National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for atmospheric research united

  1. UCL Migration Research Unit 2013 Migration Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    UCL Migration Research Unit ANNUAL REPORT 2013 Migration Research Unit UCL DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY in the Migration Research Unit. Two key members of the research unit are on the move. JoAnn McGregor moves highly successful MSc in Global Migration and her involvement in the degree will be missed as well as her

  2. Atmospheric Research at BNL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Daum

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

  3. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    MAR 2015 The influence of absorbed solar radiation by Saharan dust on hurricane genesis Sebastian, Bern, Switzerland Abstract To date, the radiative impact of dust and the Saharan air layer (SAL the atmosphere due to absorption of solar radiation but thus shifts convection to regions more conducive

  4. rganizing the Research Report to Reveal the Units of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rganizing the Research Report to Reveal the Units of Research UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Organizing the Research Report to Reveal the Units of Research. Relation of research purpose to research design II. Relation of research design to outline of report. A

  5. ANNUAL REPORT 2012 UCL Migration Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    in research on migration in different contexts including Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Mexico, South Africa, CanadaANNUAL REPORT 2012 UCL Migration Research Unit Migration Research Unit UCL DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY #12;Co-Directors' Report The UCL Migration Research Unit (MRU) was first established by John Salt

  6. United States Department Atmospheric and Biospheric Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , priorities for research on air pollution, forest fire effects, nutrient cycling, water resources century have caused a dramatic increase in global air pollution. This process has accelerated in the past. These changes, together with more severe droughts, forest fires, and air pollution (ozone, nitrogen or sulfur

  7. Zeroing and testing units developed for Gerdien atmospheric ion detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolarz, P.; Marinkovic, B.P.; Filipovic, D.M.

    2005-04-01

    Low current measurements in atmospheric ion detection using a Gerdien condenser are subjected to numerous sources of error. Zeroing and testing units described in this article, connected as modules to this type of detector, enable some of these errors to be found and eliminated. The zeroing unit provides digital compensation of the zero drift with a digital sample and hold circuit of 12-bit resolution. It overcomes difficulties related to zero drift and techniques used in the zero conductivity determination when the accelerating potential or airflow rate are zero. The testing unit is a current reference of nominally 10{sup -12} A intended for testing and correcting the system on current leakage and other measuring deviations due to changes in atmospheric parameters. This unit is an independent battery-powered module, which provides a charge of 10{sup -12} C per cycle (frequency of order 1 Hz) to the collecting electrode. The control of Gerdien devices is substantially simplified using the zeroing and testing units realized here. Both units are used during 'zero conductivity' regime only.

  8. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  9. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  10. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  11. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  12. Overview and Progress of United States Advanced Battery Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research (USABC) Activity Overview and Progress of United States Advanced Battery Research (USABC) Activity 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  13. Field Stations Compliance CommitteesAdministrative Units Research Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    & Regional Development Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute Miller Institute for Basic Research Radio Diving & Small Boat Safety Stem Cell Research Oversight Archaeological Research Facility Berkeley Energy Care Research Administration & Compliance -Sponsored Projects Office -Office of Animal Care & Use

  14. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  15. Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

  16. Overview of the United States Department of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, G.M. ); Tichler, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating a major atmospheric research effort, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM). The program is a key component of DOE's research strategy to address global climate change and is a direct continuation of DOE's decade-long effort to improve the ability of General Circulation Models (GCMs) to provide reliable simulations of regional, and long-term climate change in response to increasing greenhouse gases. The effort is multi-disciplinary and multi-agency, involving universities, private research organizations and more than a dozen government laboratories. The objective of the ARM Research is to provide an experimental testbed for the study of important atmospheric effects, particularly cloud and radiative processes, and to test parameterizations of these processes for use in atmospheric models. This effort will support the continued and rapid improvement of GCM predictive capability. 2 refs.

  17. Field Stations Compliance CommitteesAdministrative Units Research Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    of the Environment Berkeley Nanosciences & Nanoengineering Institute California Institute for Energy for the Study of Sexual Culture Center for Tebtunis Papyri Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI) Field Station & Social Research Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Institute of Transportation

  18. NARSTO Support for Atmospheric Science Research and Data Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a public/private alliance with members from Canada, Mexico, and the United States #12;New NARSTO Program and Sigurd W. Christensen NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 17-18, 2006 ORNL research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  20. United States Department of Agriculture Research, Education and Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    basic process engineering background, knowledge of engineering unit operations and cost analysisUnited States Department of Agriculture Research, Education and Economics Agricultural Research will also be expected to construct accurate mass balances and conduct first-order techno-economic

  1. Atmospheric Science Program. Summaries of research in FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report provides descriptions for all projects funded by ESD under annual contracts in FY 1994. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than one year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states it goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used.

  2. Research on Nursing Unit Layouts: An Integrative Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2015-06-01

    PURPOSE: To present an integrative review of the research studies on nursing unit layouts. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Studies selected for review were published between 1956 and 2014. For the purpose of this review, a framework for integrative...

  3. Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    1 Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia Earth Sciences Building metallogenic constraints on mineralization in poorly understood or exposed portions of Yukon and Alaska. The mineral deposit studies, models, and metallogenic frameworks developed in this project

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  5. Research Integrity Professional Development -Online Unit New training for HDR students and research academic staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Research Integrity Professional Development - Online Unit New training for HDR students and research academic staff Curtin is strengthening its research culture as it pursues its objective to be a research-intensive university that attracts and retains iconic scholars who undertake high-impact research

  6. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  8. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakov, T.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Catalytic Oxidation of ,S02 on Carbonand S.G. Chang, "Catalytic oxidation of S02 on carbonCHEMISTRY LBL-6819 Catalytic Oxidation of S02 on Carbon in

  9. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2011-03-01

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  10. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-27

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) requests the following: · A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NFO for closure of CAU 104 · The transfer of CAU 104 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  11. Cheng-Hsuan Lu Atmospheric Sciences and Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    and aerosols in Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) by introducing a double-moment cloud component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) primarily at the National Center for Atmospheric global models (i.e., the Global Forecast System, GFS, and the Climate Forecast System, CFS). Our proposed

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-09-06

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station http. Arbaugh is a statistician with the Station's Atmospheric Deposition Effects Research Unit at Riverside and associate professor with the National Park Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit, College of Forest

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1 Atmospheric

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1 Atmospheric7

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM12 Atmospheric

  17. Policies and Procedures for Establishing, Operating, and Reviewing Organized Research Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    40 Addendum A Policies and Procedures for Establishing, Operating, and Reviewing Organized Research of organized research units to conduct and facilitate coordinated research programs and service activities, to promote collaborations among and across disciplines, to enhance the University's research strengths

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  19. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  20. ANNUAL REPORT CIRACooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    of Economics/CIRA Mark DeMaria, Colorado State University NOAA RAMM Branch Ingrid Guch, NOAA Chief, NOAASat and National Park Service Air Quality Research Division activities) to allow the reader a more complete with the infrastructure and intellectual talent produced and used by both sides of the funded activities. For further

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range ecosystemsresearch unit located in Riverside. California. PAUL H. DUNN was project leader at that time and is now project leader of the atmospheric deposition research unit in Riverside. Calif. SUSAN C. BARRO

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  3. Status of flow-battery research in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.P.; Chamberlin, J.L.; Saxton, H.J.; Symons, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    Flow batteries are defined as electrochemical energy storage devices in which at least one of the active materials is stored external to the power converting cell-stack, and in which this soluble active material is circulated via the electrolyte, through the cell-stack during system charge or discharge. Although intensive development of some of these systems has been underway for some time, they were only classified as a distinct category in the United States recently. Of the projects on flow batteries which are still being conducted, the work on the zinc/chlorine system (EDA) has been in progress since 1968; programs on zinc/bromine (Exxon, Gould), on iron/chromium Redox (NASA-Lewis Research Center), and on the iron/ferric-ferrous chloride system (NRG/GEL) have all been underway about seven years; research on the zinc/ferro-ferricyanide battery (Lockheed) has been conducted since 1978. The present paper, which reviews the 1982 status of these battery programs, appears timely since, except for the Lockheed system, the developments have all reached the stage where multi-kilowatt-hour batteries are under test.

  4. A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Automotive Industry September 6, 2006 United States Automotive Materials Partnership, A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research 1000 Town Center Building, Suite 300 Southfield, MI 48075

  5. Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii, Honolulu. Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

  6. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, centered on Earth System Modeling and OAR's role develop and/or can use accurate and timely predictions of the Earth system that come from modeling. The 18

  7. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

  8. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1985, this research has examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain, summarized the field studies and analyses of dry deposition and resuspension conducted in past years, and begun participation in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain; Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants; and Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation (PRECP).

  9. Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Meeting the Needs of the Energy Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Meeting the Needs of the Energy of an Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). The purpose of this effort Frontier Research Center proposal: "Integrated Science of Geological Carbon Sequestration" to BES office

  10. Portland State University Graduate School of Education Research unit Early Childhood Outcomes Measurement Project (ECOMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University Graduate School of Education Research unit Early Childhood Outcomes Measurement Project (ECOMP) US Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative

  11. Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  14. Potential of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and AMSU-B measurements for atmospheric temperature and humidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aires, Filipe

    Potential of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and AMSU-B measurements for atmospheric. The retrieval approach has been evaluated by comparison with available in situ measurements. Citation: Karbou, F., F. Aires, C. Prigent, and L. Eymard (2005), Potential of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU

  15. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-06-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 × 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 × 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 × 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 × 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  19. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Severe Weather Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and supporting high- risk, high-payoff research. Dr. Hayes began his remarks by outlining not what keeps him up services. Several themes emerged in the roundtable, including: Information Architecture, Communicating Risk (pipeline) while researching new observational technologies, so data can be shared and not withheld due

  20. Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather in order to improve the Nation's ability to protect human and ecosystem health. What We Do ARL conducts research and development in the fields of atmospheric dispersion, air quality, climate change, and boundary

  1. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1987-06-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects.

  4. Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    Flemish fieldstone: unravelling lithological differences and diagenesis Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic: Fieldstone, natural stone, diagenesis, microscopy with a great interest in sedimentation processes and diagenesis, in petrology and Flemish stratigraphy

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  7. Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. . Research Inst.)

    1991-08-01

    An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

  8. Overview of the United States Priorities and Research Programs on Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' Department of Energy established a Carbon Sequestration Program in 1998, Regional Carbon SequestrationOverview of the United States Priorities and Research Programs on Carbon Sequestration M. Karmis Partnerships in 2003, and FutureGen, the Integrated Sequestration and Hydrogen Research Initiative, in 2003

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-07-25

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 – June 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  3. Research by BNL investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886. BNL-62609 DOE research on atmospheric aerosols S are an programs dealing with atmospheric science, subsurface science, environmental radon, ocean margins

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive user statistics. However, Archive users are only down about 10% from last quarter. Anothe

  5. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-03-15

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. I

  8. 2001 RESEARCH ASSESSMENT EXERCISE Unit of Assessment 11: Other Studies and Professions Allied to Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    2001 RESEARCH ASSESSMENT EXERCISE Unit of Assessment 11: Other Studies and Professions Allied (including vision science and nutrition), the professions allied to medicine and health promotion. The panel relating to the professions allied to medicine, most notably physiotherapy and speech therapy

  9. United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Director General of the Russian Federation State Corporation “Rosatom” Sergey Kirienko today signed the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation on Cooperation in Nuclear- and Energy-Related Scientific Research and Development

  10. ESRU (Environment and Society Research Unit), Dept of Geography, UCL (University College London),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    ESRU (Environment and Society Research Unit), Dept of Geography, UCL (University College London the Estuaries Initiative Review. #12;The development of meaningful indicators of Estuary Management Partnership is maintained and increased. · The commitment of stakeholders to EMPs is maintained and increased. · Further

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that

  12. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  13. Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, Christopher L.

    to observations. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is also well represented in both RAMS and NARR, but the Baja Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950­2002) CHRISTOPHER L. CASTRO* Department downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM

  14. )OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - glades. They also monitor ocean currents, studying changes that may affect rainfall or climate. AOML)OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). AOML car- ries out world-class research

  15. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  16. About United for Medical Research United for Medical Research represents leading research institutions, patient and health advocates and private industry, joined together

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    science for generations. The 24-year U.S. federal investment in HGP-related genomics research amounts and the data resulting from the Human Genome Project (HGP) as the foundation for advancements in medicine, science and technological development. The HGP has had a profound positive effect, not only in human

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Cumulative Quarterly Report October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-07-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for April 1 - June 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and are not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The AMF statistics for this reporting period were not available at the time of this report. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours for the fixed sites. The average well exceeded our goal this quarter.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. T

  11. The Status of Beryllium Research for Fusion in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2003-12-01

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactors has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets and as an oxygen getter for plasma-facing surfaces. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling and changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied to better understand important processes and to assist with design. Presently, studies are underway at the University of California Los Angeles to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling.

  12. Thermospheric tides simulated by the national center for atmospheric research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model at equinox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)); Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1993-05-01

    The authors use the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) to model tides and dynamics in the thermosphere. This model incorporates the latest advances in the thermosphere general circulation model. Model results emphasized the 70[degree] W longitude region to overlap a series of incoherent radar scatter installations. Data and the model are available on data bases. The results of this theoretical modeling are compared with available data, and with prediction of more empirical models. In general there is broad agreement within the comparisons.

  13. Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} and crops: Research methodology and direct effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, H.; Acock, B.

