National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for atmospheric sciences research

  1. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  2. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  3. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  4. Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

  5. NARSTO Support for Atmospheric Science Research and Data Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a public/private alliance with members from Canada, Mexico, and the United States #12;New NARSTO Program and Sigurd W. Christensen NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 17-18, 2006 ORNL research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

  6. Atmospheric Science Program. Summaries of research in FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report provides descriptions for all projects funded by ESD under annual contracts in FY 1994. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than one year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states it goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used.

  7. Cheng-Hsuan Lu Atmospheric Sciences and Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    and aerosols in Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) by introducing a double-moment cloud component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) primarily at the National Center for Atmospheric global models (i.e., the Global Forecast System, GFS, and the Climate Forecast System, CFS). Our proposed

  8. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling...

  9. Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences 1959­2009 WayneBurt. #12;Oceanography and Atmospheric in Oceanography (TENOC). Wayne Burt immediately responds with proposal to President Strand of Oregon State College to start a graduate Department of Oceanography. 1959 Oregon State Board of Higher Education approves

  10. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP) concentrations and sea- surface temperatures (SSTs). These integrations enable the relative role of ozone

  11. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  12. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1985, this research has examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain, summarized the field studies and analyses of dry deposition and resuspension conducted in past years, and begun participation in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain; Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants; and Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation (PRECP).

  14. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  16. Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate and it emits Note: heat balance Fvis( = Fout = Te 4 z #12;(simple Greenhouse cont.) 0 1 2 3 4 Ground Space Top

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1987-06-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  19. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 20142015 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate Program in Land and Atmospheric Science at the University of Minnesota. It is a sciencebased interdisciplinary program focused on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related

  20. FUNDAMENTALS OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE COURSE: ...................................................................................... EAS B9014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    and Physics 20700 and 20800 Textbook (required): Atmospheric Science: An Introductory Survey (2nd editionFUNDAMENTALS OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE COURSE% Students will write a term paper, linking a topic learned in class with either (a) their own research or (b

  1. Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Atmospheric Sciences Undergraduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Computational Science and Engineering Certification for Atmospheric Sciences Undergraduate Students The Computational Science and Engineering certificate program is designed to provide ATMS under- graduate students a certificate in "Computational Science and Engineering," students must complete the required courses listed

  2. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  3. Atmospheric Research at BNL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Daum

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

  4. Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret Kivelson, Member, National Academy of Sciences; Member

  5. Space Science: Atmospheres Evolution of planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    ;Atmospheres / Evolution Heat Sources Compressional Energy Trapped Radioactive Material Tidal InteractionsSpace Science: Atmospheres Part- 7a Evolution of planets Out-Gassing/ Volcanoes Evolution Initial Species Solar abundance Solar wind composition? Carbonaceous chondrites? Variables Early sun

  6. Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences IntroductIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences #12;IntroductIon A Rich History in Science Driven Engineering, through research sponsored by NASA, NSF, DoD, DoE and other governmental agencies. This research has than individual components. The proud history of the disciplines has yielded a department honored

  7. The Computational Sciences. Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    The Computational Sciences. Research activities range from the theoretical foundations. The teaching mission of the computational sciences includes almost every student in the University for computational hardware and software. The computational sciences are undergoing explosive growth worldwide

  8. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sukyoung

    2013-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2013) Published online in Wiley Online Library Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea *Correspondence to: C. Yoo, Center for Atmosphere). A number of studies have shown that the MJO plays an important role in modulating the extratropical cir

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T

    2004-10-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  10. Education research Primary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Education research Primary Science Survey Report December 2011 #12;Primary Science Survey Report, Wellcome Trust 1 Background In May 2009 Key Stage 2 science SATs (Standard Assessment Tests) were abolished fiasco might occur, where the results were delayed and their quality questioned. The loss of science SATs

  11. Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

  12. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  13. What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website...

  14. Natalie Marie Mahowald Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing, Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Chemistry and 1 1 Natalie Marie Mahowald Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Director

  15. Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other. Research is tending away from classical agronomy to the science of soil, crop, air. More emphasis is on the environment, less on agriculture. 1.3 Graduate program The Field of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences offers

  16. Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    FRONT Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta of exploring and understanding our planet Dr. John A. Allan Dr. John A. Allan founded the Department of Geology at the University of Alberta in 1912, and subsequently helped establish both the Alberta Research Council and the Alberta Geological

  17. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric scientists apply physics, mathematics, and chemistry to understandAtmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric the atmosphere and its interactions with land and sea. One of the goals of atmospheric science is to understand

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    Disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear waste into marine sediments would create high temperature-high gamma radiation environments adjacent to waste canisters. Under these conditions sediments will react producing pore waters that differ significantly from those occurring naturally. These changes may enhance canister corrosion or facilitate transport of radionuclides through unreacted sediments beyond the heated zone. In addition, the term ''near field'' needs clarification, as it is used widely without having a precise meaning. Research in three areas was undertaken to improve our understanding of near field chemical processes. Initially, isothermal experiments were carried out in ''Dickson'' hydrothermal systems. These were followed by an experimental program directed at understanding the chemical effects of temperature-gradient induced transport. Finally, additional experimentation was done to study the combined effects of hydrothermal conditions and intense gamma radiation. Having completed this body of experimental work, it was concluded that near field conditions are not an obstacle to the safe use of abyssal marine sediments for the disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear wastes. 41 refs., 6 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Atmospheric sciences division. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynor, G.S. (ed.) [ed.

    1981-12-01

    The research activities of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Department of Energy and Environment for FY 1981 are presented. Facilities and major items of equipment are described. Research programs are summarized in three categories, modeling, field and laboratory experiments and data management and analysis. Each program is also described individually with title, principal investigator, sponsor and funding levels for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Future plans are summarized. Publications for FY 1981 are listed with abstracts. A list of personnel is included.

  20. Science and Technology Roadmap Cooperative Research Program (CoRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Science and Technology Roadmap Cooperative Research Program (CoRP) National Oceanic and Atmospheric.3.2 The Global Precipitation Climatology Project 5. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP 6. PERFORMANCE TARGETS 6RP research capabilities are described along with a science roadmap for the next decade. This science

  1. Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Science Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret Kivelson, Member, National Academy of Sciences; Member

  2. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    MAR 2015 The influence of absorbed solar radiation by Saharan dust on hurricane genesis Sebastian, Bern, Switzerland Abstract To date, the radiative impact of dust and the Saharan air layer (SAL the atmosphere due to absorption of solar radiation but thus shifts convection to regions more conducive

  3. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    in atmospheric chemistry/air quality and climate and a growing reputation in oceanography, geophysicsSchool of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Strategic Plan March 1 opportunities. Vision The vision of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is: To lead in innovative

  4. Research Highlights | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Nuclear Science | Research Highlights SHARE Research Highlights 1-3 of 3 Results Neutron scattering continues as a vital tool in superconductivity studies January 01, 2011...

  5. Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOAA Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU...

  6. ATM401, ATM601, CHEM601 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    as atmospheric chemistry. You should be able to read and analyze weather maps or climate diagrams, interpret as atmospheric chemistry. Fundamental goals are that you develop skills to think as an atmospheric scientistATM401, ATM601, CHEM601 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences Fall 2013 Class time: TR 11:30am

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  8. MEET THE PEER COUNSELORS Marine and Atmospheric Science Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MEET THE PEER COUNSELORS Marine and Atmospheric Science Program Welcome all incoming at the University of Miami and the Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS). Incoming students as possible, both academically and socially. We are here as guides for incoming and prospective students who

  9. High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions A. S´obester , S. J. Johnston and processing atmospheric observations across a range of altitudes. We consider the aeronautical a specified block of airspace. I. The Need for Wide Altitude Range Atmospheric Observations The ability

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  11. CSU's Atmospheric Science 50th Anniversary Fort Collins, CO, July 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Climate Change Science Thomas C. Peterson NOAA's National Climatic Data Center Asheville, North Carolina's National Climatic Data Center #12;CSU's Atmospheric Science 50th Anniversary Fort Collins, CO, July 2012 4 NOAA's National Climatic Data Center What it is not · Not the latest research ­ For that see the July

  12. Content Development Policy: Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences 1 The University of Manchester Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    Content Development Policy: Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences 1 The University of Manchester Library Content Development Policy Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences Monday, 30 April.................................................................................................55 #12;2 Content Development Policy: Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences Introduction

  13. Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii, Honolulu. Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

  14. The faculty and students in the Atmospheric Sciences Department use physics, chemistry, and mathematics to better understand the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    The faculty and students in the Atmospheric Sciences Department use physics, chemistry chemistry Atmospheric fluid dynamics Biosphere interactions Climate variability Clouds & storms Radiative, and mathematics to better understand the atmosphere and improve the prediction of its future state, both over

  15. Research by BNL investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886. BNL-62609 DOE research on atmospheric aerosols S are an programs dealing with atmospheric science, subsurface science, environmental radon, ocean margins

  16. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Natural Sciences Research Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NmENT 18 BIomEdICAL SCIENCE 20 TooLS ANd TEChNoLoGy dEVELopmENT 22 INVESTING IN ThE FUTURE Faculty are available from the Planning Department at www.imperial.ac.uk/planning/statistics. 2 #12;Professor Maggie of Imperial's founding charter. Imperial's technology transfer company, Imperial Innovations, was the first

  18. CollegeofEarth,Ocean, andAtmosphericSciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    CollegeofEarth,Ocean, andAtmosphericSciences New Undergraduate STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 Name Options: Applied Ecology and Resource Management (E-Campus only) 169 Aquatic Biology 501 Environmental Chemistry for Environmental Sciences 490 Environmental Conservation & Sustainability 577 Environmental

  19. AND APPLICATION Data Science Researchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    that is helping to transform society. Researchers will provide a hands-on look at the research and technologies, and bring them to market. To learn more about how your company can get involved, please see our website and continue the journey with us to unlock the power of Data Science. Sharon K. Sputz Director of Strategic

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  1. Science & Research Agriculture & Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to environmentalists, who want the funding diverted to renewable energy research. The initiative began as a US & Institutions Energy Efficiency Energy Supply Enlargement Enterprise & Jobs Financial Services Health is contributed by the other members. In 2001, total construction costs were estimated at around 5.9 billion

  2. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the monsoon forecasting models, which many times do not represent the heat energy available to the atmosphere, have a great demand for accurate, long range forecast (LRF) of mon- soon rainfall, which has always. We studied the impacts of ocean mean temperature (OMT), representing the heat energy of the upper

  3. Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    in a piecemeal fashion. However, a combined water and energy balance approach is now viable in analyzing, including the Global Energy and Water Exchanges (GEWEX) project of the World Climate Research ProgrammeAiguo Dai Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy Dates: August

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  5. Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cycle Science & Technology Fusion Nuclear Science Isotope Development and Production Nuclear Security Science & Technology Nuclear Systems Modeling, Simulation & Validation...

  6. The Global Anthropogenic Lead Experiment Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The Global Anthropogenic Lead Experiment Ed Boyle Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences Reuer Rick Kayser Boyle Lab, arriving in Rio at the end of EN 367 #12;The Global Anthropogenic Lead Experiment · Lead is a volatile element and it is emitted by high temperature industrial activities (smelting

  7. DEPARTMENT OF EARTH, OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF EARTH, OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE STRATEGIC PLAN Preamble The new Department. This strategic plan shows how the strength of EOAS will be enhanced by combining the proficiencies of its the University's strategic goals. The Department will continue with the University to offer the public beyond

  8. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    OF CONTENTS Basic Energy Sciences Nanoscience/Nanotechnology Group Basic Energy Sciences Nanoscience/Nanotechnology Group Chair: Douglas H. Lowndes (ORNL) A. Paul#12;#12;Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions ABSTRACT This report

  9. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, centered on Earth System Modeling and OAR's role develop and/or can use accurate and timely predictions of the Earth system that come from modeling. The 18

  10. Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurityPediatricNOAA Science Engagement Move your data

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  12. Paul Roundy Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    agricultural drought events in the United States Midwest Corn Belt Region (CBR) based on an index of anomalous to Onset and Breakdown of Agricultural Drought over the United States Corn Belt Region The proposed work: Research to Advance Understanding, Monitoring, and Prediction of Drought. The proposed work would fulfill

  13. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Dear Alumni and Friends, The Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and air quality, radiation and remote sensing, climate and atmosphere Dear Alumni and Friends, The Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University is proud to be recognized as one of the top atmospheric science programs in the United States. For 50 years

  15. David C. Noone Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Research 1998 Visiting Research Scholar, British Antarctic Survey Honors and Awards (select) 2012 for Research in Environmental Sciences Campus Box 216, University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0216 Phone: +1, polar and past climate, cycles of water and carbon, and stable isotopes. Biographical narrative: Dr

  16. Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 45 (2008) 274319 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    will be assessed. The atmospheric response is known to create small-scale wind stress curl and diver- gence and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 COAS Admin. Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503, USA e of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, UCLA, 7127 Math Sciences Building, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095

  17. Inspiring Careers in Science Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenryInhibiting Individual NotchInspiring Careers in Science Research

  18. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  19. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  20. Operations Research:Operations Research: The Science of BetterThe Science of Better

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Operations Research:Operations Research: The Science of BetterThe Science of Better Richard C, Institute For Operations Research and the Management Sciences SmartWorld December 8, 2004 QuickTimeTM and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. #12;Operations Research:Operations

  1. Fusion materials science and technology research opportunities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the ITER era Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fusion materials science and technology research opportunities now and during the ITER era Several high-priority...

  2. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  3. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2006 Accomplishment High Performance collections of scientific data. In recent years, much of the work in computer and computational science has problem. It is generally accepted that as sciences move into the tera- and peta-scale regimes that one

  4. Science and Parliament Research Council secondments -an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Tamsin A.

    Science and Parliament Research Council secondments - an opportunity for postgraduates Dr Tamsin Mather University of Oxford tamsinm@earth.ox.ac.uk #12;Talk outline · What parliament does · Science.g., POST, clerks #12;Science and Parliament 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 1988/891989/901990

  5. Education research Acquisition of Science Subject

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Education research Acquisition of Science Subject Knowledge and Pedagogy in Initial Teacher Training October 2011 #12;Acquisition of Science Subject Knowledge and Pedagogy in Initial Teacher Training There is concern about how trainee science teachers acquire subject knowledge and pedagogy to teach across

  6. B.Sc. Honors in Atmospheric Sciences 2014-2015 Name ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    & Remote Sensing _______ EAS 270 The Atmosphere _______ EAS 294 or HGP 250 Natural Resources & Env. Mgmt the approval of the Atmospheric Sciences advisor. Note 4 Recommended Arts options include any EAS X9X or HGP

  7. What is Atmospheric Science? Atmospheric science is the study of short-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    dynamics, weather analysis and forecasting, cloud physics, air pollution meteorology, tropical and severe to forecasting to air pollution meteorology to forensic meteorology to basic and applied research. Some graduates, severe weather analysis, development of forecast tools, air pollution control). The Department of Defense

  8. Department of Biological Sciences 2005 Funded Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    (U.S. Army) Breast Cancer Research Program, $423,146. Aquatic Toxicology - DOD-T9700-Ecological Risk Center for Science and Industry (IICSI), Baghdad. #12;Creation and Field Testing of Transgenic Cotton in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. 2004- 2006. National Science Foundation, as subcontract from New Mexico

  9. SCIENCE RESEARCH POLICY IN SOUTH AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    SCIENCE RESEARCH POLICY IN SOUTH AFRICA George F R Ellis A DISCUSSION DOCUMENT for the Royal Society of South Africa February 14, 2001 #12;i Preface This science policy discussion document has been written by Prof G F R Ellis (University of Cape Town) on behalf of the Royal Society of South Africa

  10. A Systems Approach to Service Science Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glushko, Robert J.

    A Systems Approach to Service Science Research Service Science Faculty Workshop National Tsing Hua@ischool.berkeley.edu Plan for Today's Talk Motivating the Concept of "Service System" Making Sense of the Service System Concept Modeling Approaches for Service Systems "Point of View" in Service Systems Bridging the Front

  11. . Advances in Geosciences, Volume 10 : Atmospheric Science . : World Scientific, . p 40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    . Advances in Geosciences, Volume 10 : Atmospheric Science . : World Scientific, . p 40 http://site.ebrary.com/id/10361904?ppg=40 Copyright © World Scientific. . All rights reserved. May not be reproduced in any form. #12;. Advances in Geosciences, Volume 10 : Atmospheric Science . : World Scientific, . p 41 http

  12. Final Technical Report for earmark project "Atmospheric Science Program at the University of Louisville"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowling, Timothy Edward [University of Louisville

    2014-02-11

    We have completed a 3-year project to enhance the atmospheric science program at the University of Louisville, KY (est. 2008). The goals were to complete an undergraduate atmospheric science laboratory (Year 1) and to hire and support an assistant professor (Years 2 and 3). Both these goals were met on schedule, and slightly under budget.

