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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

2

Atmospheric Mercury Research Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary and analysis of research findings on utility and environmental mercury from 1997 to 2003. The update categorizes and describes recent work on mercury in utility-burned coal and its route through power plants, the measures for its control, and its fate in the environment following emissions from utility stacks. This fate includes atmospheric chemistry and transport, deposition to land and water surfaces, aquatic cycling, the dynamics of mercury in freshwater fish food webs, and th...

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

4

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

5

COOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNITS2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The CRU program expects to continue to work with cooperators in identify- ing high priority hiring actions Cooperators' Coalition (NCC) for the CRU program, which targets efforts in CRU to (i) find new ways to workCOOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNITS2009 Year In Review PROGRAM YEAR IN REVIEW In Fiscal Year (FY) 2009

6

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELSEVIER AtmosphericResearch 38 (1995) 207-235 ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH On the parameterization of ice and water substance mixing ratio fields were only strongly altered by turning off the ice phase of these schemes includes ice processes. But in mid- latitudes and also in tropics the ice phase is an important

Moelders, Nicole

7

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

8

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

9

The NCAR Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) facility developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will support observational research on the structure of the atmospheric surface layer. ASTER will provide state-...

J. A. Businger; W. F. Dabberdt; A. C. Delany; T. W. Horst; C. L. Martin; S. P. Oncley; S. R. Semmer

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED •I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

12

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

14

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

15

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

16

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

17

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

18

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH FY-1979, CHAPTER IN THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California atmospheric aerosols," Environ. Sci. Technol. ll•suspensions," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,formation," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Oil Shale Research in the United States | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research in the United States Oil Shale Research in the United States Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories, and Public...

20

Oil Shale Research in the United States | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Shale Research in the United States Oil Shale Research in the United States Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research [EVS Program Area]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Science and Climate Research Atmospheric Science and Climate Research EVS research, combined with portable, high-performance climate and weather applications, offers a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. In an ever-changing, dynamic climate, we measure, model, and analyze atmospheric processes that are vital to understanding our planet. Our measurement capabilities range from remote sensing and surface meteorology instruments to instrumentation designed to quantify the land-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and greenhouse gases. Modeling capabilities begin with regional-scale climate, air quality, and aerosol modeling and extend to global chemical transport models, general circulation models of the atmosphere, models of the biosphere, and coupled Earth system models.

22

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

23

Error Structure and Atmospheric Temperature Trends in Observations from the Microwave Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar-orbiting satellites measures the atmospheric temperature from the surface to the lower stratosphere under all weather conditions, excluding ...

Cheng-Zhi Zou; Mei Gao; Mitchell D. Goldberg

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2010, DOESC-ARM-10-029 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

25

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2011, DOESC-ARM-11-022 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

26

Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research  

SciTech Connect

Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

27

Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Day) Day) Process: Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Dist. Units Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Operating Capacity Idle Operable Capacity Operable Utilization Rate Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Process Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 15,283 15,709 16,327 16,490 16,306 16,162 1985-2013 PADD 1 1,134 1,188 1,178 1,142 1,122 1,130 1985-2013 East Coast 1,077 1,103 1,080 1,058 1,031 1,032 1985-2013 Appalachian No. 1 57 85 98 84 90 97 1985-2013 PADD 2 3,151 3,087 3,336 3,572 3,538 3,420 1985-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 2,044 1,947 2,069 2,299 2,330 2,266 1985-2013

28

Does the Surface Pressure Equal the Weight per Unit Area of a Hydrostatic Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common statement that the surface pressure in a hydrostatic atmosphere is equal to the weight per unit area of the air aloft is shown to be true only for a Cartesian world. Here the unit area is the surface area of the base of the atmospheric ...

Peter R. Bannon; Craig H. Bishop; James B. Kerr

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Clear Skies S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. A. Clough S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by- line mode! then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. consistent with downlooking data taken with the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) (Smith et al. 1983) from 20 km and with simultaneous data taken

30

Asking the Right Questions: Atmospheric Sciences Research and Societal Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, those who conduct federally funded research in the United States have been asked by their patrons, the public and their elected representatives, to demonstrate more efficacy with respect to societal needs. Although there is a ...

Roger A. Pielke Jr.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

Dupont, DL

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

32

Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Atmospheric ammonia and particulate inorganic nitrogen over the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use in situ observations from the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network, the Midwest Ammonia Monitoring Project, 11 surface site campaigns as well as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding ...

Heald, Colette L.

34

UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.BJ' 1-7 I I .BJ' 1-7 I I .* , UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS P. 0. BOX E OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE 37830 AREA CODE 615 TELEPHONE 483.8611 March 10, 1977 Assistant Director for Health Protection, DSSC-HQ ATTN: R. H. Kennedy, DSSC-HQ ERDA RESURVEY PROGRAM: JOSLYN STAINLESS STEEL COMPANY, FORT WAYNE, INDIANA On October 23, 1976, H. W. Dickson and I visited the subject site to reassess the radiological status of those facilities utilized under AEC/MED contract during 1944-49 and to determine the need for a formal ERDA/ORNL survey. Discussions were held with Mr. Edwin E. Hodgess, Jr., Vice President-Operations who provided information on the AEC operations and identified those parts of the plant which were involved.

