtain a desired composition in the resulting composite. 2 figs.

  6. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  7. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  8. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    address: Center for Atmospheric Chemistry Study, Departmenttween phytoplankton, atmospheric chemistry, and climate areno. 12 ? 4601– 4605 CHEMISTRY Atmospheric aerosol deposition

  9. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  10. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  11. Autumn 2014 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    to perform atmospheric chemistry measurements in this remote region of ubiquitous oil and gas drilling 30 days they raised $12,000, enough to support Maria's travel to Utah and to cover the costs

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  13. Magnetized Atmospheres around Accreting Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zane; R. Turolla; A. Treves

    2000-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation of atmospheres around accreting neutron stars with high magnetic field ($B\\gtrsim 10^{12}$ G) and low luminosity ($L\\lesssim 10^{33}$ erg/s). We compute the atmospheric structure, intensity and emergent spectrum for a plane-parallel, pure hydrogen medium by solving the transfer equations for the normal modes coupled to the hydrostatic and energy balance equations. The hard tail found in previous investigations for accreting, non-magnetic neutron stars with comparable luminosity is suppressed and the X-ray spectrum, although still harder than a blackbody at the star effective temperature, is nearly planckian in shape. Spectra from accreting atmospheres, both with high and low fields, are found to exhibit a significant excess at optical wavelengths above the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the X-ray continuum.

  14. 13, 1479714822, 2013 Atmospheric waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    .5194/acpd-13-14797-2013 © Author(s) 2013. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Sciences ss Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Discussions Atmospheric Measurement s Discussions This discussion paper is/has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  15. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  16. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2013 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  17. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  18. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2008 University of Colorado at Boulder, Jet Propulsion Laboratory) LASP: A Brief History In 1946-47, a handful of American universities joined Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper

  19. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    1 Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2010 University of Colorado from the Na- val Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  20. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic formats. For more information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.wiley.com. Library of Congress Cataloging components of the atmosphere, nitrogen, oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, and the noble gases. In the late

  1. Electrostatic activation of prebiotic chemistry in substellar atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Craig R; Diver, Declan A; Rimmer, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    Charged dust grains in the atmospheres of exoplanets may play a key role in the formation of prebiotic molecules, necessary to the origin of life. Dust grains submerged in an atmospheric plasma become negatively charged and attract a flux of ions that are accelerated from the plasma. The energy of the ions upon reaching the grain surface may be sufficient to overcome the activation energy of particular chemical reactions that would be unattainable via ion and neutral bombardment from classical, thermal excitation. As a result, prebiotic molecules or their precursors could be synthesised on the surface of dust grains that form clouds in exoplanetary atmospheres. This paper investigates the energization of the plasma ions, and the dependence on the plasma electron temperature, in the atmospheres of substellar objects such as gas giant planets. Calculations show that modest electron temperatures of $\\approx 1$ eV ($\\approx 10^{4}$ K) are enough to accelerate ions to sufficient energies that exceed the activation...

  2. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; Thomas Frisch; Yves Pomeau

    2013-08-05

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius-Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependance of the evaporation rate are successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave a way to reach efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  3. Non-equilibrium chemistry in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Saumon; M. S. Marley; K. Lodders; R. S. Freedman

    2002-07-02

    Carbon monoxide and ammonia have been detected in the spectrum of Gl 229B at abundances that differ substantially from those obtained from chemical equilibrium. Vertical mixing in the atmosphere is a mechanism that can drive slowly reacting species out of chemical equilibrium. We explore the effects of vertical mixing as a function of mixing efficiency and effective temperature on the chemical abundances in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and on their spectra. The models compare favorably with the observational evidence and indicate that vertical mixing plays an important role in brown dwarf atmospheres.

  4. Atmosphere Sciences Instrumentation Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Water Probe Robert Mitchell Challenge: · Power varies with Temperature, Pressure, Airspeed, and Others Balance Cycle · Down Points - Frost/Dew Temperature #12;Pressure Transducer David Keith · Pressure sensing · Funnel helps prevent evaporation inside instrument · Each tip creates a 100ms switch closure · Closure

  5. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  6. Intrinsic Bioprobes, Inc. (Tempe, AZ)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randall W. (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

    2008-07-15

    Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

  7. AveCryostatTemp.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass andAtomsVehicles and Fuels Site Map Printable#$

  8. Atmospheric Chemistry Theodore S. Dibble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Atmospheric Chemistry FCH 511 Fall 2014 Theodore S. Dibble Professor of Chemistry 421 in Required Text Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution nineteenth year at ESF, and my seventeenth year teaching FCH 511 (Atmospheric Chemistry). I have done a lot

  9. The seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, Bridget Frances

    1994-01-01

    differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter. 40 years of monthly mean surface data and 25 years of monthly mean 700mb and 500mb data is averaged over the seasons. The spatial correlation of four northern hemisphere midlatitude test sites...

  10. Lifetimes and eigenstates in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1994-01-01

    Perturbation dynamics in atmospheric chemistry. J. Geophys.isotopic variations in atmospheric chemistry. Geophys. Res.M. et al. 2001 Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases (

  11. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    L. , et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from theI. , et al. (2006), Atmospheric chemistry of a 33 – 34 hourvolcanic eruptions on atmospheric chemistry, Chem. Geol. ,

  12. ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive CampaignListAtmospheric Heat

  13. ARM - Atmospheric Pressure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive CampaignListAtmospheric

  14. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractor ofvarDOE PAGES11 PPPL-Atmospheric PSF

  15. Direct Kinetics Study of the Temperature Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elrod, Matthew J.

    CH3O2 reac- tion and the potential atmospheric ramifications of significant CH2O production from for the detection of reactants and products. The temperature dependence of the CH2O-producing channel rate constant of methane in the atmosphere [1]. CH OH !: CH H O (1)4 3 2 1CH O( D) !: CH OH (2)4 3 CH O M !: CH O M (3)3 2

  16. Extreme hydrodynamic atmospheric loss near the critical thermal escape regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Kislyakova, K G

    2015-01-01

    By considering martian-like planetary embryos inside the habitable zone of solar-like stars we study the behavior of the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape of hydrogen for small values of the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta thermal energy. Our study is based on a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that calculates the volume heating rate in a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. We find that when the $\\beta$ value near the mesopause/homopause level exceeds a critical value of $\\sim$2.5, there exists a steady hydrodynamic solution with a smooth transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. For a fixed XUV flux, the escape rate of the upper atmosphere is an increasing function of the temperature at the lower boundary. Our model results indicate a crucial enhancement of the atmospheric escape rate, when the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta$ decr...

  17. Atmospheric contamination for CMB ground-based observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Errard, J; Akiba, Y; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Baccigalupi, C; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Cukierman, A; Delabrouille, J; Dobbs, M; Ducout, A; Elleflot, T; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Feeney, S; Gilbert, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Hill, C; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A H; Jeong, O; Katayama, N; Kaufman, J; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Jeune, M Le; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leon, D; Linder, E; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Miller, N J; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Okamura, T; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Puglisi, G; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K M; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Tajima, O; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Whitehorn, N; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2015-01-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3d-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive an analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the POLARBEAR-I project first season data set. We compare our results to previous st...

  18. A High-Temperature Fuel Cell to Provide On-Site Process Reducing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nitrogen gas often provides a reducing atmosphere for these processes. High-temperature fuel cells directly convert the chemical energy in its fuel to electricity, with water,...

  19. Investigation on coal pyrolysis in CO{sub 2} atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunbo Duan; Changsui Zhao; Wu Zhou; Chengrui Qu; Xiaoping Chen [Institute for Thermal Power Engineering of Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2009-07-15

    Considerable studies have been reported on the coal pyrolysis process and the formation of SO{sub 2} and NOx processors such as H{sub 2}S, COS, SO{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3} in inert atmospheres. Similar studies in CO{sub 2} atmosphere also need to be accomplished for better understanding of the combustion characteristics and the SO{sub 2}/NOx formation mechanism of oxy-fuel combustion, which is one of the most important technologies for CO{sub 2} capture. In this study, thermogravimetry coupled with Fourier Transform Infrared (TG-FTIR) analysis was employed to measure the volatile yield and gas evolution features during coal pyrolysis process in CO{sub 2} atmosphere. Results show that replacing N{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} does not influence the starting temperature of volatile release but seems to enhance the volatile releasing rate even at 480{sup o}C. At about 760{sup o}C, CO{sub 2} prevents the calcite from decomposing. In CO{sub 2} atmosphere, the volatile yield increases as the temperature increases and decreases as the heating rate increases. COS is monitored during coal pyrolysis in CO{sub 2} atmosphere while there are only H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} formed in N{sub 2} atmosphere. The COS is most likely formed by the reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. No NH{sub 3} was monitored in this study. In CO{sub 2} atmosphere, the gasification of char elevates the conversion of char-N to HCN. The HCN yield increases as the temperature increases and decreases as the heating rate increases. 20 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Observations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    samples from the recovery cruise and Bob O'Malley for evaluation of the CTD sensors used on the deployment p. 8 b. Instrument Calibration p. 9 Ocean Temperature and Salinity Sensors p. 9 Met Sensors p. 10 Doppler Profiler Compass p. 10 ADCP/ADP Battery Capacity p. 11 Pressure Sensors p. 11 CTD Sensors p. 12 c

  1. The Global Anthropogenic Lead Experiment Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Global Anthropogenic Lead Experiment Ed Boyle Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences Reuer Rick Kayser Boyle Lab, arriving in Rio at the end of EN 367 #12;The Global Anthropogenic Lead Experiment · Lead is a volatile element and it is emitted by high temperature industrial activities (smelting

  2. Atmospheric Environment Center Joint Laboratory cole des Ponts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghorbel, Amin

    ) doctoral school and is a member of the EFLUVE Environmental Science Observatory and of the "Urban Futures and accurate observations for wind, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity, and atmospheric turbulence. Simu- lations are performed with the Code_Saturne com- putational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Air

  3. Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM); Babayan, Steve E. (Huntington Beach, CA); Hicks, Robert F. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Large area atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two planar, parallel electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the volume therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly spacing the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, there is a negligible density of ions surviving for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike the situation for low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  4. Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

  5. Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes VALE RY MASSON AND YANN SEITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is able to model the 2-m temperature accurately, as well as the 10-m wind, without any use of analyticalIncluding Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes VALE´ RY MASSON coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme levels, the coupling proposed here remains

  6. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga; Ann Stepp, Mary; Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony; Trink, Barry

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  7. Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate and it emits Note: heat balance Fvis( = Fout = Te 4 z #12;(simple Greenhouse cont.) 0 1 2 3 4 Ground Space Top

  8. Carbon dioxide in soil profiles: Production and temperature dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Biosphere/atmosphere interactions 1. Introduction [2] Soil CO2 emissions comprise an important component of the global carbon cycle, and represent the largest terrestrial source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Globally, 2000]. As global temperatures rise, any changes in soil CO2 emissions will in part be determined

  9. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric scientists apply physics, mathematics, and chemistry to understandAtmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric the atmosphere and its interactions with land and sea. One of the goals of atmospheric science is to understand

  10. Volcanic contribution to decadal changes in tropospheric temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santer, Benjamin D.

    Despite continued growth in atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, global mean surface and tropospheric temperatures have shown slower warming since 1998 than previously. Possible explanations for the slow-down include ...

  11. DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY The missions of the Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry (MAC) are to carry out broadly based research on the chemistry of the atmosphere and marine and stratosphere. Atmospheric Chemistry Research activities in atmospheric chemistry and modeling are diverse

  12. Atmospheric Chemistry in Giant Planets, Brown Dwarfs, and Low-Mass Dwarf Stars II. Sulfur and Phosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channon Visscher; Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2006-06-06

    Thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations are used to model sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in giant planets, brown dwarfs, and extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). The chemical behavior of individual S- and P-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of pressure, temperature, and metallicity. The results are independent of particular model atmospheres and, in principle, the equilibrium composition along the pressure-temperature profile of any object can be determined. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the dominant S-bearing gas throughout substellar atmospheres and approximately represents the atmospheric sulfur inventory. Silicon sulfide (SiS) is a potential tracer of weather in substellar atmospheres. Disequilibrium abundances of phosphine (PH3) approximately representative of the total atmospheric phosphorus inventory are expected to be mixed upward into the observable atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. In hotter objects, several P-bearing gases (e.g., P2, PH3, PH2, PH, HCP) become increasingly important at high temperatures.

  13. INFERENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS CLOUDS IN AN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; De Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole; Zsom, Andras; Seager, Sara; Fortney, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Desert, Jean-Michel; Heng, Kevin; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Gillon, Michael; Barclay, Thomas; Cowan, Nicolas B.

    2013-10-20

    We present new visible and infrared observations of the hot Jupiter Kepler-7b to determine its atmospheric properties. Our analysis allows us to (1) refine Kepler-7b's relatively large geometric albedo of Ag = 0.35 ± 0.02, (2) place upper limits on Kepler-7b thermal emission that remains undetected in both Spitzer bandpasses and (3) report a westward shift in the Kepler optical phase curve. We argue that Kepler-7b's visible flux cannot be due to thermal emission or Rayleigh scattering from H{sub 2} molecules. We therefore conclude that high altitude, optically reflective clouds located west from the substellar point are present in its atmosphere. We find that a silicate-based cloud composition is a possible candidate. Kepler-7b exhibits several properties that may make it particularly amenable to cloud formation in its upper atmosphere. These include a hot deep atmosphere that avoids a cloud cold trap, very low surface gravity to suppress cloud sedimentation, and a planetary equilibrium temperature in a range that allows for silicate clouds to potentially form in the visible atmosphere probed by Kepler. Our analysis does not only present evidence of optically thick clouds on Kepler-7b but also yields the first map of clouds in an exoplanet atmosphere.

  14. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-11-19

    The OH- and O3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven pressures at each temperature.

  15. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY - RESPONSE TO HUMAN INFLUENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOGAN, J; PRATHER, M; WOFSY, S; MCELROY, M

    1978-01-01

    Trans. II 70, 253. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Clyne, M. A. A. &data for modelling atmospheric chemistry. NBS Technical NoteChem. 80, 2711. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Sanadze, G. A. 1963 On

  16. IMPROVED QUASISTEADYSTATEAPPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, Laurent O.

    IMPROVED QUASI­STEADY­STATE­APPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION # L. O. JAY QSSA are presented. Key words. atmospheric chemistry, sti# ordinary di#erential equations, quasi PII. S1064827595283033 1. Introduction. As our scientific understanding of atmospheric chemistry

  17. Temperature System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water and Temperature

  18. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  19. Infrared Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian James Mills

    2012-01-01

    However, atmospheres of cool planets can still be studiedvia outgassing as the planet cools (Rogers & Seager 2010).at low resolution) and the cool, low-mass planet GJ 1214b (

  20. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion...

  1. Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

  2. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, A. H. [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); McLinden, M. O. [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Tew, W. L. [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)] [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2013-09-11

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO{sub 2} concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa.

  4. College of Engineering 2/23/2014 Why Become an Engineer? 12/23/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael P.

    satellite measurements of IR emissions also confirm this reduction. Temp.anomaly(°C) Source: NOAA #12 on Atmospheric CO2 Variations http://keelingcurve.ucsd.edu/ That ain't natural!!! #12;2/23/2014 6 FAMU on Temperature / CO2 Correlations http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Co2-temperature-plot.svg FAMU-FSU College

  5. An active atmospheric methane sink in high Arctic mineral cryosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Maggie C.Y.; Stackhouse, B.; Layton, Alice C.; Chauhan, Archana; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, Karuna; Mykytczuk, N. C.S.; Bennett, Phil C.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Burton, N.; et al

    2015-04-14

    The transition of Arctic carbon-rich cryosols into methane (CH?)-emitting wetlands due to global warming is a rising concern. However, the spatially predominant mineral cryosols and their CH? emission potential are poorly understood. Fluxes measured in situ and estimated under laboratory conditions coupled with -omics analysis indicate (1) mineral cryosols in the Canadian high Arctic contain atmospheric CH?-oxidizing bacteria; (2) the atmospheric CH? uptake flux increases with ground temperature; and, as a result, (3) the atmospheric CH? sink strength will increase by a factor of 5-30 as the Arctic warms by 5-15 °C over a century. We demonstrated that acidic mineralmore »cryosols have previously unrecognized potential of negative CH? feedback.« less

  6. Clear sky atmosphere at cm-wavelengths from climatology data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    We utilise ground-based, balloon-born and satellite climatology data to reconstruct site and season-dependent vertical profiles of precipitable water vapour (PWV). We use these profiles to numerically solve radiative transfer through the atmosphere, and derive atmospheric brightness temperature ($T_{\\rm atm}$) and optical depth ($\\tau$) at the centimetre wavelengths. We validate the reconstruction by comparing the model column PWV, with photometric measurements of PWV, performed in the clear sky conditions towards the Sun. Based on the measurements, we devise a selection criteria to filter the climatology data to match the PWV levels to the expectations of the clear sky conditions. We apply the reconstruction to the location of the Polish 32-metre radio telescope, and characterise $T_{\\rm atm}$ and $\\tau$ year-round, at selected frequencies. We also derive the zenith distance dependence for these parameters, and discuss shortcomings of using planar, single-layer, and optically thin atmospheric model approxima...

  7. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Clement, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  8. The atmospheres of earthlike planets after giant impact events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupu, R. E.; Freedman, Richard [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Zahnle, Kevin; Marley, Mark S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Schaefer, Laura [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fegley, Bruce [Planetary Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cahoy, Kerri, E-mail: Roxana.E.Lupu@nasa.gov [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    It is now understood that the accretion of terrestrial planets naturally involves giant collisions, the moon-forming impact being a well-known example. In the aftermath of such collisions, the surface of the surviving planet is very hot and potentially detectable. Here we explore the atmospheric chemistry, photochemistry, and spectral signatures of post-giant-impact terrestrial planets enveloped by thick atmospheres consisting predominantly of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The atmospheric chemistry and structure are computed self-consistently for atmospheres in equilibrium with hot surfaces with composition reflecting either the bulk silicate Earth (which includes the crust, mantle, atmosphere, and oceans) or Earth's continental crust. We account for all major molecular and atomic opacity sources including collision-induced absorption. We find that these atmospheres are dominated by H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, while the formation of CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is quenched because of short dynamical timescales. Other important constituents are HF, HCl, NaCl, and SO{sub 2}. These are apparent in the emerging spectra and can be indicative that an impact has occurred. The use of comprehensive opacities results in spectra that are a factor of two lower brightness temperature in the spectral windows than predicted by previous models. The estimated luminosities show that the hottest post-giant-impact planets will be detectable with near-infrared coronagraphs on the planned 30 m class telescopes. The 1-4 ?m will be most favorable for such detections, offering bright features and better contrast between the planet and a potential debris disk. We derive cooling timescales on the order of 10{sup 5-6} yr on the basis of the modeled effective temperatures. This leads to the possibility of discovering tens of such planets in future surveys.