  13. Energy Frontier Research Center Center for Materials Science...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Frontier Research Center Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Frontier Research Center Center for Materials Science of...

  14. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  15. Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

  16. Science DMZ Fuels Fusion Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-Contest Sign56Science

  17. Supporting Clinical Research AAAS/Science Translational Medicine Panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    for Translational Medicine Jennifer A. Lyon, MS, MLIS, AHIP Clinical Research Librarian UF Health Science Center

  18. LANL Fusion Energy Sciences ResearchLANL Fusion Energy Sciences Research G. A. Wurden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LANL Fusion Energy Sciences ResearchLANL Fusion Energy Sciences Research G. A. Wurden Fusion Power for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED #12;| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Abstract (LANL/PPPL/ORNL) on the W7 X stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, principally edge plasma control

  19. Citizen Science: Contributions to Astronomy Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Carol; Smith, Arfon; Fortson, Lucy; Bamford, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The contributions of everyday individuals to significant research has grown dramatically beyond the early days of classical birdwatching and endeavors of amateurs of the 19th century. Now people who are casually interested in science can participate directly in research covering diverse scientific fields. Regarding astronomy, volunteers, either as individuals or as networks of people, are involved in a variety of types of studies. Citizen Science is intuitive, engaging, yet necessarily robust in its adoption of sci-entific principles and methods. Herein, we discuss Citizen Science, focusing on fully participatory projects such as Zooniverse (by several of the au-thors CL, AS, LF, SB), with mention of other programs. In particular, we make the case that citizen science (CS) can be an important aspect of the scientific data analysis pipelines provided to scientists by observatories.

  20. ATMOS 5000: Intro to Atmospheric Science Fall Term 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    allows: · Atmospheric boundary layer · Carbon cycle, CO2 · Ozone hole, stratospheric chemistry · Air on the atmospheric controls on the weather (beach volleyball versus a rainy day indoors, skiing on a sunny day

  1. Global change research: Science and policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1993-05-01

    This report characterizes certain aspects of the Global Change Research Program of the US Government, and its relevance to the short and medium term needs of policy makers in the public and private sectors. It addresses some of the difficulties inherent in the science and policy interface on the issues of global change. Finally, this report offers some proposals for improving the science for policy process in the context of global environmental change.

  2. Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

  3. MEA 213 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences I FALL Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    and define the major terms that apply to meteorology. Structure of the atmosphere: Explain the chemical composition and vertical structure of the atmosphere. Weather maps: Read, interpret and plot station moisture parameter such as dew point, specific humidity, and mixing ratio from measured atmospheric

  4. Research Staff | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliatesMadden-JulianOut withResearch Sheds Light on

  5. AFFILIATIONS: Mass and Baars--Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Joslyn--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    AFFILIATIONS: Mass and Baars--Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Joslyn-- Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Pyle, Tewson, Jones--Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; GneiTinG, raf

  6. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  7. Presented by Research Alliance in Math and Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented by Research Alliance in Math and Science Debbie McCoy Computing and Computational Sciences #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy McCoy_RAMS_SC10 Research Alliance in Math and Science (RAMS) Program The Research Alliance in Math and Science Program is designed

  8. Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakubowski, Mariusz H.

    Expanding Earth Sciences Research with Layerscape In Brief Websites: layerscape Earth in three-dimensional space and time. Oceanographers and earth scientists are using this free set of serious illness in the hospital was pneumonia." The Earth is a vast, complicated system comprised

  9. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-07-21

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology, climate systems, and environmental engineering. Building on this scientific foundation, we also perform applied earth science research and technology development to support DOE in a number of its program areas. We currently organize our efforts in the following Division Programs: Fundamental and Exploratory Research--fundamental research in geochemistry, geophysics, and hydrology to provide a basis for new and improved energy and environmental technologies; Climate and Carbon Sciences--carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere and oceans, and global and regional climate modeling, are the cornerstones of a major developing divisional research thrust related to understanding and mitigating the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere; Energy Resources--collaborative projects with industry to develop or improve technologies for the exploration and production of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs, and for the development of bioenergy; Environmental Remediation and Water Resources--innovative technologies for locating, containing, and remediating metals, radionuclides, chlorinated solvents, and energy-related contaminants in soils and groundwaters; Geologic Carbon Sequestration--development and testing of methods for introducing carbon dioxide to subsurface geologic reservoirs, and predicting and monitoring its subsequent migration; and Nuclear Waste and Energy--theoretical, experimental, and simulation studies of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Climate Science, Ecology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, and Hydrogeology. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. In this document, we present summaries of selected current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, the projects described here are representative of the nature and breadth of the ESD research effort. We are proud of our scientific accomplishments and we hope that you will find this material useful and exciting. A list of publications for the period from J

  10. CRIRES Science Verification Proposal Determining the atmospheric precipitable water vapour content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    CRIRES Science Verification Proposal Determining the atmospheric precipitable water vapour content the precipitable water vapour (PWV) content over Paranal by determining the equivalent widths of 7 carefully. Scientific Case: Atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV) is one of the crucial parameters in infrared (IR

  11. October 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 10 BioScience 895 Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    October 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 10 · BioScience 895 Articles Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 reduce the concen- tration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Understanding biological and edaphic processes of the 21st century (IPCC 2001a). Management of vegetation and soils for terrestrial carbon sequestration

  12. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  13. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-11-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4) Environmental Remediation Technology; and (5) Climate Variability and Carbon Management. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Microbial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Geophysics and Geomechanics, Geochemistry, and Hydrogeology and Reservoir Dynamics. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. A list of publications for the period from January 2002 to June 2003, along with a listing of our personnel, are appended to the end of this report.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  15. Science DMZ-Based Big-Science Pacific Research Platform Debuts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science DMZ-Based Big-Science Pacific Research Platform Debuts at CENIC 2015 Annual Conference News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries...

  16. Chemistry and materials science research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-31

    The research reported here in summary form was conducted under the auspices of Weapons-Supporting Research (WSR) and Institutional Research and Development (IR D). The period covered is the first half of FY90. The results reported here are for work in progress; thus, they may be preliminary, fragmentary, or incomplete. Research in the following areas are briefly described: energetic materials, tritium, high-Tc superconductors, interfaces, adhesion, bonding, fundamental aspects of metal processing, plutonium, synchrotron-radiation-based materials science, photocatalysis on doped aerogels, laser-induced chemistry, laser-produced molecular plasmas, chemistry of defects, dta equipment development, electronic structure study of the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of Al-Li Alloys, and the structure-property link in sub-nanometer materials.

  17. Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arrison, Thomas Samuel

    2014-03-31

    This is the final technical report for DE-SC0005916 Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process.

  18. ARESE (ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment) Science Plan [Atmospheric Radiation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, F.P.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Cess, R.D.; Ramanathan, V.; Collins, W.D.; Minnis, P.; Ackerman, T.P.; Vitko, J.; Tooman, T.P.

    1995-09-27

    Several recent studies have indicated that cloudy atmospheres may absorb significantly more solar radiation than currently predicted by models. The magnitude of this excess atmospheric absorption, is about 50% more than currently predicted and would have major impact on our understanding of atmospheric heating. Incorporation of this excess heating into existing general circulation models also appears to ameliorate some significant shortcomings of these models, most notably a tendency to overpredict the amount of radiant energy going into the oceans and to underpredict the tropopause temperature. However, some earlier studies do not show this excess absorption and an underlying physical mechanism that would give rise to such absorption has yet to be defined. Given the importance of this issue, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is sponsoring the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) to study the absorption of solar radiation by clear and cloudy atmospheres. The experimental results will be compared with model calculations. Measurements will be conducted using three aircraft platforms (ARM-UAV Egrett, NASA ER-2, and an instrumented Twin Otter), as well as satellites and the ARM central and extended facilities in North Central Oklahoma. The project will occur over a four week period beginning in late September, 1995. Spectral broadband, partial bandpass, and narrow bandpass (10nm) solar radiative fluxes will be measured at different altitudes and at the surface with the objective to determine directly the magnitude and spectral characteristics of the absorption of shortwave radiation by the atmosphere (clear and cloudy). Narrow spectral channels selected to coincide with absorption by liquid water and ice will help in identifying the process of absorption of radiation. Additionally, information such as water vapor profiles, aerosol optical depths, cloud structure and ozone profiles, needed to use as input in radiative transfer calculations, will be acquired using the aircraft and surface facilities available to ARESE. This document outlines the scientific approach and measurement requirements of the project.

  19. Curriculum Vitae Program of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Mechanics and Turbulence !Multi-Scale Numerical Modeling !Hydrometeorology and Micrometeorology !Land-Atmosphere Interaction EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT 2005-2009: B.E., Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, China 2009-2013: Ph.D., Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (with a certificate from

  20. Science education. Changing the culture of science education at research universities.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Research Programs in Science (Teachers College Press, NewDC1 www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 331 14 JANUARY 2011A. W. Shouse, Eds. , Taking Science to School: Learning and

  1. Molecular Science Research Center, 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1992-03-01

    During 1991, the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) experienced solid growth and accomplishment and the Environmental, and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) construction project moved forward. We began with strong programs in chemical structure and dynamics and theory, modeling, and simulation, and both these programs continued to thrive. We also made significant advances in the development of programs in materials and interfaces and macromolecular structure and dynamics, largely as a result of the key staff recruited to lead these efforts. If there was one pervasive activity for the past year, however, it was to strengthen the role of the EMSL in the overall environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) mission at Hanford. These extended activities involved not only MSRC and EMSL staff but all PNL scientific and technical staff engaged in ER/WM programs.

  2. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakov, T.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Catalytic Oxidation of ,S02 on Carbonand S.G. Chang, "Catalytic oxidation of S02 on carbonCHEMISTRY LBL-6819 Catalytic Oxidation of S02 on Carbon in

  3. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. 12: 162167 (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    2011-01-01

    des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette, France *Correspondence to: Ben Kravitz making this idea attractive to policy makers. However, Robock et al. (2009) point out that strato constant to approximate the net effects of stratospheric aerosols on the planetary energy balance. Robock

  4. Science Signaling: Research, Teach, and Discover with the Weekly Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Science Signaling: Research, Teach, and Discover with the Weekly Journal Devoted to Cellular Signal Journal January 2008: Change name from Science's STKE to Science Signaling September 2008: First issue compilation #12;Journal Content Editorial Guides Editorials Editors' Choice Research Articles and Resources

  5. Tsunami Research Tsunami Science after 2004 Sumatra Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunami Research Tsunami Science after 2004 Sumatra Disaster Vasily Titov NOAA Center for Tsunami Research #12;NOAA Center for Tsunami Research NCTR Personnel September 2009 Develop methods and tools to reduce tsunami hazard and protect life. Testbed new tsunami forecast

  6. University of Hawaii Department of Atmospheric Sciences Dr. Pao-Shin Chu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    University of Hawaii Department of Atmospheric Sciences Dr. Pao-Shin Chu Professor of Meteorology Hawaii State Climatologist chu@hawaii.edu Ph: (808) 956-2573 Fax: (808) 956-2877 2552 Correa Road, University of Hawai'i HIG Building, Room 318 Services Minor Request (Referral to another source) No Charge

  7. 2306 JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Chaotic Trajectories of Tidally Perturbed Inertial Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2306 JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Chaotic Trajectories of Tidally Perturbed Inertial ABSTRACT It is shown that tidal perturbations of a geopotential height in an inviscid, barot~opic atmos formulation of both ~he free, inertial, and the tidally forced problems permitted the application o~ the twi

  8. Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014 8 News Transforming undergraduate education, reopening of the Pacific Museum of Earth, and more 18 New Faculty Three on their latest investigations #12;PhotobyKirstenHodge ii EarthMatters 2014 iii Contents iii From the Editor iv

  9. S. M. PENNY Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Reply S. M. PENNY Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington received 4 November 2010, in final form 2 March 2011) ABSTRACT Penny et al. recently showed and the amplitude compares well with the midwinter suppression. 1. Introduction Penny et al. (2010, hereafter PRB10

  10. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY College of Earth, Ocean, & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    and River Dominated Margins", Santiago de Compostela, Spain, June 19-24, 2005. · 2009 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation Meeting, "Significance of River-Ocean Coherence for Fluxes and Fate of Terrestrial

  11. Science & Research Highlights | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Archives: 2014 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed...

  12. Atmospheric Science Program Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999Science Program

  13. Managing Research Data in Big Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman Gray; Tobia Carozzi; Graham Woan

    2012-07-17

    The project which led to this report was funded by JISC in 2010--2011 as part of its 'Managing Research Data' programme, to examine the way in which Big Science data is managed, and produce any recommendations which may be appropriate. Big science data is different: it comes in large volumes, and it is shared and exploited in ways which may differ from other disciplines. This project has explored these differences using as a case-study Gravitational Wave data generated by the LSC, and has produced recommendations intended to be useful variously to JISC, the funding council (STFC) and the LSC community. In Sect. 1 we define what we mean by 'big science', describe the overall data culture there, laying stress on how it necessarily or contingently differs from other disciplines. In Sect. 2 we discuss the benefits of a formal data-preservation strategy, and the cases for open data and for well-preserved data that follow from that. This leads to our recommendations that, in essence, funders should adopt rather light-touch prescriptions regarding data preservation planning: normal data management practice, in the areas under study, corresponds to notably good practice in most other areas, so that the only change we suggest is to make this planning more formal, which makes it more easily auditable, and more amenable to constructive criticism. In Sect. 3 we briefly discuss the LIGO data management plan, and pull together whatever information is available on the estimation of digital preservation costs. The report is informed, throughout, by the OAIS reference model for an open archive.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-09-06

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

  15. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) User Facilities User Facilities Home User Facilities at a Glance All User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities X-Ray Light...

  16. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Computers & Networks Calendar Safety Search PSFC Go Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology About PSFC Research People Education News...

  17. Lori Thompson Sentman EDUCATION: Ph.D. candidate, Atmospheric Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include model execution and management of the earth system model components and the mixed layer ocean model, development of improved earth system models and research on the interactions and feedbacks. Tasks include model execution and management of the earth system model components and the mixed layer

  18. The College of the Environment has seven degree-granting units, where disciplines span the land and sea, atmosphere and space, and connect both the natural and social sciences. In addition, the College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    of Earth and Space Sciences furthers the understanding of Earth, the solar system, and their histories. The department's scope extends from the center of Earth to the rim of the solar system, and its activities cut and models to bear on pressing issues of sustainability in fisheries. Atmospheric Sciences Research

  19. the Department should apply the same principles to climate and atmospheric research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to develop a clean energy alternative pow- ered by domestic resources. As a result of the program's sole dependent on federal funding, but instead as temporary and targeted initiatives with five-year terms- duction. FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES Fusion Energy Sciences conducts basic science research and ex

  20. Research Data Practice in the Life Sciences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Stuart

    The broad aim of the RIN-funded Case Studies in Life Sciences project, undertaken by a team of social scientists and information specialists from the Institute for the Study of Science, Technology and Innovation (ISSTI) ...