    1993-12-31

    Carbon dioxide is the food of trees and grass. Our relentless pursuit of a better life has taken us down a traffic jammed road, past smoking factories and forests. This pursuit is forcing a rise in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} level, and no one know when and if flood stage will be reached. Some thinkers have suggested that this increase of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere will cause warming. No matter whether this prediction is realized or not, more CO{sub 2} will directly affect plants. Data from controlled observations have usually, but not always, shown benefits. Our choices of scientific equipment for gathering CO{sub 2} response data are critical since we must see what is happening through the eye of the instrument. The signals derived from our sensors will ultimately determine the truth of our conclusions, conclusion which will profoundly influence our policy decisions. Experimental gear is selected on the basis of scale of interest and problem to be addressed. Our imaginations and our budgets interact to set bounds on our objectives and approaches. Techniques run the gamut from cellular microprobes through whole-plant controlled environment chambers to field-scale exposure systems. Trade-offs exist among the various CO{sub 2} exposure techniques, and many factors impinge on the choice of a method. All exposure chambers are derivatives of three primary types--batch, plug flow, and continuous stirred tank reactor. Systems for the generation of controlled test atmospheres of CO{sub 2} vary in two basic ways--size and degree of control. Among the newest is free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment which allows tens of square meters of cropland to be studied.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, P

  15. Regional Management Units for Marine Turtles: A Novel Framework for Prioritizing Conservation and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Regional Management Units for Marine Turtles: A Novel Framework for Prioritizing Conservation, Virginia, United States of America, 2 Global Marine Division, Conservation International, Arlington, Virginia, United States of America, 3 Center for Marine Conservation, Duke University, Beaufort, North

  16. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  18. Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    Patrick G. R. Jodice U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Clemson, South Carolina, 29634, USA Tel.: (Office) +1 864.656.6190, (Home) +1 864.653.3872 Email: pjodice-June 2004), U.S. Geological Survey, South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Clemson

  19. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Baller; C. Bromberg; N. Buchanan; F. Cavanna; H. Chen; E. Church; V. Gehman; H. Greenlee; E. Guardincerri; B. Jones; T. Junk; T. Katori; M. Kirby; K. Lang; B. Loer; A. Marchionni; T. Maruyama; C. Mauger; A. Menegolli; D. Montanari; S. Mufson; B. Norris; S. Pordes; J. Raaf; B. Rebel; R. Sanders; M. Soderberg; J. St. John; T. Strauss; A. Szelc; C. Touramanis; C. Thorn; J. Urheim; R. Van de Water; H. Wang; B. Yu; M. Zuckerbrot

    2014-03-09

    A workshop was held at Fermilab on March 20-21, 2013 to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPC) in the United States. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions organized into seven topical categories: $i)$ Argon Purity, $ii)$ Cryogenics, $iii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iv)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $v)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $vi)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vii)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these topical categories. It also highlights areas in LArTPC research and development that are common between neutrino experiments and dark matter experiments.

  20. Nitrogen isotopes as indicators of NOx source contributions to atmospheric nitrate deposition across the Midwestern and Northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Elliott; C. Kendall; S.D. Wanke; D.A. Burns; E.W. Boyer; K. Harlin; D.J. Bain; T.J. Butler

    2007-11-15

    Global inputs of NOx are dominated by fossil fuel combustion from both stationary and vehicular sources and far exceed natural NOx sources. However, elucidating NOx sources to any given location remains a difficult challenge, despite the need for this information to develop sound regulatory and mitigation strategies. We present results from a regional-scale study of nitrogen isotopes (15N) in wet nitrate deposition across 33 sites in the midwestern and northeastern U.S. We demonstrate that spatial variations in 15N are strongly correlated with NOx emissions from surrounding stationary sources and additionally that 15N is more strongly correlated with surrounding stationary source NOx emissions than pH, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, or NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations. Although emission inventories indicate that vehicle emissions are the dominant NOx source in the eastern U.S., our results suggest that wet NO{sub 3}{sup -} deposition at sites in this study is strongly associated with NOx emissions from power plants. This suggests that large areas of the landscape potentially receive atmospheric NOy deposition inputs in excess of what one would infer from existing monitoring data alone. Moreover, we determined that spatial patterns in 15N values are a robust indicator of stationary NOx contributions to wet NO{sub 3}{sup -} deposition and hence a valuable complement to existing tools for assessing relationships between NO{sub 3}{sup -} deposition, regional emission inventories, and for evaluating progress toward NOx reduction goals. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

  2. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assessing the tropical ocean current system partly responsible for the fresh water budget. AOML will alsoAOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Administra- tor of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmo- spheric Research in January and began his new duties

  3. Research needs for strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.S.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    This report identifies reservoir characterization and reservoir management research needs and IOR process and related research needs for the fourth geologic class, strandplain/barrier island reservoirs. The 330 Class 4 reservoirs in the DOE Tertiary OH Recovery Information System (TORIS) database contain about 30.8 billion barrels of oil or about 9% of the total original oil-in-place (OOIP) in all United States reservoirs. The current projection of Class 4 ultimate recovery with current operations is only 38% of the OOIP, leaving 19 billion barrels as the target for future IOR projects. Using the TORIS database and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (surfactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, California, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000, which emphasizes the urgent need for the development and demonstration of cost-effective recovery technologies.

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General is a supervisory research entomologist in the Station's Regeneration Insect Research Unit in Berkeley. W. WAYNE

  5. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

    2011-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  6. the Department should apply the same principles to climate and atmospheric research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to develop a clean energy alternative pow- ered by domestic resources. As a result of the program's sole dependent on federal funding, but instead as temporary and targeted initiatives with five-year terms- duction. FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES Fusion Energy Sciences conducts basic science research and ex

  7. Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 United States decisions regarding our resources and economic well-being. NOAA Research's FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 Strategic Plan is guided by the vision and goals expressed in the agency's Strategic Plan. We support a broad range

  8. Portland State University Graduate School of Education Research unit Technology for Early Childhood Braille Literacy (TEC-BL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland State University Graduate School of Education Research unit Technology for Early Childhood Braille Literacy (TEC-BL) US Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative will investigate the efficacy of the new electronic note takers and Braille displays in early literacy instruction

  9. Virginie GUEMAS, Lead researcher for Polar Climate Prediction in the Climate Forecasting Unit (CFU) at IC3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginie GUEMAS, Lead researcher for Polar Climate Prediction in the Climate Forecasting Unit (CFU in exchange for a commitment to do a PhD. INVITED STAYS · ECMWF (European Center for Medium Range Weather, Reading, England).in December 2008: invitation by Rowan Sutton for a one-week stay #12;PEER REVIEWED

  10. The development of meaningful indicators of Estuary Management Partnership success. ESRU (Environment and Society Research Unit), Dept of Geography,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    (Environment and Society Research Unit), Dept of Geography, UCL (University College London), Remax House, 31 Management Partnership success. Report from UCL to English Nature (Estuaries Initiative Review) UCL is maintained and increased. · The commitment of stakeholders to EMPs is maintained and increased. · Further

  11. SUPPORT FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES IN FY 2013 HELP THE UNITED STATES REMAIN A WORLD LEADER IN FUSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE U.S. FUSION PROGRAM Fusion energy is the power source of our sun and the stars. ItsSUPPORT FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES IN FY 2013 HELP THE UNITED STATES REMAIN A WORLD LEADER IN FUSION fusion researchers, and prepare for the commercialization of fusion energy, the U.S. must have its own

  12. Searching for Comparative International Water Research: Urban and Rural Water Conservation Research in India and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wescoat, James

    Comparison is common in water management research: every table, map, and graph invites comparisons of different places and variables. Detailed international comparisons, however, seem infrequent in water resources research. ...

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  14. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Forest Experiment Station research unit in New Hampshirein 1957, where he studied problemsof regenerationandthinning research unit at Warren, Pennsylvania, where he headed a program of research on problems related

  15. Annosus Root Disease in Europe and the Southeastern United States: Occurrence, Research, and Historical Perspective'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History #12;Annosus Root Disease in Europe and the Southeastern United States: Occurrence disease in Europe and the southeastern United States is reviewed in prefacing the focus. This mode of spread has accounted for a long history of damage in Europe where losses occur as: (1

  16. Summary Recommendations of Review of Statistical Research Methods Training and Research Support (including the Statistical Consulting Unit)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    (including the Statistical Consulting Unit) Training in statistics for postgraduates R1: The senior a co-ordinated approach to the statistical training of postgraduate students. R2: If the senior, and which is designed to capture postgraduates in programs where statistics training is not routinely

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond • 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able • 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area • 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where the total effective dose at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  18. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General assigned to the Station's research unit studying the regeneration of California forests

  19. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General is a Research Ecologist at the Station's Timber Management/Wildlife Habitat Interactions Unit, Redwood Sciences

  20. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area •05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able •05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton •05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area •05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), “equation of state” experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: •Conduct radiological surveys. •Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. •If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). •Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  2. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2000-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

  3. United States Cooperative State Washington, DC 20250 Department of Research, Education,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    and Recipients of Competitive Research Grants. CSREES Research Review Guide 22005 Administrative Use Only #12;CSREES Research Review Guide 22005 Administrative Use Only Civil Rights Compliance Review Guide administrators, faculty and staff prepare for a civil rights review. Equally important, the guide serves

  4. Atmospheric Environment ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    that the influence of the urban region on wind patterns and atmospheric stability could be studied. HeightAtmospheric Environment ] (

  5. Office of the Vice President for Research 438 Whitney Road Extension, Unit 1006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    438 Whitney Road Extension, Unit 1006 Storrs, CT 06269-1006 9/14 2) Enter a search term (e term(s). Helpful searching hints: · use quotes around any phrases for an exact match; e.g., "childhood obesity." The search term is not case sensitive (childhood obesity= Childhood Obesity) · use

  6. The College of the Environment has seven degree-granting units, where disciplines span the land and sea, atmosphere and space, and connect both the natural and social sciences. In addition, the College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    of Earth and Space Sciences furthers the understanding of Earth, the solar system, and their histories. The department's scope extends from the center of Earth to the rim of the solar system, and its activities cut and models to bear on pressing issues of sustainability in fisheries. Atmospheric Sciences Research

  7. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  8. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2002 Volume 6, Number 3-4 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    atmospheric CO2 and its "green- house" warming effect. As anticipated, the addition of iron in both patches global warming. The R/V Revelle scientific team distributed several tons of iron sulfate and the inert

  9. Guidelines on Safety in Field Research Responsible Unit: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    or remote or politically unstable locations; extreme weather conditions; hazardous terrain; harmful wildlife and team leaders who are involved in directly supervising research on location. Due diligence must, the categories of risk that may be associated with each location and kind of field research and in determining

  10. A Resurgence of United Kingdom Nuclear Power Research (2011 EFRC Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Grimes, Robin W. (Imperial College, London, UK)

    2012-03-14

    Robin W. Grimes, Professor at Imperial College, London,was the third speaker in the the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Grimes discussed recent research endeavors in advanced nuclear energy systems being pursued in the UK. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  11. 2001 Research Assessment Exercise Overview for Unit of Assessment 17: Veterinary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    instances where the numbers involved were lower than optimal. Overall the standard of research outputs had of the submissions, most of which were rated at a national standard. We recognise the difficulty of maintaining high on the future of veterinary research to maximise the available resources. On the above theme, it is worth noting

  12. Research Note RMRS-RN-72. December 2014. United States Department of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) research, we found that solar-powered global positioning systems platform transmitter terminals (GPS PTTs and Haydon 2010), while increasing safety to researchers. Despite the potential benefits of solar Argos Transmitter to Aid Recovery of Solar Argos/GPS PTTs Christopher P. Hansen, Mark A. Rumble, R. Scott Gamo

  13. United States-Philippines bases agreements: prospect for its renewal. Research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahimer, S.M.

    1988-05-01

    Remarks on the problems and issues related to the United States-Philippines Bases Agreement and prospect for its renewal are included namely: analysis of the provisions of the new Philippine Constitution; ASEAN perspective on the bases; US policy on nuclear weapons and its interest and options; Philippine interests and priorities, including alternate plans to compensate for the possible withdrawal of the US from the Philippines; and then an assessment of the effects of these factors on the renewal of the Bases Agreement. There are difficulties and barriers to the renewal of the said Agreement posed by conflicting policies of both parties and also due to divergent views on priorities, constitutional processes of both countries, and time constraints for concluding an agreement. However there are options for the United States regarding the problem, depending upon the desired level of its presence in Asia/Pacific region and how central the Philippine bases are to US national security interests.