  9. Emulation to simulate low resolution atmospheric data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebbur Venkata Subba Rao, Vishwas [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    Climate simulations require significant compute power, they are complex and therefore it is time consuming to simulate them. We have developed an emulator to simulate unknown climate datasets. The emulator uses stochastic collocation and multi-dimensional in- terpolation to simulate the datasets. We have used the emulator to determine various physical quantities such as temperature, short and long wave cloud forcing, zonal winds etc. The emulation gives results which are very close to those obtained by simulations. The emulator was tested on 2 degree atmospheric datasets. The work evaluates the pros and cons of evaluating the mean first and inter- polating and vice versa. To determine the physical quantities, we have assumed them to be a function of time, longitude, latitude and a random parameter. We have looked at parameters that govern high stable clouds, low stable clouds, timescale for convection etc. The emulator is especially useful as it requires negligible compute times when compared to the simulation itself.

  10. Stress-tolerant and temperature-stable RF MEMS capacitive switches and tunable filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reines, Isak C.

    2010-01-01

    B.2.7 Gold Electroplating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sample. B.2.7 Gold Electroplating (1)Wafer dehydrate for 2for the heater for the electroplating setup, Temp = 55 ? C,

  11. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    ThermoChem, under contract to the Department of Energy, conducted extensive research, development and demonstration work on a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) to confirm that advanced technology can meet these performance objectives. The ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC system integrates a pulse combustor with an atmospheric bubbling-bed type fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) In this modular configuration, the pulse combustor burns the fuel fines (typically less than 30 sieve or 600 microns) and the fluidized bed combusts the coarse fuel particles. Since the ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC employs both the pulse combustor and the AFBC technologies, it can handle the full-size range of coarse and fines. The oscillating flow field in the pulse combustor provides for high interphase and intraparticle mass transfer rates. Therefore, the fuel fines essentially burn under kinetic control. Due to the reasonably high temperature (>1093 C but less than the temperature for ash fusion to prevent slagging), combustion of fuel fines is substantially complete at the exit of the pulse combustor. The additional residence time of 1 to 2 seconds in the freeboard of the PAFBC unit then ensures high carbon conversion and, in turn, high combustion efficiency. A laboratory unit was successfully designed, constructed and tested for over 600 hours to confirm that the PAFBC technology could meet the performance objectives. Subsequently, a 50,000 lb/hr PAFBC demonstration steam boiler was designed, constructed and tested at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. This Final Report presents the detailed results of this extensive and successful PAFBC research, development and demonstration project.

  12. Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*, Julia Laskin,*, and Sergey A. Nizkorodov fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate of radiation through Earth's atmosphere. The cloud albedo effect, Special Issue: 2015 Chemistry in Climate

  13. Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; McFarlane, SA

    2012-10-31

    The purpose of this document is to describe the Raman Lidar Profiles–Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) value-added product (VAP) and the procedures used to derive atmospheric temperature profiles from the raw RL measurements. Sections 2 and 4 describe the input and output variables, respectively. Section 3 discusses the theory behind the measurement and the details of the algorithm, including calibration and overlap correction.

  14. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres. We construct analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios (from 0.1 to 100), we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if th...

  15. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  16. Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric atmospheric entry of NASA's Phoenix Mars probe using Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment (ASE) data atmospheric entry, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L24204, doi:10.1029/2010GL045382. 1. Introduction [2] Phoenix

  17. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  18. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

  19. Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation OLE PETERS1,2,3 * AND J. DAVID NEELIN3 1 convection and precipitation (the order parameter)--with correlated regions on scales of tens to hundreds the climatological mean by an order of magnitude or more. Moist convection and the accompanying precipitation have

  20. Atmospheric Dispersion Lecture Atmospheric Local-Scale Dispersion Modelling.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heterogeneous temperature and pressure fields. Local heat flux depends on the position of the point to the sun-resting global circulation of air masses is the unequal distribution of solar heat flux to the earth surface). The temperature depends on the heat transfer and capacity characteristics of the surface (sea, soil, desert

  1. ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

    1995-09-27

    Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative transfer calculations, will be acquired using the aircraft and surface facilities available to ARESE. This document outlines the scientific approach and measurement requirements of the project.

  2. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  3. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Sattelberger, Alfred P. (Darien, IL); Yeamans, Charles (Berkeley, CA); Hartmann, Thomas (Idaho Falls, ID); Silva, G. W. Chinthaka (Las Vegas, NV); Cerefice, Gary (Henderson, NV); Czerwinski, Kenneth R. (Henderson, NV)

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  4. Space Science: Atmospheres Evolution of planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    ;Atmospheres / Evolution Heat Sources Compressional Energy Trapped Radioactive Material Tidal InteractionsSpace Science: Atmospheres Part- 7a Evolution of planets Out-Gassing/ Volcanoes Evolution Initial Species Solar abundance Solar wind composition? Carbonaceous chondrites? Variables Early sun

  5. Equilibration of an atmosphere by geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Malte F. (Malte Friedrich)

    2013-01-01

    A major question for climate studies is to quantify the role of turbulent eddy fluxes in maintaining the observed atmospheric mean state. It has been argued that eddy fluxes keep the mid-latitude atmosphere in a state that ...

  6. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 20142015 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate Program in Land and Atmospheric Science at the University of Minnesota. It is a sciencebased interdisciplinary program focused on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore »and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  8. Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Suspended Particulates: Comparison with Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2011-08-25

    Atmospheric flows exhibit self-similar fractal space-time fluctuations on all space-time scales in association with inverse power law distribution for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as wind, temperature, etc., and thus implies long-range correlations, identified as self-organized criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature. A general systems theory based on classical statistical physical concepts developed by the author visualizes the fractal fluctuations to result from the coexistence of eddy fluctuations in an eddy continuum, the larger scale eddies being the integrated mean of enclosed smaller scale eddies. The model satisfies the maximum entropy principle and predicts that the probability distributions of component eddy amplitudes and the corresponding variances (power spectra) are quantified by the same universal inverse power law distribution which is a function of the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution (spectrum). The atmospheric particulate size spectrum is derived in terms of the model predicted universal inverse power law characterizing atmospheric eddy spectrum. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement with the following four experimentally determined data sets: (i) CIRPAS mission TARFOX_WALLOPS_SMPS aerosol size distributions (ii) CIRPAS mission ARM-IOP (Ponca City, OK) aerosol size distributions (iii) SAFARI 2000 CV-580 (CARG Aerosol and Cloud Data) cloud drop size distributions and (iv) TWP-ICE (Darwin, Australia) rain drop size distributions.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  10. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  11. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling...

  12. A Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    D/Masters Applied Marine Physics Marine & Atmospheric Chemistry Marine Affairs & Policy (Masters Only) MarineA Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric Studies Our graduate program has over 250 students University of MiaMi rosenstiel school of Marine & atMospheric science #12;Miami Ranks #5: fDi Magazine's Top

  13. Atmospheric evolution on Venus Bruce Fegley, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Atmospheric evolution on Venus Bruce Fegley, Jr. Planetary Chemistry Laboratory Department by Hunten et al. (1983), of Magellan results by Bougher et al. (1997), and atmospheric chemistry on Venus and Ancient Environments Edited by Vivien Gornitz January 2004 #12;2 ATMOSPHERIC EVOLUTION ON VENUS Overview

  14. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide David Archer,1 Michael Eby,2 Victor Brovkin,3 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere literature on the atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 and its impact on climate, and we present initial

  15. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 C to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  16. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, T.J.; Anderson, I.E.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Nosrati, M.; Unal, O.

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix. 3 figs.

  17. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    2001-04-10

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  18. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-07-13

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or ceramic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  19. Low temperature joining of ceramic composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina (Ames, IA); Nosrati, Mohammad (Ames, IA); Unal, Ozer (Ames, IA)

    1999-01-12

    A method of joining similar or dissimilar ceramic and ceramic composite materials, such as SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites, at relatively low joining temperatures uses a solventless, three component bonding agent effective to promote mechanical bond toughness and elevated temperature strength to operating temperatures of approximately 1200 degrees C. The bonding agent comprises a preceramic precursor, an aluminum bearing powder, such as aluminum alloy powder, and mixtures of aluminum metal or alloy powders with another powder, and and boron powder in selected proportions. The bonding agent is disposed as an interlayer between similar or dissimilar ceramic or cermaic composite materials to be joined and is heated in ambient air or inert atmosphere to a temperature not exceeding about 1200 degrees C. to form a strong and tough bond joint between the materials. The bond joint produced is characterized by a composite joint microstructure having relatively soft, compliant aluminum bearing particulate regions dispersed in a ceramic matrix.

  20. Atmospheric composition change - global and regional air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    in urban air. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2881–deep convective system. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 4,processes in atmospheric chemistry. Chemical Society Review

  1. Coupling of nitrous oxide and methane by global atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Hsu, J

    2010-01-01

    supported by NSF’s Atmospheric Chemistry program (grant ATM-Methane by Global Atmospheric Chemistry Michael J. Prathergas, through atmospheric chemistry that en- hances the

  2. Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew Waite

    2010-01-01

    and J. Viidanoja, Atmospheric chemistry of c 3 -c 6organic nitrates, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9 (4),organic aerosol yields, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  3. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  4. COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF HOT NEPTUNES, WITH APPLICATION TO GJ 436b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, J. I. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Line, M. R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Visscher, C. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Richardson, M. R. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005-1892 (United States); Nettelmann, N.; Fortney, J. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Barman, T. S. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Stevenson, K. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Madhusudhan, N., E-mail: jmoses@spacescience.org [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Neptune-sized extrasolar planets that orbit relatively close to their host stars—often called {sup h}ot Neptunes{sup —}are common within the known population of exoplanets and planetary candidates. Similar to our own Uranus and Neptune, inefficient accretion of nebular gas is expected produce hot Neptunes whose masses are dominated by elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. At high atmospheric metallicities of 10-10,000 times solar, hot Neptunes will exhibit an interesting continuum of atmospheric compositions, ranging from more Neptune-like, H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres to more Venus-like, CO{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. We explore the predicted equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry of generic hot Neptunes and find that the atmospheric composition varies strongly as a function of temperature and bulk atmospheric properties such as metallicity and the C/O ratio. Relatively exotic H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, and even O{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres are possible for hot Neptunes. We apply our models to the case of GJ 436b, where we find that a CO-rich, CH{sub 4}-poor atmosphere can be a natural consequence of a very high atmospheric metallicity. From comparisons of our results with Spitzer eclipse data for GJ 436b, we conclude that although the spectral fit from the high-metallicity forward models is not quite as good as the best fit obtained from pure retrieval methods, the atmospheric composition predicted by these forward models is more physically and chemically plausible in terms of the relative abundance of major constituents. High-metallicity atmospheres (orders of magnitude in excess of solar) should therefore be considered as a possibility for GJ 436b and other hot Neptunes.

  5. Atmospheric circulation of eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Knutson, Heather A.; Marley, Mark S.

    2014-11-10

    The hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b has become a prime target for Spitzer Space Telescope observations aimed at understanding the atmospheric response of exoplanets on highly eccentric orbits. Here we present a suite of three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models for HAT-P-2b that investigate the effects of assumed atmospheric composition and rotation rate on global scale winds and thermal patterns. We compare and contrast atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b, which assume one and five times solar metallicity, both with and without TiO/VO as atmospheric constituents. Additionally we compare models that assume a rotation period of half, one, and two times the nominal pseudo-synchronous rotation period. We find that changes in assumed atmospheric metallicity and rotation rate do not significantly affect model predictions of the planetary flux as a function of orbital phase. However, models in which TiO/VO are present in the atmosphere develop a transient temperature inversion between the transit and secondary eclipse events that results in significant variations in the timing and magnitude of the peak of the planetary flux compared with models in which TiO/VO are omitted from the opacity tables. We find that no one single atmospheric model can reproduce the recently observed full orbit phase curves at 3.6, 4.5 and 8.0 ?m, which is likely due to a chemical process not captured by our current atmospheric models for HAT-P-2b. Further modeling and observational efforts focused on understanding the chemistry of HAT-P-2b's atmosphere are needed and could provide key insights into the interplay between radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes in a wide range of exoplanet atmospheres.

  6. Pluto's atmosphere from stellar occultations in 2012 and 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias-Oliveira, A; Lellouch, E; Vieira-Martins, R; Assafin, M; Camargo, J I B; Braga-Ribas, F; Gomes-Júnior, A R; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Colas, F; Decock, A; Doressoundiram, A; Dumas, C; Emilio, M; Polleri, J Fabrega; Gil-Hutton, R; Gillon, M; Girard, J; Hau, G; Ivanov, V D; Jehin, E; Lecacheux, J; Leiva, R; Lopez-Sisterna, C; Mancini, L; Maury, A; Meza, E; Morales, N; Nagy, L; Opitom, C; Ortiz, J L; Pollock, J; Roques, F; Snodgrass, C; Soulier, J F; Thirouin, A; Vanzi, L; Widemann, T; Reichart, D E; LaCluyze, A P; Haislip, J B; Ivarsen, K M; Dominik, M; Jørgensen, U; Skottfelt, J

    2015-01-01

    We analyze two multi-chord stellar occultations by Pluto observed on July 18th, 2012 and May 4th, 2013, and monitored respectively from five and six sites. They provide a total of fifteen light-curves, twelve of them being used for a simultaneous fit that uses a unique temperature profile, assuming a clear (no-haze) and pure N_2 atmosphere, but allowing for a possible pressure variation between the two dates. We find a solution that fits satisfactorily (i.e. within the noise level) all the twelve light-curves, providing atmospheric constraints between ~1,190 km (pressure ~ 11 \\mubar) and ~ 1,450 km (pressure ~0.1 \\mubar) from Pluto's center. Our main results are: (1) the best-fitting temperature profile shows a stratosphere with strong positive gradient between 1,190 km (at 36 K, 11 \\mubar) and r = 1,215 km (6.0 \\mubar), where a temperature maximum of 110 K is reached; above it is a mesosphere with negative thermal gradient of -0.2 K/km up to ~ 1,390 km (0.25 \\mubar), where, the mesosphere connects itself to ...

  7. Atmospheric gradients and the stability of expanding jets. [Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardee, P.E.; Koupelis, T.; Norman, M.L.; Clarke, D.A. Illinois, University, Urbana )

    1991-05-01

    Numerical simulations of adiabatically expanding slab jets in initial static pressure balance with an external atmosphere have been performed and compared to predictions made by a linear analysis of the stability of expanding jets. It is found that jets are stabilized by jet expansion as predicted by the linear analysis. It is also found that an expanding jet can be destabilized by a positive temperature gradient or temperature jump in the surrounding medium which lowers the Mach number defined by the external sound speed. A temperature gradient or jump is more destabilizing than would be predicted by a linear stability analysis. The enhanced instability compared to an isothermal atmosphere with identical pressure gradient is a result of the reduced external Mach number and a result of a higher jet density relative to the density in the external medium and higher ram speed. Other differences between predictions made by the linear theory and the simulations can be understood qualitatively as a result of a change in wave speed as the wave amplitude increases. 12 refs.

  8. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Design and Engineering of most components in the Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed System was completed prior to September 1992. The components remaining to be designed at that time were: Aerovalves for the Pulse Combustor; Gas and coal injectors for the Pulse Combustor; Lines for PC tailpipes; Air plenum and inlet silencer; Refractory lined hot gas duct connecting outlet hot cyclone to boiler; Structure and platforms, and ladders around PAFBC vessel access and major equipment. Design work is currently in progress on all of the above components. Items 1, 2, 3 and 4 are 50% completed, and items 5 6 are 75% complete.

  9. Natalie Marie Mahowald Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing, Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Chemistry and 1 1 Natalie Marie Mahowald Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Director

  10. Atmospheric characterization of the hot Jupiter Kepler-13Ab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shporer, Avi; O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Knutson, Heather A.; Szabó, Gyula M.; Zhao, Ming; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P.; Todorov, Kamen O.

    2014-06-10

    Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler data allows us to measure the planet's occultation (secondary eclipse) and phase curve in the optical, which we combine with occultations observed by warm Spitzer at 4.5 ?m and 3.6 ?m and a ground-based occultation observation in the K{sub s} band (2.1 ?m). We derive a day-side hemisphere temperature of 2750 ± 160 K as the effective temperature of a black body showing the same occultation depths. Comparing the occultation depths with one-dimensional planetary atmosphere models suggests the presence of an atmospheric temperature inversion. Our analysis shows evidence for a relatively high geometric albedo, A {sub g} = 0.33{sub ?0.06}{sup +0.04}. While measured with a simplistic method, a high A {sub g} is supported also by the fact that the one-dimensional atmosphere models underestimate the occultation depth in the optical. We use stellar spectra to determine the dilution, in the four wide bands where occultation was measured, due to the visual stellar binary companion 1.''15 ± 0.''05 away. The revised stellar parameters measured using these spectra are combined with other measurements, leading to revised planetary mass and radius estimates of M{sub p} = 4.94-8.09 M {sub J} and R{sub p} = 1.406 ± 0.038 R {sub J}. Finally, we measure a Kepler midoccultation time that is 34.0 ± 6.9 s earlier than expected based on the midtransit time and the delay due to light-travel time and discuss possible scenarios.

  11. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

  12. Hydride production in zircaloy-4 as a function of time and temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkison, Adam Joseph

    2009-05-15

    The experiments performed for this thesis were designed to define the primary process variables of time, temperature, and atmosphere for an engineering system that will produce metal powder from recycled nuclear fuel ...

  13. Soil organic matter stability and the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Nancy Rosalind

    2012-11-29

    Soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2, with the potential for large positive feedbacks with global warming. The size of these feedbacks will depend on the relative sensitivity to temperature of very ...

  14. The accuracy of miniature bead thermistors in the measurement of upper air temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Donald C. (Donald Charles), 1933-

    1967-01-01

    A laboratory study was made of the errors of miniature bead thermistors of 5, 10, and 15 mils nominal diameter when used for the measurement of atmospheric temperature. Although the study was primarily concerned with the ...

  15. Heating and jet formation by colliding shocks in solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, T.; Ryutova, M.P.; Covington, J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Ryutova, M.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/IGPP, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fludra, A. [Space Science Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United States)

    1999-06-01

    We show that ubiquitous small-scale magnetic flux {open_quotes}tubes{close_quotes} constantly emerging from subsurface layers, may cause the formation of plasma jets and a sporadic excess of temperature near the solar surface. Photospheric network magnetic elements collide and reconnect, creating a sling-shot effect which generates complex 3D shock waves with the curved surface. Self-focusing of these shocks occurs as they propagate upward in the rarefied atmosphere. Depending on the geometry of the shock collision, highly concentrated energy may be either converted entirely into heat or into strong jets, or be distributed between the two. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  17. Finite Temperature Schrödinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bai-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Qing-Cai Wang; Yan Wang

    2011-06-11

    We know Schr\\"{o}dinger equation describes the dynamics of quantum systems, which don't include temperature. In this paper, we propose finite temperature Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature. When the temperature T=0, it become Shr\\"{o}dinger equation.