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1 Atmospheric

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1 Atmospheric7

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM12 Atmospheric

  4. Enriching Sustainable Transport Decisions: Inputs from Operations Research and the Management Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellar, Barry; Garrison, William

    2009-01-01

    techniques, research operations, inquiring instruments,Inputs from Operations Research and the Management SciencesInputs from Operations Research and the Management Sciences

  5. Institute for Research in Cognitive Science IRCS Technical Reports Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabulis, Xenophon

    Institute for Research in Cognitive Science IRCS Technical Reports Series University for Research in Cognitive Science Technical Re- port No. IRCS-04-01. This paper is posted at ScholarlyCommons@Penn. http://repository.upenn.edu/ircs reports/1 #12;The Starry Night Texture Xenophon Zabulis1

  6. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research · Basic Energy Sciences · Biological and Environmental Research · Fusion Energy Sciences · High Energy Physics · Nuclear Physics What my students Code ­http://code.google.com/p/net-almanac/ ­Beta release this week #12;Contact Information Jon Dugan

  7. Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, W

    2013-03-08

    The objective of the ARM Science Board is to promote the Nation’s scientific enterprise by ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the DOE’s User Facility known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. The goal of the User Facility is to serve scientific researchers by providing unique data and tools to facilitate scientific applications for improving understanding and prediction of climate science.

  8. 01/14 Ver. 2.1 Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Transfer, Remote Sensing & Instrumentation Space Science Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Jablonowski,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret Kivelson, Member, National Academy

  9. Science of Earth Systems Offered by the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    in environmental management and policy, law or medicine, science journalism and K-12 science education. #12;Major, dwindling energy resources, inadequate water supplies, and political strife over strategic minerals a comprehensive understanding of the world as we know it. Students may chose to focus on one of a number

  10. NETL Researchers Chosen as Science & Engineering Ambassadors...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been chosen as Science & Engineering Ambassadors, with the goal of increasing public understanding and...

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  12. ANNUAL REPORT CIRACooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    of Economics/CIRA Mark DeMaria, Colorado State University NOAA RAMM Branch Ingrid Guch, NOAA Chief, NOAASat and National Park Service Air Quality Research Division activities) to allow the reader a more complete with the infrastructure and intellectual talent produced and used by both sides of the funded activities. For further

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. I

  14. Research in the chemical sciences: Summaries of FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This summary book is published annually on research supported by DOE`s Division of Chemical Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Research in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced batteries is arranged according to national laboratories, offsite institutions, and small businesses. Goal is to add to the knowledge base on which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. The special facilities used in DOE laboratories are described. Indexes are provided (topics, institution, investigator).

  15. Environmental Science & Policy 22 100-111 Research impacts and impact on research in biodiversity conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Science & Policy 22 100-111 1 Research impacts and impact on research in biodiversity, biodiversity, research, society, policy Introduction Global environmental issues such as biodiversity loss pose environmental issues is translated into societal solutions. The EU research policy links research agendas

  16. Forest Research The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission FR Science Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission FR Science Focus 2011-16 Understanding forests and providing solutions for a sustainable future #12;Forest Research - Who we are Forest Research (FR) is the Forestry Commission's Research Agency and is the UK's foremost body for forest

  17. Service Learning in Library and Information Science (LIS) Education: Connecting Research and Practice to Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehra, Bharat

    2004-01-01

    poor. Library and Information Science Research, 7(2), 97-Librarianship and information science. In F. Machlup & U.Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 12,

  18. The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaniotakis, E.

    2010-01-01

    of Our Living World • Fusion Energy Sciences ? Bring theResearch (2007 – published) • Fusion Energy Science (2008 –center), ORNL and NCAR. Fusion Energy Sciences supports

  19. RESEARCH CENTER REVIEW GUIDELINES DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    RESEARCH CENTER REVIEW GUIDELINES DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ periodic external reviews of all academic research centers (referred throughout as Center). Such reviews-examination and evaluation. Equally important, reviews allow Centers to examine their current position and the research

  20. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Biorefinery research at SBT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Pelletizing technique · Pretreatment · Pellet storage · Pellet quality Ongoing research projects: Wood pellets, Danmark Ongoing research projects: Wood pellets Pellet Platform II SLU and The Swedish Pellet Industry Sciences www.slu.se Pellet mill > 100.000 ton/year >drying gases from steel mill Ongoing research example

  1. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  2. Advanced Materials & NanoSciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Heriot-Watt, Paisley, St Andrews, Strathclyde, and the joint Chemistry Research School

  3. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT GUIDELINES FOR RESEARCH (ESM 401)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT GUIDELINES FOR RESEARCH (ESM 401) I. ESM 401 in establishing and achieving appropriate career goals. 3. To increase student motivation by integrating classroom (Appendix A) and submits three copies to the Environmental Science & Management Department office

  5. Annular Core Research Reactor - Critical to Science-Based Weapons...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to science-based weapons design and certification. The ACRR is a pool-type research reactor (Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Facility) that has been in operation since the 1970s...

  6. GE Researcher Explores Science Behind Movie Chappie | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When Will We Have Robot Best Friends? A GE Researcher Explores the Science Behind Movie Magic Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new...

  7. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

    1984-05-01

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring.

  8. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

  9. Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This document describes the Fiscal Year 1996 activities and products of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The report is organized into four main sections. The introduction identifies the basic program structure, describes the programs of the Environmental Sciences Division, and provides the level of effort for each program area. The research areas and project descriptions section gives program contact information, and provides descriptions of individual research projects including: three-year funding history, research objective and approach used in each project, and results to date. Appendixes provide postal and e-mail addresses for principal investigators and define acronyms used in the text. The indexes provide indexes of principal investigators, research institutions, and keywords for easy reference. Research projects are related to climatic change and remedial action.

  10. IntegratedScienceWorkingforYou Research Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasivespeciesvisionarywhitepaper . . . 3 Bioenergyproductionsystems: Potential renewable energy . . . . . . . . . . 3 ecosystem management and research partnership projects in Arizona, Montana, New Mexico, and Nevada. For more

  11. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Useful Links Collaborations at Alcator...

  12. MM5 Aids Forecasters Over the past five years a group in the Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Jaeglé's specialty is atmospheric chemistry. Her research deals with analysis and modelingMM5 Aids Forecasters Over the past five years a group in the Atmospheric Sciences department has around the region. (see Page 8) New Faculty Join Atmospheric Sciences In the past year, Atmospheric

  13. Research in the chemical sciences. Summaries of FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This summary book is published annually to provide information on research supported by the Department of Energy`s Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of four Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries provide the scientific and technical public, as well as the legislative and executive branches of the Government, information, either generally or in some depth, about the Chemical Sciences program. Scientists interested in proposing research for support will find the publication useful for gauging the scope of the present basic research program and it`s relationship to their interests. Proposals that expand this scope may also be considered or directed to more appropriate offices. The primary goal of the research summarized here is to add significantly to the knowledge base in which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. As a result, scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, but another important consideration is emphasis on science that is advancing in ways that will produce new information related to energy.

  14. CSRI SUMMER PROCEEDINGS 2008 The Computer Science Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    A Department of Energy National Laboratory SAND2008-8257P Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated university faculty and students to Sandia National Laboratories for focused collaborative researchCSRI SUMMER PROCEEDINGS 2008 The Computer Science Research Institute at Sandia National

  15. INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER FOR ENERGY RESEARCH INDIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Debnath

    Dear Sir/ Madam, There is a requirement Pressure Transducers for the Solar Thermal Plant at IIScINTERDISCIPLINARY CENTER FOR ENERGY RESEARCH INDIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE BANGALORE ­ 560 012, INDIA of the supply The Quotation should be addressed to: The Convener, Interdisciplinary Center for Energy Research

  16. 05/14 Ver. 2.1 Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret Kivelson, Member, National Academy of Sciences; Member

  17. IntegratedScienceWorkingforYou Research Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effectiveness in central Idaho . . . .4 Fire characteristics charts: How to generate and interpret organi- zation--the most extensive natural resources research organization in the world. We maintain 14

  18. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Materials Science Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12Working withPhoto of1855JohnScience Staff The

  19. Los Alamos researchers create 'map of science'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-EearnstakesLosMap of science Los Alamos

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  2. Summaries of FY 1979 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Chemists, physicists, chemical engineers and others who are considering the possibility of proposing research for support by this Division wll find the booklet useful for gauging the scope of the program in basic research, and the relationship of their interests to the overall program. These smmaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program for members of the scientific and technological public, and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government, in order to indicate the areas of research supported by the Division and energy technologies which may be advanced by use of basic knowledge discovered in this program. Scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by Chemical Sciences. Another important consideration is the identifying of chemical, physical and chemical engineering subdisciplines which are advancing in ways which produce new information related to energy, needed data, or new ideas.

  3. Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    ___________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Research Master's Degree in Soil and Crop Sciences A candidate for a research master's degree in Soil and Crop Sciences is expected to demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skill in the Field of Soil and Crop research in the field of soil and crop sciences. Candidates are expected to synthesize and create new

  4. HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH GROUPS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALICANTE Field Name Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH GROUPS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ALICANTE Field Name Description Translational Research Join University-Conselleria Unit for Translational Research in the health sciences This is a participative and multidisciplinary group, open to all Health Sciences research groups and Teaching and Research

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1981-02-01

    Separate absracts were prepared for the 15 sections of this progress report which is a description of atmospheric research at PNL organized in terms of the following energy technologies: coal, gas and oil; fission and fusion; and oil shale. (KRM)

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top LDRD Publications Research Laboratory

  7. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photo featureParticleDarkMuonsResearch

  8. Sandia Energy - Earth Sciences Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjectsCyberNotLED Lighting Veeco: ResearchEarth

  9. Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

  10. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Severe Weather Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and supporting high- risk, high-payoff research. Dr. Hayes began his remarks by outlining not what keeps him up services. Several themes emerged in the roundtable, including: Information Architecture, Communicating Risk (pipeline) while researching new observational technologies, so data can be shared and not withheld due

  11. Fusion Science and Technology Research Program (VLT Programs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    · UCLA Electric Tokamak: Dr. Robert Taylor, et al. - Main purpose is to generate near unity beta plasma, Dr. J. Maggs, Prof. G. Morales - Experimental and theoretical studies of fundamental processes: research aimed at advancing the underlying engineering sciences, understanding fundamental issues

  12. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Research · Fusion Energy Sciences · High Energy Physics · Nuclear Physics IPv6 SNMP Network will become consistent and routine IPv6 SNMP Network Management Goals #12;2/2/10 ·ESnet has a long history - Polling of SNMP MIBs - Handling of asynchronous trap based alerts - GUI input & output Enablers ESnet has

  13. CSRI SUMMER PROCEEDINGS 2013 The Computer Science Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    July 22, 2014 A Department of Energy National Laboratory SAND2014-20409 R Sandia National LaboratoriesCSRI SUMMER PROCEEDINGS 2013 The Computer Science Research Institute at Sandia National Laboratories Editors: Sivasankaran Rajamanickam Michael L. Parks S. Scott Collis Sandia National Laboratories

  14. Copyright 1998, Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Copyright 1998, Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences 0092 September­October 1998 (pp. 13­24) Raw Material Management at Welch's, Inc. Edmund W. Schuster Welch's, Inc cooperative, faced complex logistics in planning recipes for products sold in retail stores. The recently

  15. Climate Research in Society 1 CLIMATE SCIENCE IN SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Climate Research in Society 1 CLIMATE SCIENCE IN SOCIETY The situation is post-normal The situation is as follows: Man-made climate change is real, but we are still arguing what it really consists in and how temperature. Restricting emissions will reduce or slow down future climate change. Although everybody agrees

  16. Research in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Research in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences www.birmingham.ac.uk/les #12;The College international challenges, including lifelong health and well being, food security, energy security, and living in this key area. Our strategy is to build around our strengths and to bridge these to cognate areas

  17. Janez POTOCNIK European Commissioner for Science and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janez POTOCNIK European Commissioner for Science and Research Nuclear Energy for a New Europe 2005 of the Commission to which I belong: Building on what Europe can do best, providing excellent education, allowing conference on nuclear energy, but also because it takes place in such beautiful surroundings. In this short

  18. Operations Research Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Operations Research Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS Code-MAOR Departmental/Program Major To Time Series (3) MA 35300 Linear Algebra II With Applications (3) Math Selective I: MA 36200 Topics 51700 - Statistical Inference (3) Math Selective II: MA 37500 - Introduction To Discrete Mathematics /MA

  19. OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE Editor: A. Ravi Ravindran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautam, Natarajan

    OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE HANDBOOK Editor: A. Ravi Ravindran September 29, 2006 fundamental concepts in queues, clarify assumptions used to derive results, motivate models using examples of the notation used in this chapter and the fundamental results are from Kulkarni [7]. If one is interested

  20. ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 24, NO. 2, 2007, 118 Probability Distribution Function of a Forced Passive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yongyun

    of a Forced Passive Tracer in the Lower Stratosphere HU Yongyun ( ) Department of Atmospheric Sciences, School The probability distribution function (PDF) of a passive tracer, forced by a "mean gradient", is stud- ied. First the PDFs of such an externally forced passive tracer. Then, we carry out numerical simulations

  1. Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in the bottom bound- ary layer. In the nonlinear internal waves that were observed, the kinetic energy. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, L.K. [ed.; Wildung, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part 2: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

  3. Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather in order to improve the Nation's ability to protect human and ecosystem health. What We Do ARL conducts research and development in the fields of atmospheric dispersion, air quality, climate change, and boundary

  4. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  5. Minority Summer Research Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poff, Kenneth L.

    2004-08-12

    Gutierrez and Larcom (2000) suggest that ''According to the National Science Foundation/Division of Science Resources Studies in 1997, the percentage distribution of scientists and engineers in the labor force by race/ethnicity changed little between 1993 and 1997''. According to this report, Black, non-Hispanic went from 3.6 in 1993 to 3.4 in 1997. Hispanic went from 3.0 in 1993 to 3.1 in 1997; and American Indian/Alaskan Native stayed the same at 0.3 during the same period. The only exceptions were a slight increase in the percentage of Asian from 9.2 in 1993 to 10.4 in 1997, while a slight decrease in percentage White from 83.9 in 1993 to 82.8 in 1997. Overall, no major changes in minorities were present in the science and engineering fields during that period. These data shows that major efforts are needed in order to improve and achieve better results for diversity in the workplace (Gutierrez & Larcom, 2000). This does not mean that major steps have not been taken over this period. For example, the Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences (also funded in part by NSF under the title, ''Undergraduate Researchers in Plant Sciences Program'') was established in an effort to enhance the diversity of the plant science community. The Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences was designed to encourage members of underrepresented groups to seek career opportunities in the plant sciences. To achieve this end, the program contained several components with the primary focus on mentored research for undergraduate students. The research experience was provided during the summer months on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. At the end of the summer experience, each participant presented an oral report on their research, and submitted a written paper on the same topic. This was deliberately designed to mimic the plant science professions in which research leads to presentations in the form of reports, papers, etc. In addition to the program's research component, the participants met twice each week with the co-coordinators, William Gordon and Ken Poff, for an ''enrichment''. One ''enrichment'' each week was dedicated to a seminar or field experience designed to broaden the participants views of the plant sciences. The second ''enrichment'' was designed to teach strategies for successfully crossing cultural barriers, and to develop the skills necessary for success in admissions to and successful completion of graduate school. During the eleven-year duration of the program, participants have included students from underrepresented populations at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), an Hispanic Serving Institution (MSI), and a Native American transfer student from a Tribal College (Table I).

  6. Research News | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    sciences, primarily in physics but also including subject areas such as chemistry, biology and life sciences, materials science, nuclear sciences and engineering, energy...

  7. July 31,2008 Dear members of the U.S. fusion energy sciences research community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 31,2008 Dear members of the U.S. fusion energy sciences research community: I will be leaving my post as Associate Director of the Office of Science for the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES-term planning exercise for all areas of science covered by the OFES, including magnetic fusion energy sciences

  8. Center for Mathematical Sciences RESEARCH WORKSHOP OF THE ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinchover, Yehuda

    of Technology #12;Technion-Israel Institute of Technology RESEARCH WORKSHOP OF THE ISRAEL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Value Problems with Measure Data Technion - Israel Institute of Technology PROGRAM All lectures:20-11:00 11:00-11:50 Gianni Dal Maso Quasistatic evolution for Cam-Clay plasticity 12:00-12:50 Fred Weissler

  9. Cultivating Global Science IN OUR RAPIDLY EXPANDING GLOBAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ENTERPRISE, GOOD SCIENCE ANYWHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Subra

    .* The heads of major science and engineering research funding agen- cies from nearly 50 countries's unique needs for economic growth, national security, and human capital development. One major barrier synthesized into a coherent set of basic principles that were circulated for input from all participants

  10. Challenges in Ceramic Science: A Report from the Workshop on Emerging Research Areas in Ceramic Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Gregory S.