  14. DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY The missions of the Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry (MAC) are to carry out broadly based research on the chemistry of the atmosphere and marine and stratosphere. Atmospheric Chemistry Research activities in atmospheric chemistry and modeling are diverse

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  16. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  17. United States-Republic of Korea (ROK) International Nuclear Energy Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Laclede GasEfficiency|Feed|DepartmentThe United States and Japan enjoy

  18. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Drilling 1976-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    This report, the second in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in drilling and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  19. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Exploration 1976-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    This report, the first in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in exploration and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  20. Fluid flow migration study inside geomaterials Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    of the study is to study internal processes of porous geomaterials by analysis the pore structure in 2D and 3D geomaterials, fluid flow, modelling, optical microscopy and 3D image analysis. Promotor: Prof. Dr. Veerle of the geological material. Petrographical research with optical and fluorescence microscopy and SEM. Non

  1. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  2. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  3. Contribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds to atmospheric carbon monoxide levels in two areas of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    - house gas, but also the hydroperoxide radical (HO2). HO2 converts nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxideContribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds to atmospheric carbon monoxide. Chen, K. Carmody, S. Vutukuru, and D. Dabdub (2007), Contribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture MIX: A Computer Program to Evaluate Forest Service, a research entomologist, is in charge of the unit developing improved technology for integrated management

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Programs: A Review of Cognitive and Behavioral Studies Introduction Recent wildfires in the Western United

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range to the Chaparral Prescribed Fire Research Unit, headquartered at Riverside, California. Publisher: Pacific

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    A United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  8. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General acrossthe United States provide estimates of the amount of erosion reductionon forest roadsfrom

  9. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94701 United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range of California, Berkeley, and a cooperator with the Research Unit. #12;Acknowledgments We especially acknowledge

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range to the Station's chaparral and related ecosystems research unit, with headquarters at Riverside, California. He

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of California Oaks: A Bibliography Agriculture Forest Service Pacific forester in the Station's Forest Regeneration Research Unit, at Redding, California. He holds bachelor

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    United States Department of Agriculture Rural Business- Cooperative Service Research Report 157, concentration, globalization, agency theory Cooperatives in a Changing Global Food System United States

  13. Directory of Solar Energy Research Activities in the United States: First Edition, May 1980. [1220 projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    Information covering 1220, FY 1978 and FY 1979 solar energy research projects is included. In addition to the title and text of project summaries, the directory contains the following indexes: subject index, investigator index, performing organization index, and supporting organization index. This information was registered with the Smithsonian Science Information Exchange by Federal, State, and other supporting organizations. The project summaries are categorized in the following areas: biomass, ocean energy, wind energy,photovoltaics, photochemical energy conversion, photobiological energy conversion, solar heating and cooling, solar process heat, solar collectors and concentrators, solar thermal electric generation, and other solar energy conversion. (WHK)

  14. National Center for Atmospheric Research: Climate Discovery Teacher's Guide http://www.eo.ucar.edu/educators/ClimateDiscovery/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    on solar absorption. Prior Knowledge & Skills · Graphing skills · Data collection skills AAAS Science Standards Physical Science Interactions of Matter and Energy Earth and Space Science Energy in the earth h Earth's Energy Cycle: Albedo Unit: Cycles Lesson: 4 Materials & Preparation Time: · Preparation

  15. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2013 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  16. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  17. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    1 Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2010 University of Colorado from the Na- val Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  18. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research A world leader in observing, understanding, and predicting the Earth system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Base (= FY 2015 Enacted + Inflationary Adjustments). Highlights include: · High Performance Computing Recapitalization (+ $9.0M) to begin recapitalization of the Research and Development High-Performance Computing

  19. VAMDC FP7 project and STARK-B database: C II Stark broadening parameters for white dwarf atmospheres research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larbi-Terzi, Neila; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2010-11-23

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3s-np spectral series within the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, calculated additionally using the Coulomb approximation (the method of Bates and Damgaard). The both results were compared and the disagreement is found only in one case where the configuration mixing allows a forbidden transition to a close perturbing energy level. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al.. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e-Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  1. Research on the Integration Characteristics of Cooling Energy Recovery from Room Exhausting Cool Air in Summer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.

    2006-01-01

    energy integration I, and effect factor on atmospheric environment of building energy F. The positive effects of these new concepts and methods on traditional approaches are also predicted. Theoretical research on an energy recovery unit that recovers...

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range symposium dealing with this subject in the western United States, the papers presented address current ........................................................................................................................................ 1 Annosus Root Disease in Europe and the Southeastern United States: Occurrence, Research

  3. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Carlos M. Gutierrez Secretary NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC in a modeled tsunami caused by each of 804 unit earthquakes (tsunami sources) in the Pacific and 194

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Research, and export from 1997 to 2010, for main world regions and the United States. Detailed tables by country

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper-Central United States (Monserud and Ek 1977; Monserud 1987). This model was used within the framework of FOREST

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station for the Station's Wildland Recreation and the Urban Culture Research Work Unit, located at the Forest Fire

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Research, import, and export from 1997 to 2010, for main world regions and the United States. Detailed tables

  8. Simulations of Clouds and Sensitivity Study by Weather Research and Forecast Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Case 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Zhang, M.

    2005-03-18

    One of the large errors in general circulation models (GCMs) cloud simulations is from the mid-latitude, synoptic-scale frontal cloud systems. Now, with the availability of the cloud observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) 2000 cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) and other observational datasets, the community is able to document the model biases in comparison with the observations and make progress in development of better cloud schemes in models. Xie et al. (2004) documented the errors in midlatitude frontal cloud simulations for ARM Case 4 by single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs). According to them, the errors in the model simulated cloud field might be caused by following reasons: (1) lacking of sub-grid scale variability; (2) lacking of organized mesoscale cyclonic advection of hydrometeors behind a moving cyclone which may play important role to generate the clouds there. Mesoscale model, however, can be used to better under stand these controls on the subgrid variability of clouds. Few studies have focused on applying mesoscale models to the forecasting of cloud properties. Weaver et al. (2004) used a mesoscale model RAMS to study the frontal clouds for ARM Case 4 and documented the dynamical controls on the sub-GCM-grid-scale cloud variability.

  9. REVISED FINAL REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK – DCN 0496-SR-06-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-10-10

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Ogden, UT. He was project leader of the fire fundamentals research work unit from 1966 until 1979 and is currently project leader of the fire behavior research work unit at the fire sciences laboratory. RALPH A

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloop, Christy

    2013-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 569 comprises the following nine corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area • 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area • 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area • 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area • 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area • 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area • 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area • 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area • 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 569 based on the implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-2.

  12. Options for Near-Term Phaseout of CO2 Emissions from Coal Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Options for Near-Term Phaseout of CO2 Emissions from Coal Use in the United States P U S H K E R options for phasing out coal emissions in the United States by 2030. We focus on coal for physical science research in the past few years: The "safe" long-term level of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs

  13. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT OF STORMWATER AND WASTEWATER AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT (SPRU) DISPOSITION PROJECT, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abitz, R.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2011-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating the water management procedures at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU). The facility has three issues related to water management that require technical assistance: (1) due to a excessive rainfall event in October, 2010, contaminated water collected in basements of G2 and H2 buildings. As a result of this event, the contractor has had to collect and dispose of water offsite; (2) The failure of a sump pump at a KAPL outfall resulted in a Notice of Violation issued by the New York State Department of Environment and Conservation (NYSDEC) and subsequent Consent Order. On-site water now requires treatment and off-site disposition; and (3) stormwater infiltration has resulted in Strontium-90 levels discharged to the storm drains that exceed NR standards. The contractor has indicated that water management at SPRU requires major staff resources (at least 50 persons). The purpose of this review is to determine if the contractor's technical approach warrants the large number of staff resources and to ensure that the technical approach is compliant and in accordance with federal, state and NR requirements.

  14. The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    The Center for Water-Energy Efficiency is a not-for-profit research and development unit at the University of California, Davis, leading innovations in water and energy efficient technologies and policies between water and energy and to use and allocate both more efficiently. Collaborating with partners

  15. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Muńoz-Rojas, David; Nelson, Shelby F.; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul; Roozeboom, Fred; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2015-04-02

    given to describe this system, but in this research update, we standardize its name to the Cambridge University Close Proximity (CUCP) reactor (design details are given in Ref. 24). An illustration of the CUCP gas manifold is given in Fig. 2... times, as indicated. Reprinted with permission from D. Muńoz-Rojas, H. Sun, D. C. Iza, J. Weickert, L. Chen, H. Wang, L. Schmidt-Mende, J. L. MacManus-Driscoll, Prog. Photovoltaics: Res. Appl. 21, 393 (2013). Copyright 2013 Wiley-VCH. adherent...

  16. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  17. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    Disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear waste into marine sediments would create high temperature-high gamma radiation environments adjacent to waste canisters. Under these conditions sediments will react producing pore waters that differ significantly from those occurring naturally. These changes may enhance canister corrosion or facilitate transport of radionuclides through unreacted sediments beyond the heated zone. In addition, the term ''near field'' needs clarification, as it is used widely without having a precise meaning. Research in three areas was undertaken to improve our understanding of near field chemical processes. Initially, isothermal experiments were carried out in ''Dickson'' hydrothermal systems. These were followed by an experimental program directed at understanding the chemical effects of temperature-gradient induced transport. Finally, additional experimentation was done to study the combined effects of hydrothermal conditions and intense gamma radiation. Having completed this body of experimental work, it was concluded that near field conditions are not an obstacle to the safe use of abyssal marine sediments for the disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear wastes. 41 refs., 6 figs., 17 tabs.

  18. Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-10-24

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements by adapting a theoretical approach previously developed for the AERONET measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1) an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2) and an offset (i.e. uncertainty) of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the upwelling and downwelling broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03), and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or ±0.04). Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 Wm-2).

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

    2012-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

  20. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service General Technical #12;- TH ,a geneticist, is assigned to the Station's research unit dyin etics of western forest trees, with headquarters in Berkeley, Berkeley. PAUL D. cal technician with the genetics research unit, isa forestry gra California, Berkeley

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper of the Eastern United States have been devastated by invasive pests. We used existing data to predict-quarter in total host density. Gypsy moth occupies only 23 percent of its potential range in the Eastern United

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper NE-722 James E. Smith Linda S. Heath A Model of Forest Floor Carbon Mass for United States Forest contiguous United States. Manuscript received for publication 22 April 2002 #12;A Model of Forest Floor

  3. CCFE is the fusion research arm of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority Presentation to PhD and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in 2019. BASIC PARAMETERS: ·Plasma Major Radius 6.2m ·Plasma Minor Radius 2.0m ·Plasma Current 15.0MA-T fusion power density is approximated by: Plasma pressure in atmospheres We need >1MWm-3 for a economic Plasma experiments Materials science Engineering #12;Can we do fusion at a compact scale? #12;What is it

  4. Atmospheric Pollution Research 3 (2012) 279288 Atmospheric Pollution Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    2012-01-01

    a commercial anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon and from an on­site finishing swine confinement house.32±0.32 kg NH3­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , 0.78±0.49 kg NH 3 ­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , 1.55±1.40 kg NH3­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , and 1.35±0.61 kg NH 3 ­N animal ­1 yr ­1 in summer, fall, winter, and spring respectively

  5. Studentnumber:Name:Degree: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Studentnumber:Name:Degree: Semester: Semester: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit: Year the Undergraduate Degree Course Rules. Have you included units that will lead to at least one degree-specific major that the units you choose in first year will lead to at least one degree-specific major. It is a requirement

  6. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103, NO. D17, PAGES 22,449-22,462, SEPTEMBER 20, 1998 Atmospheric chemistry and distribution of formaldehyde and several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric chemistry and distribution of formaldehyde and several multioxygenated carbonyl compoundsduring formaldehyde(FA), glycolaldehyde(GA), glyoxal(GL), methylglyoxal(MG), andpyruvicacid

  7. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  8. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  9. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP) concentrations and sea- surface temperatures (SSTs). These integrations enable the relative role of ozone

  10. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2008 University of Colorado at Boulder, Jet Propulsion Laboratory) LASP: A Brief History In 1946-47, a handful of American universities joined Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper

  11. ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEP Power ConditioningClimate and

  12. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Research Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Research thorium test foil A...

  13. NonNewtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Non­Newtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory M. Alam Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal properties of granular fluids are probed via event­driven simulations of the inelastic hard­sphere model. We find that granular fluids support large normal stress differences for the whole range of densities

  14. Non-Newtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Non-Newtonian Granular Fluids: Simulation and Theory M. Alam Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal properties of granular fluids are probed via event-driven simulations of the inelastic hard-sphere model. We find that granular fluids support large normal stress differences for the whole range of densities

  15. ARIZONA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT -SEPTEMBER 2004 SSeelleecctteedd AAssppeeccttss ooff tthhee NNaattuurraall HHiissttoorryy ooff GGiillaa CChhuubb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonar, Scott A.

    and secure by Weedman et al. (1996). The species is considered extirpated in New Mexico (Sublette et al. 1990). Gila chub is a candidate for listing under the United States Endangered Species Act (USFWS 1999 are thought to be a highly secretive species, preferring calm deep water, or remaining close to various cover

  16. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to optical frequencies, extending to X-rays and gamma rays. The electromagnetic pulse associated to its abundance in nature. Lightning processes radiate impulsive electromagnetic waves from DC

  17. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General Estimates for Forest Types of the United States James E. Smith Linda S. Heath Kenneth E. Skog Richard A forest types within 10 regions of the United States. Separate tables were developed for afforestation

  18. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Thomas J. Mills Frederick W. Bratten #12;The Authors: are with the Station's research unit studying fire J. MILLS, a forest economist, is in charge of the unit. He earned degrees at Michigan State

  19. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  20. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Proceedings of the Agriculture Pacific Southwest Symposium on Social of Agriculture; 96 p. The growing demand for recreation at the wildland-urban interface throughout the United and the Urban Culture Research Unit headquartered at the Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Dr

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General Technical Report NE-318 Atlas of Climate Change Effects in 150 Bird Species of the Eastern United States Service 359 Main Road Delaware, OH 43015 USA #12;United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southern Research Station General Technical United States. In: Rauscher, H. Michael, and Kurt Johnsen, eds. Southern forest science: past, present Trends in the Southern United States Robert A. Mickler, James E. Smith, and Linda S. Heath1 Abstract

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General reported in USDA Forest Service surveys for forests of the conterminous United States. Developed for use estimates are provided for regional tree-mass totals using summary forest statistics for the United States

  4. United States transuranium and uranium registries - 25 years of growth, research, and service. Annual report, April 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathren, R.L.; Harwick, L.A.; Toohey, R.E.; Russell, J.J.; Filipy, R.E.; Dietert, S.E.; Hunacek, M.M.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Registries originated in 1968 as the National Plutonium Registry with the name changed to the United States Transuranium Registry the following year to reflect a broader concern with the heavier actinides as well. Initially, the scientific effort of the USTR was directed towards study of the distribution and dose of plutonium and americium in occupationally exposed persons, and to assessment of the effects of exposure to the transuranium elements on health. This latter role was reassessed during the 1970`s when it was recognized that the biased cohort of the USTR was inappropriate for epidemiologic analysis. In 1978, the administratively separate but parallel United States Uranium Registry was created to carry out similar work among persons exposed to uranium and its decay products. A seven member scientific advisory committee provided guidance and scientific oversight. In 1992, the two Registries were administratively combined and transferred from the purview of a Department of Energy contractor to Washington State University under the provisions of a grant. Scientific results for the first twenty-five years of the Registries are summarized, including the 1985 publication of the analysis of the first whole body donor. Current scientific work in progress is summarized along with administrative activities for the period.