  18. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  19. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  20. Computing planetary atmospheres with algorithms derived from action thermodynamics and a novel version of the virial theorem for gravitating polyatomic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Ivan R

    2015-01-01

    An objective revision of the Laplace barometric formula for isothermal planetary atmospheres is proposed. From Clausius virial theorem equating the root mean square kinetic energy to half the gravitational potential energy, planetary atmospheres are required to have declining temperature with altitude as a consequence of the interaction between thermodynamic heat flow and gravity. The virial action hypothesis predicts non adiabatic lapse rates in temperature yielding a practical means to calculate variations with altitude in atmospheric entropy, free energy, molecular density and pressure. Remarkably, the new formulae derived enable prediction of atmospheric profiles with physical properties closely resembling those observed on Earth, Venus and Mars. These new formulae provide an objective basis for computing the dynamic morphology of the atmosphere. Climate scientists may consider this explanatory hypothesis for self organisation of planetary atmospheres for its possible relevance for predicting global surfa...

  1. Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerlich, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861 and Arrhenius 1896 and is still supported in global climatology essentially describes a fictitious mechanism in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, ...

  2. TAPAS, a web-based service of atmospheric transmission computation for astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertaux, J L; Ferron, S; Boone, C; Bodichon, R

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of astronomical targets acquired from ground-based instruments are affected by the atmospheric transmission. The authors and their institutes are developing a web-based service, TAPAS (Transmissions of the AtmosPhere for AStromomical data). This service, freely available, is developed and maintained within the atmospheric ETHER data center. TAPAS computes the atmospheric transmission in the line-of-sight to the target indicated by the user. The user files a request indicating the time, ground location, and either the equatorial coordinates of the target or the Zenith Angle of the line-of sight (LOS). The actual atmospheric profile (temperature, pressure, humidity, ozone content) at that time and place is retrieved from the ETHER atmospheric data base (from a combination of ECMWF meteorological field and other informations), and the atmospheric transmission is computed from LBLRTM software and HITRAN data base for a number of gases: O2, H2O, O3, CO2, and Rayleigh extinction. The first purpose of TAPAS ...

  3. Compositional diversity in the atmospheres of hot Neptunes, with application to GJ 436b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, Julianne I; Visscher, Channon; Richardson, Molly R; Nettelmann, Nadine; Fortney, Jonathan J; Stevenson, Kevin B; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2013-01-01

    Neptune-sized extrasolar planets that orbit relatively close to their host stars -- often called "hot Neptunes" -- are common within the known population of exoplanets and planetary candidates. Similar to our own Uranus and Neptune, inefficient accretion of nebular gas is expected produce hot Neptunes whose masses are dominated by elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. At high atmospheric metallicities of 10-10,000x solar, hot Neptunes will exhibit an interesting continuum of atmospheric compositions, ranging from more Neptune-like, H2-dominated atmospheres to more Venus-like, CO2-dominated atmospheres. We explore the predicted equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry of generic hot Neptunes and find that the atmospheric composition varies strongly as a function of temperature and bulk atmospheric properties such as metallicity and the C/O ratio. Relatively exotic H2O, CO, CO2, and even O2-dominated atmospheres are possible for hot Neptunes. We apply our models to the case of GJ 436b, where we find that a...

  4. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William Kevin (Stillwater, MN); Janikowski, Stuart Kevin (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  5. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  6. Atmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 13731382 A hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate and forecast ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    conditional on observed (or forecasted) meteorology including temperature, humidity, pressure, and wind speed, defining the spatial­temporal extent of episodes of dangerous air quality, forecasting urban and areaAtmospheric Environment 39 (2005) 1373­1382 A hierarchical Bayesian model to estimate and forecast

  7. Abel transform inversion of radio occultation measurements made with a receiver inside the Earth's atmosphere.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Jennifer

    with an Abel transform to give a vertical profile of refractive index and subsequently temperature an estimate of the atmospheric refractive index profile. The measurement geometry is closely related to problems encountered when inverting seismic time­travel data and solar occultation measurements, where

  8. Proceedings of the 51st Anniversary Conference of KSME PHYSICAL MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Bruce

    a model house in a small wind tunnel to measure wind pressure against the model. Since then, many attempts over tall buildings. The temperature differences within the atmospheric boundary layer affect both wind is discussed with special emphasis on wind-tunnel simulation techniques. The governing equations of motion

  9. Precipitation Response to the Gulf Stream in an Atmospheric GCM* AKIRA KUWANO-YOSHIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Precipitation Response to the Gulf Stream in an Atmospheric GCM* AKIRA KUWANO-YOSHIDA Earth The precipitation response to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients associated with the Gulf Stream a narrow band of precipitation, surface convergence, and evaporation that closely follows the Gulf Stream

  10. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The design of the Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) as described in the Quarterly Report for the period April--June, 1992 was reviewed and minor modifications were included. The most important change made was in the coal/limestone preparation and feed system. Instead of procuring pre-sized coal for testing of the PAFBC, it was decided that the installation of a milling system would permit greater flexibility in the testing with respect to size distributions and combustion characteristics in the pulse combustor and the fluid bed. Particle size separation for pulse combustor and fluid bed will be performed by an air classifier. The modified process flow diagram for the coal/limestone handling system is presented in Figure 1. The modified process flow diagrams of the fluidized bed/steam cycle and ash handling systems are presented in Figures 2 and 3, respectively.

  11. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  12. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  13. Physics Potential of Future Atmospheric Neutrino Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-12-12

    The potential of future high statistics atmospheric neutrino experiments is considered, having in mind currently discussed huge detectors of various technologies (water Cerekov, magnetized iron, liquid Argon). I focus on the possibility to use atmospheric data to determine the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ and the neutrino mass hierarchy. The sensitivity to the $\\theta_{23}$-octant of atmospheric neutrinos is competitive (or even superior) to long-baseline experiments. I discuss the ideal properties of a fictitious atmospheric neutrino detector to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  14. 4, 497545, 2011 atmosphere-wildland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandel, Jan

    by the coupling of a mesoscale weather 498 #12;GMDD 4, 497­545, 2011 Coupled atmosphere-wildland model WRF-Fire 3

  15. Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    discharges from wastewater treatment, atmospheric deposition, and so forth, resulting in increasing), including oxidized and reduced inorganic and organic forms. The availability of Nr limits primary pro

  16. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth...

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    ET AL. : EREBUS PLUME CHEMISTRY Horrocks, L. A. , C.et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from the ANTCI2007), Reactive halogen chemistry in volca- nic plumes, J.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - temp.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on darkMicroorganismsnowReportJ.Next Quarter-CenturyFutureSummary

  19. C:\WINDOWS\Temp\SOCpdf.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6 Shares ofDOE/WIPP-97-2238A

  20. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, M. [ed.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl{sub 3}) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report.

  1. Response of global soil consumption of atmospheric methane to changes in atmospheric climate and nitrogen deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Soil consumption of atmospheric methane plays an important secondary role in regulating the atmospheric CH4 budget, next to the dominant loss mechanism involving reaction with the hydroxyl radical (OH). Here we used a ...

  2. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Feedback Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S1 describes our zero-dimensional energy balance model. Section S2 de- scribes how we estimate TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE X - 3 Section S1. Model details Zero-dimensional energy balance models of the Earth concentration C, they might have very different average net top-of-atmosphere energy fluxes N. As a result, N

  3. Part 1. Energy and Mass Energy Balance and Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Part 1. Energy and Mass Chapter 3. Energy Balance and Temperature #12;Introduction Solar radiation Gases also scatter energy The global energy budget A balance between incoming solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial radiation #12;Atmospheric Influences on Insolation Radiant energy is absorbed

  4. Author's Accepted Manuscript High-temperature-oxidation-induced ordered struc-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    and turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO2 and O2. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place-fuel combustion turbine power generation systems are being developed, materials performance of candidate

  5. Global temperature deviations as a random walk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, O.

    1996-12-31

    Surface air temperature is the main parameter to represent the earth`s contemporary climate. Several historical temperature records on a global/monthly basis are available. Time-series analysis shows that they can be modelled via autoregressive moving average models closely connected to the classical random walk model. Fitted models emphasize a nonstationary character of the global/monthly temperature deviation from a certain level. The nonstationarity explains all trends and periods, found in the last century`s variability of global mean temperature. This means that the short-term temperature trends are inevitable and may have little in common with a currently increasing carbon dioxide amount. The calculations show that a reasonable understanding of the contemporary global mean climate is attainable, assuming random forcing to the climate system and treating temperature deviation as a response to it. The forcings occur due to volcanic eruptions, redistribution of cloudiness, variations in snow and ice covered areas, changes in solar output, etc. Their impact can not be directly estimated from changes of the earth`s radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, because actual measurements represent mixture of the forcings and responses. Thus, it is impossible empirically to separate the impact of one particular forcing (e.g., that due to increase of CO{sub 2} amount) from the sequence of all existing forcings in the earth climate system. More accurate modelling involving main feedback loops is necessary to ease such a separation.

  6. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S SURFACE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Romani, P. N.; Hesman, B. E. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Carlson, R. C.; Gorius, N. J. P. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Coustenis, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Tokano, T., E-mail: donald.e.jennings@nasa.gov [Institut fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Koeln (Germany)

    2011-08-10

    Seasonal changes in Titan's surface brightness temperatures have been observed by Cassini in the thermal infrared. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer measured surface radiances at 19 {mu}m in two time periods: one in late northern winter (LNW; L{sub s} = 335 deg.) and another centered on northern spring equinox (NSE; L{sub s} = 0 deg.). In both periods we constructed pole-to-pole maps of zonally averaged brightness temperatures corrected for effects of the atmosphere. Between LNW and NSE a shift occurred in the temperature distribution, characterized by a warming of {approx}0.5 K in the north and a cooling by about the same amount in the south. At equinox the polar surface temperatures were both near 91 K and the equator was at 93.4 K. We measured a seasonal lag of {Delta}L{sub S} {approx} 9{sup 0} in the meridional surface temperature distribution, consistent with the post-equinox results of Voyager 1 as well as with predictions from general circulation modeling. A slightly elevated temperature is observed at 65{sup 0} S in the relatively cloud-free zone between the mid-latitude and southern cloud regions.

  7. Mars atmospheric CO[subscript 2] condensation above the north and south poles as revealed by radio occultation, climate sounder, and laser ranging observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu

    [1] We study the condensation of CO[subscript 2] in Mars' atmosphere using temperature profiles retrieved from radio occultation measurements from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) as well as the climate sounding instrument onboard ...

  8. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption signatures.

  9. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sukyoung

    2013-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2013) Published online in Wiley Online Library Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea *Correspondence to: C. Yoo, Center for Atmosphere). A number of studies have shown that the MJO plays an important role in modulating the extratropical cir

  10. Results from the Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Results from the Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment Paul Withers1 and David Catling2 (1 and atmospheric structure reconstruction for Phoenix · Highlight selected aspects of Phoenix reconstruction reconstruction for Phoenix · Highlight selected aspects of Phoenix reconstruction that offer lessons for future

  11. Geochemistry of Surface-Atmosphere Interactions on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , T, and atmospheric composition ¥ ...Kinetics ¥ What are the major minerals? ¥ What is the oxidation of terrestrial alkaline igneous rocks #12;Oxidation State of the Surface ¥ 2CO + O2 = 2CO2 controls O2 ¥ Lack. ¥ S in lower atmosphere is kinetically controlled ¥ CaCO3 + SO2 = CaSO4 + CO removes SO2 , deposits CaSO4 ¥ Fe

  12. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  13. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  14. FIRST STEP IN THEORETICAL APPROACH IN STUDY OF MARS AND TITAN ATMOSPHERES WITH AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA TORCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the titan atmosphere (CH4-N2) unlike the Mars atmosphere (CO2-N2). We observe the creation of solid], one can obtain the molar fraction versus temperature. The composition of Mars is assumed to be 97% CO22, CO2 - , N2O, N2O3, N2O4, N2O5, N2O+, N3, NCN, NO2, NO2 - , NO3, O3 and the electrons

  15. GCM simulations of Titan's middle and lower atmosphere and comparison to observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lora, Juan M; Russell, Joellen L

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results are presented from a new general circulation model (GCM) of Titan, the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM), which couples the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) spectral dynamical core to a suite of external/sub-grid-scale physics. These include a new non-gray radiative transfer module that takes advantage of recent data from Cassini-Huygens, large-scale condensation and quasi-equilibrium moist convection schemes, a surface model with "bucket" hydrology, and boundary layer turbulent diffusion. The model produces a realistic temperature structure from the surface to the lower mesosphere, including a stratopause, as well as satisfactory superrotation. The latter is shown to depend on the dynamical core's ability to build up angular momentum from surface torques. Simulated latitudinal temperature contrasts are adequate, compared to observations, and polar temperature anomalies agree with observations. In the lower atmosphere, the insolation distribution is shown to strongly impact turbulent fluxes, and ...

  16. DIRECT IMAGING DETECTION OF METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF GJ 504 b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janson, Markus; Brandt, Timothy D.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Spiegel, David S.; Thalmann, Christian; Currie, Thayne; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Zimmerman, Neil; Schlieder, Joshua; Brandner, Wolfgang; Feldt, Markus; Sorahana, Satoko; Kotani, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Egner, Sebastian; Abe, Lyu; Carson, Joseph C.; Goto, Miwa; and others

    2013-11-20

    Most exoplanets detected by direct imaging thus far have been characterized by relatively hot (?1000 K) and cloudy atmospheres. A surprising feature in some of their atmospheres has been a distinct lack of methane, possibly implying non-equilibrium chemistry. Recently, we reported the discovery of a planetary companion to the Sun-like star GJ 504 using Subaru/HiCIAO within the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru survey. The planet is substantially colder (<600 K) than previously imaged planets, and has indications of fewer clouds, which implies that it represents a new class of planetary atmospheres with expected similarities to late T-type brown dwarfs in the same temperature range. If so, one might also expect the presence of significant methane absorption, which is characteristic of such objects. Here, we report the detection of deep methane absorption in the atmosphere of GJ 504 b, using the Spectral Differential Imaging mode of HiCIAO to distinguish the absorption features around 1.6 ?m. We also report updated JHK photometry based on new K {sub s}-band data and a re-analysis of the existing data. The results support the notion that GJ 504 b has atmospheric properties distinct from other imaged exoplanets, and will become a useful reference object for future planets in the same temperature range.

  17. Studying atmosphere-dominated hot Jupiter Kepler phase curves: Evidence that inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection is common

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shporer, Avi

    2015-01-01

    We identify 3 Kepler transiting planet systems, Kepler-7, Kepler-12, and Kepler-41, whose orbital phase-folded light curves are dominated by planetary atmospheric processes including thermal emission and reflected light, while the impact of non-atmospheric (i.e. gravitational) processes, including beaming (Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, is negligible. Therefore, those systems allow a direct view of their atmospheres without being hampered by the approximations used in the inclusion of both atmospheric and non-atmospheric processes when modeling the phase curve shape. Here we analyze Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b atmosphere based on their Kepler phase curve, while the analysis of Kepler-7b was presented elsewhere. The model we used efficiently computes reflection and thermal emission contributions to the phase curve, including inhomogeneous atmospheric reflection due to longitudinally varying cloud coverage. We confirm Kepler-12b and Kepler-41b show a westward phase shift between the brightest...

  18. CHINESE JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICS Vol.49, No.3, 2006, pp: 588598 REGIONAL DIFFERENCE OF SUMMER AIR TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURFACE TEMPERATURE SUN Jian-Qi1,2 WANG Hui-Jun1 1 State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling, the temporal- spatial distributions of summer air temperature (SAT) are investigated. It is found TEMPERATURE ANOMALIES IN NORTHEAST CHINA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO ATMOSPHERIC GENERAL CIRCULATION AND SEA

  19. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  20. A comparison of chemistry and dust cloud formation in ultracool dwarf model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. Helling; A. Ackerman; F. Allard; M. Dehn; P. Hauschildt; D. Homeier; K. Lodders; M. Marley; F. Rietmeijer; T. Tsuji; P. Woitke

    2008-09-24

    The atmospheres of substellar objects contain clouds of oxides, iron, silicates, and other refractory condensates. Water clouds are expected in the coolest objects. The opacity of these `dust' clouds strongly affects both the atmospheric temperature-pressure profile and the emergent flux. Thus any attempt to model the spectra of these atmospheres must incorporate a cloud model. However the diversity of cloud models in atmospheric simulations is large and it is not always clear how the underlying physics of the various models compare. Likewise the observational consequences of different modeling approaches can be masked by other model differences, making objective comparisons challenging. In order to clarify the current state of the modeling approaches, this paper compares five different cloud models in two sets of tests. Test case 1 tests the dust cloud models for a prescribed L, L--T, and T-dwarf atmospheric (temperature T, pressure p, convective velocity vconv)-structures. Test case 2 compares complete model atmosphere results for given (effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g). All models agree on the global cloud structure but differ in opacity-relevant details like grain size, amount of dust, dust and gas-phase composition. Comparisons of synthetic photometric fluxes translate into an modelling uncertainty in apparent magnitudes for our L-dwarf (T-dwarf) test case of 0.25 < \\Delta m < 0.875 (0.1 < \\Delta m M 1.375) taking into account the 2MASS, the UKIRT WFCAM, the Spitzer IRAC, and VLT VISIR filters with UKIRT WFCAM being the most challenging for the models. (abr.)

  1. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  2. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  3. Chemistry of atmospheres formed during accretion of the Earth and other terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, L

    2009-01-01

    We used chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetic calculations to model chemistry of the volatiles released by heating different types of carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondritic material as a function of temperature and pressure. Our results predict the composition of atmospheres formed by outgassing during accretion of the Earth and other terrestrial planets. Outgassing of CI and CM carbonaceous chondritic material produces H2O-rich (steam) atmospheres in agreement with the results of impact experiments. However, outgassing of other types of chondritic material produces atmospheres dominated by other gases. Outgassing of ordinary (H, L, LL) and high iron enstatite (EH) chondritic material yields H2-rich atmospheres with CO and H2O being the second and third most abundant gases. Outgassing of low iron enstatite (EL) chondritic material gives a CO-rich atmosphere with H2, CO2, and H2O being the next most abundant gases. Outgassing of CV carbonaceous chondritic material gives a CO2-rich atmosphere with ...

  4. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 265.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 265.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probable of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecendented rate. The average change in phase is not coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration.