    Challenges in Ceramic Science: A Report from the Workshop on Emerging Research Areas in Ceramic-mail: gr20@andrew.cmu.edu J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 95 [12] 3699­3712 (2012) DOI: 10.1111/jace.12033 © 2012 The American Ceramic Society Journal Feature #12;u Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace

  11. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  12. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  13. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  14. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  15. Core Research Activities and Studies of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, Jon K.

    2015-02-11

    Lists activities of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and summarizes research results partly enabled by this award.

  16. Social and Economic Research Group Centre for Human and Ecological Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Social and Economic Research Group Centre for Human and Ecological Science Forest Research UK 22nd considerations & legislative restrictions · Perceptions - Reduction in/ loss of genetic diversity (previous crop

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. ORMS Undergraduate Student Learning Goals All Operations Research and Management Science graduates are expected to acquire the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    ORMS Undergraduate Student Learning Goals All Operations Research and Management Science graduates in practice. The ORMS (Operations Research and Management Science) program has four possible concentrations, statistics, operations research, and management sciences. · Learn how to apply these skills and tools

  19. Phase Transitions of Aqueous Atmospheric Particles Scot T. Martin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transformations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles," in 1995-1996 at MIT in Atmospheric Chemistry. He was an Assistant Professor in Aquatic and Atmospheric Chemistry in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineers in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program). His laboratory research group is currently active in two

  20. Photo: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , marine geophysics, ocean acoustics, and marine and atmospheric chemistry. The school is also known as onePhoto: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) was founded in 1943 in Biscayne Bay near Miami. It is the only subtropical applied and basic marine and atmospheric research

  1. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-28

    The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

  2. 2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cieslak, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

  3. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  4. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  5. RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science Gene Discovery Research Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    Genomics Research Group Cellulose Production Research Team Enzyme Research Team Bioplastic Research Team

  6. HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs Effective: June 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs Responsibility: Vice President for Research SHARED FACILITIES Overview The mission of shared facilities at the Health Science Center is to support the research activities of investigators and their research partners

  7. HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs Effective: May 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs in a standard patient care setting (non-research). #12;HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Effective: May 2008 Section 7.2 Human Research Protection Program Revised: June 2013 Policy 7.2.3 Research

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-07-25

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 – June 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. GE's BBQ Science Experiments Produce Results |GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming UpgradesArea:BenefitsResearchScience

  3. Michael O. Rabin Thomas J. Watson Sr. Research Professor of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael O. Rabin Thomas J. Watson Sr. Research Professor of Computer Science Harvard University 1964-66 Chairman, Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University 1970-71 Chairman, Computer Science Science, Harvard University 1983-2012 Thomas J. Watson Sr. Professor of Computer Science, Harvard

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive user statistics. However, Archive users are only down about 10% from last quarter. Anothe

  5. Operations Research Letters 38 (2010) 550555 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Barry L.

    2010-01-01

    Operations Research Letters 38 (2010) 550­555 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Operations Engineering and Logistics Management, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay

  6. Fiscal year 1998 summary report of the NOAA Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poole-Kober, E.M.; Viebrock, H.J.

    1999-06-01

    During Fiscal Year 1998, the Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division provided meteorological and modeling assistance to the US Environmental Protection Agency. Among the significant research studies and results were the following: publication and distribution of Models-3/Community Mutliscale Air Quality system; estimation of the nitrogen deposition to Chesapeake Bay, continued evaluation and application of air quality models for mercury, dioxin, and heavy metals, continued conduct of deposition velocity field studies over various major categories of land-use; conduct of the Ozark Isoprene Experiment to investigate biogenic isoprene emissions; analysis and modeling of dust resuspension data; continued study of buoyant puff dispersion in the convective boundary layer; and development of a standard practice for an objective statistical procedure for comparing air quality model outputs with field data.

  7. Connecting Lab-Based Attosecond Science with FEL research

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    In the last few years laboratory-scale femtosecond laser-based research using XUV light has developed dramatically following the successful development of attosecond laser pulses by means of high-harmonic generation. Using attosecond laser pulses, studies of electron dynamics on the natural timescale that electronic processes occur in atoms, molecules and solids can be contemplated, providing unprecedented insight into the fundamental role that electrons play in photo-induced processes. In my talk I will briefly review the present status of the attosecond science research field in terms of present and foreseen capabilities, and discuss a few recent applications, including a first example of the use of attosecond laser pulses in molecular science. In addition, I will discuss very recent results of experiments where photoionization of dynamically aligned molecules is investigated using a high-harmonics XUV source. Photoionization of aligned molecules becomes all the more interesting if the experiment is performed using x-ray photons. Following the absorption of x-rays, ejected photoelectrons can be used as a probe of the (time-evolving) molecular structure, making use of intra-molecular electron diffraction. This amounts, as some have stated, to ?illuminating the molecule from within?. I will present the present status of our experiments on this topic making use of the FLASH free electron laser in Hamburg. Future progress in this research field not only depends on the availability of better and more powerful light sources, but also requires sophisticated detector strategies. In my talk I will explain how we are trying to meet some of the experimental challenges by using the Medipix family of detectors, which we have already used for time- and space-resolved imaging of electrons and ions.

  8. Subject Coverage, Science Fiction and Fantasy Research Database, Summer 2013 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Hal W.

    2013-08-07

    Science journalism has been studied from the perspectives of science journalists in the West. However, studies of science journalism from the perspectives of general reporters in developing or developed countries are scarce. This study was a survey...

  9. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaolo, Donald

    2008-01-01

    the commencement of the Earth Sciences Division 30 yearstelling. Happy Anniversary! Earth Sciences Division ears YTritium in Engineered and Earth Materials Stefan Finsterle,

  10. HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs Effective: April 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs components of the HRPP: #12;HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research for Research Operations · VPR Offices o Office of the Institutional Review Board (OIRB) o Office of Clinical

  11. Biology | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Biology SHARE...

  12. B.Sc. Specialization in Atmospheric Sciences 2014-2015 Name ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    & Remote Sensing _______ EAS 270 The Atmosphere _______ EAS 294 or HGP 250 Natural Resources & Env. Mgmt Recommended Arts options include any EAS X9X or HGP courses. Note 5 Open option ­ chosen from any credit

  13. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01

    polymer photoresists by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that

  15. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  16. GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian Aquatic Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (6 scientists) and 3 major hydroelectric companies (Nalcor, Manitoba Hydro

  17. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  18. Basic Research Needs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    identify priority research directions for longer term energy planning. The BES Reports web page contains a listing of and links to BES and BESAC (Basic Energy Sciences Advisory...

  19. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  20. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  1. European Journal of Operational Research 243 (2015) 944955 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    European Journal of Operational Research 243 (2015) 944­955 Contents lists available at Science A discontinuous mispricing model under asymmetric information Winston S. Buckleya, , Hongwei Longb a Department of Mathematical Sciences, Bentley University, Waltham, MA 02452, USA b Department of Mathematical Sciences

  2. Multi-University Research to Advance Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dept of Applied Physics and Applied Math, Columbia University, New York, NY Plasma Science and FusionMulti-University Research to Advance Discovery Fusion Energy Science using a Superconducting Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA Outline · Intermediate scale discovery fusion energy science needs support

  3. Getting Alice Through the Door: Social Science Research and Natural Resource Management1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment usage and the impact upon social structures (Force and others 1993) are not always easyGetting Alice Through the Door: Social Science Research and Natural Resource Management1 Alan W of the various roles of the social sciences and the types of questions amenable to social science are examined

  4. S-1041 Multistate Research Project The Science and Engineering for a Biobased Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -OILS........................................................................................24 Charles A. Mullen* and Akwasi A. Boateng, Crop Conversion Science and Engineering, EasternS-1041 Multistate Research Project The Science and Engineering for a Biobased Industry Conversion Tumbleson University of Illinois #12;S-1041: The Science and Engineering for a Biobased Industry 2010

  5. Why Citizen Science? Public participation in scientific research, commonly called citizen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Findings Why Citizen Science? Public participation in scientific research, commonly called citizen as the citizen science type of PPSR when compared against typologies (Fig 2). Furthermore, 82% of projects that 71% of PPSR projects were in the citizen science model and focused on conservation and/or ecology

  6. Opportunities for Materials Science and Biological Research at the OPAL Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, S. J.

    2008-03-17

    Neutron scattering techniques have evolved over more than 1/2 century into a powerful set of tools for determination of atomic and molecular structures. Modern facilities offer the possibility to determine complex structures over length scales from {approx}0.1 nm to {approx}500 nm. They can also provide information on atomic and molecular dynamics, on magnetic interactions and on the location and behaviour of hydrogen in a variety of materials. The OPAL Research Reactor is a 20 megawatt pool type reactor using low enriched uranium fuel, and cooled by water. OPAL is a multipurpose neutron factory with modern facilities for neutron beam research, radioisotope production and irradiation services. The neutron beam facility has been designed to compete with the best beam facilities in the world. After six years in construction, the reactor and neutron beam facilities are now being commissioned, and we will commence scientific experiments later this year. The presentation will include an outline of the strengths of neutron scattering and a description of the OPAL research reactor, with particular emphasis on it's scientific infrastructure. It will also provide an overview of the opportunities for research in materials science and biology that will be possible at OPAL, and mechanisms for accessing the facilities. The discussion will emphasize how researchers from around the world can utilize these exciting new facilities.

  7. )OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - glades. They also monitor ocean currents, studying changes that may affect rainfall or climate. AOML)OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). AOML car- ries out world-class research

  8. Physics education research: Resources for middle school science teachers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krusberg, Zosia A C

    2009-01-01

    This resource letter intends to provide middle school science teachers with a collection of resources to aid them in planning and implementing a physical science curriculum. The resources are in the form of books, websites, journals, and organizations.

  9. ENGINEERING AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH COUNCIL 1 2We are the main UK government agency for funding research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    EPSRC funding in order to maximise the impact of the UK's investment in science and engineering. Energy the Technology Strategy Board (TSB) and the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) to ensure that our prioritiesWHATWEDO ENGINEERING AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH COUNCIL #12;1 2We are the main UK government

  10. 12.085 Seminar in Environmental Science, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    Required for all Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences majors in the Environmental Science track, this course is an introduction to current research in the field. Stresses integration of central scientific concepts ...

  11. Perspective Research in Macromolecular Science: Challenges and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; Department of Polymer Science; Department of Polymer Science, UniVersity of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325; Department of Chemical Engineering opportunities, the National Science Foundation through the Polymers Program of the Division of Materials

  12. Europe PMC Guidelines for Researchers funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nawratil, Georg

    1 Europe PMC Guidelines for Researchers funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) 1. What is Europe PMC? Europe PubMedCentral (Europe PMC) is a free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences archive, Europe PMC provides a stable and permanent online archive of full-text peer reviewed research

  13. Aerosol Science and Technology, 48:803812, 2014 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 48:803­812, 2014 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol of particle growth in the atmosphere, and many properties of the resulting mixed particles depend on organic. In this article, analytic equations are derived p(;d) for condensational growth in a continuously mixed flow

  14. Research Universities: Core of the US Science and Technology System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tuzin, “Equilibrium in the Research University”, Change,for Postwar Scientific Research. July 1945. Reprinted ingraduate programs. CSHE Research & Occasional Paper Series

  15. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research Fusion Technology & Engineering Plasma Technology Waves & Beams Useful...

  16. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, publications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering...

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-06-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 × 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 × 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 × 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 × 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  4. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Eddy-mediated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Andrew

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS Supporting Information for "Eddy-mediated transport of warm, and over- turning circulation. 1 Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. 2 Environmental Sciences and Engineering, California

  5. FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PJ Hughes

    2000-06-13

    A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

  6. Evaluation of Routine Atmospheric Sounding Measurements using Unmanned Systems (ERASMUS) Science Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th,EnvironmentalEqual7/31/2016Routine Atmospheric8

  7. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Archived Data at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AERI instrument is an advanced version of the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) designed and fabricated at the University of Wisconsin (Revercomb et al. 1988) to measure upwelling infrared radiances from an aircraft. The AERI is a fully automated ground-based passive infrared interferometer that measures downwelling atmospheric radiance from 3.3 - 18.2 mm (550 - 3000 cm-1) at less than 10-minute temporal resolution with a spectral resolution of one wavenumber. It has been used in DOEĆs Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Much of the data available here at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), an institute within the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center, may also be available in the ARM Archive. On this website, data and images from six different field experiments are available, along with AERIPLUS realtime data for the Madison, Wisconsin location. Realtime data includes temperature and water vapor time-height cross sections, SKEWT diagrams, convective stability indices, and displays from a rooftop Lidar instrument. The field experiments took place in Oaklahoma and Wisconsin with the AERI prototype.

  8. ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC SCIENCE LETTERS, 2013, VOL. 6, NO. 1, 39-43 Effects of Clouds and Aerosols on Surface Radiation Budget Inferred from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    of Atmospheric Physics, NUIST, Nanjing 210044, China 3 Global Change and Earth System Science (GCESS), Beijing Radiative Effects (AREs) are 12.7, ­37.6, and ­24.9 W m­2 , indicating that aerosols have LW warming impact have much stronger LW warming effect and SW cooling effect on the surface radiation budget than AREs

  9. Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology Research Needed Now for Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamber Research Plasma Chamber Research embodies the scientific and engineering disciplines required Chamber · Plasma Heating/Fueling/CD · Safety · Tritium · Materials · Design Studies #12;Scope of Plasma

  10. Rocket Science? No, It's Harder | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    says Juan Albeniz, Business Program Manager, Oil & Gas at GE Global Research Europe. Juan Albeniz, Business Program Manager, Oil & Gas at GE Global Research, Europe Juan...

  11. 01/14 Ver. 4.1 Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved Space Weather Prize Christiane Jablonowski,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret

  12. Mutation Research 666 (2009) 6873 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2009-01-01

    for carcinogenesis [2], and with the risk of low-dose radiation recognized in the past decade [3], the mechanism of RIBE has become a "hot spot" in radiation biology research. Mitochondria are generally known as "powerMutation Research 666 (2009) 68­73 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Mutation Research

  13. Behavioural Brain Research 233 (2012) 7989 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    2012-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 233 (2012) 79­89 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Behavioural Brain Research journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bbr Research report Dendritic morphology in the brain have been studied in both human and animal populations, and may result in novel circuitry

  14. HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs Effective: April 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs HANDBOOK OF OPERATING PROCEDURES Chapter 7 Research and Sponsored Programs Effective: April 2003 Section 7 Effective: April 2003 Section 7.7 Clinical Research Revised: May 2015 Policy 7.7.1 Budgeting and Billing

  15. RC 22036 (98924) April 17, 2001 Computer Science IBM Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jong-Deok

    RC 22036 (98924) April 17, 2001 Computer Science IBM Research Report A Debugging Platform for Java IBM Research Division Thomas J. Watson Research Center P.O. Box 218 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 DISTRIBUTION NOTICE: This report has been submitted for publication outside of IBM and will probably

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-07-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for April 1 - June 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and are not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The AMF statistics for this reporting period were not available at the time of this report. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours for the fixed sites. The average well exceeded our goal this quarter.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

  1. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Xuhua

    of Presentation Part 1: Program Architecture Renewal Part 2: Funding Stream - Formal Partnerships Connection de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada Program Architecture Renewal #12;4 Program Architecture Renewal Goals: greater overall program coherence; simplified application process; flexible funding

  2. Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Initiative & Carle PARTNERING IN RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    Center at Mills Breast Cancer Institute Carle Research Institute (217) 326-4508 research@carle.com www to be solved · Tissue procurement services provides clinical samples for advanced research · Laboratory Manager studies · Aid with the navigation of the IRB process · Assistance with logistics of clinical research

  3. Service Science, Management and Engineering Curricula and Research at NC State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perros, Harry

    _allen@ncsu.edu (919) 515-6941 Harry Perros Professor, Department of Computer Science, NC State University Raleigh, NC1 Service Science, Management and Engineering Curricula and Research at NC State University Steven and Computer Engineering, NC State University Raleigh, NC 27695-7911 candice@ncsu.edu (919) 515-7357 Michael

  4. Sustainability science: The emerging research program William C. Clark* and Nancy M. Dickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability science: The emerging research program William C. Clark* and Nancy M. Dickson John F&T) in the quest for a transition toward sustainability. These movements take as their point of departure a widely this sustainability challenge, the multiple movements to harness science and tech- nology for sustainability focus

  5. int. j. geographical information science, 1999, vol. 13, no. 4, 289 309 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pylyshyn, Zenon

    current Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are becoming more adept at presenting informationint. j. geographical information science, 1999, vol. 13, no. 4, 289± 309 Research Article Four of data brings with it a International Journal of Geographical Information Science ISSN 1365-8816 print

  6. Frontline Earth Science Research @ St Andrews The Rise of the Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    1 Frontline Earth Science Research @ St Andrews The Rise of the Earth System: A Tale of Ice, Oxygen Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, may I extend a very warm welcome to you at this half-day symposium. This is the third such event we have hosted; the first, Insights into Earth Processes from

  7. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  8. DOE Office of Basic Sciences: An Overview of Basic Research Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Basic Energy Sciences Overview Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC ) Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research...