  5. Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Department of Energy of the United States of America and the National Science Foundation of the United States of America concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in Nuclear and Particle Physics

  6. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    collabora- tion between Brazil, France, and the United States to better understand the ocean masses (e.g., the United (continued on page 2) Zachary Barton of AOML and Jonathan Shannahoff, the chief.aoml.noaa.gov/keynotes/ States and Brazil) and for the formation of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic. The suite

  7. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Energy Conversion 1976-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mines, Gregory L.

    2010-09-01

    This report, the last in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in energy conversion and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  8. Challenges and Opportunities with Big Data A community white paper developed by leading researchers across the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challenges and Opportunities with Big Data A community white paper developed by leading researchers recognized broadly, and there is growing enthusiasm for the notion of ``Big Data.'' While the promise of Big, scale, timeliness, complexity, and privacy problems with Big Data impede progress at all phases

  9. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Reservoir Engineering 1976-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B. Mack; Pruess, Karsten; Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Majer, Ernest L.; Rose, Peter E.; Adams, Michael; Roberston-Tait, Ann; Moller, Nancy; Weare, John; Clutter, Ted; Brown, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    This report, the third in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in reservoir engineering and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  10. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acciarri, R; Artrip, D; Baller, B; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Carls, B; Chen, H; Deptuch, G; Epprecht, L; Dharmapalan, R; Foreman, W; Hahn, A; Johnson, M; Jones, B J P; Junk, T; Lang, K; Lockwitz, S; Marchionni, A; Mauger, C; Montanari, C; Mufson, S; Nessi, M; Back, H Olling; Petrillo, G; Pordes, S; Raaf, J; Rebel, B; Sinins, G; Soderberg, M; Spooner, N; Stancari, M; Strauss, T; Terao, K; Thorn, C; Tope, T; Toups, M; Urheim, J; Van de Water, R; Wang, H; Wasserman, R; Weber, M; Whittington, D; Yang, T

    2015-01-01

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: $i)$ Argon Purity and Cryogenics, $ii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iii)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $iv)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $v)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vi)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  11. Summary of the Second Workshop on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Research and Development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Acciarri; M. Adamowski; D. Artrip; B. Baller; C. Bromberg; F. Cavanna; B. Carls; H. Chen; G. Deptuch; L. Epprecht; R. Dharmapalan; W. Foreman; A. Hahn; M. Johnson; B. J. P. Jones; T. Junk; K. Lang; S. Lockwitz; A. Marchionni; C. Mauger; C. Montanari; S. Mufson; M. Nessi; H. Olling Back; G. Petrillo; S. Pordes; J. Raaf; B. Rebel; G. Sinins; M. Soderberg; N. Spooner; M. Stancari; T. Strauss; K. Terao; C. Thorn; T. Tope; M. Toups; J. Urheim; R. Van de Water; H. Wang; R. Wasserman; M. Weber; D. Whittington; T. Yang

    2015-04-23

    The second workshop to discuss the development of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) in the United States was held at Fermilab on July 8-9, 2014. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Coordinating Panel for Advanced Detectors, a body that was initiated by the American Physical Society Division of Particles and Fields. All presentations at the workshop were made in six topical plenary sessions: $i)$ Argon Purity and Cryogenics, $ii)$ TPC and High Voltage, $iii)$ Electronics, Data Acquisition and Triggering, $iv)$ Scintillation Light Detection, $v)$ Calibration and Test Beams, and $vi)$ Software. This document summarizes the current efforts in each of these areas. It primarily focuses on the work in the US, but also highlights work done elsewhere in the world.

  12. Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    My research interests. Numerical method of stochastic partial differential equations; Uncertainty Quantification; High-order numerical method; Domain ...

  13. Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    author

    Research Interests. Mathematical biology: Computational modelling of biological systems, experimental design and control of cellular processes. Applied math: ...

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 11,58911,599, doi:10.1002/2013JD020526, 2013 Seasonal cycle of orographic gravity wave occurrence above small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    are not observed in AIRS data they have likely dissipated and induced a drag force on the atmosphere below the 40 to the Southern Hemisphere's lack of orographic waves and orographic wave drag relative to the Northern Hemisphere by mountainous terrain. Mountains are the source of some of the largest amplitude waves in the strato- sphere

  15. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 112, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50505, 2013 SO2 as a possible proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    gases such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere [Robock, 2000 accurately using satellite data, while sulphur dioxide is much easier to detect accurately, but is much less]. These eruptions can occur in remote locations which are not the focus of regular measurements, and the first

  16. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 9, NO. 10, PAGES 1207-1210, OCTOBEX 1982 PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NITRATE AND SULFATE IN THE MARINE ATMOSPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    of nitrate in the atmosphere have been conducted in continental (primarily urban) areas; data on nitrate polycarbonate sheets were used as impaction surfaces; these sheets had a "frosted" finish which minimizes to collect the smallest particles. The polycarbonate inlpaction sheets were used because of their inertness

  17. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    ThermoChem, under contract to the Department of Energy, conducted extensive research, development and demonstration work on a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) to confirm that advanced technology can meet these performance objectives. The ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC system integrates a pulse combustor with an atmospheric bubbling-bed type fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) In this modular configuration, the pulse combustor burns the fuel fines (typically less than 30 sieve or 600 microns) and the fluidized bed combusts the coarse fuel particles. Since the ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC employs both the pulse combustor and the AFBC technologies, it can handle the full-size range of coarse and fines. The oscillating flow field in the pulse combustor provides for high interphase and intraparticle mass transfer rates. Therefore, the fuel fines essentially burn under kinetic control. Due to the reasonably high temperature (>1093 C but less than the temperature for ash fusion to prevent slagging), combustion of fuel fines is substantially complete at the exit of the pulse combustor. The additional residence time of 1 to 2 seconds in the freeboard of the PAFBC unit then ensures high carbon conversion and, in turn, high combustion efficiency. A laboratory unit was successfully designed, constructed and tested for over 600 hours to confirm that the PAFBC technology could meet the performance objectives. Subsequently, a 50,000 lb/hr PAFBC demonstration steam boiler was designed, constructed and tested at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. This Final Report presents the detailed results of this extensive and successful PAFBC research, development and demonstration project.

  18. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for their technical reviews and historical knowledge. The research covered by this paper would not have been possible Management, National Park Service, Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U of Defense-Defense Nuclear Agency, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Los Angeles City and County Fire

  19. Status of coal liquefaction in the United States and related research and development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, R.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; McNeese, L.E.

    1982-10-05

    We divide coal liquefaction processes into four categories: (1) indirect liquefaction, such as Fischer-Tropsch and methanol synthesis, in which coal is fist gasified to produce a synthesis gas which is then recombined to produce liquids; (2) direct liquefaction processes, typified by H-Coal, Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS), and SRC-I and II, in which a slurry of coal and solvent is subjected to high severity liquefaction conditions, either with or without added catalyst; (3) two-stage liquefaction, such as Conoco's CSF process, in which an initial dissolution at mild conditions is followed by a more severe catalytic hydrogenation-hydrocracking step; or the short contact time two-stage liquefaction processes being developed currently by groups which include Chevron, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Department of Energy/Fossil Energy (DOE/FE); and (4) pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis processes, such as COED and Cities Service-Rockewell, in which coal is carbonized to produce liquids, gases, and char. Pilot plant experience with the various processes is reviewed (including equipment problems, corrosion and abrasion, refractory life, heat recovery, coke deposits, reactor kinetics, scale-up problems, health hazards, environmental impacts, upgrading products, economics, etc.). Commercialization possibilities are discussed somewhat pessimistically in the light of reduction of US Oil imports, weakening oil prices, conversion to coal, smaller automobiles, economics and finally, some uncertainty about SFC goals and policies. (LTN)

  20. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  1. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 4906491 , doi:10.1002/jgrd.50358, 2013 Assessment of intercalibration methods for satellite microwave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Assessment of intercalibration methods for satellite microwave humidity sounders Viju O. John,1 Richard P) simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs). Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B instruments onboard the polar, and A. Kottayil (2013), Assessment of intercalibration methods for satellite microwave humidity sounders

  2. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  3. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *ReindustrializationEnergyWindNO.RequirementsResearch Research

  4. Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    MATH35012 Wave Motion Unit code: MATH35012 Credit Rating: 10 Unit level: Level 3 Teaching period This course unit aims to elucidate some of the physical properties of important types of wave motion and their mathematical descriptions. Overview Wave motion occurs in the oceans, atmosphere and in the earth. Problems

  5. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  6. Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2009-02-14

    Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

  7. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  8. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclearPrincipal InvestigatorsResearch

  9. Dear Alumni and Friends, The Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and air quality, radiation and remote sensing, climate and atmosphere Dear Alumni and Friends, The Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University is proud to be recognized as one of the top atmospheric science programs in the United States. For 50 years

  10. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 428 (1999) 593}607 Radio-controlled xenon #ashers for atmospheric monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 428 (1999) 593}607 Radio-controlled xenon of Physics, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

  11. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida September-October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Sandy's powerful winds and the regions of heaviest precipitation. These highly-accurate, real-time data winds, torrential rains, and a storm surge that flooded low-lying regions from the Carolinas to Maine of the Caribbean and pelting Florida with tropical storm-force winds and rain. Hurricane Research Division (HRD

  12. B. Joseph Guglielmo, EDUCATION UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, David

    AND ADVISORY UNITS ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS Dean's Office Management Staff Susan Abby, executive assistant Pharmaceutical Services, UCSF Medical Center Daniel Wandres, PharmD, associate dean; vice chair, DepartmentD, chair Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences James Wells, PhD, chair ORGANIZED RESEARCH UNIT Molecular

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2-Nek5000 |

  14. Phase Transitions of Aqueous Atmospheric Particles Scot T. Martin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transformations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles," in 1995-1996 at MIT in Atmospheric Chemistry. He was an Assistant Professor in Aquatic and Atmospheric Chemistry in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineers in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program). His laboratory research group is currently active in two

  15. Photo: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , marine geophysics, ocean acoustics, and marine and atmospheric chemistry. The school is also known as onePhoto: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) was founded in 1943 in Biscayne Bay near Miami. It is the only subtropical applied and basic marine and atmospheric research

  16. B S P Course Course Name Cross Listed P 140 Energy and Environment (F, 4 units)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    (alternate spring semesters, 3 units) P 103 Introduction to Hydrology (SP, 3 units) B P C106 Air Pollution (F, 3 units) EPS C180, ESPM C180 B S P 107 Climate Change Mitigation (SP, 3 units) P 108 Air Pollutant Air Pollution (F, 3 units) ESPM C180 P C181 Atmospheric Physics and Dynamics (3 units) GEOG C139 P C

  17. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a synthesis of net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990-2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or...

  18. Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Modeling of Alpine Atmospheric Dynamics II 707.424, VU 2, SS2005 Unit 7: Model code structure: mesoscale convective system 17-18 April 2004: Sierra hydraulic jump case 21 January 2005: the "Universiade) Introduction (brief description of the phenomenon and a description of the model and of the measurements

  19. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER The influence of plants on atmospheric methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER The influence of plants on atmospheric methane in an agriculture-dominated landscape on atmospheric methane (CH4) in an agriculture-dominated landscape in the Upper Mid- west of the United States role in the landscape-scale CH4 budget. Keywords Methane . Corn . Soybean . Agriculture . Land surface

  1. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  2. Initial Husky BPU H-OIL{reg_sign} unit operations and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faupel, T.H.; Tasker, K.G. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Bannayan, M.A. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The Husky Bi-Provincial Upgrader (BPU) complex was successfully started up in the fall of 1992. The heart of this heavy oil upgrading plant is the H-Oil{reg_sign} unit, which utilizes ebullated-bed technology to hydrocrack and upgrade heavy atmospheric residue (400{degrees}C{sup +}) to synthetic crude oil. The H-Oil process, jointly licensed by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) and Texaco Development Corp. (TDC), employs daily catalyst additions and withdrawals, thereby maintaining constant catalytic activity. Since its successful start-up, the H-Oil unit, designed to process 5,088 m{sup 3}/sd (32,000 BPSD), has processed in excess of 5,850 m{sup 3}/sd (36,800 BPSD) of atmospheric residue at conversion levels in the 55 to 65 vol% range. The on-stream factor for the first year of operation has been a very respectable 81% for a new unit, which is significantly better than prior residue hydrocracking unit start-ups. The onstream factor for the second full year of operation was over 95% based on unit availability. The process performance and yields from the H-Oil unit have been in close agreement with the design values. The H-Oil unit was accepted by the BPU without a process guarantee test run which was waived. This paper summarizes the initial operations and performance of the H-Oil unit and provides a comparison of process performance and product yields between ebullated-bed laboratory units and the commercial unit.