  5. The seasons, global temperature, and precession

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, D.J. [AT& T Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1995-04-07

    Analysis of instrumental temperature records beginning in 1659 shows that in much of the world the dominant frequency of the seasons is one cycle per anomalistic year (the time from perihelion to perihelion, 365.25964 days), not one cycle per tropical year (the time from equinox to equinox, 365.24220 days), and that the timing of the annual temperature cycle is controlled by perihelion. The assumption that the seasons were timed by the equinoxes has caused many statistical analyses of climate data to be badly biased. Coherence between changes in the amplitude of the annual cycle and those in the average temperature show that between 1854 and 1922 there were small temperature variations, probably of solar origin. Since 1922, the phase of the Northern Hemisphere coherence between these quantities switched from 0{degrees} to 180{degrees} and implies that solar variability cannot be the sole cause of the increasing temperature over the last century. About 1940, the phase patterns of the previous 300 years began to change and now appear to be changing at an unprecedented rate. The average change in phase is now coherent with the logarithm of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. 80 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Experimental study on the emission spectra of microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin, E-mail: guixin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liao, Shanshan [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shenzhen Power Supply Co. Ltd., Shenzhen 518000, Guangdong (China)

    2014-01-28

    An experimental study on microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure was conducted by employing optical emission spectroscopy. Based on a microwave plasma generation device developed for nanoparticle synthesis, we studied the influence of input microwave power and gas flow rate on the optical emission behaviors and electron temperature of plasma using Ar, He, and N{sub 2} as working gas, respectively. The physics behind these behaviors was discussed. The results are useful in characterizing microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure and can be used for improving nanoparticle synthesis system for commercial use in the future.

  7. U.S.DOE Global Monthly Station Temperature and Precipitation, 1738-1980

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The global monthly station temperature and precipitation data from the U.S. Department of Energy, a dataset hosted at, covers the time period from January, 1738 to December, 1980. The air temperature and precipitation levels are platform observations from ground and water surfaces. The data are maintained in the Research Data Archive at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  9. Superconductivity at Any Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anber, Mohamed M; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We construct a 2+1 dimensional model that sustains superconductivity at all temperatures. This is achieved by introducing a Chern Simons mixing term between two Abelian gauge fields A and Z. The superfluid is described by a complex scalar charged under Z, whereas a sufficiently strong magnetic field of A forces the superconducting condensate to form at all temperatures. In fact, at finite temperature, the theory exhibits Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition due to proliferation of topological vortices admitted by our construction. However, the critical temperature is proportional to the magnetic field of A, and thus, the phase transition can be postponed to high temperatures by increasing the strength of the magnetic field. This model can be a step towards realizing the long sought room temperature superconductivity.

  10. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS...

  11. Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Environment 44 (2010) 4678–4734 Brunner, D. , Staehelin,Environment 44 (2010) 4678–4734 Vedantham, A. , Wuebbles,Environment 44 (2010) 4678–4734 global atmosphere’. In:

  12. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Kian Tan; Aik Hui Chan; Christian Kurtsiefer

    2015-12-29

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  13. HYPERsensarium : an archive of atmospheric conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Kelly E. (Kelly Evelyn)

    2013-01-01

    HYPERsensarium proposes a tangible interface of atmospheres for public experience through an archive of historical and projected weathers. While architecture's purpose has long been to act as the technical boundary between ...

  14. Uraninite and Fullerene in Atmospheric Particulates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    incineration, uranium mining, and atmospheric testing of nuclearweapons-burning power plants typically contain very small amounts of uranium ( concentrations, the form of the uranium has been unknown. Using a variety of advanced electron microscopy

  15. T emporal structure in the deep-water temperature of four Swiss lakes: A short-term climatic change indicator?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingstone, David M.

    7 T emporal structure in the deep-water temperature of four Swiss lakes: A short-term climatic in the hypolimnion. Since in temperate latitudes coupling between deep water and atmosphere is at its strongest in atmospheric forcing on the deep-water temper- ature may well be greater than any seasonal influences. The deep-water

  16. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  17. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  18. Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963....

  19. The faculty and students in the Atmospheric Sciences Department use physics, chemistry, and mathematics to better understand the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    The faculty and students in the Atmospheric Sciences Department use physics, chemistry chemistry Atmospheric fluid dynamics Biosphere interactions Climate variability Clouds & storms Radiative, and mathematics to better understand the atmosphere and improve the prediction of its future state, both over

  20. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  1. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  2. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  3. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  4. Basalt-Atmosphere Interactions on Venus -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Atmosphere? · CaAl2Si2O8 + SO3 CaSO4 + Al2SiO5 + SiO2 ­ Anhydrite + andalusite + quartz !!! · Does this reaction proceed? ­ Venus atmosphere est'd 0.2 - 0.3 ppt SO3. #12;Reaction Position · From this, very possible that SO3 is buffered! · But ... SO3 value is not known very well - who knows what is really going

  5. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

    2010-05-03

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  6. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howcroft, Caius L.F.

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  7. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune explains the transition from a prograde to a retrograde equatorial jet, while the broader jets are due to the deformation radius being a larger fraction of the planetary radius.

  8. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  9. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A © 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  10. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  11. Atmospheric mercury (Hg) in the Adirondacks: Concentrations and sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun-Deok Choi; Thomas M. Holsen; Philip K. Hopke

    2008-08-15

    Hourly averaged gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations and hourly integrated reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and particulate Hg (HgP) concentrations in the ambient air were measured at Huntington Forest in the Adirondacks, New York from June 2006 to May 2007. The average concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP were 1.4 {+-} 0.4 ng m{sup -3}, 1.8 {+-} 2.2 pg m{sup -3}, and 3.2 {+-} 3.7 pg m{sup -3}, respectively. RGM represents <3.5% of total atmospheric Hg or total gaseous Hg (TGM: GEM + RGM) and HgP represents <3.0% of the total atmospheric Hg. The highest mean concentrations of GEM, RGM, and HgP were measured during winter and summer whereas the lowest mean concentrations were measured during spring and fall. Significant diurnal patterns were apparent in warm seasons for all species whereas diurnal patterns were weak in cold seasons. RGM was better correlated with ozone concentration and temperature in both warm than the other species. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify possible Hg sources. This method identified areas in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, and Missouri, which coincided well with sources reported in a 2002 U.S. mercury emissions inventory. 51 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 Kmore »in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  13. NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S

    2008-09-22

    A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

  14. Rayleigh lidar observations of mesosphere temperature structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Dao, P.D.; Mcnutt, R.T.; Klemetti, W.; Moskowitz, W.; Davidson, G. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)]|[PhotoMetrics, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Ground-based observations of atmospheric density profiles to 92 km were obtained for four successive seasons between summer 1989 and spring 1990. These results were obtained with a powerful Rayleigh lidar facility located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio). This instrument combined a 14-W XeF laser transmitter with a 2.54-m receiver mirror to observe returns from altitudes between 40 and 95 km. Analysis of the scale height dependence of the density profiles produced temperatures with a measurement error of about 5 K (approximately 2.5%) at 90 km when the lidar data was averaged for 20 min. and smoothed in height over 2.7 km. Examination of these profiles for the total of 18 nights showed that there often existed in the mesophere a layer of enhanced temperatures when compared with the U.S. standard profile. The layer centroid height was about 85 km for summer and 70 to 75 km for winter. Data obtained for the equinoctial periods showed the amplitude of these layers to be weak. The winter temperature profiles showed evidence for long-period waves passing through the region of the thermal anomaly while the equinox profiles revealed more sporadic wave activity with shorter vertical wavelengths. Both the winter and summer temperature data displayed regions where the observed lapse rate approached the adiabatic lapse rate. In the summer the wave activity near the iversion layer was weak.

  15. Controlled Microdroplet Transport in an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire, P D; Kelsey, C P; Bingham, A; Montgomery, E P; Bennet, E D; Potts, H E; Rutherford, D; McDowell, D A; Diver, D A; Mariotti, D

    2015-01-01

    We report the controlled injection of near-isolated micron-sized liquid droplets into a low temperature He-Ne steady-state rf plasma at atmospheric pressure. The H2O droplet stream is constrained within a 2 mm diameter quartz tube. Imaging at the tube exit indicates a log-normal droplet size distribution with an initial count mean diameter of 15 micrometers falling to 13 micrometers with plasma exposure. The radial velocity profile is approximately parabolic indicating near laminar flow conditions with the majority of droplets travelling at >75% of the local gas speed and having a plasma transit time of chemistry effects. The successful demonstration of controlled microdroplet streams opens up possibilities for gas-phase microreactors and remote delivery of active species for pla...

  16. Current state of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) technology, a coal burning method that has several environmental and technical advantages over the more conventional technologies, such as pulverized-coal methods. The AFBC approach injects an air stream into a boiler in such a way that it mixes with solid fuel and sorbent to create a dense phase region or fluidized bed. This method makes it possible to use a much wider range of low-quality fuels and to burn them at lower temperatures with less pollutant by-product. The paper presents a comprehensive overview of AFBC technology to date. It includes worldwide development of this technology since the 1950s necessary to meet ever-stricter emissions requirements while providing greater fuel flexibility.

  17. Recuperated atmosphere SOFC/gas turbine hybrid cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lundberg, Wayne (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2010-08-24

    A method of operating an atmospheric-pressure solid oxide fuel cell generator (6) in combination with a gas turbine comprising a compressor (1) and expander (2) where an inlet oxidant (20) is passed through the compressor (1) and exits as a first stream (60) and a second stream (62) the first stream passing through a flow control valve (56) to control flow and then through a heat exchanger (54) followed by mixing with the second stream (62) where the mixed streams are passed through a combustor (8) and expander (2) and the first heat exchanger for temperature control before entry into the solid oxide fuel cell generator (6), which generator (6) is also supplied with fuel (40).

  18. Recuperated atmospheric SOFC/gas turbine hybrid cycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lundberg, Wayne

    2010-05-04

    A method of operating an atmospheric-pressure solid oxide fuel cell generator (6) in combination with a gas turbine comprising a compressor (1) and expander (2) where an inlet oxidant (20) is passed through the compressor (1) and exits as a first stream (60) and a second stream (62) the first stream passing through a flow control valve (56) to control flow and then through a heat exchanger (54) followed by mixing with the second stream (62) where the mixed streams are passed through a combustor (8) and expander (2) and the first heat exchanger for temperature control before entry into the solid oxide fuel cell generator (6), which generator (6) is also supplied with fuel (40).

  19. New analysis indicates no thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob L.; Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-20

    An important focus of exoplanet research is the determination of the atmospheric temperature structure of strongly irradiated gas giant planets, or hot Jupiters. HD 209458b is the prototypical exoplanet for atmospheric thermal inversions, but this assertion does not take into account recently obtained data or newer data reduction techniques. We reexamine this claim by investigating all publicly available Spitzer Space Telescope secondary-eclipse photometric data of HD 209458b and performing a self-consistent analysis. We employ data reduction techniques that minimize stellar centroid variations, apply sophisticated models to known Spitzer systematics, and account for time-correlated noise in the data. We derive new secondary-eclipse depths of 0.119% ± 0.007%, 0.123% ± 0.006%, 0.134% ± 0.035%, and 0.215% ± 0.008% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 ?m bandpasses, respectively. We feed these results into a Bayesian atmospheric retrieval analysis and determine that it is unnecessary to invoke a thermal inversion to explain our secondary-eclipse depths. The data are well fitted by a temperature model that decreases monotonically between pressure levels of 1 and 0.01 bars. We conclude that there is no evidence for a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b.

  20. White light emission from silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yi; Shirai, Hajime

    2009-02-15

    An atmospheric pressure microplasma jet was employed as a deposition tool to fabricate silicon oxycarbide films from tetraethoxysilane-argon (Ar) mixture gas at room temperature. Resultant films exhibit intense visible emission under a 325 nm excitation which appears white to naked eyes in the range from {approx}1.75 to {approx}3.5 eV at room temperature. The origin of photoluminescence is attributed to the electron-hole pair recombination through neutral oxygen vacancies (NOVs) in the film. The density of NOV defects was found in the range from 3.48x10{sup 15} to 2.23x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The photoluminescence quantum efficiencies were estimated to be 1.48%-4.15%. Present experiment results demonstrate that the silicon oxycarbide films prepared by using atmospheric pressure microplasma jet would be a competitive candidate for the development of white light emission devices.

  1. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel, E-mail: ngadams@uga.edu [University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, 101 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, 101 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants.

  2. Plant Response and Environmental Data from the Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Oldfield Community Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation (OCCAM) project is a joint effort of ORNL and the University of Tennessee to investigate community and ecosystem response to global change, specifically looking at the interactive effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide, surface temperatures, and soil moisture. The plants studied for their response to warming temperatures, elevated carbon dioxide, and altered water availability include C3 and C4 grasses, forbs, and legumes. These plants are typical of an old-field ecosystem that establishes itself on unused agricultural land. The results of the research focus on species abundance, production, phenology, and what is going on chemically below ground. Data are currently available from 2003 through July, 2008.

  3. The coupling of winds, aerosols and chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

    REVIEW The coupling of winds, aerosols and chemistry in Titan's atmosphere BY SEBASTIEN LEBONNOIS 1'Ae´ronomie, IPSL, CNRS, BP3, 91371 Verrie`res le Buisson, France The atmosphere of Titan is a complex system, where the observed atmospheric structure of Titan's lower atmosphere (mainly in the stratosphere and troposphere

  4. Phase of atmospheric secondary organic material affects its reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the reactivity of atmospheric SOM particles. atmospheric chemistry chemical aging organic aerosol collectionPhase of atmospheric secondary organic material affects its reactivity Mikinori Kuwata and Scot T of atmospheric organic particles among solid, semisolid, and liquid phases is of keen current scientific interest

  5. ATM401, ATM601, CHEM601 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    as atmospheric chemistry. You should be able to read and analyze weather maps or climate diagrams, interpret as atmospheric chemistry. Fundamental goals are that you develop skills to think as an atmospheric scientistATM401, ATM601, CHEM601 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences Fall 2013 Class time: TR 11:30am

  6. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Yan

    Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces Douglas J in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dy- namics simulations are becoming increasingly in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces

  7. Atmospheric Escape by Magnetically Driven Wind from Gaseous Planets II --Effects of Magnetic Diffusion--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Yuki A; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate roles of Alfvenic waves in the weakly-ionized atmosphere of hot Jupiters by carrying out non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with Ohmic diffusion in one-dimensional magnetic flux tubes. Turbulence at the surface excites Alfven waves and they propagate upward to drive hot (~ 10^4 K) outflows. The magnetic diffusion plays an important role in the dissipation of the Alfvenic waves in the weakly ionized atmosphere of hot Jupiters. The mass-loss rate of the spontaneously driven planetary wind is considerably reduced, in comparison with that obtained from ideal MHD simulations because the Alfvenic waves are severely damped at low altitudes in the atmosphere, whereas the wave heating is still important in the heating of the upper atmosphere. Dependence on the surface temperature, planetary radius, and velocity dispersion at the surface is also investigated. We find an inversion phenomenon of the transmitted wave energy flux; the energy flux carried by Alfven waves in the upper atmosphere h...

  8. Millimeter Wavelength Brightness Fluctuations of the Atmosphere Above the South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. S. Bussmann; W. L. Holzapfel; C. L. Kuo

    2004-12-02

    We report measurements of the millimeter wavelength brightness fluctuations produced by the atmosphere above the South Pole made with the Arcminute Cosmology Bolometer Array Receiver (ACBAR). The data span the 2002 Austral winter during which ACBAR was mounted on the Viper telescope at the South Pole. We recover the atmospheric signal in the presence of instrument noise by calculating the correlation between signals from distinct elements of the ACBAR bolometer array. With this method, it is possible to measure atmospheric brightness fluctuations with high SNR even under the most stable atmospheric conditions. The observed atmospheric signal is characterized by the parameters of the Komolgorov-Taylor (KT) model, which are the amplitude and power law exponent describing the atmospheric power spectrum, and the two components of the wind angular velocity at the time of the observation. The KT model is typically a good description of the observed fluctuations, and fits to the data produce values of the Komolgorov exponent that are consistent with theoretical expectations. By combining the wind angular velocity results with measurements of the wind linear velocity, we find that the altitude of the observed atmospheric fluctuations is consistent with the distribution of water vapor determined from radiosonde data. For data corresponding to frequency passbands centered on 150, 219, and 274 GHz, we obtain median fluctuation power amplitudes of [10, 38, 74] mK^{2} rad^{-5/3} in Rayleigh-Jeans temperature units. Comparing with previous work, we find that these median amplitudes are approximately an order of magnitude smaller than those found at the South Pole during the Austral summer and at least 30 times lower than found at the ALMA site in the Atacama desert.

  9. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  10. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  11. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  12. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  13. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  14. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  15. Calibrating Pyrgeometers Outdoors Independent from the Reference Value of the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hickey, J. R.; Grobner, J.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.

    2006-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for the calibration of thermopile pyrgeometers in the absence of a reference for measurement of atmospheric longwave irradiance. This is referred to as the incoming longwave irradiance in this article. The method is based on an indoor calibration using a low-temperature blackbody source to obtain the calibration coefficients that determine the pyrgeometer's radiation characteristics. From these coefficients the outgoing irradiance of the pyrgeometer can be calculated. The pyrgeometer is then installed outdoors on an aluminum plate that is connected to a circulating temperature bath. By adjusting the temperature bath to the approximate value of the effective sky temperature, the pyrgeometer's body temperature is lowered changing the pyrgeometer's thermopile output. If the incoming longwave irradiance is stable, the slope of the outgoing irradiance versus the pyrgeometer's thermopile output is the outdoor net irradiance responsivity (RSnet), independent of the absolute value of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. The indoor calibration coefficients and the outdoor RSnet are then used in the pyrgeometer equation to calculate the incoming longwave irradiance. To evaluate this method, the calculated irradiance using the derived coefficients was compared to the irradiance measured using a pyrgeometer with direct traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This is maintained at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Switzerland. Based on results from four pyrgeometers calibrations, this method suggests measurement agreement with the WISG to within +/- 3 W/m2 for all sky conditions.

  16. Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

  17. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68 (2006) 20532060 On possible drivers of Sun-induced climate changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2006-01-01

    Author's personal copy Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68 (2006) 2053 of two current hypotheses on the dependence of climate change on solar activity. One of them states that variations in the tropospheric temperature are caused directly by changes of the solar radiance (total

  18. February 9, 2002 Muon Collaboration Technical Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of gaseous helium at 66 K or 22 K in a closed loop configuration. Phased Temperature Approach/Pulse- ~3-15 MJ · Possible Rep Rate High Temp- >10/hr · High Temperature Helium Delivery- ~66 K · Low Temperature Helium Delivery- ~22 K · Energy Removal Rate (Low Temp)- ~25 kJ/s · Energy Removal Rate (High Temp

  19. Separating the influence of temperature, drought, and fire on interannual variability in atmospheric CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    in the Community Earth System Model: Evaluation andsimulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparisoncycle accurately in Earth system models (ESMs). Recently,

  20. North-Atlantic dynamics and European temperature extremes in the IPSL model: sensitivity to atmospheric resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codron, Francis

    and CNRM global climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th

  1. Three-dimensional gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure microdischarges using Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Demetre J.

    and guided into a periscope, which consisted of a Brewster's angle window, a right angle prism, and a 3 mm

  2. Validation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder temperature and moisture profiles over tropical oceans and their impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    ] Tropical cyclones are one of the costliest and deadliest natural disasters in the United States and other the potential for economic damage and deaths. However, due to the lack of the conventional observations over/I satellite rainfall rates results in improvements in hurricane track forecasts in the GEOS global model [Hou

  3. The second virial coefficient of the major atmospheric gases at low temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claitor, Lilburn Carroll

    1948-01-01

    that encounters between molecules are rare, the only forces acting on the molecules are those of the retaining vessel. The behavior of a gas under such conditions 's expressed oy the ideal gas law, PV = RT where P is pressure, V is volume, R is the universal..., and, so long as encounters between three or more molecules are rare, the behavior of the gas can be expressed by PV = RT (I + Bj)) where') is the molal density and B is the second viriai coefficient. Th1s equation can also be written, approxi...