  9. Precambrian Research 228 (2013) 85101 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    2013-01-01

    Precambrian Research 228 (2013) 85­101 Contents lists available at SciVerse Science, the extent of organic matter remineralization (and thus degree of 13 C depletion) is correlated with water

  10. Behavioural Brain Research 223 (2011) 403410 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalen, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 223 (2011) 403­410 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Behavioural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 2. The structural and functional connectivity of the human amygdala and prefrontal cortex

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. T

  12. Motivation, Design, and Ubiquity: A Discussion of Research Ethics and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David R. Wright

    2007-06-04

    Modern society is permeated with computers, and the software that controls them can have latent, long-term, and immediate effects that reach far beyond the actual users of these systems. This places researchers in Computer Science and Software Engineering in a critical position of influence and responsibility, more than any other field because computer systems are vital research tools for other disciplines. This essay presents several key ethical concerns and responsibilities relating to research in computing. The goal is to promote awareness and discussion of ethical issues among computer science researchers. A hypothetical case study is provided, along with questions for reflection and discussion.

  13. Thermospheric tides simulated by the national center for atmospheric research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model at equinox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)); Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1993-05-01

    The authors use the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) to model tides and dynamics in the thermosphere. This model incorporates the latest advances in the thermosphere general circulation model. Model results emphasized the 70[degree] W longitude region to overlap a series of incoherent radar scatter installations. Data and the model are available on data bases. The results of this theoretical modeling are compared with available data, and with prediction of more empirical models. In general there is broad agreement within the comparisons.

  14. Enhancing Biological Science Research Opportunities at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    , July 28, 2012 #12;#1 Lesson Learned: logistics · double purpose teaching and research · get paid to do system · avoid maintenance costs/time · research groups > 4 take less effort than

  15. Research Institute of Micro/Nanometer Science & Technology Multiple Openings : Chemistry, Materials Science, Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Science, Nanotechnology Shanghai, China We have several job openings for experienced polymer chemists / nanotechnology. We will consider hiring chemists who are skillful in macromolecular synthesis ("click chemistry

  16. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research> alcator>tokamak...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact...

  17. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact...

  18. Pergamon AtmosphericEnvironmentVol. 30, No. 12, pp. 2233-2256, 1996 Copyright 1996 El~vier ,ScienceLtd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    .S.A.; and ~Mobile Source Emissions Research Branch, Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory, U2 ratios and other emissions characteristics. The Tuscarora Mountain Tunnel is flat, making (evaporative running losses, etc.). Measured CO/CO2 ratios agreed well with concurrent roadside infrared remote

  19. RESEARCH SCHOOL FOR EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCES AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    doctoral research training. There may be undergraduate courses, or modules from the Research School's MRes training will be provided primarily by your Principal Supervisor, with assistance from a Subsidiary College Research School. Information on the training courses and other resources provided by the CRS can

  20. Office of Biological and Environmental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levels) ·Research Programs - Climate and Earth System Modeling (~$78) - Atmospheric Systems Research-scale, long-term field studies Process modeling with ties to earth- system models Funding to universities Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences Advanced Scientific Computing Research Nuclear Physics Biological Systems

  1. Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} and crops: Research methodology and direct effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, H.; Acock, B.

    1993-12-31

    Carbon dioxide is the food of trees and grass. Our relentless pursuit of a better life has taken us down a traffic jammed road, past smoking factories and forests. This pursuit is forcing a rise in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} level, and no one know when and if flood stage will be reached. Some thinkers have suggested that this increase of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere will cause warming. No matter whether this prediction is realized or not, more CO{sub 2} will directly affect plants. Data from controlled observations have usually, but not always, shown benefits. Our choices of scientific equipment for gathering CO{sub 2} response data are critical since we must see what is happening through the eye of the instrument. The signals derived from our sensors will ultimately determine the truth of our conclusions, conclusion which will profoundly influence our policy decisions. Experimental gear is selected on the basis of scale of interest and problem to be addressed. Our imaginations and our budgets interact to set bounds on our objectives and approaches. Techniques run the gamut from cellular microprobes through whole-plant controlled environment chambers to field-scale exposure systems. Trade-offs exist among the various CO{sub 2} exposure techniques, and many factors impinge on the choice of a method. All exposure chambers are derivatives of three primary types--batch, plug flow, and continuous stirred tank reactor. Systems for the generation of controlled test atmospheres of CO{sub 2} vary in two basic ways--size and degree of control. Among the newest is free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment which allows tens of square meters of cropland to be studied.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, P

  3. The Role of "Citizen Science" in Weather and Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    stations to help document Climate resources of the country And provide science-based weather forecasts by volunteers to see their data put to use. #12;Weather reports began on Pikes Peak in 1873 Credit: NOAA Photo weather and climate data were simple ­ Determining the "climate resource" of our country -- specifically

  4. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  5. DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, supports a number of basic research projects in materials, chemicals, and biosciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that impact several renewable energy technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). The goal of the Material Sciences projects is to study the structural, optical, electrical, and defect properties of semiconductors and related materials using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Specific projects involving PV include: ordering in III-V semiconductors, isoelectronic co-doping, doping bottlenecks in semiconductors, solid-state theory, and computational science. The goal of the Chemical Sciences projects is to advance the fundamental understanding of the relevant science involving materials, photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, nanoscale chemistry, and catalysis that support solar photochemical conversion technologies. Specific projects relating to PV include: dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, semiconductor nanostructures, and molecular semiconductors. This presentation will give an overview of some of the major accomplishments of these projects.

  6. eResearch New Zealand Supported by the Ministry of Research, Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, James R.

    skills. Learn more about Summer of eResearch 2010: https://wiki.auckland.ac.nz/x/nE2iAQ Specific projects to further research · focus on discipline specific research infrastructure projects, support research, Energy and Minerals) · mentored by a national research Institute or Centre BeSTGRID Summer of eResearch

  7. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  8. Evolving research directions in Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    processes in Earth System models. Received 19 October 2012,processes in Earth System models. There have been majorIn many respects, Earth System models contain significant

  9. Single-Column Modeling C. J. Walcek Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vapor andParticle DatabaseC.J.AC. J.

  10. Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn, 1969 The8,April 2004Argonne

  11. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Fusion Technology & Engineering Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratoroy Useful Links The links...

  12. HIV genetic research to be discussed at Bradbury Science Museum...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    degree in theoretical physics from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Physics in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. After his time as a postdoctoral researcher at Brookhaven...

  13. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>publications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links APS Presentations New Orleans...

  14. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tour Alcator C-Mod Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact...

  15. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C-mod Alcator Introduction Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information...

  16. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings & Seminars Contact Information Physics...

  17. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research> alcator>tokamak...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tour Alcator C-Mod Introduction Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings &...

  18. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research> alcator> computers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tour Alcator C-Mod Introduction Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News Meetings &...

  19. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research, alcator, pubs,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarterly review viewgraphs Alcator Introduction Facility Information Tokamak Data & Real-Time Information Computer & Data Systems Research Program Information Publications & News...

  20. Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearchResearchResearch High

  1. Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearchResearchResearch

  2. Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:486501, 2009 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a NOAA research vessel during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition for glutaric acid in mixed glutaric acid/NH4HSO4 test aerosols was 0.22 ng collected mass, which corresponds min­1. During TexAQS 2006/GoMACCS, signals well above the detection limit were observed at a number

  3. Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Life Sciences 6 (2012) 335-341 The International Research Group in Geophysics Europe to create the IRGGEA (International Group in Geophysics Europe Africa) in order to pursue the scientific: Scientific network, ethical rules, geophysics, sustainable research, Africa. 1. Introduction

  4. Behavioural Brain Research 198 (2009) 267272 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    2009-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 198 (2009) 267­272 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Behavioural Brain Research journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/bbr Review The emergence of consciousness s t r a c t The brains of animals show chemical, anatomical, and functional differences

  5. Applied Ocean Research (2013) Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    2013-01-01

    as a viable contender for future offshore wind farm developments. The primary benefit of floating structuresApplied Ocean Research (2013) Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Applied Ocean Research journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/apor Multibody dynamics of floating wind turbines with large

  6. NREL Highlights SCIENCE Research provides insight for exploring use of Earth-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL Highlights SCIENCE Research provides insight for exploring use of Earth- abundant quaternary, it is critical to find new material that is Earth abundant and easily manufactured. Previous experimental studies This research provides insight for exploring use of Earth-abundant quaternary semiconductors for large

  7. Virus Research 160 (2011) 256263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Virus Research 160 (2011) 256­263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Virus Research journal Tombusvirus Ecogenomics Genomic sequence Fern host a b s t r a c t Viruses are most frequently discovered-associated viruses beyond these narrow constraints, non-cultivated plants of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage

  8. Virus Research 167 (2012) 3442 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Virus Research 167 (2012) 34­42 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Virus Research Accepted 24 March 2012 Available online 2 April 2012 Keywords: Plant virus Comovirinae Survey Polymorphism Phylogenetics a b s t r a c t Viruses are most frequently discovered because they cause disease. To expand

  9. Virus Research 141 (2009) 169173 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Virus Research 141 (2009) 169­173 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Virus Research journal of northeastern Oklahoma frequently contain virus-like sequences in particulate fractions Vijay Muthukumara: Available online 17 January 2009 Keywords: Plant virus Metagenomics Biodiversity Retroelements Tymovirus a b

  10. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Basic research in a broad range of energy technologies leadsbasic research that underpins a broad range of energy technologies.Basic  Energy  Sciences   10.2.5 Reaction  Dynamics  in  Complex  Molecular  Systems   Principal Investigator: Thomas Miller, California Institute of Technology

  11. Collegeof Agriculture and Life Sciences Proposalfor ResearchFunds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    ResearchMentor: Tammo Steenhuis,Biological & Environmental Engineering Signatureof FacultyResearchMentor: '-- 119 Adrian A. Harpold Biological and Environmental Engineering 30 Riley-Robb Hall Cornell University Ithaca Sufficientandsafewateris theunderpinningof asociety'shealth,security,economy,and environmentalcondition[1]. Rainfall

  12. Comparative Biomedical Sciences is one of five graduate fields associated with the Biological & Biomedical Sciences (BBS) Graduate Program. As an umbrella program, the BBS fosters an atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Background Comparative Biomedical Sciences is one of five graduate fields associated with the Biological & Biomedical Sciences (BBS) Graduate Program. As an umbrella program, the BBS fosters fields are members of the BBS Graduate Program: Comparative Biomedical Sciences Immunology & Infectious

  13. Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH THE UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) Earth Systems Research Center is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrative scientists and students study the Earth's ecosystems, atmosphere, water, and ice using field measurements

  14. Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearchResearch Biological and

  15. Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearchResearch Biological

  16. Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearchResearch

  17. MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center: research>alcator>introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review, Thursday, July 14, 2005 10:00 Steve Wolfe: Status of the run campaign, and research operations weeks JOULE target 10:15 Yijun Lin: Status of "all metal wall" JOULE...

  18. Postdoctoral Research Associate Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Ridge National Laboratory, USA 2010 - 2013 Postdoctoral Researcher in National Renewable Energy National Laboratory huangb@ornl.gov Publications Education Tsinghua University Physics Ph.D., 2010 Jilin Laboratory, USA Honors 2012 National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation Award (nomination) 2011 Beijing

  19. Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This report focuses on research in global change, as well as environmental remediation. Global change research investigates the following: distribution and balance of radiative heat energy; identification of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases; and prediction of changes in the climate and concomitant ecological effects. Environmental remediation develops the basic understanding needed to remediate soils, sediments, and ground water that have undergone radioactive and chemical contamination.

  20. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assessing the tropical ocean current system partly responsible for the fresh water budget. AOML will alsoAOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Administra- tor of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmo- spheric Research in January and began his new duties

  1. NREL: Biomass Research - Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:News ReleasesChemical and Catalyst Science

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z Research: Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of(LVOC) Working at the LVOC LVOCZ NewsFusionScience

  3. Energy Frontier Research Center Center for Materials Science of Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Tracking

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Materials Science: Video Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque AlbuquerqueCybernetics: PerceptionMaterials Science

  5. Science Day Offers Students STEM Activities | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| Stanford SynchrotronVideo-Contest Sign56ScienceOpens Doors

  6. About the Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Program Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. This research provides the foundations for new energy technologies#12;About the Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Program Basic Energy Sciences (BES) supports fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy

  7. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saffer, Shelley I.

    2014-12-01

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  8. THE DEMONSTRATION AND SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS (DSX): A FUNDAMENTAL SCIENCE RESEARCH MISSION ADVANCING TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strangeway, Robert J.

    based research areas are: · Wave Particle Interaction Experiment: Researching the physics of very low experiments include research in three major experiment categories. The physics of Very Low Frequency (VLF, 0 distributions; radiation dose rates, local magnetic fields and pitch angle distributions in the poorly

  9. Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA inResearchResearch

  10. Chemical Engineering | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical and Engineering Materials Clean Energy Nuclear Sciences Computer Science Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics Environment...

  11. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Xuhua

    of Presentation Part 1: Changes at SSHRC Program Architecture Renewal The Partnerships and Research Portfolios Renewal Goals: Greater overall program coherence; Simplified application process; Flexible funding options that may result in best practices or models that can be adapted by others or scaled up at a regional

  12. Postdoctoral Research Associate Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    : Synthesis of carbon nanomaterials (i.e. graphene) and metal carbides; Understanding relationship between Professional Activities 2013 Organizer and Chair for International Graduate Symposium on energy and fuel Research, ACS Book "Production and Purification of Ultraclean Transportation Fuels" Honors and Awards 2013

  13. Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the research that must be done. For example, the applied research programs in the DOE need a greater awareness of the user facilities and an understanding of how to use them to solve their unique problems. The discussions reinforced what all of the participants already knew: the issue of energy security is of major importance both for the U.S. and for the world. Furthermore, it is clear that major changes in the primary energy sources, in energy conversion, and in energy use, must be achieved within the next fifty years. This time scale is determined by two drivers: increasing world population and increasing expectations of that population. Much of the research and development currently being done are concerned with incremental improvements in what has been done in the immediate past; and it is necessary to take this path because improvements will be needed across the board. These advances extend the period before the radical changes have to be made; however, they will not solve the underlying, long-range problem. The Subpanel recommends that a major program be funded to conduct a multidisciplinary research program to address the issues to ensure a secure energy future for the U.S. It is necessary to recognize that this program must be ensured of a long-term stability. It is also necessary that a management and funding structure appropriate for such an approach be developed. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences is well positioned to support this initiative by enhancement of their already world-class scientific research programs and user facilities.