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to moisture availability and solar radiation. We describe research results pertaining to global climate change Technical Report PSW-GTR-235 June 2011 A Review of the Potential Effects of Climate Change on Quaking Aspen of the potential effects of climate change on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Western United States

  4. PRIMARY CAVITY-SITE SELECTION BY BIRDS STEPHEN K. SWALLOW.' Department of Natural Resources and New York CooperativeWildlife Research Unit, Cornell Uni-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutiérrez, R.J.

    in randomly located 0.049-ha circles ( N = 61) in 1979. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that forest suitablesnags within those sites is recommended.Use of logistic regression models by field managers is discussed United States where most of the forested land is privately owned and, therefore, where maintenance

  5. DPF for a Tractor Auxiliary Power Unit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for a Tractor Auxiliary Power Unit DPF for a Tractor Auxiliary Power Unit Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007)....

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47 Industrial1

  7. ORISE Climate and Atmospheric Research: Contact Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclear andTwo-Phase75ORCIDContact Us

  8. ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclearHowAssetonCapabilities ORISE

  9. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  10. MM5 Aids Forecasters Over the past five years a group in the Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Jaeglé's specialty is atmospheric chemistry. Her research deals with analysis and modelingMM5 Aids Forecasters Over the past five years a group in the Atmospheric Sciences department has around the region. (see Page 8) New Faculty Join Atmospheric Sciences In the past year, Atmospheric

  11. Research Report faculty of law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Research student profiles | 09 Crime Research Centre | 11 Consumer Research Unit | 13 2011 Research, working closely with a number of State Government Departments and Agencies. In 2011, the Crime Research entitled "Reducing imprisonment rates in Australia: international experiences, marginal populations

  12. Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences 1959­2009 WayneBurt. #12;Oceanography and Atmospheric in Oceanography (TENOC). Wayne Burt immediately responds with proposal to President Strand of Oregon State College to start a graduate Department of Oceanography. 1959 Oregon State Board of Higher Education approves

  13. Paul Roundy Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    agricultural drought events in the United States Midwest Corn Belt Region (CBR) based on an index of anomalous to Onset and Breakdown of Agricultural Drought over the United States Corn Belt Region The proposed work: Research to Advance Understanding, Monitoring, and Prediction of Drought. The proposed work would fulfill

  14. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  15. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1996 annual report wetlands research related to the Pen Branch restoration effort on the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Kolka, R.K. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States); Trettin, C.C. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service and their collaborators (SRTC, SREL, and several universities) in wetlands monitoring and research on the Savannah River Site. This report describes the rationales, methods, and results (when available) of these studies and summarizes and integrates the available information through 1996.

  16. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY YEARLY REPORT FY 1992 Director Alfred M and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2205 adjacent to GLERL Muskegon Vessel Operations Facility. Photo courtesy of Mark Ford. ii #12;Contents

  17. University of Manchester Researchers Into Management Researchers into Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    University of Manchester ­ Researchers Into Management ! ! ! ! Researchers into Management ! ! Institute of Leadership and Management Candidate Guide and Unit Requirements ! !1 Version Updated December 2013 ! Institute of Leadership & Management Candidate Guide & Unit Requirements for Level 5 Award

  18. Unit and student details Unit code Unit title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Unit and student details Unit code Unit title If this is a group assignment, each student must submitted Has any part of this assessment been previously submitted as part of another unit/course? Yes not be copied. No part of this assignment has been previously submitted as part of another unit/course. I

  19. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    address: Center for Atmospheric Chemistry Study, Departmenttween phytoplankton, atmospheric chemistry, and climate areno. 12 ? 4601– 4605 CHEMISTRY Atmospheric aerosol deposition

  20. Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K; Biswas, Kaushik; Song, Bo; Zhang, Sisi

    2012-08-01

    In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications in green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and fire safety. A related issue is the degree to which new standards are adopted and enforced. In the U.S., standards are developed using a consensus process, and local government agencies are free to implement these standards or to ignore them. For example, some U.S. states are still using 2003 versions of the building efficiency standards. There is also a great variation in the degree to which the locally adopted standards are enforced in different U.S. cities and states. With a more central process in China, these issues are different, but possible impacts of variable enforcement efficacy may also exist. Therefore, current building codes in China will be compared to the current state of building fire-safety and energy-efficiency codes in the U.S. and areas for possible improvements in both countries will be explored. In particular, the focus of the applications in China will be on green buildings. The terminology of 'green buildings' has different meanings to different audiences. The U.S. research is interested in both new, green buildings, and on retrofitting existing inefficient buildings. An initial effort will be made to clarify the scope of the pertinent wall insulation systems for these applications.

  1. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  2. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  3. Autumn 2014 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    to perform atmospheric chemistry measurements in this remote region of ubiquitous oil and gas drilling 30 days they raised $12,000, enough to support Maria's travel to Utah and to cover the costs

  4. Economic Model For a Return on Investment Analysis of United States Government High Performance Computing (HPC) Research and Development (R & D) Investment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Earl C.; Conway, Steve; Dekate, Chirag

    2013-09-30

    This study investigated how high-performance computing (HPC) investments can improve economic success and increase scientific innovation. This research focused on the common good and provided uses for DOE, other government agencies, industry, and academia. The study created two unique economic models and an innovation index: 1 A macroeconomic model that depicts the way HPC investments result in economic advancements in the form of ROI in revenue (GDP), profits (and cost savings), and jobs. 2 A macroeconomic model that depicts the way HPC investments result in basic and applied innovations, looking at variations by sector, industry, country, and organization size. ? A new innovation index that provides a means of measuring and comparing innovation levels. Key findings of the pilot study include: IDC collected the required data across a broad set of organizations, with enough detail to create these models and the innovation index. The research also developed an expansive list of HPC success stories.

  5. Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT 001113 AP Old O/S A/P NonResCk 0000 General 000000 General #12;Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program

  6. Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine and climate projections; critically and quantitatively analyze environmental management and policy proposals mercury research. Global Budget of Mercury Prior to the onset of human industrial activities, the amount

  7. Title/Topic: Research Misconduct Functional Classification: Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    1 Title/Topic: Research Misconduct Number: 69 Functional Classification: Research Monitoring Unit: Initially Issued: March 1, 2006 Last Revised: Last Reviewed: RESEARCH MISCONDUCT I. Introduction* *Federal law requires Federal agencies sponsoring research to require an awardee institution to have

  8. FUNDAMENTALS OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE COURSE: ...................................................................................... EAS B9014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    and Physics 20700 and 20800 Textbook (required): Atmospheric Science: An Introductory Survey (2nd editionFUNDAMENTALS OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE COURSE% Students will write a term paper, linking a topic learned in class with either (a) their own research or (b

  9. Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee Biomass Research and Development Initiative October...

  10. United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and...

  11. United States Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cung-cp nhng c lng công-sc hot ng chính xác cho vic ánh bt tôm. Tuy-nhięn, hp-ng vi S Lięn-Kt ng-vě nhng c lng chính xác t l cho cá-hng-con b-chęt tůy thuc-vŕo ngŕnh hi-sn tôm lŕ iu ch-yu trong k-hŕnh vŕ lŕ mt cách tin-li vŕ hiu qu nht xác nh chính xác s lng vŕ v trí nhng công-sc hat-ng xy ra trong

  12. United States Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Thái LGL ang cung-cp nhng c lng công-sc hot ng chính xác cho vic ánh-bt tôm. Tuy-nhięn, hp-ng vi S Lięn-vě nhng c lng chính xác t l cho cá-hng-con b-chęt tůy thuc-vŕo ngŕnh ánh-bt tôm lŕ iu ch-yu trong k-Ngh-Nghip ięu-hŕnh vŕ lŕ mt cách tin-li vŕ hiu qu nht xác nh chính xác s lng vŕ v trí nhng công-sc hat-ng xy ra

  13. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    estimates of the total run size for each listed group of fish. Several Snake River species will have Smolts Arriving at Various Locations in the Columbia River Basin in 2014 Each year your office requests arriving at selected Columbia and Snake River projects. These estimates are necessary for evaluating

  14. Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Genealogy of MajorNationalDay)

  15. UNITED STEELWORKERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE:Administrationfollowing tableUNITED FERC

  16. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States

  17. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States7

  18. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States78

  19. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United

  20. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 UnitedDuke-4-E

  1. 13, 1479714822, 2013 Atmospheric waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    .5194/acpd-13-14797-2013 © Author(s) 2013. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Sciences ss Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Discussions Atmospheric Measurement s Discussions This discussion paper is/has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  2. The middle Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaquin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of scattered light above the planetary limb from 116 Viking Orbiter images are used to constrain the temporal and spatial behavior of aerosols suspended in the Martian atmosphere. The data cover a wide range of seasons, locations, and viewing geometry, providing information about the aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution. The typical atmospheric column contains one or more discrete, optically thin, ice-like haze layers between 30 and 90 km elevation whose composition is inferred to be water ice. Below the detached hazes, a continuous haze, interpreted to have a large dust component, extends from as much as 50 km to the surface. The haze distribution exhibits an annual variation that reflects a seasonally driven circulation in the middle atmosphere. The potential role of stationary gravity waves in modifying the middle atmosphere circulation is explored using a linear theory applied to a realistic Martian environment. Martian topography derived from radar observations is decomposed into Fourier harmonics and used to linearly superpose gravity waves arising from each component. The larger amplitude topography on Mars combined with the absence of extended regions of smooth topography like oceans generates larger wave amplitudes than on the Earth. The circulation of the middle atmosphere is examined using a two-dimensional, linearized, axisymmetric model successfully employed in the study of the terrestrial mesosphere. Illustrations of temperature and wind speeds are presented for the southern summer solstice and southern spring equinox.

  3. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency: Proceedings Series. IAEA. 2005. Worldwide marine Radionuclides in the Marine Environment: A Selected Bibliography Compiled and edited by: Chris Belter: NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and National Marine Fisheries Service, have prepared

  4. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  5. Field Stations Compliance CommitteesAdministrative Units Research Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    California Institute for Energy and the Environment California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences Center of Paleontology UC Botanical Garden University & Jepson Herbaria Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI) Helen Wills Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies Institute of Transportation Studies Institute

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " 1Total U.S. includes all primary occupied housing units in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military...

  7. United States Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Consumer Product Safety Commission United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

  8. A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Energy Conversion 1976-2006 A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Energy...

  9. Flammability Characteristics of Hydrogen and Its Mixtures with Light Hydrocarbons at Atmospheric and Sub-atmospheric Pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Thuy Minh Hai

    2013-07-13

    /vapor. This research focuses on the flammability limits of hydrogen and its binary mixtures with light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, n-butane, and ethylene) at sub-atmospheric pressures. The flammability limits of hydrogen, light hydrocarbons, and binary mixtures...

  10. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  11. Contamination analysis unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregg, Hugh R. (Livermore, CA); Meltzer, Michael P. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  13. Autumn 2012 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    wind, and accumulated precipitation at a designated city. Forecasts are made over a two-week period Department 1 The UW Atmospheric Sciences spring forecast contest has been an annual tradition there will be a marine push or a convergence zone wrecking their forecast for maximum temperature and precipitation

  14. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic formats. For more information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.wiley.com. Library of Congress Cataloging components of the atmosphere, nitrogen, oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, and the noble gases. In the late

  15. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

  17. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  18. Reactive greenhouse gas scenarios: Systematic exploration of uncertainties and the role of atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Holmes, Christopher D; Hsu, Juno

    2012-01-01

    et al. (2011b), The RCP greenhouse gas concentrations andResearch Council (2010), Greenhouse Gas Emissions: MethodsATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GREENHOUSE GASES Prather, M. , and

  19. Small Units inside Large Units 8.1 Experimental units bigger than observational units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    Chapter 8 Small Units inside Large Units 8.1 Experimental units bigger than observational units 8, but it is individual people that are measured. In general, suppose that there are m experimental units, each of which consists of k observational units, and that there are t treatments, each of which is applied

  20. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  1. Winter floods in Britain are connected to atmospheric rivers David A. Lavers,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Winter floods in Britain are connected to atmospheric rivers David A. Lavers,1,2 Richard P. Allan,2 flooding in the winter and fall seasons has been widespread in the United Kingdom (UK) and Western Europe over recent decades. Here we show that winter flood events in the UK are connected to Atmospheric

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry Theodore S. Dibble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Atmospheric Chemistry FCH 511 Fall 2014 Theodore S. Dibble Professor of Chemistry 421 in Required Text Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution nineteenth year at ESF, and my seventeenth year teaching FCH 511 (Atmospheric Chemistry). I have done a lot

  3. Lifetimes and eigenstates in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1994-01-01

    Perturbation dynamics in atmospheric chemistry. J. Geophys.isotopic variations in atmospheric chemistry. Geophys. Res.M. et al. 2001 Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases (

  4. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    L. , et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from theI. , et al. (2006), Atmospheric chemistry of a 33 – 34 hourvolcanic eruptions on atmospheric chemistry, Chem. Geol. ,

  5. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  6. PLANNING UNIT March 18, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Sanjiva

    PLANNING UNIT March 18, 2009 Advertisement for IREDA Renewable Energy Chair in the Institute acclaimed credentials to its Chair positions. IREDA Renewable Energy Chair was established in the year 1997. The objectives of IREDA Renewable Energy Chair include Research and Development, upgradation of technology