  4. Measurements of the Infrared SpectraLines of Water Vapor at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matter By SarahMODELING CLOUD1 H( 7Measurements of the

  5. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  6. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  7. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  8. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  9. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  10. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  11. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  12. Quantifying chaos in the atmosphere Richard Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington, Richard

    , Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB, UK Abstract: The atmosphere is known to be forced by a variety of energy sources, including radiation and heat fluxes emanating from the boundary layer associated with sea as the competing champions controlling process in the physical world. With or without Einstein, there can

  13. The mean molecular mass of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , Mars, Mars #12;Science Questions · Mean molecular mass (µ) -> Chemical composition · How did Titan form? · Current reservoirs of volatiles · Ethane/methane puddles/ocean · Thermal structure of atmosphere #12, delicate, etc ­ T/p sensors are simple, cheap, reliable · Is it possible to know µ based on simple

  14. Characterizing Titan's Upper Atmosphere Using the Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    methane chemical losses. INMS Data T-GITM Bell et al. [2010b] #12;Constraints on Escape · Parameter Sweep-Thermosphere Model (GITM) · 3-D, non-hydrostatic, altitude-based atmospheric model ­ Compressible Navier (TVD) MUSCL Scheme. ­ Block-based Massively Parallel Framework ­ Updating with 4th order Runge

  15. Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark R. Swain; Gautam Vasisht; Giovanna Tinetti

    2008-02-07

    Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thus the detection of methane rather than carbon-monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanisms that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  16. Connectivity To Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-02-26

    To establish DOE and NNSA connectivity to Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for sites and facilities that have the potential for releasing hazardous materials sufficient to generate certain emergency declarations and to promote efficient use of resources for consequence assessment activities at DOE sites, facilities, operations, and activities in planning for and responding to emergency events. No cancellations.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  18. Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine and climate projections; critically and quantitatively analyze environmental management and policy proposals mercury research. Global Budget of Mercury Prior to the onset of human industrial activities, the amount

  19. Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honrath, Richard E.

    observations. Prior to the advent of satellite observations, they provided weather data critical to the accuracy of European weather forecasts. Today, they provide a unique base for studies of atmospheric Monitoring Complex (AGAMC) is a set of ground-based measurement stations for use in sampling the marine

  20. MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS AT707 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    .8 Static Stability Structure 9.9 Gravity Wave Generation in Unbalanced Jet­Front Systems 10. Equatorial, T. G., 2007: Transport in the Middle Atmosphere. J. Meteorol. Soc. Japan, 85B, 165­191. 1 #12. Vertically Propagating Waves 2.1 Extratropical (Planetary) Rossby Waves 2.2 Extratropical Gravity Waves 2

  1. Atmospheric aerosol light scattering and polarization peculiarities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patlashenko, Zh I

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers environmental problems of natural and anthropogenic atmospheric aerosol pollution and its global and regional monitoring. Efficient aerosol investigations may be achieved by spectropolarimetric measurements. Specifically second and fourth Stokes parameters spectral dependencies carry information on averaged refraction and absorption indexes and on particles size distribution functions characteristics.

  2. THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    over large fields, long times and many wave- lengths (heights) simultaneously -- Judge and Peter (1998THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE ROBERT J. RUTTEN Sterrekundig Instituut, Postbus 80 000, NL­3508 TA, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract. This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low

  3. Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II 707.424, VU 2, SS2005 Unit 7: Model code structure: mesoscale convective system 17-18 April 2004: Sierra hydraulic jump case 21 January 2005: the "Universiade) Introduction (brief description of the phenomenon and a description of the model and of the measurements

  4. Dynamics of Jupiter's Atmosphere Andrew P. Ingersoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Dowling University of Louisville Peter J. Gierasch Cornell University Glenn S. Orton Jet Propulsion no topography, i.e., no con- tinents or oceans; its atmosphere merges smoothly with the planet's fluid interior with falling ice and rain. On Jupiter, the separation mechanism is still to be determined. The winds of Jupiter

  5. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    MAR 2015 The influence of absorbed solar radiation by Saharan dust on hurricane genesis Sebastian, Bern, Switzerland Abstract To date, the radiative impact of dust and the Saharan air layer (SAL the atmosphere due to absorption of solar radiation but thus shifts convection to regions more conducive

  6. INTRODUCTION Atmospheric aerosol particles influence the Earth's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunderle, Stefan

    , scattering, and absorbing solar electromagnetic radiation and by modifying cloud properties due to their roleINTRODUCTION Atmospheric aerosol particles influence the Earth's radiation budget by reflecting to maximum cover a region once in the daytime. In contrary, up-to-date geostationary instruments like

  7. Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    and the transfer of energy among these systems. Global energy balance The Sun is the primary source of energy), and biosphere (living organisms) that are driven by solar energy. The ocean and the atmosphere have the greatest on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance

  8. SUPPLEMENTARY Submitted to: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    S1 SUPPLEMENTARY Submitted to: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Title: Quantifying/fuels/emission control devices for coal-fired power plants by province. Table S4. The uncertainties of unabated emission Ratio of biomass burning Normal (Province dependent) Questionnaire: Wang and Zhang (2008) B 1 A

  9. file:///C|/DOCUME~1/ADMINI~1/LOCALS~1/Temp/~LWF0000.htm (1 of 2) [10/22/2004 9:51:07 AM] until afterthemassivebombardmentsceased.Thisof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    - tremesof temperature,pressureandacidity/alkalinity in wateryenvironmentsatthebottomof theoceanor in hot surface zone bathed both in the intense ultraviolet radiation of the early Sun and a rain by impacts. Since there exists a relatively narrow distribution of agesand rapid transition from older

  10. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  11. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  12. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  13. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Shell, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  14. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-01-17

    The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

  15. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  16. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  17. Clathration of Volatiles in the Solar Nebula and Implications for the Origin of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Jonathan I. Lunine; Caroline Thomas; Matthew Pasek; Ulysse Marboeuf; Yann Alibert; Vincent Ballenegger; Daniel Cordier; Yves Ellinger; Francoise Pauzat; Sylvain Picaud

    2008-10-01

    We describe a scenario of Titan's formation matching the constraints imposed by its current atmospheric composition. Assuming that the abundances of all elements, including oxygen, are solar in the outer nebula, we show that the icy planetesimals were agglomerated in the feeding zone of Saturn from a mixture of clathrates with multiple guest species, so-called stochiometric hydrates such as ammonia hydrate, and pure condensates. We also use a statistical thermodynamic approach to constrain the composition of multiple guest clathrates formed in the solar nebula. We then infer that krypton and xenon, that are expected to condense in the 20-30 K temperature range in the solar nebula, are trapped in clathrates at higher temperatures than 50 K. Once formed, these ices either were accreted by Saturn or remained embedded in its surrounding subnebula until they found their way into the regular satellites growing around Saturn. In order to explain the carbon monoxide and primordial argon deficiencies of Titan's atmosphere, we suggest that the satellite was formed from icy planetesimals initially produced in the solar nebula and that were partially devolatilized at a temperature not exceeding 50 K during their migration within Saturn's subnebula. The observed deficiencies of Titan's atmosphere in krypton and xenon could result from other processes that may have occurred both prior or after the completion of Titan. Thus, krypton and xenon may have been sequestrated in the form of XH3+ complexes in the solar nebula gas phase, causing the formation of noble gas-poor planetesimals ultimately accreted by Titan. Alternatively, krypton and xenon may have also been trapped efficiently in clathrates located on the satellite's surface or in its atmospheric haze.

  18. Tides in the mesopause region over Fort Collins, Colorado (41N, 105W) based on lidar temperature observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - teristics of the westward traveling solar tidal waves in the mesopause region, which can impact thermal hopefully stimulate future tidal studies with lidar temperature, and zonal and meridional wind observations: tides, mesopause region, lidar temperature, midlatitude 1. Introduction [2] Atmospheric solar tides

  19. Modeling Stellar Atmospheres with a Spherically Symmetric Version of the Atlas Code: Testing the Code by Comparisons to Interferometric Observations and PHOENIX Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilding R. Neilson; John B. Lester

    2008-09-01

    One of the current opportunities for stellar atmospheric modeling is the interpretation of optical interferometric data of stars. Starting from the robust, open source ATLAS atmospheric code (Kurucz, 1979), we have developed a spherically symmetric code, SATLAS, as a new option for modeling stellar atmospheres of low gravity stars. The SATLAS code is tested against both interferometric observations of M giants by Wittkowski and collaborators, and spherically symmetric M giant NextGen models from the PHOENIX code. The SATLAS models predict interferometric visibilities that agree with the observed visibilities and with predicted visibilities, and the SATLAS atmospheric structures also agree with those from spherical PHOENIX models, with just small differences in temperature and pressure at large depths in the atmospheres.

  20. Improved determination of the atmospheric parameters of the pulsating sdB star Feige 48

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latour, M.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Green, E. M.; Chayer, P.

    2014-06-10

    As part of a multifaceted effort to better exploit the asteroseismological potential of the pulsating sdB star Feige 48, we present an improved spectroscopic analysis of that star based on new grids of NLTE, fully line-blanketed model atmospheres. To that end, we gathered four high signal-to-noise ratio time-averaged optical spectra of varying spectral resolutions from 1.0 Å to 8.7 Å, and we made use of the results of four independent studies to fix the abundances of the most important metals in the atmosphere of Feige 48. The mean atmospheric parameters we obtained from our four spectra of Feige 48 are: T {sub eff} = 29,850 ± 60 K, log g = 5.46 ± 0.01, and log N(He)/N(H) = –2.88 ± 0.02. We also modeled, for the first time, the He II line at 1640 Å from the STIS archive spectrum of the star, and with this line we found an effective temperature and a surface gravity that match well with the values obtained with the optical data. With some fine tuning of the abundances of the metals visible in the optical domain, we were able to achieve a very good agreement between our best available spectrum and our best-fitting synthetic one. Our derived atmospheric parameters for Feige 48 are in rather good agreement with previous estimates based on less sophisticated models. This underlines the relatively small effects of the NLTE approach combined with line blanketing in the atmosphere of this particular star, implying that the current estimates of the atmospheric parameters of Feige 48 are reliable and secure.

  1. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. I. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS VIA THE SHALLOW WATER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Workman, Jared E-mail: jworkman@coloradomesa.edu

    2014-08-01

    Within the context of exoplanetary atmospheres, we present a comprehensive linear analysis of forced, damped, magnetized shallow water systems, exploring the effects of dimensionality, geometry (Cartesian, pseudo-spherical, and spherical), rotation, magnetic tension, and hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction. Across a broad range of conditions, we find that the key governing equation for atmospheres and quantum harmonic oscillators are identical, even when forcing (stellar irradiation), sources of friction (molecular viscosity, Rayleigh drag, and magnetic drag), and magnetic tension are included. The global atmospheric structure is largely controlled by a single key parameter that involves the Rossby and Prandtl numbers. This near-universality breaks down when either molecular viscosity or magnetic drag acts non-uniformly across latitude or a poloidal magnetic field is present, suggesting that these effects will introduce qualitative changes to the familiar chevron-shaped feature witnessed in simulations of atmospheric circulation. We also find that hydrodynamic and magnetic sources of friction have dissimilar phase signatures and affect the flow in fundamentally different ways, implying that using Rayleigh drag to mimic magnetic drag is inaccurate. We exhaustively lay down the theoretical formalism (dispersion relations, governing equations, and time-dependent wave solutions) for a broad suite of models. In all situations, we derive the steady state of an atmosphere, which is relevant to interpreting infrared phase and eclipse maps of exoplanetary atmospheres. We elucidate a pinching effect that confines the atmospheric structure to be near the equator. Our suite of analytical models may be used to develop decisively physical intuition and as a reference point for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of atmospheric circulation.

  2. High temperature storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-06-07

    A high temperature electrochemical cell is described comprising: a solid-state divalent cation conducting electrolyte; a positive electrode in contact with the electrolyte; a solid-state negative electrode contacting a divalent cation conducting molten salt mediating agent providing ionic mediation between the solid-state negative electrode and the solid-state electrolyte.

  3. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  4. Transition temperature in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.; Christ, N. H.; Mawhinney, R. D. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Datta, S.; Jung, C.; Schmidt, C.; Umeda, T. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Heide, J. van der; Kaczmarek, O.; Laermann, E.; Miao, C. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Karsch, F. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Petreczky, P. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Petrov, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-09-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the transition temperature in QCD with two light and one heavier (strange) quark mass on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=4 and 6. Calculations with improved staggered fermions have been performed for various light to strange quark mass ratios in the range, 0.05{<=}m-circumflex{sub l}/m-circumflex{sub s}{<=}0.5, and with a strange quark mass fixed close to its physical value. From a combined extrapolation to the chiral (m-circumflex{sub l}{yields}0) and continuum (aT{identical_to}1/N{sub {tau}}{yields}0) limits we find for the transition temperature at the physical point T{sub c}r{sub 0}=0.457(7) where the scale is set by the Sommer-scale parameter r{sub 0} defined as the distance in the static quark potential at which the slope takes on the value (dV{sub qq}(r)/dr){sub r=r{sub 0}}=1.65/r{sub 0}{sup 2}. Using the currently best known value for r{sub 0} this translates to a transition temperature T{sub c}=192(7)(4) MeV. The transition temperature in the chiral limit is about 3% smaller. We discuss current ambiguities in the determination of T{sub c} in physical units and also comment on the universal scaling behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the chiral limit.

  5. Numerical study on microwave-sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.; Hua, W., E-mail: huaw@scu.edu.cn; Guo, S. Y. [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)] [School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2014-04-15

    A numerical study on microwave sustained argon discharge under atmospheric pressure is reported in this paper. The purpose of this study is to investigate both the process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited gas discharge under atmospheric pressure, thereby aiding improvements in the design of the discharge system, setting the appropriate working time, and controlling the operating conditions. A 3D model is presented, which includes the physical processes of electromagnetic wave propagation, electron transport, heavy species transport, gas flow, and heat transfer. The results can be obtained by means of the fluid approximation. The maxima of the electron density and gas temperature are 4.96?×?10{sup 18} m{sup ?3} and 2514.8?K, respectively, and the gas pressure remains almost unchanged for typical operating conditions with a gas flow rate of 20 l/min, microwave power of 1000 W, and initial temperature of 473?K. In addition, the conditions (microwave power, gas flow rate, and initial temperature) of discharge are varied to obtain deeper information about the electron density and gas temperature. The results of our numerical study are valid and clearly describe both the physical process and effects of the conditions of microwave-excited argon discharge.

  6. Emergence of a flux tube through a partially ionised solar atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. D. Arber; M. Haynes; J. E. Leake

    2007-06-28

    For a magnetic flux tube, or indeed any flux, to emerge into the Solar corona from the convection zone it must pass through the partially ionised layers of the lower atmosphere: the photosphere and the chromosphere. In such regions the ion-neutral collisions lead to an increased resistivity for currents flowing across magnetic field lines. This Cowling resistivity can exceed the Spitzer resistivity by orders of magnitude and in 2.5D simulations has been shown to be sufficient to remove all cross field current from emerging flux. Here we extend this modelling into 3D. Once again it is found that the Cowling resistivity removes perpendicular current. However the presence of 3D structure prevents the simple comparison possible in 2.5D simulations. With a fully ionised atmosphere the flux emergence leads to an unphysically low temperature region in the overlying corona, lifting of chromospheric material and the subsequent onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Including neutrals removes the low temperature region, lifts less chromospheric matter and shows no signs of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Simulations of flux emergence therefore should include such a neutral layer in order to obtain the correct perpendicular current, remove the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and get the correct temperature profile. In situations when the temperature is not important, i.e. when no simulated spectral emission is required, a simple model for the neutral layer is demonstrated to adequately reproduce the results of fully consistent simulations.

  7. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  8. Atmospheric Aerosols and Cloud Condensation Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Vapor Pressure Ambient Vapor Pressure Top Plate Temperature = 297 K Bottom Plate Temperature = 292 K Maximum Supersautration = 1.0% Vapor Pressure ­ Ambient vapor pressure is linear from top to bottom. ­ Saturation vapor pressure is a curve from top to bottom. ­ A supersaturation exists between top and bottom

  9. Nocturnal light and temperature influences on necrophagous, carrion-associating blow fly species (Diptera: Calliphoridae) of forensic importance in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Ryan Scott

    2004-11-15

    mass with lower atmospheric pressure than that of the air surrounding it) at rural study sites near Snook (Burleson County), Texas, under artificial lighting of at least 1500 footcandles when temperatures were at 26?C or higher. Trials conducted under...

  10. The signature of ozone depletion on tropical temperature trends, as revealed by their seasonal cycle in model integrations with single forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    [1] The effect of ozone depletion on temperature trends in the tropical lower stratosphere is explored with an atmospheric general circulation model, and directly contrasted to the effect of increased greenhouse gases and ...

  11. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  12. BIOSIGNATURE GASES IN H?-DOMINATED ATMOSPHERES ON ROCKY EXOPLANETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    Super-Earth exoplanets are being discovered with increasing frequency and some will be able to retain stable H2-dominated atmospheres. We study biosignature gases on exoplanets with thin H2 atmospheres and habitable surface ...