  14. Department of Atmospheric Sciences, S.O.E.S.T., University of Hawai'i at Mnoa 2525 Correa Road, HIG 350; Honolulu, HI 96822 956-8775

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    350; Honolulu, HI 96822 956-8775 & Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, S.O.E.S.T., University of Hawai'i at Mnoa 1000 Pope Road, MSB 312; Honolulu, HI 96822 956-8083 Mark A. Cane Lamont

  15. Computing at the leading edge: Research in the energy sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirin, A.A.; Van Dyke, P.T.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this publication is to highlight selected scientific challenges that have been undertaken by the DOE Energy Research community. The high quality of the research reflected in these contributions underscores the growing importance both to the Grand Challenge scientific efforts sponsored by DOE and of the related supporting technologies that the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) and other facilities are able to provide. The continued improvement of the computing resources available to DOE scientists is prerequisite to ensuring their future progress in solving the Grand Challenges. Titles of articles included in this publication include: the numerical tokamak project; static and animated molecular views of a tumorigenic chemical bound to DNA; toward a high-performance climate systems model; modeling molecular processes in the environment; lattice Boltzmann models for flow in porous media; parallel algorithms for modeling superconductors; parallel computing at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory; the advanced combustion modeling environment; adaptive methodologies for computational fluid dynamics; lattice simulations of quantum chromodynamics; simulating high-intensity charged-particle beams for the design of high-power accelerators; electronic structure and phase stability of random alloys.

  16. TORCH Computational Reference Kernels - A Testbed for Computer Science Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel Webb; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David H.; Demmel, James W.; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-12-02

    For decades, computer scientists have sought guidance on how to evolve architectures, languages, and programming models in order to improve application performance, efficiency, and productivity. Unfortunately, without overarching advice about future directions in these areas, individual guidance is inferred from the existing software/hardware ecosystem, and each discipline often conducts their research independently assuming all other technologies remain fixed. In today's rapidly evolving world of on-chip parallelism, isolated and iterative improvements to performance may miss superior solutions in the same way gradient descent optimization techniques may get stuck in local minima. To combat this, we present TORCH: A Testbed for Optimization ResearCH. These computational reference kernels define the core problems of interest in scientific computing without mandating a specific language, algorithm, programming model, or implementation. To compliment the kernel (problem) definitions, we provide a set of algorithmically-expressed verification tests that can be used to verify a hardware/software co-designed solution produces an acceptable answer. Finally, to provide some illumination as to how researchers have implemented solutions to these problems in the past, we provide a set of reference implementations in C and MATLAB.

  17. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Observations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    samples from the recovery cruise and Bob O'Malley for evaluation of the CTD sensors used on the deployment p. 8 b. Instrument Calibration p. 9 Ocean Temperature and Salinity Sensors p. 9 Met Sensors p. 10 Doppler Profiler Compass p. 10 ADCP/ADP Battery Capacity p. 11 Pressure Sensors p. 11 CTD Sensors p. 12 c

  18. Atmosphere Sciences Instrumentation Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Water Probe Robert Mitchell Challenge: · Power varies with Temperature, Pressure, Airspeed, and Others Balance Cycle · Down Points - Frost/Dew Temperature #12;Pressure Transducer David Keith · Pressure sensing · Funnel helps prevent evaporation inside instrument · Each tip creates a 100ms switch closure · Closure

  19. 13, 1479714822, 2013 Atmospheric waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    .5194/acpd-13-14797-2013 © Author(s) 2013. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Sciences ss Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Discussions Atmospheric Measurement s Discussions This discussion paper is/has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  20. Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

  1. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReportsDeterminatIonFornl71:An AtomicLargeAnCNMS RESEARCH

  2. Research News | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday Production of SOA in UrbanArcticResearchLibrary2010

  3. K. SHAFER SMITH AND ROSS TULLOCH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York (Manuscript received 17 November 2008, in final the Corresponding author address: K. Shafer Smith, Courant Insti- tute of Mathematical Sciences, New York Universit

  4. Life may be water-based but the components of life science research are not always water-soluble.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Life may be water-based but the components of life science research are not always water a free IUBMB-Sigma-Nicholson Metabolic Pathway Chart: sigma.com/biofiles Online Product Catalog The Life Science Online Product Catalog contains the largest selection of life science products available. Voted

  5. Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems -Beautiful Images and Perceptive Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems unable to replicate the successes of human pattern recognition. The growth of citizen science on the web-computational citizen science platform that combines the efforts of human classifiers with those of computational

  6. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novich, C.M.

    1985-02-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the terrestrial ecology of semi-arid sites; (2) marine sciences; (3) radionuclide fate and effects; (4) waste mobilization, fate and effects; and (5) theoretical research on environmental sampling. (ACR)

  8. Climate research in the former Soviet Union. FASAC: Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center technical assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.; Ellsaesser, H.W.; Harshvardhan; Hoffert, M.I.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report assesses the state of the art in several areas of climate research in the former Soviet Union. This assessment was performed by a group of six internationally recognized US experts in related fields. The areas chosen for review are: large-scale circulation processes in the atmosphere and oceans; atmospheric radiative processes; cloud formation processes; climate effects of natural atmospheric disturbances; and the carbon cycle, paleoclimates, and general circulation model validation. The study found an active research community in each of the above areas. Overall, the quality of climate research in the former Soviet Union is mixed, although the best Soviet work is as good as the best corresponding work in the West. The best Soviet efforts have principally been in theoretical studies or data analysis. However, an apparent lack of access to modern computing facilities has severely hampered the Soviet research. Most of the issues considered in the Soviet literature are known, and have been discussed in the Western literature, although some extraordinary research in paleoclimatology was noted. Little unusual and exceptionally creative material was found in the other areas during the study period (1985 through 1992). Scientists in the former Soviet Union have closely followed the Western literature and technology. Given their strengths in theoretical and analytical methods, as well as their possession of simplified versions of detailed computer models being used in the West, researchers in the former Soviet Union have the potential to make significant contributions if supercomputers, workstations, and software become available. However, given the current state of the economy in the former Soviet Union, it is not clear that the computer gap will be bridged in the foreseeable future.

  9. Science budget inquiry continues with input from affected institutes : Research Fortnight : Feb 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    its plans to cut funding for solar terrestrial physics, a key area of research at the centre. The STFC The directors of two of the institutions most under threat from cuts in funding by the Science and Technology's management and warning the STFC that the community is "deeply pessimistic and angry" about the funding

  10. An Agenda for Human-Computer Interaction Research: Science and Technology Serving Human Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneiderman, Ben

    An Agenda for Human-Computer Interaction Research: Science and Technology Serving Human Needs and technology planners respond to the growing activity in human-computer interaction, a broad perspective may and challenges for the continued growth of HCI. Partnerships among universities, corporations, government

  11. Computer Science Research and Development manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamprecht, Fred A.

    classification software solutions, which required ex- pert knowledge in pattern recognition techniques in orderComputer Science ­ Research and Development manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) An object-oriented library for systematic training and comparison of classifiers for computer-assisted tumor

  12. USING NERC SCIENCE Welcome to the latest edition of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    USING NERC SCIENCE March 2009 Welcome to the latest edition of the Natural Environment Research. The results will show how the UK can meet its goal to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 while dealing with anxieties about energy security. The two year project has involved a unique whole systems

  13. BRICSLS-97-1Chomicki&Toman:TemporalLogicinInformationSystems BRICSBasic Research in Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toman, David

    BRICSLS-97-1Chomicki&Toman:TemporalLogicinInformationSystems BRICSBasic Research in Computer Science Temporal Logic in Information Systems Jan Chomicki David Toman BRICS Lecture Series LS-97-1 ISSN/1/ #12;Temporal Logic in Information Systems Jan Chomicki David Toman #12;#12;Jan Chomicki Dept

  14. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Academia-based Translational Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    this relationship to reduce attrition rates in technology development.The seminar will also highlightInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Academia-based Translational Research and Industry Collaboration with Salim Shah, Chief Scientist, Office of Operations and Planning

  15. Research briefing on selected opportunities in atomic, molecular, and optical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses research on the following topics: The Laser-Atom Revolution; Controlling Dynamical Pathways; Nonclassical States of Light; Transient States of Atomic Systems; New Light Generation and Handling; Clusters; Atomic Physics at User Facilities; and Impacts of AMO Sciences on Modern Technologies.

  16. Research briefing on selected opportunities in atomic, molecular, and optical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: The Laser-Atom Revolution; Controlling Dynamical Pathways; Nonclassical States of Light; Transient States of Atomic Systems; New Light Generation and Handling; Clusters; Atomic Physics at User Facilities; and Impacts of AMO Sciences on Modern Technologies.

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 1 A Survey of Research on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbeel, Pieter

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 1 A Survey of Research on Cloud Robotics and Automation Ben Kehoe Student Member, IEEE, Sachin Patil Member, IEEE, Pieter Abbeel Senior Member, IEEE, Ken-accessible resources, has potential to provide significant benefits to robots and automation systems. This survey

  18. int. j. geographical information science, 1999, vol. 13, no. 4, 385 396 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pylyshyn, Zenon

    int. j. geographical information science, 1999, vol. 13, no. 4, 385± 396 Research Article.verbree@geo.tudelft.nlgvanmaren@yahoo.com 2 Department of Technical Mathematics and Informatics, Faculty of Information Technology and Systems a 3D GIS&VR system (Karma VI) based on existing GIS and VR technology that uses the three views

  19. int. j. geographical information science, 1998, vol. 12, no. 4, 353 371 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pylyshyn, Zenon

    such as ® le systems, Geographical Information Systems and database management systems which contain data ableint. j. geographical information science, 1998, vol. 12, no. 4, 353± 371 Research Article Towards integrated geographical information processing DAVID J. ABEL CSIRO Division of Information Technology, GPO

  20. Frontline Earth Science Research @ St Andrews The Rise and Fall of Mountain Belts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    1 Frontline Earth Science Research @ St Andrews (FRESH) The Rise and Fall of Mountain Belts 18 and for controlling the tectonics of mountain building by Z ZZ- dZ ZZ tween tectonics and anatexis and establish (28-23 Ma) suite comprises anastamosing sheets of foli- ated two-mica, garnet-bearing granite

  1. Synergy Award for Innovation Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Bin

    Synergy Award for Innovation Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada are used widely in industry to conserve energy, increase productivity and improve product quality. However, such as in the oil, gas and mining industries, where only three or four contracts are awarded each year. They

  2. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Spring 2012 Solar Collector Research & Development Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Spring 2012 Solar Collector Research, low-maintenance solar collector that can output competitive efficiencies with respect to current solar & Development Phase II Overview Solar Dynamic is a small organization with the hopes of producing an affordable

  3. Precambrian Research 224 (2013) 169183 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    2013-01-01

    Precambrian Research 224 (2013) 169­183 Contents lists available at SciVerse Science of autotrophic carbon fixation and aerobic decom- position in shallow-water environments, and increased remineralization by anaerobic heterotrophs in deeper-water environments. Correlation between organic carbon

  4. Fisheries Research 121122 (2012) 4350 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Fisheries Research 121­122 (2012) 43­50 Contents lists available at SciVerse Science t On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing by the turbine blade in the Columbia River Basin (CRB), it is common for juvenile salmonids to pass hydroelectric dams. There are three

  5. Behavioural Brain Research 263 (2014) 9097 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioural Brain Research 263 (2014) 90­97 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Behavioural- tational day 7 to postnatal day 14) or postnatal (day 15­56) periods and also exposed a subset of dams in the forced swim test relative to all other groups. Offspring from restrained dams increased the number

  6. For life science research only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures. FOR IN VITRO USE ONLY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    For life science research only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures. FOR IN VITRO USE ONLY was coupled with activated resorufin [N-(resorufin-4-carbonyl)piperidine-4- carbonic acid N by total hydrolysis using pronase*). Structure Stability Stable at 15 to 25° C, stored dry and protected

  7. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2013-07-19

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  8. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6AerosolsofMarshallMission HighScience(SC)

  9. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

    2011-03-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

  10. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  11. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  12. Global warming and its implications for conservation. 3. How does it work? Part two: atmospheric science and the layer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    Global warming and its implications for conservation. 3. How does it work? Part two: atmospheric warms the surface of the planet as it moves toward an equilibrium of energy fluxes in and out. The layer

  13. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992. Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy.

  14. Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 » Inside IceResearch » National

  15. Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Burns, Peter (Director, Materials Science of Actinides); MSA Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Energy Frontier Research Center Materials Science of Actinides' was submitted by the EFRC for Materials Science of Actinides (MSA) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. MSA is directed by Peter Burns at the University of Notre Dame, and is a partnership of scientists from ten institutions.The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  16. National Center for Atmospheric Research: Climate Discovery Teacher's Guide http://www.eo.ucar.edu/educators/ClimateDiscovery/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    on solar absorption. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Graphing skills · Data collection skills AAAS Science Standards Physical Science Interactions of Matter and Energy Earth and Space Science Energy in the earth h Earth's Energy Cycle: Albedo Unit: Cycles Lesson: 4 Materials & Preparation Time: · Preparation

  17. Fusion Materials Science and Technology Research Opportunities now and during the ITER Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Blanchard, James; Callis, Richard W.; Kessel, Charles E.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lee, Peter J.; Mccarthy, Kathryn; Morley, Neil; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Nygren, Richard; Tynan, George R.; Whyte, Dennis G.; Willms, Scott; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-02-22

    Several high-priority near-term potential research activities to address fusion nuclear science challenges are summarized. General recommendations include: 1) Research should be preferentially focused on the most technologically advanced options (i.e., options that have been developed at least through the single-effects concept exploration stage, Technology Readiness Levels >3), 2) Significant near-term progress can be achieved by modifying existing facilities and/or moderate investment in new medium-scale facilities, and 3) Computational modeling for fusion nuclear sciences is generally not yet sufficiently robust to enable truly predictive results to be obtained, but large reductions in risk, cost and schedule can be achieved by careful integration of experiment and modeling.

  18. Fusion materials science and technology research opportunities now and during the ITER era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Zinkle; J.P. Planchard; R.W. Callis; C.E. Kessel; P.J. Lee; K.A. McCarty; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    Several high-priority near-term potential research activities to address fusion nuclear science challenges are summarized. General recommendations include: (1) Research should be preferentially focused on the most technologically advanced options (i.e., options that have been developed at least through the singleeffects concept exploration stage, technology readiness levels >3), (2) Significant near-term progress can be achieved by modifying existing facilities and/or moderate investment in new medium-scale facilities, and (3) Computational modeling for fusion nuclear sciences is generally not yet sufficiently robust to enable truly predictive results to be obtained, but large reductions in risk, cost and schedule can be achieved by careful integration of experiment and modeling.

  19. 2013 POLAR MARINE SCIENCE GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR (MARCH 10-15, 2013 - FOUR POINTS SHERATON, VENTURA CA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Jeff S.

    2012-12-15

    As dynamic and thermodynamic processes associated with warming trends are impacting sea ice cover, oceanographic processes and atmosphere-ocean interactions across polar regions at unprecedented rate, observations and models show fundamentally different regional ecosystem responses. The non-linear and multi-directional biogeochemical responses of polar systems to atmospheric and oceanographic forcings emphasize the need to consider and reconcile observations and models at global and regional scales. The 9th GRC on Polar Marine Science will discuss recent developments and challenges emerging from contemporary and paleo-climate observations and models, encompassing regional and global scales. The GRC addresses the structure, functionalities and controls of polar marine systems through topics such as sea ice biogeochemistry, atmosphere-ocean forcings and interactions, food web trophodynamics, carbon and elemental cycling and fluxes, and a spectrum of ecological processes and interactions.

  20. Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research Strategic Data Roadmap for Earth System Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Palanisamy, Giri; Shipman, Galen; Boden, Thomas A.; Voyles, Jimmy W.

    2014-04-25

    Rapid advances in experimental, sensor, and computational technologies and techniques are driving exponential growth in the volume, acquisition rate, variety, and complexity of scientific data. This wealth of scientifically meaningful data has tremendous potential to lead to scientific discovery. However, to achieve scientific breakthroughs, these data must be exploitable—they must be analyzed effectively and efficiently and the results shared and communicated easily within the wider Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) community. The explosion in data complexity and scale makes these tasks exceedingly difficult to achieve, particularly given that an increasing number of disciplines are working across techniques, integrating simulation and experimental or observational results (see Table 5 in Appendix 2). Consequently, we need new approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization that provide research teams with easy-to-use and scalable end-to-end solutions. These solutions must facilitate (and where feasible, automate and capture) every stage in the data lifecycle (shown in Figure 1), from collection to management, annotation, sharing, discovery, analysis, and visualization. In addition, the core functionalities are the same across climate science communities, but they require customization to adapt to specific needs and fit into research and analysis workflows. To this end, the mission of CESD’s Data and Informatics Program is to integrate all existing and future distributed CESD data holdings into a seamless and unified environment for the acceleration of Earth system science.