  7. United States Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is composed of representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Publicly Owned Treatment Works Developed by the Sewage Sludge Subcommittee United States Nuclear Regulatory associated with this project: Lee Abramson, NRC/Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Kevin Aiello, Middlesex

  8. United States Department of Agriculture Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillingham, Michael

    and Environmental Studies Institute, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC

  9. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr a . - 3=A-;fi ''

  10. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr a . - 3=A-;fi

  11. UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1afr a . - 3=A-;fi.BJ' 1-7

  12. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , Santiago Jime´nez e a CIEMAT, Atmospheric Pollution Unit, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid, Spain b LSCE

  13. United Nations Programme on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    United Nations Programme on Space Applications UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR OUTER SPACE, Sputnik 1. Soon after that event, the Member States of the United Nations declared that space should and natural resources management. At the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses

  14. ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive CampaignListAtmospheric Heat

  15. ARM - Atmospheric Pressure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive CampaignListAtmospheric

  16. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractor ofvarDOE PAGES11 PPPL-Atmospheric PSF

  17. Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences IntroductIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences #12;IntroductIon A Rich History in Science Driven Engineering, through research sponsored by NASA, NSF, DoD, DoE and other governmental agencies. This research has than individual components. The proud history of the disciplines has yielded a department honored

  18. Optimising Join Cost Weights For Unit Selection Speech Synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodcock, Steve

    2008-12-04

    Unit selection synthesis predominates today, but is not yet of a quality to rival natural speech. Unit selection can be inconsistent in quality and one of the causes are the joins. Earlier research suggested joins are ...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  20. Unit 35 - Raster Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 35, CC in GIS; Peuquet, Donna

    1990-01-01

    in GIS - 1990 Page 8 Unit 35 - Raster Storage GIS to whichNCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990 Page 9 Unit 35 - RasterStorage UNIT 35 IMAGES NCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990

  1. Environmental Research Center to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and transportation energy were established. Today there are five main areas of research in atmospheric processes energy. Projects range from developing autonomous vehicles, and transportation systems of the future the center has branched out into solar energy and energy storage research, which has created an important

  2. A report to United Services Automobile Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Master Research Agreement No. 0000004417 between Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI) and United this agreement: Task 1: Develop Survey Instrument Task 2: Conduct Survey Task 3: Analyze Survey and Prepare

  3. Evaluating atmospheric CO2 inversions at multiple scales over a highly-inventoried agricultural landscape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, Andrew E.; Lauvaux, Thomas; West, Tristram O.; Denning, A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Uliasz, Marek; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Cooley, Dan; Andrews, Arlyn; Ogle, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    An intensive regional research campaign was conducted by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) in 2005 to study the carbon cycle of the highly productive agricultural regions of the Midwestern United States. Forty-_ve di_erent associated projects were spawned across _ve U.S. agencies over the course of nearly a decade involving hundreds of researchers. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the ability of atmospheric inversion techniques to use highly calibrated CO2 mixing ratio data to estimate CO2 exchange over the major croplands of the U.S. Statistics from densely monitored crop production, consisting primarily corn and soybeans, provided the backbone of a well-studied\\bottom up"flux estimate that was used to evaluate the atmospheric inversion results. Three different inversion systems, representing spatial scales varying from high resolution mesoscale, to continental, to global, coupled to different transport models and optimization techniques were compared to the bottom up" inventory estimates. The mean annual CO2-C sink for 2007 from the inversion systems ranged from 120 TgC to 170 TgC, when viewed across a wide variety of inversion setups, with the best" point estimates ranging from 145 TgC to 155 TgC. Inversion-based mean C sink estimates were generally slightly stronger, but statistically indistinguishable,from the inventory estimate whose mean C sink was 135 TgC. The inversion results showed temporal correlations at seasonal lengths while week to week correlations remained low. Comparisons were made between atmospheric transport yields of the two regional inversion systems, which despite having different influence footprints in space and time due to differences in underlying transport models and external forcings, showed similarity when aggregated in space and time.

  4. Developing the CLAMS Simulation Units from Topography, Vegetation, and Ownership Coastal Landscape Analysis and Modeling Study; College of Forestry, Oregon State University, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis, OR; Oregon De

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the CLAMS Simulation Units from Topography, Vegetation, and Ownership Coastal Landscape a three step process which focuses on topography, vegetation, and ownership. Once complete, the resulting

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates Research AffiliatesThe SurprisinglyAtmospheric Aerosol

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates Research AffiliatesThe SurprisinglyAtmospheric

  7. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates Research AffiliatesThe SurprisinglyAtmosphericSimulating

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchTo Be or NotNewPreferred States of theAtmospheric

  9. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchTo Be orTheImproving WaterPollutionAtmospheric Sea

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchTo Be orTheImproving WaterPollutionAtmospheric

  11. Research Misconduct (Research Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Research Misconduct (Research Integrity Coordinator report) Glossary ADR Associate Dean Research ANDS Australian National Data Sharing ITS Information Technology Services NeCTAR National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources RSDI Research Storage Data Infrastructure input Research Integrity Advisors

  12. Critical Materials Institute signs new member United Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signs new member United Technologies Research Center Contacts: For release: Aug. 18, 2015 Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 296-4505 Laura Millsaps, Ames...

  13. Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate and it emits Note: heat balance Fvis( = Fout = Te 4 z #12;(simple Greenhouse cont.) 0 1 2 3 4 Ground Space Top

  14. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric scientists apply physics, mathematics, and chemistry to understandAtmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric the atmosphere and its interactions with land and sea. One of the goals of atmospheric science is to understand

  15. RESEARCH AT JOHANNES GUTENBERG UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaus, Boris

    RESEARCH AT JOHANNES GUTENBERG UNIVERSITY MAINZ #12;CONTENTS THE GUTENBERG SPIRIT | 4 PROFILE BUILDING | 6 CLUSTER OF EXCELLENCE AND RESEARCH CENTERS | 11 RESEARCH UNITS | 29 CROSS-SECTIONAL TASKS AND INFRASTRUCTURE | 51 Prof. Walter Bisang, a fellow of the Gutenberg Research College, is conducting research

  16. STAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    STAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH CENTER Postrgraduate study in mathematical physics Marika Taylor Mathematical Sciences and STAG research centre, Southampton December 19, 2014 Marika Taylor (University of Southampton) Mathematical Physics December 19, 2014 1 / 26 #12;STAG RESEARCH

  17. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

  18. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

    2012-08-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

  19. Institute of Space Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Outreach: Media and General Funding, Staff and Programs Department of Physics and Engineering Physics: isas@dansas.usask.ca Web site: http://www.usask.ca/physics/isas Annual Report 2000 #12;3 Table Ionospheric Physics Aeronomy Research G.R. Davis A.H. Manson G.J. Sofko, A.V. Koustov A.V. Koustov, G

  20. Computer support to run models of the atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, I.

    1996-08-30

    This research is focused on a better quantification of the variations in CO{sub 2} exchanges between the atmosphere and biosphere and the factors responsible for these exchangers. The principal approach is to infer the variations in the exchanges from variations in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} distribution. The principal tool involves using a global three-dimensional tracer transport model to advect and convect CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The tracer model the authors used was developed at the Goddard institute for Space Studies (GISS) and is derived from the GISS atmospheric general circulation model. A special run of the GCM is made to save high-frequency winds and mixing statistics for the tracer model.

  1. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  2. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-04-19

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant (1) the freshwater has a high pressure (>30 or more atm.) and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electricity generation plant. The offered electricity installation in 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output. Key words: Extraction freshwater, method of getting freshwater, receiving energy from atmosphere, powerful renewal electric plant.

  3. United Sates Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    United Sates Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water (4305) EPA/823/B/95/003 August 1995 QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide #12;QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide United States

  4. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range, objectives, and targets and specific work plans for the field units--the National Forests and their Ranger

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Peelflc Southwest Forest and Range that are expressed in tems familim to the user. Theboard footand cubic footare mdiriond units of measure, altlnough

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Usual Planting and Harvesting Dates for U.S. Field Crops million acres of barley were harvested in the United States (U.S.) during 1996. After reaching a peak

  7. National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Networks: Data on the chemistry of precipitation

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) is a nationwide network of sites collecting data on the chemistry of precipitation for monitoring of geographical and temporal long-term trends. The precipitation at each station is collected weekly according to strict clean-handling procedures. It is then sent to the Central Analytical Laboratory where it is analyzed for hydrogen (acidity as pH), sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and base cations (such as calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium). The network is a cooperative effort between many different groups, including the State Agricultural Experiment Stations, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and numerous other governmental and private entities. DOE is one of these cooperating agencies, though it plays a smaller funding role than some of the other federal sources. Since 1978, the NADP/NTN has grown from 22 stations to over 250 sites spanning the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program has also expanded its sampling to two additional networks: 1) the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN), currently with over 90 sites, was formed in 1995 to collect weekly samples of precipitation which are analyzed by Frontier Geosciences for total mercury, and 2) the Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN), formed for the purpose of studying precipitation chemistry trends with greater temporal resolution than the NTN. [taken from the NADP History and Overview page at http://nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/nadpoverview.asp] Data from these networks are freely available in via customized search interfaces linked to interactive maps of the stations in the three networks. Animated Isopleth maps in Flash and PowerPoint are also available to display concentrations and depositions various substances such as sulfate, nitrate, etc. (Specialized Interface)

  8. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY - RESPONSE TO HUMAN INFLUENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOGAN, J; PRATHER, M; WOFSY, S; MCELROY, M

    1978-01-01

    Trans. II 70, 253. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Clyne, M. A. A. &data for modelling atmospheric chemistry. NBS Technical NoteChem. 80, 2711. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Sanadze, G. A. 1963 On

  9. IMPROVED QUASISTEADYSTATEAPPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, Laurent O.

    IMPROVED QUASI­STEADY­STATE­APPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION # L. O. JAY QSSA are presented. Key words. atmospheric chemistry, sti# ordinary di#erential equations, quasi PII. S1064827595283033 1. Introduction. As our scientific understanding of atmospheric chemistry

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimated UseofWaterintheUnitedStatesin2005 Trends in estimated water use in the United States.L., Hutson, S.S., Linsey, K.S., Lovelace, J.K., and Maupin, M.A., 2009, Estimated use of water in the United

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range unit investigating measurement and analysis techniques for management planning, with headquarters in Berkeley, Calif. ELLIOT L. AMIDON is now assigned to the Station's unit at Arcata, Calif., that is studying

  12. UNITED STATES PARTMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES PARTMENT OF lMMERCE J8l1CATION SEATTLE, WA IOVEMBER 1973 FISHERY FACTS-6 U. S of foreign fishing off United States coastal waters, and the aevelopment and enforce- ment of international;ABSTRACT Dungeness crabs, Cancer magister, occur in the inshore waters of t he west coast of the United

  13. United States Nuclear Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission United States Department of Energy United States.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 E-mail: DISTRIBUTION@nrc.gov Facsimile: 301; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10

  14. Unit Testing Discussion C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

  15. The Macroscopic Cortical Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell Populations Differential Will Penny 21st April 2011 #12;The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell as formulated in David et al. (2006). #12;The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell

  16. Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over fractional cloud cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Prather, Michael J; Penner, Joyce E

    2007-01-01

    trace gases and atmospheric chemistry, in Climate Change2007 Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over2007), Global atmospheric chemistry: Integrating over

  17. Compliance with United States Export Control 1 Current Revision: 12/04/2014 Compliance with United States Export Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Compliance with United States Export Control 1 Current Revision: 12/04/2014 Laws Compliance with United States Export Control Laws Policy Type: Administrative Responsible Office: Office of Research, the United States has enacted export control laws to govern the transfer of certain information, items

  18. Infrared Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian James Mills

    2012-01-01

    However, atmospheres of cool planets can still be studiedvia outgassing as the planet cools (Rogers & Seager 2010).at low resolution) and the cool, low-mass planet GJ 1214b (

  19. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT Energy Efficiency Research Office Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION Interest Energy Research Program, Sol Focus, and the United Technologies Research Center). Authors

  20. Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion...

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Workshop Report - Research Needs for Wind Resource Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Lundquist, J.; Shaw, W.

    2008-06-01

    This workshop brought the different atmospheric and wind technology specialists together to evaluate research needs for wind resource characterization.

  2. Photos credits for front cover: Top photos Comstock and Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the role of research. 1. Biomass energy--Economic aspects--United States. 2. Biomass energy--Research--United States. 3. Feedstock--United States--Costs. 4. Corn--Yields--United States. 5. Forest biomass--United States. 6. Alcohol as fuel. 7. Biodiesel fuels--United States. I. Biomass Research and Development Board

  3. Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

  4. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  5. An approach for verifying biogenic greenhouse gas emissions inventories with atmospheric CO 2 concentration data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogle, Stephen; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Schuh, Andrew E.; Cooley, Dan; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Breidt, F. Jay; et al

    2015-03-10

    Verifying national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventories is a critical step to ensure that reported emissions data to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are accurate and representative of a country’s contribution to GHG concentrations in the atmosphere. Verification could include a variety of evidence, but arguably the most convincing verification would be confirmation of a change in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere that is consistent with reported emissions to the UNFCCC. We report here on a case study evaluating this option based on a prototype atmospheric CO2 measurement network deployed in the Mid-Continent Region of themore »conterminous United States. We found that the atmospheric CO2 measurement data did verify the accuracy of the emissions inventory within the confidence limits of the emissions estimates, suggesting that this technology could be further developed and deployed more widely in the future for verifying reported emissions.« less

  6. NOAA Central Library July 2012 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Central Library July 2012 1 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce National Undersea Research Program Bibliography: Preliminary Statistics Compiled by Chris Belter, NOAA Central Library July 2012 #12;NOAA Central Library July 2012 2 Introduction This report presents

  7. Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    FRONT Earth & Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta of exploring and understanding our planet Dr. John A. Allan Dr. John A. Allan founded the Department of Geology at the University of Alberta in 1912, and subsequently helped establish both the Alberta Research Council and the Alberta Geological

  8. Atmospheric sciences division. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynor, G.S. (ed.) [ed.

    1981-12-01

    The research activities of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Department of Energy and Environment for FY 1981 are presented. Facilities and major items of equipment are described. Research programs are summarized in three categories, modeling, field and laboratory experiments and data management and analysis. Each program is also described individually with title, principal investigator, sponsor and funding levels for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Future plans are summarized. Publications for FY 1981 are listed with abstracts. A list of personnel is included.