  13. Author's Accepted Manuscript ORBIT-CENTERED ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, Brendt

    solar and geomagnetic activities and different prediction windows. Compar- ison with previouslyAuthor's Accepted Manuscript ORBIT-CENTERED ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY PREDICTION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL Shoemaker, Riccardo Bevilacqua, ORBIT-CENTERED ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY PREDICTION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL

  14. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    Isolating Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere in the KuroshioSST coupler . . . . Chapter 3 Mesoscale Ocean-Atmosphere4.2 Impact of Mesoscale SST on Precipitation Chapter 4 vi

  15. U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Coastal Data Area Network) Project Description: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA consists of four separate components, an administrative local area network (LAN) component; a public access

  16. EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    . Students are requested not to use laptops or cell phones during class. Textbook: The Atmospheric Balance 02 Feb Atmospheric radiation. Demonstration: Invisibility at 1800 K. Spectra and Planck's Nobel

  17. ATMOS 5000: Intro to Atmospheric Science Fall Term 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    allows: · Atmospheric boundary layer · Carbon cycle, CO2 · Ozone hole, stratospheric chemistry · Air on the atmospheric controls on the weather (beach volleyball versus a rainy day indoors, skiing on a sunny day

  18. Atmospheric rivers as Lagrangian coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garaboa, Daniel; Huhn, Florian; Perez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    We show that filamentous Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) over the Northern Atlantic Ocean are closely linked to attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the large scale wind field. LCSs represent lines of attraction in the evolving flow with a significant impact on all passive tracers. Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE), we extract LCSs from a two-dimensional flow derived from water vapor flux of atmospheric reanalysis data and compare them to the three-dimensional LCS obtained from the wind flow. We correlate the typical filamentous water vapor patterns of ARs with LCSs and find that LCSs bound the filaments on the back side. Passive advective transport of water vapor from tropical latitudes is potentially possible.

  19. Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations for Earth Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can robustly measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of 4-5 percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  20. Measuring Magnetic Fields in the Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Wijn, A G

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery by Hale in the early 1900s that sunspots harbor strong magnetic field, magnetism has become increasingly important in our understanding of processes on the Sun and in the Heliosphere. Many current and planned instruments are capable of diagnosing magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. Photospheric magnetometry is now well-established. However, many challenges remain. For instance, the diagnosis of magnetic field in the chromosphere and corona is difficult, and interpretation of measurements is harder still. As a result only very few measurements have been made so far, yet it is clear that if we are to understand the outer solar atmosphere we must study the magnetic field. I will review the history of solar magnetic field measurements, describe and discuss the three types of magnetometry, and close with an outlook on the future.

  1. Performance of the STACEE Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STACEE Collaboration; D. A. Williams; D. Bhattacharya; L. M. Boone; M. C. Chantell; Z. Conner; C. E. Covault; M. Dragovan; P. Fortin; D. Gingrich; D. T. Gregorich; D. S. Hanna; G. Mohanty; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; S. Oser; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; T. O. Tumer; F. Vincent; J. A. Zweerink

    2000-10-17

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is located at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The field of solar tracking mirrors (heliostats) around a central receiver tower is used to direct Cherenkov light from atmospheric showers onto secondary mirrors on the tower, which in turn image the light onto cameras of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE Collaboration has previously reported a detection of the Crab Nebula with approximately 7 standard deviation significance, using 32 heliostats (STACEE-32). This result demonstrates both the viability of the technique and the suitability of the site. We are in the process of completing an upgrade to 48 heliostats (STACEE-48) en route to an eventual configuration using 64 heliostats (STACEE-64) in early 2001. In this paper, we summarize the results obtained on the sensitivity of STACEE-32 and our expectations for STACEE-48 and STACEE-64.

  2. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Goodwin; Charles Jenkins; Andrew Lambert

    2007-06-19

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  3. Novel Low Temperature Solid State Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chonglin; Nash, Patrick; Liu, Jian; Collins, Gregory

    2009-12-15

    We have successfully fabricated (PrBa)Co{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}} and (LaBa)Co{sub 2}O{sub 5+{deleta}} epitaxial thin film on various single crystal substrates. Physical and electrochemical properties characterizations were carried out. Highly conductive oxygen-deficient double perovskite LnBaCo2O5+? thin films were grown on single crystal (001) SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), (001) MgO, (001) LaAlO{sub 3} and (110) NdGaO{sub 3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure studies from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. High temperature transport properties was carried in different atmosphere (O{sub 2},Air, N{sub 2}) up to ~900K. Resistance response of (LaBa)Co{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}} epitaxial thin film was characterized in oxygen, nitrogen and 4% hydrogen over a wide range of temperature from 400?C up to 800?C. To determine the electrode performance and oxygen exchange kinetics of PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}, multi-layered thin film based half cell was deposited on LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrate. The temperature dependence of the resistance of this half ?cell structure was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) within different temperature and gas environments. Anode supported fuel cells, with GCO:YSZ multilayer thin film as electrolyte and PBCO thin film as electrode, are fabricated on tape casted NiO/YSZ substrate. Full cell performance is characterized up to 800?C.

  4. Thermalisation of electrons in a stellar atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Chevallier

    2006-01-23

    We are interested in electrons kinetics in a stellar atmosphere to validate or invalidate the usually accepted hypothesis of thermalisation of electrons. For this purpose, we calculate the velocity distribution function of electrons by solving the kinetic equation of these particles together with the equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium. We note that this distribution can deviate strongly from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution if non-LTE effects are important. Some results and astrophysical consequences are examined.

  5. Atmospheric structure determined from satellite data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Keith Shelburne

    1978-01-01

    Subject: Meteorology ATM)SPHERIC STRUCTURE DETEiUIINED FRDM SATELLITE DATA A Thesis XEITH SHELBURNE KNIGHT Approved as to style and content. hyi (Chairman of Cor ' iee) C. (Head of Department) (Miemher) ABSTRACT Atmospheric Structure Determined... from Satellite Data. (August 1978) Keith Shelburne Knight, B. A. , University of California at Los Angeles Chairman of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. James R. Scoggins The capabilities of the Nimbus-6 satellite sounding data for use in synoptic analysis...

  6. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Momtaz N. (Columbia, MD)

    1993-10-26

    A pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed reactor system is disclosed and claimed along with a process for utilization of same for the combustion of, e.g. high sulfur content coal. The system affords a economical, ecologically acceptable alternative to oil and gas fired combustors. The apparatus may also be employed for endothermic reaction, combustion of waste products, e.g., organic and medical waste, drying materials, heating air, calcining and the like.

  7. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-04-19

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant (1) the freshwater has a high pressure (>30 or more atm.) and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electricity generation plant. The offered electricity installation in 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output. Key words: Extraction freshwater, method of getting freshwater, receiving energy from atmosphere, powerful renewal electric plant.

  8. Atmospheric Parameters of 169 F, G, K and M-type Stars in the Kepler Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Frasca, A; Uytterhoeven, K; Briquet, M; Van Winckel, H; Drobek, D; Niemczura, E; Lampens, P; Lykke, J; Bloemen, S; Gameiro, J F; Jean, C; Volpi, D; Gorlova, N; Mortier, A; Tsantaki, M; Raskin, G

    2013-01-01

    The asteroseismic and planetary studies, like all research related to stars, need precise and accurate stellar atmospheric parameters as input. We aim at deriving the effective temperature (Teff), the surface gravity (log g), the metallicity ([Fe/H]), the projected rotational velocity (v sin i) and the MK type for 169 F, G, K, and M-type Kepler targets which were observed spectroscopically from the ground with five different instruments. We use two different spectroscopic methods to analyse 189 high-resolution, high-signal-to-noise spectra acquired for the 169 stars. For 67 stars, the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters are derived for the ?first time. KIC 9693187 and 11179629 are discovered to be double-lined spectroscopic binary systems. The results obtained for those stars for which independent determinations of the atmospheric parameters are available in the literature are used for a comparative analysis. As a result, we show that for solar-type stars the accuracy of present determinations of atmospheric...

  9. Plants, Weathering, and the Evolution of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berner, Robert A

    2008-02-05

    Over the past six years we have published 24 papers that can be divided into three sections: (1) Study of plants and weathering, (2) modeling the evolution of atmospheric CO2 over Phanerozoic time (past 550 million years). (3) Modeling of atmospheric O2 over Phanerozoic time. References to papers published acknowledging this grant can be found at the end of this report and almost all are supplied in pdf form. (1) In the temperate forests of the Cascade Mountains, USA, calcium and magnesium meet vastly different fates beneath angiosperms vs gymnosperms. Calcium is leached beneath both groves of trees, but leached 20-40% more beneath the angiosperms. Magnesium is retained in the forest system beneath the angiosperms and leached from beneath the gymnosperms. (2) We have shown that climate and CO2, based on both carbon cycle modeling and hundreds of independent proxies for paleo-CO2, correlate very well over the past 550 million year. In a recent paper we use this correlation to deduce the sensitivity of global mean temperature to a doubling of atmospheric CO2, and results are in excellent agreement with the results of climatologists based on the historical record and on theoretical climate models (GCM’s).(3) We have shown that concentrations of atmospheric oxygen, calculated by a combined carbon-sulfur cycle model, over the past 550 million years have varied with and influenced biological evolution.

  10. Shipboard Atmospheric O2 Measurements in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    outgassing on the atmospheric gradients at this latitude and time of year. This CO2 outgassing is in contrast

  11. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  12. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  13. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  14. Rapid Fluctuations in the Lower Solar Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, J K; Christian, D J; Jess, D B; Mathioudakis, M

    2011-01-01

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (IG) and CaII K-line intensity (IK) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28 - 326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 \\pm, 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25 - 100 mHz ("UHF") range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis {\\kappa}, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of IG, IK, UHF power, and {\\kappa}, reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low IG, IK, and UHF power and {\\kappa} \\approx 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of...

  15. Atmospheric and combustion chemistry of dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Sehested, J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    It has been demonstrated that dimethyl ether (DME) is an ideal diesel fuel alternative. DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, combines good fuel properties with low exhaust emissions and low combustion noise. Large scale production of this fuel can take place using a single step catalytic process converting CH{sub 4} to DME. The fate of DME in the atmosphere has previously been studied. The atmospheric degradation is initiated by the reaction with hydroxyl radicals, which is also a common feature of combustion processes. Spectrokinetic investigations and product analysis were used to demonstrate that the intermediate oxy radical, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}O, exhibits a novel reaction pathway of hydrogen atom ejection. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to chemi-ions based on supersonic molecular beam sampling has recently been demonstrated. The highly reactive ionic intermediates are sampled directly from the flame and identified by collision activation mass spectrometry and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrum reflects the distribution of the intermediates in the flame. The atmospheric degradation of DME as well as the unique fuel properties of a oxygen containing compound will be discussed.

  16. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  17. Dirac Equation at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Chun-Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose finite temperature Dirac equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature for a relativistic particle of spin-1/2. When the temperature T=0, it become Dirac equation. With the equation, we can study the relativistic quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature.

  18. Atmospheric Chemistry of Venus-like Exoplanets Laura Schaefer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Atmospheric Chemistry of Venus-like Exoplanets by Laura Schaefer and Bruce Fegley, Jr thermodynamic calculations to model atmospheric chemistry on terrestrial exoplanets that are hot enough for chemical equilibria between the atmosphere and lithosphere, as on Venus. The results of our calculations

  19. Isotopic evidence for Mesoarchaean anoxia and changing atmospheric sulphur chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Alan Jay

    LETTERS Isotopic evidence for Mesoarchaean anoxia and changing atmospheric sulphur chemistry James changes in pre-2.45-Gyr-ago atmospheric pathways for non-mass-dependent chemistry and in the ultraviolet J. Kaufman1 The evolution of the Earth's atmosphere is marked by a transition from an early

  20. Phase Transitions of Aqueous Atmospheric Particles Scot T. Martin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transformations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles," in 1995-1996 at MIT in Atmospheric Chemistry. He was an Assistant Professor in Aquatic and Atmospheric Chemistry in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineers in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program). His laboratory research group is currently active in two

  1. Renewed growth of atmospheric methane R. G. Prinn,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use these data, along with an inverse method applied to a simple model of atmospheric chemistry this observation further using a simple model of atmospheric transport and chemistry to attempt to quantifyRenewed growth of atmospheric methane M. Rigby,1 R. G. Prinn,1 P. J. Fraser,2 P. G. Simmonds,3 R. L

  2. Photo: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , marine geophysics, ocean acoustics, and marine and atmospheric chemistry. The school is also known as onePhoto: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) was founded in 1943 in Biscayne Bay near Miami. It is the only subtropical applied and basic marine and atmospheric research

  3. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    in atmospheric chemistry/air quality and climate and a growing reputation in oceanography, geophysicsSchool of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Strategic Plan March 1 opportunities. Vision The vision of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is: To lead in innovative

  4. Usage Policies Notebook for Thermco Atmospheric Diffusion Furnace system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Usage Policies Notebook for Thermco Atmospheric Diffusion Furnace system Revision date September 2014 #12;2 Emergency Plan for Diffusion Furnaces Standard Operating Procedures for Emergencies Contact;4 Usage Policies for Thermco Atmospheric Diffusion Furnace Standard policies for usage The Atmospheric

  5. High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions A. S´obester , S. J. Johnston and processing atmospheric observations across a range of altitudes. We consider the aeronautical a specified block of airspace. I. The Need for Wide Altitude Range Atmospheric Observations The ability

  6. MEA 213 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences I FALL Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    and define the major terms that apply to meteorology. Structure of the atmosphere: Explain the chemical composition and vertical structure of the atmosphere. Weather maps: Read, interpret and plot station moisture parameter such as dew point, specific humidity, and mixing ratio from measured atmospheric

  7. RESULTS FROM THE PHOENIX ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE PAUL WITHERS*,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    RESULTS FROM THE PHOENIX ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE EXPERIMENT PAUL WITHERS*,a AND DAVID C. CATLINGb through the atmosphere of Mars, Phoenix recorded acceleration and angular velocity data using the Experimental Data Records (EDRs) of the Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment (ASE), are available from

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T

    2004-10-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  9. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  10. Reactive greenhouse gas scenarios: Systematic exploration of uncertainties and the role of atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Holmes, Christopher D; Hsu, Juno

    2012-01-01

    and time scales in atmospheric chemistry, Philos. Trans. R.PRATHER ET AL. : ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GREENHOUSE GASESet al. (2001), Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases,

  11. Environmental Chamber Study of Atmospheric Chemistry and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yingdi

    2011-01-01

    modelling: a review. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics,emerging issues. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009. 9:aqueous phase. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009. 9:

  12. A comparison of the chemical sinks of atmospheric organics in the gas and aqueous phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, S. A; Nizkorodov, S. A

    2012-01-01

    cal data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phaseAttribution 3.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics AJ. and Pandis, S. : Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, John

  13. Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Theory, GWPs for CH 4 and CO, and runaway growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1996-01-01

    Program and NSF's Atmospheric Chemistry Program for supporteigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, (2) Exponential decaytracer gases and atmospheric chemistry, in steady-state

  14. Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

    2011-01-01

    for CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10,and precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9,dust particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9,

  15. Atmospheric chemistry results from the ANTCI 2005 Antarctic plateau airborne study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2010 for Full Article Atmospheric chemistry results from theL. , et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from the2010), Plume chemistry and atmospheric impact of emissions

  16. Time scales in atmospheric chemistry: Theory, GWPs for CH4 and CO, and runaway growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Prather, MJ

    1996-01-01

    Program and NSF's Atmospheric Chemistry Program for supporteigenstates in atmospheric chemistry, (2) Exponential decaytracer gases and atmospheric chemistry, in steady-state

  17. Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew W.

    2011-01-01

    +NO 3 reaction. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 2009, 9,radicals (NO 3 ). Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 2008, 8,aerosol yields. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 2009, 9,

  18. Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

    2011-01-01

    CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 5241-precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 3223-particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9, A. P.

  19. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Phillip, Bradley L. (20976 Fairmount Blvd., Shaker Heights, Cuyahoga County, OH 44120)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compostions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  20. Materials for the scavanging of hydrogen at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Phillip, Bradley L. (Shaker Heights, OH)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen getter composition comprising a double or triple bonded hydrocarbon with a high melting point useful for removing hydrogen gas, to partial pressures below 0.01 torr, from enclosed spaces and particularly from vessels used for transporting or containing fluids at elevated temperatures. The hydrogen getter compositions disclosed herein and their reaction products will neither melt nor char at temperatures in excess of 100.degree. C. They possess significant advantages over conventional hydrogen getters, namely low risk of fire or explosion, no requirement for high temperature activation or operation, the ability to absorb hydrogen even in the presence of contaminants such as water, water vapor, common atmospheric gases and oil mists and are designed to be disposed within the confines of the apparatus. These getter materials can be mixed with binders, such as fluropolymers, which permit the getter material to be fabricated into useful shapes and/or impart desirable properties such as water repellency or impermeability to various gases.

  1. Chemistry of Silicate Atmospheres of Evaporating Super-Recommended short title: Silicate Atmospheres of Super-Earths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Chemistry of Silicate Atmospheres of Evaporating Super- Earths Recommended short title: Silicate Atmospheres of Super-Earths Laura Schaefer1,2 Bruce Fegley, Jr.1,3 1 Planetary Chemistry through currently available methods. Keywords: atmosphere, silicate, exoplanet, chemistry #12;- 4 - 1

  2. Numerical simulations of multi-shell plasma twisters in the solar atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfv\\'en waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube, and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube which is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreov...

  3. Simulating the escaping atmospheres of hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salz, M; Schneider, P C; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    Absorption of high-energy radiation in planetary thermospheres is believed to lead to the formation of planetary winds. The resulting mass-loss rates can affect the evolution, particularly of small gas planets. We present 1D, spherically symmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the escaping atmospheres of 18 hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood. Our sample only includes strongly irradiated planets, whose expanded atmospheres may be detectable via transit spectroscopy. The simulations were performed with the PLUTO-CLOUDY interface, which couples a detailed photoionization and plasma simulation code with a general MHD code. We study the thermospheric escape and derive improved estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our simulations reproduce the temperature-pressure profile measured via sodium D absorption in HD 189733 b, but show unexplained differences in the case of HD 209458 b. In contrast to general assumptions, we find that the gravitationally more tightly bound thermospheres of massive and compact...

  4. On detecting biospheres from thermodynamic disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Catling, David C

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in the atmospheres of Solar System planets, in which we quantify the difference in Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere compared to that of all the atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere, as measured by this available Gibbs free energy, is not unusual by Solar System standards and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's atmosphere is in contact with a surface ocean, which means that gases can react with water, and so a multiphase calculation that includes aqueous species is required. We find that the disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole o...

  5. Sulfur capture by oil shale ashes under atmospheric and pressurized FBC conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kuelaots, I.; Ots, A. [Tallinn Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Dept.

    1995-12-31

    When oil shale contains large quantities of limestone, a significant auto-absorption of sulfur is possible under suitable conditions. The sulfur capture by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus. The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. The Ca/S molar ratios in the two oil shales studied were 8 (Estonian) and 10 (Israeli). The samples were first burned in a gas atmosphere containing O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2} if pressurized). After the combustion step, SO{sub 2} was added and sulfation started. The results with the oil shales were compared to those obtained with an oil shale cyclone ash from the Narva power plant in Estonia. In general, the results from the sulfur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized conditions showed that the oil shale cannot only capture its own sulfur but also significant amounts of additional sulfur of another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. For example from the runs at atmospheric pressure, the conversion of CaO to CaSO{sub 4} was about 70% for Israeli oil shale and about 55% for Estonian oil shale (850 C). For the cyclone ash the corresponding conversion was about 20%. In comparison it could be mentioned that under the same conditions the conversions of natural limestones are about 30%. The reason the cyclone ash was a poor sulfur absorbent was probably due to its temperature history. In Narva the oil shale was burned at a significantly higher temperature (1,400 C) than was used in the experiments (750 C and 850 C). This caused the ash to sinter and the reactive surface area of the cyclone ash was therefore decreased.