  1. Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report: Calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.C.; Blew, R.D. [eds.

    1997-07-01

    This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation). The Foundation`s mission to DOE-ID provides support in several key areas. The authors conduct an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain, and provide environmental education and support services related to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) natural resource issues. Also, the Foundation, with its University Affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research in the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Land Management Issues. The major accomplishments of the Foundation and its University Affiliates during the calendar year 1996 are discussed.

  2. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, Version 4 Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, Version 4 C. M. BITZ Atmospheric climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.208C for 18 horizontal). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 18 resolution is 1.728C, which is about 0.28C higher than in CCSM3

  3. Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

  4. Atmospheric Environment ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    that the influence of the urban region on wind patterns and atmospheric stability could be studied. HeightAtmospheric Environment ] (

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This 1993 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US DOE describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The report is divided into four parts, each in a separate volume. This part, Volume 2, covers Environmental Sciences. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. There are sections on Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Technology Transfer, Interactions with Educational Institutions, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development.

  6. M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR Expected Spring, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    EDUCATION M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean. Dilles Relevant Courses Interpretation of Geologic Maps Igneous Petrology Tectonic Geomorphology B.S. Geology, University of Idaho College of Science, Moscow, ID; GPA: 3

  7. U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. New interdisciplinary research communities are emerging, as are knowledgebases and scientific and computational resources critical to advancing large-scale, genome-based biology. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs will provide the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use. The scientific rationale for these centers and for other fundamental genomic research critical to the biofuel industry was established at a DOE workshop involving members of the research community (see sidebar, Biofuel Research Plan, below). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations--the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast--with partners across the nation. DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC); and DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California. Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies,

  8. Curriculum Policy of the Faculty of Science The educational and research objective of the Faculty of Science, Kobe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Chemistry Biology I Introduction to Earth Science Calculus 2 Linear Algebra 2 Basic Physical Chemistry Introduction to Computer Science Analysis Eatrh Material Science Physics Laboratories Acquire introductory Algebra 2 Physics B2 Physics C2 Physics C3 Introduction to Computer Science Physics B3 Physics C4 Physics

  9. U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel production, DOE established three Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) in September 2007. Each center is pursuing the basic research underlying a range of high-risk, high-return biological solutions for bioenergy applications. Advances resulting from the BRCs are providing the knowledge needed to develop new biobased products, methods, and tools that the emerging biofuel industry can use (see sidebar, Bridging the Gap from Fundamental Biology to Industrial Innovation for Bioenergy, p. 6). The DOE BRCs have developed automated, high-throughput analysis pipelines that will accelerate scientific discovery for biology-based biofuel research. The three centers, which were selected through a scientific peer-review process, are based in geographically diverse locations - the Southeast, the Midwest, and the West Coast - with partners across the nation (see U.S. map, DOE Bioenergy Research Centers and Partners, on back cover). DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory leads the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) in California; DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory leads the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) in Tennessee; and the University of Wisconsin-Madison leads the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). Each center represents a multidisciplinary partnership with expertise spanning the physical and biological sciences, including genomics, microbial and plant biology, analytical chemistry, computational biology and bioinformatics, and engineering. Institutional partners include DOE national laboratories, universities, private companies, and nonprofit organizations.

  10. Science for Energy Technology: Strengthening the Link Between Basic Research and Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    The nation faces two severe challenges that will determine our prosperity for decades to come: assuring clean, secure, and sustainable energy to power our world, and establishing a new foundation for enduring economic and jobs growth. These challenges are linked: the global demand for clean sustainable energy is an unprecedented economic opportunity for creating jobs and exporting energy technology to the developing and developed world. But achieving the tremendous potential of clean energy technology is not easy. In contrast to traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, clean energy technologies are in their infancy, operating far below their potential, with many scientific and technological challenges to overcome. Industry is ultimately the agent for commercializing clean energy technology and for reestablishing the foundation for our economic and jobs growth. For industry to succeed in these challenges, it must overcome many roadblocks and continuously innovate new generations of renewable, sustainable, and low-carbon energy technologies such as solar energy, carbon sequestration, nuclear energy, electricity delivery and efficiency, solid state lighting, batteries and biofuels. The roadblocks to higher performing clean energy technology are not just challenges of engineering design but are also limited by scientific understanding.Innovation relies on contributions from basic research to bridge major gaps in our understanding of the phenomena that limit efficiency, performance, or lifetime of the materials or chemistries of these sustainable energy technologies. Thus, efforts aimed at understanding the scientific issues behind performance limitations can have a real and immediate impact on cost, reliability, and performance of technology, and ultimately a transformative impact on our economy. With its broad research base and unique scientific user facilities, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) is ideally positioned to address these needs. BES has laid out a broad view of the basic and grand challenge science needs for the development of future clean energy technologies in a series of comprehensive 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and reports (inside front cover and http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html) and has structured its programs and launched initiatives to address the challenges. The basic science needs of industry, however, are often more narrowly focused on solving specific nearer-term roadblocks to progress in existing and emerging clean energy technologies. To better define these issues and identify specific barriers to progress, the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) sponsored the Workshop on Science for Energy Technology, January 18-21, 2010. A wide cross-section of scientists and engineers from industry, universities, and national laboratories delineated the basic science Priority Research Directions most urgently needed to address the roadblocks and accelerate the innovation of clean energy technologies. These Priority Research Directions address the scientific understanding underlying performance limitations in existing but still immature technologies. Resolving these performance limitations can dramatically improve the commercial penetration of clean energy technologies. A key conclusion of the Workshop is that in addition to the decadal challenges defined in the 'Basic Research Needs' reports, specific research directions addressing industry roadblocks are ripe for further emphasis. Another key conclusion is that identifying and focusing on specific scientific challenges and translating the results to industry requires more direct feedback and communication and collaboration between industrial and BES-supported scientists. BES-supported scientists need to be better informed of the detailed scientific issues facing industry, and industry more aware of BES capabilities and how to utilize them. An important capability is the suite of BES scientific user facilities, which are seen as playing a key role in advancing the science of clean energy technology. Working together, in

  11. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2002 Volume 6, Number 3-4 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    atmospheric CO2 and its "green- house" warming effect. As anticipated, the addition of iron in both patches global warming. The R/V Revelle scientific team distributed several tons of iron sulfate and the inert

  12. Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Europe. Edited by A. Spink and J. Heinstrom. Emerald. 2012. pp. In press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Library and Information Science Trends and Research: Europe. Edited by A. Spink and J. Heinstrom, there are signs that current trends are moving towards that possibility. At first glance, this may appear in some way. Records are also used for the generation of `access #12;Library and Information Science

  13. DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY The missions of the Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry (MAC) are to carry out broadly based research on the chemistry of the atmosphere and marine and stratosphere. Atmospheric Chemistry Research activities in atmospheric chemistry and modeling are diverse

  14. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   i  

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Cumulative Quarterly Report October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  16. Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 Atmospheric Stratification and Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 1 Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 2 structures thus varies as xxx Hz = x wind data in the horizontal or balloon wind data in the vertical. The results from separate experiments

  17. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  18. National Scientific Facilities and Their Science Impact on Non-Biomedical Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Kinney

    2007-05-12

    H-index, proposed by Hirsch is a good indicator of the impact of a scientist's research. When evaluating departments, institutions or labs, the importance of h-index can be further enhanced when properly calibrated for size. Particularly acute is the issue of federally funded facilities whose number of actively publishing scientists frequently dwarfs that of academic departments. Recently Molinari and Molinari developed a methodology that shows the h-index has a universal growth rate for large numbers of papers, allowing for meaningful comparisons between institutions. An additional challenge when comparing large institutions is that fields have distinct internal cultures, with different typical rates of publication and citation; biology is more highly cited than physics, which is more highly cited than engineering. For this reason, this study has focused on the physical sciences, engineering, and technology, and has excluded bio-medical research. Comparisons between individual disciplines are reported here to provide contextual framework. Generally, it was found that the universal growth rate of Molinari and Molinari holds well across all the categories considered, testifying to the robustness of both their growth law and our results. The overall goal here is to set the highest standard of comparison for federal investment in science; comparisons are made with the nations preeminent private and public institutions. We find that many among the national facilities compare favorably in research impact with the nations leading universities.

  19. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    basic plasma science, including both burning plasma and low temperature plasma science and engineering, to enhance economic

  20. Research Proposal Guidelines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4 »ProgrammingScience (SC)Programs »Research

  1. Provided for non-commercial research and educational use only. Not for reproduction, distribution or commercial use.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    and Fuqing Zhang (editors). Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences, 2nd edition, Vol 2, pp. 375­383. ISBN or commercial use. This article was originally published in the book Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences, 2ndProvided for non-commercial research and educational use only. Not for reproduction, distribution

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1: Biomedical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, C.C.; Park, J.F.

    1994-03-01

    This report summarizes FY 1993 progress in biological and general life sciences research programs conducted for the Department of Energy`s Office of Health and Environmental REsearch (OHER) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This research provides knowledge of fundamental principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of exposure to energy-related radiation and chemicals. The Biological Research section contains reports of studies using laboratory animals, in vitro cell systems, and molecular biological systems. This research includes studies of the impact of radiation, radionuclides, and chemicals on biological responses at all levels of biological organization. The General Life Sciences Research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome program.

  3. Summary of main findings of Dale Wright's MSc dissertation: Evaluating a citizen science research programme: Understanding the people who make it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Summary of main findings of Dale Wright's MSc dissertation: Evaluating a citizen science research and we hope will provide some improvements for other similar citizen science research projects. Whilst are primarily motivated to join citizen science programmes through five different major motivations. What

  4. ew Mexico boasts a long tradition of pioneering research in science and technology, dating back to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    N ew Mexico boasts a long tradition of pioneering research in science and technology, dating back Mexico, the optics industrial cluster not surprisingly carries the highest prominence. The University of New Mexico (UNM; Albuquerque, NM), the state's largest research institution, has led the graduate

  5. chemical engineering research and design 8 9 ( 2 0 1 1 ) 18551864 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    chemical engineering research and design 8 9 ( 2 0 1 1 ) 1855­1864 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Chemical Engineering Research and Design journal homepage: www sedimentary basins. © 2011 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. STAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    STAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH CENTER Postrgraduate study in mathematical physics Marika Taylor Mathematical Sciences and STAG research centre, Southampton December 19, 2014 Marika Taylor (University of Southampton) Mathematical Physics December 19, 2014 1 / 26 #12;STAG RESEARCH

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1986. The program is focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, and this research forms the basis, in conjunction with remote sensing, for definition and quantification of processes leading to impacts at the global level. This report is organized into sections devoted to Detection and Management of Change in Terrestrial Systems, Biogeochemical Phenomena, Subsurface Microbiology and Transport, Marine Sciences, and Theoretical (Quantitative) Ecology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual projects.

  8. Info-Computationalism and Philosophical Aspects of Research in Information Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic

    2012-07-03

    The historical development has lead to the decay of Natural Philosophy which until 19th century included all of our knowledge about the physical world into the growing multitude of specialized sciences. The focus on the in-depth enquiry disentangled from its broad context lead to the problem of loss of common world-view and impossibility of communication between specialist research fields because of different languages they developed in isolation. The need for a new unifying framework is becoming increasingly apparent with the information technology enabling and intensifying the communication between different research fields and knowledge communities. This time, not only natural sciences, but also all of human knowledge is being integrated in a global network such as Internet with its diverse knowledge and language communities. Info-computationalism (ICON) as a synthesis of pancomputationalism and paninformationalism presents a unifying framework for understanding of natural phenomena including living beings and their cognition, their ways of processing information and producing knowledge. Within ICON physical universe is understood as a network of computational processes on an informational structure.

  9. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  10. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  11. Tougher than Kevlar: Researchers create new high-performance fiber Posted In: Editors Picks | R&D Daily | Carbon Nanotubes & Graphene | Materials Science |

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Tougher than Kevlar: Researchers create new high-performance fiber Posted In: Editors Picks | R&D Daily | Carbon Nanotubes & Graphene | Materials Science | Nanotechnology | Engineering | Material Science | Nanotechnology | Northwestern University | Materials | University Monday, December 6, 2010

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 1, Biomedical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes progress in OHER biological research and general life sciences research programs conducted conducted at PNL in FLY 1991. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long- term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and newly developed energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of the ways in which radiation and chemicals cause biological damage.

  13. UniversiTy of MiaMi rosensTiel school of Marine and aTMospheric science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    for warning, so it is critical for any tsunami warning system to include an education component. Educating, but they remain unpredictable and even the best warning systems ­ if in place and working­ provide but a limited officials evaluate the need for global tsunami warning. Not surprisingly, Rosenstiel School researchers

  14. ScienceDaily: Researchers Directly Deposit Gold Nanoparticles In Suspension ScienceDaily: Your source for the latest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Van de Graaff Generators and more science stuff! www.arborsci.com TiPE Nano TiO2 Advanced Nano TiO2 Manufacturer 8nm Nano Anatase TiO2 www.tipe.com.cn Print this page | Email to friend | Bookmark Science Video and structures using chemicals, biomolecules, nanoparticles, nanotubes and nanowires," said Espinosa

  15. Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, James; McCord, Raymond; Sisterson, Doug; Voyles, Jimmy

    2012-11-08

    The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

  16. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard

    2012-01-01

    simulations of fusion and energy systems with unprecedentedRequirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences   14 General  and  Storage  Requirements  for  Fusion  Energy  Sciences  

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

  18. This article was downloaded by: [18.111.21.192] On: 06 April 2015, At: 08:00 Publisher: Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsimas, Dimitris

    for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) INFORMS is located in Maryland, USA Operations. Operations Research Published online in Articles in Advance 01 Apr 2015 . http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/opre.2015 of operations research, management science, and analytics. For more information on INFORMS, its publications

  19. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2013 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  20. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  1. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    1 Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2010 University of Colorado from the Na- val Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  2. Organization by Gordon Research Conferences of the 2012 Plasma Processing Science Conference 22-27 July 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane Chang

    2012-07-27

    The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in plasma science and technology as well as explore the applications of this nonequilibrium medium in possible approaches relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics and chemistry, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy, the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks and carbon dioxide neutral solar fuels (from carbon dioxide and water), and plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization.

  3. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research A world leader in observing, understanding, and predicting the Earth system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Base (= FY 2015 Enacted + Inflationary Adjustments). Highlights include: · High Performance Computing Recapitalization (+ $9.0M) to begin recapitalization of the Research and Development High-Performance Computing

  4. Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations in chemistry, physics, materials, engineering, and computer science IEEE Xplore Full text...

  5. VAMDC FP7 project and STARK-B database: C II Stark broadening parameters for white dwarf atmospheres research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larbi-Terzi, Neila; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2010-11-23

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3s-np spectral series within the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, calculated additionally using the Coulomb approximation (the method of Bates and Damgaard). The both results were compared and the disagreement is found only in one case where the configuration mixing allows a forbidden transition to a close perturbing energy level. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al.. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e-Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  6. Fusion Materials Science and Technology Research Needs: Now and During the ITER era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Snead, Lance L.

    2013-09-30

    The plasma facing components, first wall and blanket systems of future tokamak-based fusion power plants arguably represent the single greatest materials engineering challenge of all time. Indeed, the United States National Academy of Engineering has recently ranked the quest for fusion as one of the top grand challenges for engineering in the 21st Century. These challenges are even more pronounced by the lack of experimental testing facilities that replicate the extreme operating environment involving simultaneous high heat and particle fluxes, large time varying stresses, corrosive chemical environments, and large fluxes of 14-MeV peaked fusion neutrons. This paper will review, and attempt to prioritize, the materials research and development challenges facing fusion nuclear science and technology into the ITER era and beyond to DEMO. In particular, the presentation will highlight the materials degradation mechanisms we anticipate to occur in the fusion environment, the temperature- displacement goals for fusion materials and plasma facing components and the near and long-term materials challenges required for both ITER, a fusion nuclear science facility and longer term ultimately DEMO.