  9. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  10. Research Report faculty of law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Research student profile | 07 Crime Research Centre | 09 The Centre for Mining, Energy and Natural as contribute to inter-disciplinary projects and debates. The outputs of the Law School's research include entities: the Centre for Mining, Energy and Natural Resources Law, the Consumer Research Unit and the Crime

  11. Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network Jayson Maldonado-Meteorological stations. Research Objectives · Develop the hardware necessary for the collection atmospheric water content gives the real Water Vapor Content (WVC) in 3D instead of the Zenith Delay. Future Work · Testing

  12. Three Dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement on a Spherical Shell for Atmospheric Models with Lagrangian Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Three Dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement on a Spherical Shell for Atmospheric Models for Atmospheric Research 1. Introduction One of the most important advances needed in global climate models of this project is a parallel adaptive grid library, which is currently under development at the University

  13. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature received 25 October 2013, in final form 24 July 2014) ABSTRACT The wind speed response to mesoscale SST Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

  14. Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Collection Policy: SOIL, CROP AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other. Research is tending away from classical agronomy to the science of soil, crop, air. More emphasis is on the environment, less on agriculture. 1.3 Graduate program The Field of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences offers

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T

    2004-10-31

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM's Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  16. Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Chemistry of Atmospheric Brown Carbon Alexander Laskin,*, Julia Laskin,*, and Sergey A. Nizkorodov fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate of radiation through Earth's atmosphere. The cloud albedo effect, Special Issue: 2015 Chemistry in Climate

  17. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..............................................................................2 Solid Waste Management .........................................................................3 ....................................................................................4 Solid Waste ManagementUnited States Department of Returns on InvestmentsAgriculture Forest Service in Management Sciences

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"...

  19. DERIVATION AND OBSERVABILITY OF UPPER ATMOSPHERIC DENSITY VARIATIONS UTILIZING PRECISION ORBIT EPHEMERIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechtenberg, Travis Francis

    2010-04-28

    Several models of atmospheric density exist in today's world, yet most possess significant errors when compared to data determined from actual satellite measurements. This research utilizes precision orbit ephemerides (POE) in an optimal orbit...

  20. Retrieval of optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Jacqueline Anne

    2005-11-01

    The research presented here retrieves the cloud optical thickness and particle effective size of cirrus clouds using surface radiation measurements obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) field campaign. ...

  1. Sandia Energy - Phasor Measurement Units

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Units Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Phasor Measurement Units...

  2. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  3. Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Observations of atmospheric tides on Mars at the season and latitude of the Phoenix atmospheric atmospheric entry of NASA's Phoenix Mars probe using Phoenix Atmospheric Structure Experiment (ASE) data atmospheric entry, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L24204, doi:10.1029/2010GL045382. 1. Introduction [2] Phoenix

  4. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  6. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

  7. Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Critical phenomena in atmospheric precipitation OLE PETERS1,2,3 * AND J. DAVID NEELIN3 1 convection and precipitation (the order parameter)--with correlated regions on scales of tens to hundreds the climatological mean by an order of magnitude or more. Moist convection and the accompanying precipitation have

  8. The Atmospheric and Terrestrial Mobile Laboratory (ATML).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zak, Bernard Daniel; Rahn, Thom (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Nitschke, Kim (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Ivey, Mark D.; Mora, Claudia (Los Alamos National Laboratory); McDowell, Nate (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Love, Steve (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Dubey, M. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Michelsen, Hope A.; Guilderson, Tom (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Schubert, William Kent; Costigan, Keeley (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Chylek, Petr (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bambha, Ray P.; Roskovensky, John K.

    2010-04-01

    The ionospheric disturbance dynamo signature in geomagnetic variations is investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. The model results are tested against reference magnetically quiet time observations on 21 June 1993, and disturbance effects were observed on 11 June 1993. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed diurnal and latitude variations of the geomagnetic horizontal intensity and declination for the reference quiet day in midlatitude and low-latitude regions but underestimates their amplitudes. The patterns of the disturbance dynamo signature and its source 'anti-Sq' current system are well reproduced in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the model significantly underestimates the amplitude of disturbance dynamo effects when compared with observations. Furthermore, the largest simulated disturbances occur at different local times than the observations. The discrepancies suggest that the assumed high-latitude storm time energy inputs in the model were not quantitatively accurate for this storm.

  9. ORNL researchers contribute to major UN bioenergy and sustainability...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL researchers contribute to major bioenergy and sustainability report ORNL researchers Keith Kline and Virginia Dale contributed to a major United Nations report on bioenergy...

  10. Z .Atmospheric Research 56 2001 253267 www.elsevier.comrlocateratmos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Romu

    of waterspouts V .symbol . Fujita scale numbers are located on the lift off point. Symbol A?B indicates unknown path and strength; APMB, the radiosounding station in Palma. Stars indicate the location of airports

  11. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere College of ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Taylor/ATS 18 CIRA Magazine Contributors: Managing Editor: Mary McInnis-Efaw Designer: Maureen Murray Editor: Matt Rogers 2 CG/AR Product Evolution 4 NPS Seeing Clearer Air 6 Suomi NPP - 2 Years in Orbit 10 EMC, Robert Moorhead of Mississippi State Univ., Joe Tribbia of NCAR and Karen Yuen of JPL. The review

  12. CSIRO MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH GASLAB FLASK CO2 DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fitted with PTFE, PFA or Viton O-rings (flask identifier prefix "G050"), (b) glass 5.0 litre, sealed with two stopcocks fitted with PTFE O-rings ("G500"), (c) glass 0.8 litre, sealed with two stopcocks fitted with PTFE or #12;PFA O-rings ("G080"), (d) electropolished stainless steel 1.6 litre "Sirocans" fitted

  13. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakov, T.

    2010-01-01

    particles from propane-benzene combustion in air; b) exhaustsoot particles from propane-benzene combustion in air; (b)particles produced by combustion of propane saturated with

  14. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakov, T.

    2010-01-01

    propane-benzene combustion in air; b) exhaust particles from an internal combustion engine;propane-benzene combustion in air; (b) exhaust particulates from an internal combustion engine; (

  15. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere College of ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    -Resolution Rapid Refresh/ Chemistry/Smoke (HRRR/Chem/Smoke) and Urban Scale (100 meters), wind forecasts in complex related to satellite algorithm development, regional/global weather and climate modeling, education to develop and deliver new technologies and improved weather forecast models to fire-fighting teams

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM12

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM129

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1292

  20. Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D BGene NetworkNuclearDNP 20082 P r o j e c t D e s iSitesA. A.S. A.

  1. Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructureStudents today.Please Help UsStyle

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2-Nek5000 |ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0GrantsThe Life

  4. JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItem

  5. The Unit Coordinator Handbook About the Unit Coordinator Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    1 The Unit Coordinator Handbook About the Unit Coordinator Handbook This Handbook will assist you in fulfilling your responsibilities as a Unit Coordinator and has been developed with input from Unit staff, however, more resources are available at the Unit Coordinator website: http

  6. ELSEVIER Brain Research 712 (1996) 293-298 Research report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tepper, James M.

    1996-01-01

    BRAIN RESEARCH ELSEVIER Brain Research 712 (1996) 293-298 Research report Local infusion of brain examined the effects of local infusion of BDNF on the electrophysioiogical activity of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raph6 nucleus with extracellular single unit recording in vivo. Compared with vehicle-infused

  7. A continuous measure of gross primary production for the conterminous United States derived from MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    A continuous measure of gross primary production for the conterminous United States derived from Berkeley National Laboratory, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Atmospheric Science Department Center Karlsruhe (FZK/IMK-IFU), Kreuzeckbahnstr, 19, 82467 Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany af Department

  8. United States Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Shorebird Conservation Plan M A N O M E T C E N T E R F O R C O N S E R V A T I O N T I O N #12;United States Shorebird Conservation Plan Council Organizations #12;1 U n i t e d S t a t e s S h o r e b i r d C o n s e r v a t i o n P l a n 2 0 0 1 The United States Shorebird

  9. Vortices and the effects of atmospheric density stratification Harish N Dixita

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Harish

    ,1 a Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore b Engineering Mechanics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore unsta- ble due to a centrifugal Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In the second problem, centrifugal effects

  10. Regional Review on Status and Trends in Aquaculture Development in North America: Canada and the United States of America — 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olin, Paul G.; Smith, James; Nabi, Rashed

    2012-01-01

    fuels since the industrial revolution. Researchers predict0.1 unit since the industrial revolution. Modellers predict

  11. FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesieutre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    to Questionnaire on PMU Installation and Maintenance. ”Monitoring Device Options SCADA PMU PPSM DFR Relay PowerInterest Energy Research  PMU    Phasor Measurement Unit 

  12. EM Headquarters Hosts British Research Scholar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – For the first time in four years, EM headquarters is hosting a research scholar from the United Kingdom.

  13. BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollander, Jack M.

    2011-01-01

    J. M. "United States Energy Alternatives to 2010 and Beyond:on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES). Chapterwith equivalent energy supply alternatives. Social research

  14. BNL-67852-AB CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANICS IN ATMOSPHERIC PARTICLES BY SINGLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the fundamental processes, which constitute the "aerosol atmospheric life cycle", i.e., primary emission at present to evaporate and ionize the components for time of flight mass spectroscopic analysis. SPLAT. The resolving power of the instrument in mass-to-charge units is 1000. The TOF- MS spectra are digitized

  15. Potential for Atmospheric-Driven Lead Paint Degradation in the South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Potential for Atmospheric-Driven Lead Paint Degradation in the South Coast Air Basin of California manuscript received September 27, 2009. Accepted October 8, 2009. Exposure to lead in paint or lead residuesUnitedStates.Componentsofphotochemicalsmog can increase the degradation of binders in lead paint, leading to increased release of lead pigment

  16. THE INCREASING CONCENTRATION OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2: HOW MUCH, WHEN, AND WHY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the world suggests that the atmospheric concentration of CO2 has varied considerably over geologic time consequence of the varying ratio of H to C is that different fuels have different rates of CO2 emissions per emissions when fuel consumption is expressed in energy units. Table 1: CO2 Emission Rates for Fossil

  17. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 73897400 Fire and biofuel contributions to annual mean aerosol mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 7389­7400 Fire and biofuel contributions to annual mean aerosol estimate the contributions from biomass burning (summer wildfires, other fires, residential biofuel, and industrial biofuel) to seasonal and annual aerosol concentrations in the United States. Our approach

  18. An Open-path Laser Transmissometer for Atmospheric Extinction Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandran, P. M. Satheesh; Krishnakumar, C. P.; Varma, Ravi [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut, Kerala 673 601 (India); Yuen, Wangki; Rood, Mark J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2011-10-20

    A transmissometer is an optical instrument which measures transmitted intensity of monochromatic light over a fixed pathlength. Prototype of a simple laser transmissometer has been developed for transmission (or extinction) measurements through suspended absorbers and scatterers in the atmosphere over tens of meters. Instrument consists of a continuous green diode pumped solid state laser, transmission optics, photodiode detectors and A/D data acquisition components. A modulated laser beam is transmitted and subsequently reflected and returned to the unit by a retroreflecting mirror assembly placed several tens of meters away. Results from an open-path field measurement of the instrument are described.

  19. Unit Clause: Summary Benny Applebaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, Benny

    Unit Clause: Summary Benny Applebaum Tel-Aviv University Spring Semester, 2012 #12;Unit Clause: Reminder Unit Clause Input: chosen uniformly from F3(n, rn). 1 If there exists unit clause (Forced step) pick at random unit clause { i} and satisfy it 2 Otherwise, (Free step) pick a random literal i

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  5. Voltage verification unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Edward J. (Virginia Beach, VA)

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  6. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use of...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Housing units are classified as urban or rural using definitions created by...

  9. Automatically clustering similar units for unit selection in speech synthesis. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W; Taylor, Paul A

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for synthesizing speech by concatenating sub-word units from a database of labelled speech. A large unit inventory is created by automatically clustering units of the same phone class ...

  10. Space Science: Atmospheres Evolution of planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    ;Atmospheres / Evolution Heat Sources Compressional Energy Trapped Radioactive Material Tidal InteractionsSpace Science: Atmospheres Part- 7a Evolution of planets Out-Gassing/ Volcanoes Evolution Initial Species Solar abundance Solar wind composition? Carbonaceous chondrites? Variables Early sun

  11. Equilibration of an atmosphere by geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Malte F. (Malte Friedrich)

    2013-01-01

    A major question for climate studies is to quantify the role of turbulent eddy fluxes in maintaining the observed atmospheric mean state. It has been argued that eddy fluxes keep the mid-latitude atmosphere in a state that ...