  6. Noble gas temperature control of metal clusters: A molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    Noble gas temperature control of metal clusters: A molecular dynamics study Jan Westergren a noble gas atmosphere. The simulations are performed using a many-body interaction scheme for the intra-cluster potential, while a pairwise Lennard-Jones potential is used to model the interaction between the noble gas

  7. Untangling the formation of the cyclic carbon trioxide isomer in low temperature carbon dioxide ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Untangling the formation of the cyclic carbon trioxide isomer in low temperature carbon dioxide of the cyclic carbon trioxide isomer, CO3(X 1 A1), in carbon-dioxide-rich extraterrestrial ices and in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Carbon dioxide ices were

  8. An examination of short-and long-term airground temperature coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    by direct solar radiation heating rather than by conduction. Results from a numerical model indicate atmosphere appear to be coupled. Longer-term records ( f 30 years) from selected climatological stations. This coupling is important for many reasons. For example, ground temperatures drive and modulate the response

  9. Global Drifter Program (GDP) Drifting buoy measurements of Sea Surface Temperature,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Drifter Program (GDP) Drifting buoy measurements of Sea Surface Temperature, Mixed Layer Currents, Atmospheric Pressure and Winds http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/dac/gdp.html 26th Data Buoy: the principal component of the Global Surface Drifting Buoy Array, a branch of NOAA's Global Ocean Observing

  10. Simulating heat transport of harmonic temperature signals in the Earth's shallow subsurface: Lower-boundary sensitivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Simulating heat transport of harmonic temperature signals in the Earth's shallow subsurface: Lower changes, freeze-thaw cycles, and hydrologic dynamics. It is uncertain, however, whether the reported atmospheric simulations. Citation: Smerdon, J. E., and M. Stieglitz (2006), Simulating heat transport

  11. Temperature-driven decoupling of key phases of organic matter degradation in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Nathaniel B.

    Temperature-driven decoupling of key phases of organic matter degradation in marine sediments for review August 29, 2005) The long-term burial of organic carbon in sediments results in the net and atmosphere. Sediment microbial activity plays a major role in determining whether particulate organic carbon

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

  13. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  14. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  15. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  16. Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

    2009-01-01

    Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

  17. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  18. Magnetospheric structure and atmospheric Joule heating of habitable planets orbiting M-dwarf stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Glocer, A.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-07-20

    We study the magnetospheric structure and the ionospheric Joule Heating of planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone using a set of magnetohydrodynamic models. The stellar wind solution is used to drive a model for the planetary magnetosphere, which is coupled with a model for the planetary ionosphere. Our simulations reveal that the space environment around close-in habitable planets is extreme, and the stellar wind plasma conditions change from sub- to super-Alfvénic along the planetary orbit. As a result, the magnetospheric structure changes dramatically with a bow shock forming in the super-Alfvénic sectors, while no bow shock forms in the sub-Alfvénic sectors. The planets reside most of the time in the sub-Alfvénic sectors with poor atmospheric protection. A significant amount of Joule Heating is provided at the top of the atmosphere as a result of the intense stellar wind. For the steady-state solution, the heating is about 0.1%-3% of the total incoming stellar irradiation, and it is enhanced by 50% for the time-dependent case. The significant Joule Heating obtained here should be considered in models for the atmospheres of habitable planets in terms of the thickness of the atmosphere, the top-side temperature and density, the boundary conditions for the atmospheric pressure, and particle radiation and transport. Here we assume constant ionospheric Pedersen conductance similar to that of the Earth. The conductance could be greater due to the intense EUV radiation leading to smaller heating rates. We plan to quantify the ionospheric conductance in future study.

  19. Nonlinear symmetric stability of planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, J.C.; Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-11-01

    The energy-Casimir method is applied to the problem of symmetric stability in the context of a compressible, hydrostatic planetary atmosphere with a general equation of state. Linear stability criteria for symmetric disturbances to a zonally symmetric baroclinic flow are obtained. In the special case of a perfect gas the results of Stevens (1983) are recovered. Nonlinear stability conditions are also obtained that, in addition to implying linear stability, provide an upper bound on a certain positive-definite measure of disturbance amplitude.

  20. Atmospheric fogging in underground mine airways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillies, A.D.S.; Schimmelpfennig

    1983-04-01

    Loss of visibility due to the occurrence of atmospheric fogging in underground mine airways can lead to longer travel times and loss of production efficiency, an increase in the frequency of vehicular and foot traffic accidents and difficulty in checking rock surfaces for instability and loose material. Where hot and humid surface air meets colder underground air, conditions for fog formation may be present. Further, suspended particulate matter from diesel exhausts or stoping operations together with slow movement of air along passageways may contribute to formation. This study describes an investigation being undertaken with the cooperation of Kennecott's Ozark Lead Co. to identify causes of the problem.

  1. Constraining the atmospheric composition of the day-night terminators of HD 189733b: Atmospheric retrieval with aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Min; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Barstow, Joanna K.; Heng, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    A number of observations have shown that Rayleigh scattering by aerosols dominates the transmission spectrum of HD 189733b at wavelengths shortward of 1 ?m. In this study, we retrieve a range of aerosol distributions consistent with transmission spectroscopy between 0.3-24 ?m that were recently re-analyzed by Pont et al. To constrain the particle size and the optical depth of the aerosol layer, we investigate the degeneracies between aerosol composition, temperature, planetary radius, and molecular abundances that prevent unique solutions for transit spectroscopy. Assuming that the aerosol is composed of MgSiO{sub 3}, we suggest that a vertically uniform aerosol layer over all pressures with a monodisperse particle size smaller than about 0.1 ?m and an optical depth in the range 0.002-0.02 at 1 ?m provides statistically meaningful solutions for the day/night terminator regions of HD 189733b. Generally, we find that a uniform aerosol layer provide adequate fits to the data if the optical depth is less than 0.1 and the particle size is smaller than 0.1 ?m, irrespective of the atmospheric temperature, planetary radius, aerosol composition, and gaseous molecules. Strong constraints on the aerosol properties are provided by spectra at wavelengths shortward of 1 ?m as well as longward of 8 ?m, if the aerosol material has absorption features in this region. We show that these are the optimal wavelengths for quantifying the effects of aerosols, which may guide the design of future space observations. The present investigation indicates that the current data offer sufficient information to constrain some of the aerosol properties of HD189733b, but the chemistry in the terminator regions remains uncertain.

  2. Atmospheric retrieval analysis of the directly imaged exoplanet HR 8799b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Min; Heng, Kevin; Irwin, Patrick G. J. E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch

    2013-12-01

    Directly imaged exoplanets are unexplored laboratories for the application of the spectral and temperature retrieval method, where the chemistry and composition of their atmospheres are inferred from inverse modeling of the available data. As a pilot study, we focus on the extrasolar gas giant HR 8799b, for which more than 50 data points are available. We upgrade our non-linear optimal estimation retrieval method to include a phenomenological model of clouds that requires the cloud optical depth and monodisperse particle size to be specified. Previous studies have focused on forward models with assumed values of the exoplanetary properties; there is no consensus on the best-fit values of the radius, mass, surface gravity, and effective temperature of HR 8799b. We show that cloud-free models produce reasonable fits to the data if the atmosphere is of super-solar metallicity and non-solar elemental abundances. Intermediate cloudy models with moderate values of the cloud optical depth and micron-sized particles provide an equally reasonable fit to the data and require a lower mean molecular weight. We report our best-fit values for the radius, mass, surface gravity, and effective temperature of HR 8799b. The mean molecular weight is about 3.8, while the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is about unity due to the prevalence of carbon monoxide. Our study emphasizes the need for robust claims about the nature of an exoplanetary atmosphere to be based on analyses involving both photometry and spectroscopy and inferred from beyond a few photometric data points, such as are typically reported for hot Jupiters.

  3. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  4. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  5. Pyrolysis and gasification of coal at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygourakis, K.

    1988-01-01

    Coals of different ranks will be pyrolyzed in a microscope hot-stage reactor using inert and reacting atmospheres. The macropore structure of the produced chars will be characterized using video microscopy and digital image processing techniques to obtain pore size distributions. Comparative studies will quantify the effect of pyrolysis conditions (heating rates, final heat treatment temperatures, particle size and inert or reacting atmosphere) on the pore structure of the devolatilized chars. The devolatilized chars will be gasified in the regime of strong intraparticle diffusional limitations using O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O/N{sub 2}2 mixtures. Constant temperature and programmed-temperature experiments in a TGA will be used for these studies. Additional gasification experiments performed in the hot-stage reactor will be videotaped and selected images will be analyzed to obtain quantitative data on particle shrinkage and fragmentation. Discrete mathematical models will be developed and validated using the experimental gasification data.

  6. Causes and Implications of Persistent Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Biases in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Arora, Vivek K. [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada] [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada; Bao, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics] [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Cadule, Patricia [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment] [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment; Ji, Duoying [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing] [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing; Jones, Chris D. [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office] [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office; Kawamiya, Michio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)] [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Khatiwala, Samar [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY] [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Obata, Atsushi [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan] [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Shevliakova, Elena [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Six, Katharina D. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany] [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany; Tjiputra, Jerry F. [Uni Climate, Uni Research] [Uni Climate, Uni Research; Volodin, Evgeny M. [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow] [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow; Wu, Tongwen [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing] [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing

    2014-01-01

    The strength of feedbacks between a changing climate and future CO2 concentrations are uncertain and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). We analyzed emission-driven simulations--in which atmospheric CO2 levels were computed prognostically--for historical (1850-2005) and future periods (RCP 8.5 for 2006-2100) produced by 15 ESMs for the Fifth Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Comparison of ESM prognostic atmospheric CO2 over the historical period with observations indicated that ESMs, on average, had a small positive bias in predictions of contemporary atmospheric CO2. Weak ocean carbon uptake in many ESMs contributed to this bias, based on comparisons with observations of ocean and atmospheric anthropogenic carbon inventories. We found a significant linear relationship between contemporary atmospheric CO2 biases and future CO2 levels for the multi-model ensemble. We used this relationship to create a contemporary CO2 tuned model (CCTM) estimate of the atmospheric CO2 trajectory for the 21st century. The CCTM yielded CO2 estimates of 600 {plus minus} 14 ppm at 2060 and 947 {plus minus} 35 ppm at 2100, which were 21 ppm and 32 ppm below the multi-model mean during these two time periods. Using this emergent constraint approach, the likely ranges of future atmospheric CO2, CO2-induced radiative forcing, and CO2-induced temperature increases for the RCP 8.5 scenario were considerably narrowed compared to estimates from the full ESM ensemble. Our analysis provided evidence that much of the model-to-model variation in projected CO2 during the 21st century was tied to biases that existed during the observational era, and that model differences in the representation of concentration-carbon feedbacks and other slowly changing carbon cycle processes appear to be the primary driver of this variability. By improving models to more closely match the long-term time series of CO2 from Mauna Loa, our analysis suggests uncertainties in future climate projections can be reduced.

  7. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars I. Optically thin Thomson-scattering atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wielgus, M; S?dowski, A; Narayan, R; Abramowicz, M

    2015-01-01

    In general relativity static gaseous atmospheres may be in hydrostatic balance in the absence of a supporting stellar surface, provided that the luminosity is close to the Eddington value. We construct analytic models of optically thin, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation pressure of a luminous central body in the Schwarzschild metric.

  8. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 17431758 Impact of urban heat island on regional atmospheric pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    pollution C. Sarrata,Ã, A. Lemonsub , V. Massona , D. Guedaliac a CNRM-GAME Me´te´o-France 42, avenue and spatial distribution of atmospheric pollutants over the Paris region. One anticyclonic episode from urban effects have an important impact on the primary and secondary regional pollutants, more

  9. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars I. Optically thin Thomson-scattering atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wielgus; W. Klu?niak; A. S?dowski; R. Narayan; M. Abramowicz

    2015-05-22

    In general relativity static gaseous atmospheres may be in hydrostatic balance in the absence of a supporting stellar surface, provided that the luminosity is close to the Eddington value. We construct analytic models of optically thin, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation pressure of a luminous central body in the Schwarzschild metric.

  10. SYNTHETIC SPECTRA AND COLORS OF YOUNG GIANT PLANET ATMOSPHERES: EFFECTS OF INITIAL CONDITIONS AND ATMOSPHERIC METALLICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as giant planets should be warmest, largest, and brightest when they are young, but will cool, contractSYNTHETIC SPECTRA AND COLORS OF YOUNG GIANT PLANET ATMOSPHERES: EFFECTS OF INITIAL CONDITIONS 2008 March 17; accepted 2008 May 7 ABSTRACT We examine the spectra and infrared colors of the cool

  11. Development of a stable dielectric-barrier discharge enhanced laminar plasma jet generated at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Jie; Li Shibo; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an (China); Duan Yixiang [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an (China); Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2012-06-18

    A stable nonthermal laminar atmospheric-pressure plasma source equipped with dielectric-barrier discharge was developed to realize more efficient plasma generation, with the total energy consumption reduced to nearly 25% of the original. Temperature and emission spectra monitoring indicates that this plasma is uniform in the lateral direction of the jet core region. It is also found that this plasma contains not only abundant excited argon atoms but also sufficient excited N{sub 2} and OH. This is mainly resulted from the escape of abundant electrons from the exit, due to the sharp decrease of sustaining voltage and the coupling between ions and electrons.

  12. A new correlation between solar energy radiation and some atmospheric parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Antonio; Bonnici, Maurizio; Madonia, Mauro; Trancossi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The energy balance for an atmospheric layer near the soil is evaluated. By integrating it over the whole day period a linear relationship between the global daily solar radiation incident on a horizontal surface and the product of the sunshine hours at clear sky with the maximum temperature variation in the day is achieved. The results show a comparable accuracy with some well recognized solar energy models such as the \\ang-Prescott one, at least for Mediterranean climatic area. Validation of the result has been performed using old dataset which are almost contemporary and relative to the same sites with the ones used for comparison.

  13. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  14. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  15. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  16. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  17. Can we learn something more on oscillations from atmospheric neutrinos?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2006-10-04

    We show that for long-baseline experiments using a Mt water Cerenkov detector atmospheric neutrino data provide a powerful method to resolve parameter degeneracies. In particular, the combination of long-baseline and atmospheric data increases significantly the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the octant of $\\theta_{23}$. Furthermore, we discuss the possibility to use $\\mu$-like atmospheric neutrino data from a big magnetized iron calorimeter to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. Improved heterojunction quality in Cu2O-based solar cells through the optimization of atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposited Zn1-xMgxO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ievskaya, Yulia; Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Sadhanala, Aditya; Musselman, Kevin P.; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition (AP-SALD) was used to deposit n-type ZnO and Zn1-xMgxO thin films onto p-type thermally oxidized Cu2O substrates outside vacuum at low temperature. The performance of photovoltaic devices...

  19. ESRP 285 Climate Chart Questions: Your Name _______________________________ You saw Figure 1 in class. It shows estimates of atmospheric CO2 in black, average earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    in class. It shows estimates of atmospheric CO2 in black, average earth temperature in red and sea level from the readings for the 3rd class meeting. Figure 2. Closer look at the most recent 50,000 years 1

  20. The Atmospheric and Terrestrial Mobile Laboratory (ATML).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zak, Bernard Daniel; Rahn, Thom (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Nitschke, Kim (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Ivey, Mark D.; Mora, Claudia (Los Alamos National Laboratory); McDowell, Nate (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Love, Steve (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Dubey, M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Michelsen, Hope A.; Guilderson, Tom (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Schubert, William Kent; Costigan, Keeley (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Chylek, Petr (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bambha, Ray P.; Roskovensky, John K.

    2010-04-01

    The ionospheric disturbance dynamo signature in geomagnetic variations is investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. The model results are tested against reference magnetically quiet time observations on 21 June 1993, and disturbance effects were observed on 11 June 1993. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed diurnal and latitude variations of the geomagnetic horizontal intensity and declination for the reference quiet day in midlatitude and low-latitude regions but underestimates their amplitudes. The patterns of the disturbance dynamo signature and its source 'anti-Sq' current system are well reproduced in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the model significantly underestimates the amplitude of disturbance dynamo effects when compared with observations. Furthermore, the largest simulated disturbances occur at different local times than the observations. The discrepancies suggest that the assumed high-latitude storm time energy inputs in the model were not quantitatively accurate for this storm.

  1. Atmospheric lead in downtown Guatemala City

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durando, M.L.; Aragon, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic absorption (AA) analysis was employed to determine, for the first time in this country, lead concentrations in aerosols collected in Nuclepore filter media during the months of February and March (1980) in Guatemala City, Guatemala. In particular, the lead in the atmospheric fine particulate was measured in different downtown locations around noontime and in a single location at 1-h intervals throughout the day. The first was used to study short-term variations from one location to the other, and the second one was used to correlate parameters such as traffic density and wind velocity with the levels of airborne lead on the same day. In addition, this paper presents a brief discussion of the lead content in Guatemalan gasoline, the lead levels in street dusts, and the total suspended particulate matter in downtown Guatemala City.

  2. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana; Pop, Nicolina; Calinoiu, Delia

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  3. Thermodynamics of atmospheric circulation on hot Jupiters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Goodman

    2008-10-07

    Atmospheric circulation on tidally-locked exoplanets is driven by the absorption and reradiation of heat from the host star. They are natural heat engines, converting heat into mechanical energy. A steady state is possible only if there is a mechanism to dissipate mechanical energy, or if the redistribution of heat is so effective that the Carnot efficiency is driven to zero. Simulations based on primitive, equivalent-barotropic, or shallow-water equations without explicit provision for dissipation of kinetic energy and for recovery of that energy as heat, violate energy conservation. More seriously perhaps, neglect of physical sources of drag may overestimate wind speeds and rates of advection of heat from the day to the night side.

  4. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not componentsmore »of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.« less

  5. Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of Atmosphere Composition and Health Responses to Inhaled Emissions Diesel and Gasoline Engine Emissions: Characterization of...

  6. Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, W P L

    2007-01-01

    comparable to that for ethane. It is concluded that methylmethyl iodide and ethane. 32 Table A-of methyl iodide and ethane in the atmospheric reactivity

  7. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than...

  8. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces Chemistry occurring at or near the surfaces of aqueous droplets and thin films in the...