  7. Support for the Core Research Activities and Studies of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Eisenberg, Director, CSTB

    2008-05-13

    The Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council considers technical and policy issues pertaining to computer science (CS), telecommunications, and information technology (IT). The functions of the board include: (1) monitoring and promoting the health of the CS, IT, and telecommunications fields, including attention as appropriate to issues of human resources and funding levels and program structures for research; (2) initiating studies involving CS, IT, and telecommunications as critical resources and sources of national economic strength; (3) responding to requests from the government, non-profit organizations, and private industry for expert advice on CS, IT, and telecommunications issues; and to requests from the government for expert advice on computer and telecommunications systems planning, utilization, and modernization; (4) fostering interaction among CS, IT, and telecommunications researchers and practitioners, and with other disciplines; and providing a base of expertise in the National Research Council in the areas of CS, IT, and telecommunications. This award has supported the overall operation of CSTB. Reports resulting from the Board's efforts have been widely disseminated in both electronic and print form, and all CSTB reports are available at its World Wide Web home page at cstb.org. The following reports, resulting from projects that were separately funded by a wide array of sponsors, were completed and released during the award period: 2007: * Summary of a Workshop on Software-Intensive Systems and Uncertainty at Scale * Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment * Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace * Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence? * Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age * Improving Disaster Management: The Role of IT in Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery 2006: * Renewing U.S. Telecommunications Research * Letter Report on Electronic Voting * Summary of a Workshop on the Technology, Policy, and Cultural Dimensions of Biometric System 2005: * Catalyzing Inquiry at the Interface of Computing and Biology * Summary of a Workshop on Using IT to Enhance Disaster Management * Asking the Right Questions About Electronic Voting * Building an Electronic Records Archive at NARA: Recommendations for a Long-Term Strategy * Signposts in Cyberspace: The Domain Name System and Internet Navigation 2004: * ITCP: Information Technology and Creative Practices (brochure) * Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Technologies: A Workshop Summary * Getting up to Speed: The Future of Supercomputing * Summary of a Workshop on Software Certification and Dependability * Computer Science: Reflections on the Field, Reflections from the Field CSTB conducted numerous briefings of these reports and transmitted copies of these reports to researchers and key decision makers in the public and private sectors. It developed articles for journals based on several of these reports. As requested, and in fulfillment of its congressional charter to act as an independent advisor to the federal government, it arranged for congressional testimony on several of these reports. CSTB also convenes a number of workshops and other events, either as part of studies or in conjunctions with meetings of the CSTB members. These events have included the following: two 2007 workshops explored issues and challenges related to state voter registration databases, record matching, and database interoperability. A Sept. 2007 workshop, Trends in Computing Performance, explored fundamental trends in areas such as power, storage, programming, and applications. An Oct. 2007, workshop presented highlights of CSTB's May 2007 report, Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence?, along with several panels discussing the report's conclusions and their implications. A Jan. 2007 workshop, Uncertainty at Scale, explored engineering uncertainty, system complexity, and scale issues in developing large software systems. A Feb. 2007

  8. Science and Technology Research and Development in Support to ITER and the Broader Approach at CEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becoulet, A.; Hoang, G T; Abiteboul, J.; Achard, J.; Alarcon, T.; Klepper, C Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In parallel to the direct contribution to the procurement phase of ITER and Broader Approach, CEA has initiated research & development programmes, accompanied by experiments together with a significant modelling effort, aimed at ensuring robust operation, plasma performance, as well as mitigating the risks of the procurement phase. This overview reports the latest progress in both fusion science and technology including many areas, namely the mitigation of superconducting magnet quenches, disruption-generated runaway electrons, edge-localized modes (ELMs), the development of imaging surveillance, and heating and current drive systems for steady-state operation. The WEST (W Environment for Steady-state Tokamaks) project, turning Tore Supra into an actively cooled W-divertor platform open to the ITER partners and industries, is presented.

  9. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  10. Autumn 2012 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    wind, and accumulated precipitation at a designated city. Forecasts are made over a two-week period Department 1 The UW Atmospheric Sciences spring forecast contest has been an annual tradition there will be a marine push or a convergence zone wrecking their forecast for maximum temperature and precipitation

  11. Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of Illinois. at Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60607, USA. 2 Department of Mathematics, Purdue ...

  12. Computer Science Induction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Ulrich

    Computer Science Induction to Postgraduate Research Studies Ulrich Berger Head of Postgraduate Research Supervision Regulations Progression Regulations Computer Science Induction to Postgraduate Research Studies Ulrich Berger Head of Postgraduate Research Department of Computer Science Swansea

  13. W.-C. Wang X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o WW.

  14. NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaic Program and DOE Basic Energy Sciences Program. Materials Science. The Materials Science Group's research...

  15. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  16. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE Office of Energy Research - Part 1: Biomedical Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.F.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER human health, biological, general life sciences, and medical applications research programs conducted at PNL in FY 1989. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify, understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and developing energy-related technologies through an increased understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause biological damage. The sequence of this report of PNL research reflects the OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health research, concerns statistical and epidemiological studies for assessing health risks. The next section contains reports of biological research in laboratory animals and in vitro cell systems, including research with radionuclides and chemicals. The general life sciences research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome research program, and the medical applications section summarizes commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities at DOE facilities. 6 refs., 50 figs., 35 tabs.

  18. SoCS: Socially intelligent computing to support citizen science The proposed research project will investigate the capabilities and potential of social computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    SoCS: Socially intelligent computing to support citizen science The proposed research project production and innovation in citizen science projects; 2. generating new models of SoCS that support large includes case studies of several citizen science projects to establish the nature of the SoCS currently

  19. Materials Research Lab -Research Internships in Science and Engineering http://www.mrl.ucsb.edu/mrl/outreach/educational/RISE/interns08.html[5/10/12 9:18:07 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Materials Research Lab - Research Internships in Science and Engineering http Joanna Deek Cyrus Safinya Materials CHARACTERIZING THE Ph AND SALT DEPENDANCE OF NEUROFILAMENT GRAFTING DENSITIES Christine Carpenter Materials Engineering California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

  20. BRICSRS-03-9Damgard&Frandsen:AnExtendedQuadraticFrobeniusPrimalityTest BRICSBasic Research in Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    are built on the same basic principle: from the input number n, one defines an Abelian group and then testsBRICSRS-03-9Damg°ard&Frandsen:AnExtendedQuadraticFrobeniusPrimalityTest BRICSBasic Research in Computer Science An Extended Quadratic Frobenius Primality Test with Average and Worst Case Error Estimates

  1. ResearchI, Vol.Deep-Sea 44,No. 8, pp. 1427-1450, 1997 0 1997Ekvier Science Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGillicuddy Jr., Dennis J.

    Pergamon ResearchI, Vol.Deep-Sea 44,No. 8, pp. 1427-1450, 1997 0 1997Ekvier Science Ltd PII:s0967 In the oligotrophic waters of the open ocean, the availability of nitrogenous nutrients limits phytoplankton and convectively driven vertical mixing punctures the nutricline, surface waters are generally nutrient depleted

  2. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 43 (1990) 113-132 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 43 (1990) 113-132 Elsevier Science Publishers B lava: the Bracks Rhyolite. Trans-Pecos Texas. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 43: 113-132. Field and mineralogical- ly homogeneous, both laterally and vertically. Evidence that the Bracks was emplaced as a lava

  3. Journal of Volcanologyand Geothermal Research, 55 ( 1993 ) 15-32 15 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huppert, Herbert

    Journal of Volcanologyand Geothermal Research, 55 ( 1993 ) 15-32 15 Elsevier Science Publishers B. Volcanol.Geotherm.Res., 55:15-32. The effect of phenocrysts on convection in magma chambers is investigated. In ad- dition, sedimentation interfaces can produce vertical heterogeneities in density which

  4. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 45 (1991) 41 -58 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam 41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1991-01-01

    Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 45 (1991) 41 - 58 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam 41 Geology of the Platanares geothermal area, Departamento de Cop m, Honduras Grant Heikena. In: F. Goff (Editor), Honduras - A Geothermal Investigation. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 45:41 -58

  5. SUPPORT FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES IN FY 2013 HELP THE UNITED STATES REMAIN A WORLD LEADER IN FUSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE U.S. FUSION PROGRAM Fusion energy is the power source of our sun and the stars. ItsSUPPORT FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES IN FY 2013 HELP THE UNITED STATES REMAIN A WORLD LEADER IN FUSION fusion researchers, and prepare for the commercialization of fusion energy, the U.S. must have its own

  6. Simulations of Clouds and Sensitivity Study by Weather Research and Forecast Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Case 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Zhang, M.

    2005-03-18

    One of the large errors in general circulation models (GCMs) cloud simulations is from the mid-latitude, synoptic-scale frontal cloud systems. Now, with the availability of the cloud observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) 2000 cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) and other observational datasets, the community is able to document the model biases in comparison with the observations and make progress in development of better cloud schemes in models. Xie et al. (2004) documented the errors in midlatitude frontal cloud simulations for ARM Case 4 by single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs). According to them, the errors in the model simulated cloud field might be caused by following reasons: (1) lacking of sub-grid scale variability; (2) lacking of organized mesoscale cyclonic advection of hydrometeors behind a moving cyclone which may play important role to generate the clouds there. Mesoscale model, however, can be used to better under stand these controls on the subgrid variability of clouds. Few studies have focused on applying mesoscale models to the forecasting of cloud properties. Weaver et al. (2004) used a mesoscale model RAMS to study the frontal clouds for ARM Case 4 and documented the dynamical controls on the sub-GCM-grid-scale cloud variability.

  7. Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs): A Response to Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alivisatos, Paul (Director, LBNL); Crabtree, George (ANL); Dresselhaus, Mildred (MIT); Ratner, Mark (Northwestern University)

    2012-03-14

    A distinguished panel of speakers at the 2011 EFRC Summit looks at the EFRC Program and how it serves as a response to "Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination?, the culminating report that arose from a series of Basic Research Needs workshops. The panel members are Paul Alivisatos, the Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, George Crabtree, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, Mildred Dresselhause, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Mark Ratner, Professor at Northwestern University. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  8. Interested in doing research in engineering or computer science at The Australian National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    & COMPUTER SCIENCE PhD candidate Rebecca Dunn explains the ammonia thermochemical energy storage system to HE

  9. 1995 Federal Research and Development Program in Materials Science and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-12-01

    The Nation's economic prosperity and military security depend heavily on development and commercialization of advanced materials. Materials are a key facet of many technologies, providing the key ingredient for entire industries and tens of millions of jobs. With foreign competition in many areas of technology growing, improvements in materials and associated processes are needed now more than ever, both to create the new products and jobs of the future and to ensure that U.S. industry and military forces can compete and win in the international arena. The Federal Government has invested in materials research and development (R&D) for nearly a century, helping to lay the foundation for many of the best commercial products and military components used today. But while the United States has led the world in the science and development of advanced materials, it often has lagged in commercializing them. This long-standing hurdle must be overcome now if the nation is to maintain its leadership in materials R&D and the many technologies that depend on it. The Administration therefore seeks to foster commercialization of state-of-the-art materials for both commercial and military use, as a means of promoting US industrial competitiveness as well as the procurement of advanced military and space systems and other products at affordable costs. The Federal R&D effort in Fiscal Year 1994 for materials science and technology is an estimated $2123.7 million. It includes the ongoing R&D base that support the missions of nine Federal departments and agencies, increased strategic investment to overcome obstacles to commercialization of advanced materials technologies, interagency cooperation in R&D areas of mutual benefit to leverage assets and eliminate duplicative work, cost-shared research with industrial and academic partners in critical precompetitive technology areas, and international cooperation on selected R&D topics with assured benefits for the United States. The materials R&D program also supports the Administration's specific technological objectives, emphasizing development of affordable, high-performance commercial and military aircraft; ultra-fuel-efficient, low-emissions automobiles that are also safe and comfortable; powerful yet inexpensive electronic systems; environmentally safe products and processes; and a durable building and transportation infrastructure.

  10. Example Curriculum Plan Neuromotor control and rehabilitation concentration area Requirements: 10 credits of rehabilitation science coursework, 12 credits of research tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Example Curriculum Plan ­ Neuromotor control and rehabilitation concentration area Requirements: 10 credits of rehabilitation science coursework, 12 credits of research tools coursework and 22 credits Rehabilitation Science I,II 6 PTRS689 (2 semesters) Research Seminar: I-IV (4 semesters) 4 PTRS788 Total: 10

  11. The Dual Imperative in Refugee Research: Some Methodological and Ethical Considerations in Social Science Research on Forced Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobsen, Karen

    Social scientists doing fieldwork in humanitarian situations often face a dual imperative: research should be both academically sound and policy relevant. We argue that much of the current research on forced migration is ...

  12. Institute for Climate & Atmospheric Science Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    platforms to study numerous trace gases including carbon dioxide. We operate a suite of remote sensing is elucidating the carbon cycle through the satellite data (e.g., AIRS, TES, GOSAT, and OCO2

  13. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  14. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Muńoz-Rojas, David; Nelson, Shelby F.; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul; Roozeboom, Fred; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2015-04-02

    given to describe this system, but in this research update, we standardize its name to the Cambridge University Close Proximity (CUCP) reactor (design details are given in Ref. 24). An illustration of the CUCP gas manifold is given in Fig. 2... times, as indicated. Reprinted with permission from D. Muńoz-Rojas, H. Sun, D. C. Iza, J. Weickert, L. Chen, H. Wang, L. Schmidt-Mende, J. L. MacManus-Driscoll, Prog. Photovoltaics: Res. Appl. 21, 393 (2013). Copyright 2013 Wiley-VCH. adherent...

  15. A Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    D/Masters Applied Marine Physics Marine & Atmospheric Chemistry Marine Affairs & Policy (Masters Only) MarineA Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric Studies Our graduate program has over 250 students University of MiaMi rosenstiel school of Marine & atMospheric science #12;Miami Ranks #5: fDi Magazine's Top

  16. GEOL425: Data Analysis in the Earth & Environmental Sciences GEOL425 : Data Analysis in the Earth & Environmental Sciences -Fall 2009 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    in the atmospheric sciences, Academic Press, 2006. Boas, M, Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences, 2nd-tiered approach. The first tier serves as an introduction (and/or refresher) to the fundamental principles parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. · Applying a number of these tools to their own research

  17. Science & Technology Review March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Partnering to Enhance Americans Health--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Advancing the Frontiers in Cancer Research--Researchers at the University of California Davis Cancer Center and Lawrence Livermore are teaming up to fight cancer; (3) On the Leading Edge of Atmospheric Predictions--Continual research and development at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center help mitigate the consequences of toxic airborne hazards; (4) Climate and Agriculture: Change Begets Change--A Livermore researcher is using computer models to explore how a warmer climate may affect crop yields in California; (5) New Routes to High Temperatures and Pressures--With functionally graded density impactors composed of thin metal and polyethylene films, researchers can explore new areas of experimental physics; and (6) From Sound Waves to Stars: Teller's Contributions to Shock Physics--Edward Teller's interest in shock physics led to significant developments in both basic and applied science.

  18. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1991. Each project in the PNL research program is a component in an integrated laboratory, intermediate-scale, and field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. Examples include definition of the role of fundamental geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in the deep subsurface, and determination of the controls on nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and their response to stress at the landscape scale. The Environmental Science Research Center has enable PNL to extend fundamental knowledge of subsurface science to develop emerging new concepts for use in natural systems and in environmental restoration of DOE sites. New PNL investments have been made in developing advanced concepts for addressing chemical desorption kinetics, enzyme transformations and redesign, the role of heterogeneity in contaminant transport, and modeling of fundamental ecological processes.

  20. Computational Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Computational Science and Engineering Research Profile The Computational Science and Engineering and Process Engineering Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory Prof. Dr. Petros Koumoutsakos petros