  12. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 20142015 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate Program in Land and Atmospheric Science at the University of Minnesota. It is a sciencebased interdisciplinary program focused on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore »and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  14. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) Capabilities for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J; Baskett, R; Simpson, M

    2010-03-08

    The Department of Energy's National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provides critical information during hazardous airborne releases as part of an integrated national preparedness and response strategy. Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC provides 24/7 tools and expert services to map the spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC graphical products show affected areas and populations, potential casualties, and health effect or protective action guideline levels. LLNL experts produce quality-assured analyses based on field data to assist decision makers and responders. NARAC staff and collaborators conduct research and development into new science, tools, capabilities, and technologies in strategically important areas related to airborne transport and fate modeling and emergency response. This paper provides a brief overview of some of NARAC's activities, capabilities, and research and development.

  15. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  16. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling...

  17. Congressional Research Service, Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    , confidential memos, expert testimony at Congressional hearings, and responses to inquiries about major policyCongressional Research Service, Research Associate Graduate Intern Behind the Capitol Building, the face of the Legislative Branch, lies the Congressional Research Service (CRS) which provides support

  18. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  19. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  20. A Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    D/Masters Applied Marine Physics Marine & Atmospheric Chemistry Marine Affairs & Policy (Masters Only) MarineA Recognized Leader in Marine & Atmospheric Studies Our graduate program has over 250 students University of MiaMi rosenstiel school of Marine & atMospheric science #12;Miami Ranks #5: fDi Magazine's Top

  1. Atmospheric evolution on Venus Bruce Fegley, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Atmospheric evolution on Venus Bruce Fegley, Jr. Planetary Chemistry Laboratory Department by Hunten et al. (1983), of Magellan results by Bougher et al. (1997), and atmospheric chemistry on Venus and Ancient Environments Edited by Vivien Gornitz January 2004 #12;2 ATMOSPHERIC EVOLUTION ON VENUS Overview

  2. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide David Archer,1 Michael Eby,2 Victor Brovkin,3 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere literature on the atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 and its impact on climate, and we present initial

  3. Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Arthur P

    2008-01-01

    A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

  4. APPLYING ADJUDICATION AS AN ALTERNATE DISPUTE RESOLUTION FOR CONSTRUCTION DISPUTES IN THE UNITED STATES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Nicholas

    2011-08-08

    This research will look at the possibility of applying the English system of Adjudication as an alternate dispute resolution technique (ADR) in the United States Construction Industry. I focused on Construction law adjudication in the United Kingdom...

  5. UNIT SELECTION ALGORITHM FOR JAPANESE SPEECH SYNTHESIS BASED ON BOTH PHONEME UNIT AND DIPHONE UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duh, Kevin

    UNIT SELECTION ALGORITHM FOR JAPANESE SPEECH SYNTHESIS BASED ON BOTH PHONEME UNIT AND DIPHONE UNIT ABSTRACT This paper proposes a novel unit selection algorithm for Japanese Text-To-Speech (TTS) systems, CV units are basic to con- catenative TTS systems for Japanese. However, speech syn- thesized with CV

  6. Conventional regression models Unlabelled units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Sampling bias in logistic models Peter effects #12;Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of conventional models 2 Unlabelled units Point

  7. Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9, CCTP; Dodson, Rustin

    1998-01-01

    UNIT 9: SPATIAL DATA CONVERSION Written by Rustin Dodson,Programs Page 1 Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion freezingPrograms Page 2 Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion Export USGS

  8. Best Buys and Unit Pricing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-02-02

    This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

  9. Atmospheric composition change - global and regional air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    in urban air. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2881–deep convective system. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 4,processes in atmospheric chemistry. Chemical Society Review

  10. Coupling of nitrous oxide and methane by global atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Hsu, J

    2010-01-01

    supported by NSF’s Atmospheric Chemistry program (grant ATM-Methane by Global Atmospheric Chemistry Michael J. Prathergas, through atmospheric chemistry that en- hances the

  11. Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew Waite

    2010-01-01

    and J. Viidanoja, Atmospheric chemistry of c 3 -c 6organic nitrates, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9 (4),organic aerosol yields, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  12. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. Twenty-fourth progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980`s became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  13. Office of Biological and Environmental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levels) ·Research Programs - Climate and Earth System Modeling (~$78) - Atmospheric Systems Research-scale, long-term field studies Process modeling with ties to earth- system models Funding to universities Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences Advanced Scientific Computing Research Nuclear Physics Biological Systems

  14. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  15. The value of United States oil and gas reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1996-01-01

    The object of this research is to estimate a time series, starting in 1979, for the value of in-ground oil reserves and natural gas reserves in the United States. Relatively good statistics exist for the physical quantities. ...

  16. Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method Chung-Li Tsengy,Chao-an Liz, Shmuel S. Oren x October 14, 1997 Abstract In this paper, we present an e cient and robust method for solving unit commit- ment problem using a unit decommitment method. 1 Introduction A problem that must be frequently solved

  17. Physics 1114: Unit 6 Homework Problem set 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mansell, Edward "Ted"

    Physics 1114: Unit 6 Homework Problem set 1 1. A rod 4.2 m long and 0.50 cm2 in cross. (a) Calculate the downward force (in N) of the atmosphere acting on the top of a table that measures in a hydraulic lift is 16 atm. What is the heaviest vehicle (kg) it can lift if the diameter of the output line

  18. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Design and Engineering of most components in the Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed System was completed prior to September 1992. The components remaining to be designed at that time were: Aerovalves for the Pulse Combustor; Gas and coal injectors for the Pulse Combustor; Lines for PC tailpipes; Air plenum and inlet silencer; Refractory lined hot gas duct connecting outlet hot cyclone to boiler; Structure and platforms, and ladders around PAFBC vessel access and major equipment. Design work is currently in progress on all of the above components. Items 1, 2, 3 and 4 are 50% completed, and items 5 6 are 75% complete.

  19. Observations and modelling of the global distribution and long-term trend of atmospheric 14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (IWR), University of Heidelberg, INF 368, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany, now at Electrical Engineering for Australian Weather and Climate Research / CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Private Bag No. 1 and sinks, using the coarse-grid carbon cycle model GRACE. Dedicated simulations of global trends and inter

  20. Goddard technologists are working on laser instrumentation that will characterize the Martian atmosphere and improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    , detectors, and other components needed to build a completesystem. Laser/Lidar Technologies for Exploration atmosphere and improve landing safety on Mars and other solar system bodies. First Nano Device to Fly Systems Research and Technology Funds Two Goddard researchers have received funding from

  1. Natalie Marie Mahowald Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing, Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Chemistry and 1 1 Natalie Marie Mahowald Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Director

  2. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the accuracy and precision of the models, while reducing epistemic uncertainties.

  3. Program Abstracts: Formation and Growth of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter H. McMurry; Markku Kulmala

    2006-09-07

    DOE provided $11,000 to sponsor the Workshop on New Particle Formation in the Atmosphere, which was held at The Riverwood Inn and Conference Center near Minneapolis, MN from September 7 to 9, 2006. Recent work has shown that new particle formation is an important atmospheric process that must be better understood due to its impact on cloud cover and the Earth's radiation balance. The conference was an informal gathering of atmospheric and basic scientists with expertise pertinent to this topic. The workshop included discussions of: • atmospheric modeling; • computational chemistry pertinent to clustering; • ions and ion induced nucleation; • basic laboratory and theoretical studies of nucleation; • studies on neutral molecular clusters; • interactions of organic compounds and sulfuric acid; • composition of freshly nucleated particles. Fifty six scientists attended the conference. They included 27 senior scientists, 9 younger independent scientists (assistant professor or young associate professor level), 7 postdocs, 13 graduate students, 10 women, 35 North Americans (34 from the U.S.), 1 Asian, and 20 Europeans. This was an excellent informal workshop on an important topic. An effort was made to include individuals from communities that do not regularly interact. A number of participants have provided informal feedback indicating that the workshop led to research ideas and possible future collaborations.

  4. Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial, modern, and doubled carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial generated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Climate System Model for the current climate are shown to be consistent with present day satellite and deposition data. The response

  5. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research facility in Oklahoma are used to develop detailed cloud climatology. Clouds

  6. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unit Buildings",19.1,4.4,3.7,6.2,4.7 "Mobile Homes",6.9,0.5,1.1,3.9,1.4 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",14.4,5.6,4.6,2.4,1.9 "1940 to 1949",5.2,1.3,1.4,1.6,0.9 "1950 to...

  8. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are thought to contribute to carbon sequestration, including current debates on this topic. The science regarding forestry and carbon sequestration is more advanced and less controversial than that for range, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  9. Labor Relations Unit Assignments 5/1/2014 Current ELR Unit Assignments 042814.xls 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Gina Harwood H 1009388 Adult Infusion Bulkly Gina Harwood H 1009792 Adult IV Infusion Center Gina Biology & Human Anatomy: MED Veronica Busby H 1009649 Center for Nursing Research Julia Halladay S MTEC Harwood H 1009691 Clinical Nurse Specialists Julia Halladay #12;Labor Relations Unit Assignments 5

  10. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Current Research Portfolio...

  11. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  12. Atmosphere contamination following repainting of a human hyperbaric chamber complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Morris, J.W.; Caldwell, J.M.; Balk, D.M.; Flynn, E.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The Naval Medical Research Institute currently conducts hyperbaric research in a Man-Rated Chamber Complex (MRCC) originally installed in 1977. Significant engineering alterations to the MRCC and rusting of some of its interior sections necessitated repainting, which was completed in 1988. Great care was taken in selecting an appropriate paint (polyamide epoxy) and in ensuring correct application and curing procedures. Only very low levels of hydrocarbons were found in the MRCC atmosphere before initial pressurization after painting and curing. After pressurization, however, significant chemical contamination was found. The primary contaminants were aromatic hydrocarbons: xylenes (which were a major component of both the primer and topcoat paint) and ethyl benzene. The role that pressure played in stimulating off-gassing from the paint is not clear; the off-gassing rate was observed to be similar over a large range in chamber pressures from 1.6 to 31.0 atm abs. Scrubbing the chamber atmosphere with the chemical absorbent Purafil was effective in removing the contaminants. Contamination has been observed to slowly decline with chamber use and is expected to continue to improve with time. However, this contamination experience emphasizes the need for a high precision gas analysis program at any diving facility to ensure the safety of the breathing gas and chamber atmosphere.

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1981-02-01

    Separate absracts were prepared for the 15 sections of this progress report which is a description of atmospheric research at PNL organized in terms of the following energy technologies: coal, gas and oil; fission and fusion; and oil shale. (KRM)

  14. Undergraduate Research Project: Computer Modeling of Nanotube Embedded Chemicapacitive Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    by the deadly anthrax attacks on the United States in 20025 , has made the detection of contaminants even more of this undergraduate research project is to elucidate the properties of such a device proposed by the United States throughout this project. I am also indebted to the United States Army Research Laboratory for the funding

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D.L.

    2000-02-16

    The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

  16. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. WILLIAMS

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  17. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The design of the Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) as described in the Quarterly Report for the period April--June, 1992 was reviewed and minor modifications were included. The most important change made was in the coal/limestone preparation and feed system. Instead of procuring pre-sized coal for testing of the PAFBC, it was decided that the installation of a milling system would permit greater flexibility in the testing with respect to size distributions and combustion characteristics in the pulse combustor and the fluid bed. Particle size separation for pulse combustor and fluid bed will be performed by an air classifier. The modified process flow diagram for the coal/limestone handling system is presented in Figure 1. The modified process flow diagrams of the fluidized bed/steam cycle and ash handling systems are presented in Figures 2 and 3, respectively.

  18. Handbook for the Conduct of Research and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Chart 4 2014 Council on Research Membership 5 Research Compliance 5 Review Boards 5 Responsible Conduct of Research 5 Financial Conflict of Interest 5 Export Control Laws 6 Conflict of Commitment 6 Lab Closeout in the United States, and the research endeavor at LSU is defined as part of the core mission of Flagship 2020

  19. The search for exomoons and the characterization of exoplanet atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campanella, Giammarco

    2009-01-01

    Since planets were first discovered outside our own Solar System in 1992 (around a pulsar) and in 1995 (around a main sequence star), extrasolar planet studies have become one of the most dynamic research fields in astronomy. Now that more than 370 exoplanets have been discovered, focus has moved from finding planets to characterise these alien worlds. As well as detecting the atmospheres of these exoplanets, part of the characterisation process undoubtedly involves the search for extrasolar moons. A review on the current situation of exoplanet characterization is presented in Chapter 3. We focus on the characterization of transiting planets orbiting very close to their parent star since for them we can already probe their atmospheric constituents. By contrast, the second part of the Chapter is dedicated to the search for extraterrestrial life, both within and beyond the Solar System. The characteristics of the Habitable Zone and the markers for the presence of life (biosignatures) are detailed. In Chapter 4 ...

  20. Mathematical structure of unit systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Kitano

    2013-05-04

    We investigate the mathematical structure of unit systems and the relations between them. Looking over the entire set of unit systems, we can find a mathematical structure that is called preorder (or quasi-order). For some pair of unit systems, there exists a relation of preorder such that one unit system is transferable to the other unit system. The transfer (or conversion) is possible only when all of the quantities distinguishable in the latter system are always distinguishable in the former system. By utilizing this structure, we can systematically compare the representations in different unit systems. Especially, the equivalence class of unit systems (EUS) plays an important role because the representations of physical quantities and equations are of the same form in unit systems belonging to an EUS. The dimension of quantities is uniquely defined in each EUS. The EUS's form a partially ordered set. Using these mathematical structures, unit systems and EUS's are systematically classified and organized as a hierarchical tree.