  9. A New Photochemistry Code for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    A New Photochemistry Code for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres Renyu Hu, Sara Seager Massachusetts-transport equation for 111 molecules and aerosols · Eddy diffusion · Chemical kinetics · Photolysis · Boundary

  10. Application of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Polymer and Composite Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    oxidation of selected polymers using an atmospheric pressuremorphological modification of polymers under a helium-oxygenand dicyclopentadiene polymer, Submitted to Carbon for

  11. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore »statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  12. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  13. The role of moisture transport between ground and atmosphere in global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rind, D.; Rosenzweig, C.; Stieglitz, M.

    1997-12-31

    Projections of the effect of climate change on future water availability are examined by reviewing the formulations used to calculate moisture transport between the ground and the atmosphere. General circulation models and climate change impact models have substantially different formulations for evapotranspiration, so their projections of future water availability often disagree, even though they use the same temperature and precipitation forecasts. General circulation models forecast little change in tropical and subtropical water availability, while impact models show severe water and agricultural shortages. A comparison of observations and modeling techniques shows that the parameterizations in general circulation models likely lead to an underestimate of the impacts of global warming on soil moisture and vegetation. Such errors would crucially affect the temperature and precipitation forecasts used in impact models. Some impact model evaporation formulations are probably more appropriate than those in general circulation models, but important questions remain. More observations are needed, especially in the vicinity of forests, to determine appropriate parameterizations.

  14. Dynamic and spectroscopic characteristics of atmospheric gliding arc in gas-liquid two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, X.; Yu, L.; Yan, J. H.; Cen, K. F.; Cheron, B. G.

    2009-11-15

    In this study, an atmospheric alternating-current gliding arc device in gas-liquid two-phase flow has been developed for the purpose of waste water degradation. The dynamic behavior of the gas-liquid gliding arc is investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals, while the spatial evolution of the arc column is analyzed by high speed photography. Different arc breakdown regimes are reported, and the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation characteristic of the hybrid gliding arc in air-water mixture. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the active species generated in the gas-liquid plasma. The axial evolution of the OH (309 nm) intensity is determined, while the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the OH are obtained by a comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra. The significant discrepancy between the rotational and translational temperatures has also been discussed.

  15. Microwave plasma based single step method for free standing graphene synthesis at atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J.; Dias, A.; Ferreira, C. M.; Luhrs, C. C.; Phillips, J.; Abrashev, M. V.

    2013-09-23

    Microwave atmospheric pressure plasmas driven by surface waves were used to synthesize graphene sheets from vaporized ethanol molecules carried through argon plasma. In the plasma, ethanol decomposes creating carbon atoms that form nanostructures in the outlet plasma stream, where external cooling/heating was applied. It was found that the outlet gas stream temperature plays an important role in the nucleation processes and the structural quality of the produced nanostructures. The synthesis of few layers (from one to five) graphene has been confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectral studies were conducted to determine the ratio of the 2D to G peaks (>2). Disorder D-peak to G-peak intensity ratio decreases when outlet gas stream temperature decreases.

  16. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional multiple open magnetic flux tubes in the stratified solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, F. A.; Erdélyi, R. [SP"2RC, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Fedun, V., E-mail: f.gent@shef.ac.uk [Space Systems Laboratory, Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  17. Quantitative infrared absorption cross-sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-04-25

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Produced by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, the OH- and O3-initiated oxidations of isoprene are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, however, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via stand-off infrared or in situ detection. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm?1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in amore »19.94 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm?1 resolution, using a Bruker 66v FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures at each temperature and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atmosphere.« less

  18. FUV Irradiated Disk Atmospheres: Ly$\\alpha$ and the Origin of Hot H$_2$ Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E

    2015-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are strongly irradiated by a stellar FUV spectrum that is dominated by Ly$\\alpha$ photons. We investigate the impact of stellar Ly$\\alpha$ irradiation on the terrestrial planet region of disks ($\\lesssim 1$AU) using an updated thermal-chemical model of a disk atmosphere irradiated by stellar FUV and X-rays. The radiative transfer of Ly$\\alpha$ is implemented in a simple approach that includes scattering by H I and absorption by molecules and dust. Because of their non-radial propagation path, scattered Ly$\\alpha$ photons deposit their energy deeper in the disk atmosphere than the radially propagating FUV continuum photons. We find that Ly$\\alpha$ has a significant impact on the thermal structure of the atmosphere. Photochemical heating produced by scattered Ly$\\alpha$ photons interacting with water vapor and OH leads to a layer of hot (1500 - 2500 K) molecular gas. The temperature in the layer is high enough to thermally excite the H$_2$ to vibrational levels from which they can be fluore...

  19. Forecast of surface layer meteorological parameters at Cerro Paranal with a mesoscale atmospherical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lascaux, Franck; Fini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This article aims at proving the feasibility of the forecast of all the most relevant classical atmospherical parameters for astronomical applications (wind speed and direction, temperature) above the ESO ground-base site of Cerro Paranal with a mesoscale atmospherical model called Meso-Nh. In a precedent paper we have preliminarily treated the model performances obtained in reconstructing some key atmospherical parameters in the surface layer 0-30~m studying the bias and the RMSE on a statistical sample of 20 nights. Results were very encouraging and it appeared therefore mandatory to confirm such a good result on a much richer statistical sample. In this paper, the study was extended to a total sample of 129 nights between 2007 and 2011 distributed in different parts of the solar year. This large sample made our analysis more robust and definitive in terms of the model performances and permitted us to confirm the excellent performances of the model. Besides, we present an independent analysis of the model p...

  20. A new chemical scheme to study carbon-rich exoplanet atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venot, Olivia; Agúndez, Marcelino; Decin, Leen; Bounaceur, Roda

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheres with a high C/O ratio are expected to contain an important quantity of hydrocarbons, including heavy molecules (with more than 2 carbon atoms). To study correctly these C-rich atmospheres, a chemical scheme adapted to this composition is necessary. We have implemented a chemical scheme that can describe the kinetics of species with up to 6 carbon atoms. This chemical scheme has been developed with specialists of combustion and validated through experiments on a wide range of T and P. This chemical network is available on the online database KIDA. We have created a grid of 12 models to explore different thermal profiles and C/O ratios. For each of them, we have compared the chemical composition determined with a C0-C2 chemical scheme (species with up to 2 carbon atoms) and with the C0-C6 scheme. We found no difference in the results obtained with the two schemes when photolyses are not included in the model, whatever the temperature of the atmosphere. In contrast, when there is photochemistry, diff...

  1. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hillier, A., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, 17 Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  2. Atmospheric Response to Fukushima Daiichi NPP (Japan) Accident Reviled by Satellite and Ground observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouzounov, D; Hattori, K; Kafatos, M; Taylor, P

    2011-01-01

    Immediately after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan we started to continuously survey the Outgoing Long-wavelength Radiation (OLR, 10-13 microns) from NOAA/AVHRR. Our preliminary results show the presence of hot spots on the top of the atmosphere over the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) and due to their persistence over the same region they are most likely not of meteorological origin. On March 14 and 21 we detected a significant increase in radiation (14 W/m2) at the top of the atmosphere which also coincides with a reported radioactivity gas leaks from the FDNPP. After March 21 the intensity of OLR started to decline, which has been confirmed by ground radiometer network. We hypothesize that this increase in OLR was a result of the radioactive leaks released in atmosphere from the FDNPP. This energy triggers ionization of the air near the ground and lead to release of latent heat energy due to change of air humidity and temperature. Our early results demonstrate the potential ...

  3. The dayside atmosphere of the hot-Neptune GJ 436b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhusudhan, N

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the day-side atmosphere of the hot Neptune GJ~436b, based on recent Spitzer observations. We report statistical constraints on the thermal and chemical properties of the planet atmosphere, study correlations between the various molecular species, and discuss scenarios of equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemistry in GJ~436b. We model the planet atmosphere with a 1-D line-by-line radiative transfer code with parametrized molecular abundances and temperature structure. We explore the model parameter space with 10^6 models, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme. Our results encompass previous findings, indicating a paucity of methane, an over-abundance of CO and CO2, and a slight under-abundance of H2O, as compared to equilibrium chemistry with solar metallicity. The concentrations of the species are highly correlated. Our best-fit constraints require a methane (CH4) mixing ratio between 1.0e-7 - 1.0e-6, with CO > 1.0E-3, CO2 between 1.0e-6 - 1.0e-4, and H2O < 1.0E-4; higher...

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babij, Micha?; Kowalski, Zbigniew W. Nitsch, Karol; Gotszalk, Teodor; Silberring, Jerzy

    2014-05-15

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  5. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  6. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  7. Fingerprints of anthropogenic and natural variability in global-mean surface temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Yuan

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis designed to detect greenhouse warming by distinguishing between temperature rises induced by increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and those induced by background variability that are present without changes in atmospheric composition. The strategy is based on the surface temperature field. At each observation time, the projection of the anomalous temperature field on the presumed anthropogenic fingerprint is removed in order to obtain a temperature deviation field; i.e., the temperature anomalies in the phase space orthogonal to the anthropogenic fingerprint, which are presumed to be entirely natural. The time series of the expansion coefficients of the fingerprint a(t) is then regressed on this temperature deviation field to identify the axis in the orthogonal phase space along which the variations are most strongly correlated, and an index n(t) of the temporal variations along that axis is generated. The index a(t) is then regressed upon n(t) and the resulting least squares fit is regarded as the component of a(t) that can be ascribed to natural causes. The analysis was performed for monthly global surface temperature anomaly fields for the period 1900-95. Results indicate that two well defined patterns of natural variability contribute to variations in global mean temperature: the synthetic cold ocean-warm land (COWL) pattern and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In domains that include surface air temperature over Eurasia and North America, the COWL pattern tends to be dominant. The ENSO signature emerges as the pattern most strongly linearly correlated with global sea surface temperature and with tropospheric layer-averaged temperatures. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Cobalt doped lanthanum chromite material suitable for high temperature use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, R.J.

    1986-12-23

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, subject to thermal cycling temperatures of between about 25 C and about 1,200 C, capable of electronic interconnection to at least one other electrochemical cell and capable of operating in an environment containing oxygen and a fuel, is made; where the cell has a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where an improved interconnect material is applied along a portion of a supporting electrode; where the interconnect is made of a chemically modified lanthanum chromite, containing cobalt as the important additive, which interconnect allows for adjustment of the thermal expansion of the interconnect material to more nearly match that of other cell components, such as zirconia electrolyte, and is stable in oxygen containing atmospheres such as air and in fuel environments. 2 figs.

  9. Cobalt doped lanthanum chromite material suitable for high temperature use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, subject to thermal cycling temperatures of between about 25.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C., capable of electronic interconnection to at least one other electrochemical cell and capable of operating in an environment containing oxygen and a fuel, is made; where the cell has a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where an improved interconnect material is applied along a portion of a supporting electrode; where the interconnect is made of a chemically modified lanthanum chromite, containing cobalt as the important additive, which interconnect allows for adjustment of the thermal expansion of the interconnect material to more nearly match that of other cell components, such as zirconia electrolyte, and is stable in oxygen containing atmospheres such as air and in fuel environments.

  10. Line Broadening and Temperature Dependence in the 0 --> 3 Overtone Band of Carbon Monoxide Cyril Hnatovsky , Adriana Predoi-Cross , Kimberly Strong , James R. Drummond , and D. Chris Benner1 1 1 1 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Kimberly

    Line Broadening and Temperature Dependence in the 0 --> 3 Overtone Band of Carbon Monoxide Cyril. Introduction Carbon monoxide (CO) is a trace constituent present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is produced, and the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. The lifetime of an atmospheric CO molecule is relatively

  11. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji; and others

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T {sub eff}, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ? 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T {sub eff}, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test was performed with a subsample of 138 stars from the ELODIE stellar library, and the literature atmospheric parameters were recovered within 125 K for T {sub eff}, 0.10 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.29 dex for log g. These precisions are consistent with or better than those provided by the pipelines of surveys operating with similar resolutions. These results show that the spectral indices are a competitive tool to characterize stars with intermediate resolution spectra.

  12. Quantum Chaos at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Caron; H. Jirari; H. Kröger; X. Q. Luo; G. Melkonyan; K. J. M. Moriarty

    2001-06-23

    We use the quantum action to study quantum chaos at finite temperature. We present a numerical study of a classically chaotic 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling. We construct the quantum action non-perturbatively and find temperature dependent quantum corrections in the action parameters. We compare Poincar\\'{e} sections of the quantum action at finite temperature with those of the classical action.

  13. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Water, Methane and Carbon Monoxide in the Atmosphere of Exoplanet HR8799b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barman, Travis S; Macintosh, Bruce; Marois, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Absorption lines from water, methane and carbon monoxide are detected in the atmosphere of exoplanet HR8799b. A medium-resolution spectrum presented here shows well-resolved and easily identified spectral features from all three molecules across the K band. The majority of the lines are produced by CO and H2O, but several lines clearly belong to CH4. Comparisons between these data and atmosphere models covering a range of temperatures and gravities yield log mole fractions of H2O between -3.09 and -3.91, CO between -3.30 and -3.72 and CH4 between -5.06 and -5.85. More precise mole fractions are obtained for each temperature and gravity studied. A reanalysis of H-band data, previously obtained at similar spectral resolution, results in a nearly identical water abundance as determined from the K-band spectrum. The methane abundance is shown to be sensitive to vertical mixing and indicates an eddy diffusion coefficient in the range of 10^6 to 10^8 cm^2 s^-1, comparable to mixing in the deep troposphere of Jupite...

  15. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

  16. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

    2012-08-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

  17. 3D Model Atmospheres for Extremely Low-Mass White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tremblay, P -E; Kilic, M; Ludwig, H -G; Steffen, M; Freytag, B; Hermes, J J

    2015-01-01

    We present an extended grid of mean three-dimensional (3D) spectra for low-mass, pure-hydrogen atmosphere DA white dwarfs (WDs). We use CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics 3D simulations covering Teff = 6000-11,500 K and logg = 5-6.5 (cgs units) to derive analytical functions to convert spectroscopically determined 1D temperatures and surface gravities to 3D atmospheric parameters. Along with the previously published 3D models, the 1D to 3D corrections are now available for essentially all known convective DA WDs (i.e., logg = 5-9). For low-mass WDs, the correction in temperature is relatively small (a few per cent at the most), but the surface gravities measured from the 3D models are lower by as much as 0.35 dex. We revisit the spectroscopic analysis of the extremely low-mass (ELM) WDs, and demonstrate that the 3D models largely resolve the discrepancies seen in the radius and mass measurements for relatively cool ELM WDs in eclipsing double WD and WD + milli-second pulsar binary systems. We also use the 3D cor...

  18. Clouds and Chemistry: Ultracool Dwarf Atmospheric Properties from Optical and Infrared Colors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Marley; S. Seager; D. Saumon; K. Lodders; A. S. Ackerman; R. Freedman; X Fan

    2001-11-16

    The optical and infrared colors of L and T dwarfs are sensitive to cloud sedimentation and chemical equilibrium processes in their atmospheres. The i'-z' vs. J-K color-color diagram provides a window into diverse atmospheric processes mainly because different chemical processes govern each color, and cloud opacity largely affects J-K but not i'-z'. Using theoretical atmosphere models that include for the first time a self-consistent treatment of cloud formation, we present an interpretation of the i'-z' vs. J-K color trends of known L and T dwarfs. We find that the i'-z' color is extremely sensitive to chemical equilibrium assumptions: chemical equilibrium models accounting for cloud sedimentation predict redder i'-z' colors--by up to 2 magnitudes--than models that neglect sedimentation. We explore the previously known J-K color trends where objects first become redder, then bluer with decreasing effective temperature. Only models that include sedimentation of condensates are able to reproduce these trends. We find that the exact track of a cooling brown in J-K (and i'-z') is very sensitive to the details of clouds, in particular to the efficiency of sedimentation of condensates in its atmosphere. We also find that clouds still affect the strength of the J, H, and K band fluxes of even the coolest T dwarfs. In addition, we predict the locus in the i'-z' vs. J-K color-color diagram of brown dwarfs cooler than yet discovered.

  19. A moist aquaplanet variant of the Held–Suarez test for atmospheric model dynamical cores

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thatcher, D. R.; Jablonowski, C.

    2015-09-29

    A moist idealized test case (MITC) for atmospheric model dynamical cores is presented. The MITC is based on the Held–Suarez (HS) test that was developed for dry simulations on a flat Earth and replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of the low-level winds. This new variant of the HS test includes moisture and thereby sheds light on the non-linear dynamics-physics moisture feedbacks without the complexity of full physics parameterization packages. In particular, it adds simplified moist processes to the HS forcing to model large-scale condensation, boundary layer mixing, and the exchange ofmore »latent and sensible heat between the atmospheric surface and an ocean-covered planet. Using a variety of dynamical cores of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), this paper demonstrates that the inclusion of the moist idealized physics package leads to climatic states that closely resemble aquaplanet simulations with complex physical parameterizations. This establishes that the MITC approach generates reasonable atmospheric circulations and can be used for a broad range of scientific investigations. This paper provides examples of two application areas. First, the test case reveals the characteristics of the physics-dynamics coupling technique and reproduces coupling issues seen in full-physics simulations. In particular, it is shown that sudden adjustments of the prognostic fields due to moist physics tendencies can trigger undesirable large-scale gravity waves, which can be remedied by a more gradual application of the physical forcing. Second, the moist idealized test case can be used to intercompare dynamical cores. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the MITC approach and suggestions are made for further application areas. The new moist variant of the HS test can be considered a test case of intermediate complexity.« less

  20. Spectral Response of the Pulsationally-Induced Shocks in the Atmosphere of BW Vulpeculae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myron A. Smith; C. Simon Jeffery

    2002-10-08

    The star BW Vul excites an extremely strong radial pulsation that grows in its envelope and is responsible for visible shock features in the continuum flux and spectral line profiles emerging in the atmosphere At two phases separated by 0.8 cycles. Material propelled upwards in the atmosphere from the shock returns to the lower photosphere where it creates a second shock just before the start of the next cycle. We have obtained three nights of echelle data for this star over about 5 pulsation cycles (P = 0.201 days) in order to evaluate the effects of on a number of important lines in the spectrum, including the HeI 5875A and 6678A lines. These data were supplemented by archival high-dispersion IUE (UV) data from 1994. A comparison of profiles of the two HeI lines during the peak of the infall activity suggests that differences in the development of the blue wing at this time are due to heating and short-lived formations of an optically thin layer above the atmospheric region compressed by the infall. This discovery and the well-known decreases in equivalent widths of the CII 6578-83A doublet at the two shock phases, suggests that shock flattens the temperature gradient and produces heating in heating the upper atmosphere. Except for absorptions in the blue wings of the UV resonance lines, we find no evidence for sequential shock delays arriving at various regions of line formation of the photosphere (a "Van Hoof effect"). Phase lags cited by some former observers may be false indicators arising from varying degrees of desaturation of multiple lines, such as for the red HeI lines. In addition, an apparent lag in the equivalent width curve of lines arising from less excited atomic levels could instead be caused by post-shock cooling, followed by a rebound shock.