35

Atmospheric Processes Associated with Summer Floods and Droughts in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistent wet and dry events over the central United States are examined during summer. Composites based on selected persistent wet and dry events reveal common atmospheric processes and circulation features. During summer, heavy precipitation ...

Kingtse C. Mo; J. Nogues Paegle; R. Wayne Higgins

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Atmospheric Moisture Transport over the United States and Mexico as Evaluated in the NCEP Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale atmospheric hydrologic cycle over the United States and Mexico derived from the 23-yr NCEP regional reanalysis (RR) was evaluated by comparing the RR products with satellite estimates, independent sounding data, and the ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Muthuvel Chelliah; Marco L. Carrera; R. Wayne Higgins; Wesley Ebisuzaki

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Impacts of Increased Atmospheric CO2 on the Hydroclimate of theWestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional-scale projections of climate change signals due to increases in atmospheric CO2 are generated for the western United States using a regional climate model (RCM) nested within two global scenarios from a GCM. The downscaled control ...

Jinwon Kim; Tae-Kook Kim; Raymond W. Arritt; Norman L. Miller

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Trends in Atmospheric Transmission at Three Locations in the United States from 1940 to 1977  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pyrheliometric measurements at three locations in the United States axe examined to determine if there are trends in atmospheric transmission. Although the radiation values at Madison are depressed in the 1940's because of local pollution, ...

Douglas V. Hoyt; Charles P. Turner; Robert D. Evans

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Atmospheric Rivers and Flooding over the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper undertakes a hydrometeorological analysis of flood events in the central United States. Vertically integrated horizontal water vapor transport over 1979–2011 is calculated in the ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim) and used in an ...

David A. Lavers; Gabriele Villarini

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Community Hydrometeorology Laboratory for Fostering Collaborative Research by the Atmospheric and Hydrologic Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new community laboratory for fostering collaborative research between the atmospheric and hydrologic sciences communities is described. This facility, located at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, allows ...

Thomas T. Warner; David N. Yates; George H. Leavesley

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Atmospheric Science Program. Summaries of research in FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report provides descriptions for all projects funded by ESD under annual contracts in FY 1994. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than one year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states it goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - EM met a major regulatory milestone at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) by completing construction of enclosures and ventilation systems required for cleanup. The SPRU project at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory reached the milestone last week in a consent order between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act. The Department has now accomplished all the requirements of the consent order.

44

Fisheries Employment in Cooperative Research Units: Where  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venture among the federal government (USGS), a state natural resource agency, and a state host university, and other state and federal agencies may also serve as cooperators at various units. The three-point mission natural resource agencies and universities. Federal and state agencies are afforded access to Unit

Kwak, Thomas J.

45

Medical student dermatology research in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CD, Cross PC, The value of medical student research: theMedical student dermatology research in the United States1): 8 The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX.

Wagner, Richard F MD; PharmD, Boris Ioffe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

RESEARCH Open Access Choice in maternity care: associations with unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Open Access Choice in maternity care: associations with unit supply, geographic European countries, current trends in maternity unit closures create a context in which user choice may women's choice of maternity unit. We study here how pregnant women's choices interact with the distance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

48

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

49

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

50

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prediction in the atmosphere. Masters thesis, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, ColoradoColorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR) Quarterly Report No on the DoD Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research at Colorado State University, please access our web

51

Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Atmospheric System Research (ASR) » Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

52

Grey Prediction of Corrosion on the First Oil Atmospheric Distillation Unite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion is a serious problem on the first atmospheric distillation unit when the plant refines high-acid crude oil from Shengli Oil Field. To measure and predict the corrosion and related factors is significant tasks in refinery. The GM(1,1) model ... Keywords: grey system theory, DGM model, Verhulst model

Zhengfang Wang; Shuling Liu; Hui Qi; Shiwei Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Separations Process Research Unit -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separations Process Research Unit - Separations Process Research Unit - 024 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Separations Process Research Unit (024) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This facility was constructed and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission as a pilot plant for developing and testing the chemical processes to extract both uranium and plutonium from irradiated fuel. Through Fiscal Year 1999 the Department of Energy's Office of Naval Reactors performed surveillance and maintenance activities. In Fiscal Year 2000, a contract was initiated to begin the characterization of the facilities. This will be

54

United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security September 16, 2013 - 11:18am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 VIENNA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Director General of the Russian Federation State Corporation "Rosatom" Sergey Kirienko today signed the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation on Cooperation in Nuclear- and Energy-Related Scientific Research and Development on the margins of the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference in Vienna, Austria. The Agreement provides the legal framework necessary to expand cooperation

55

UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

October 13, 1976 October 13, 1976 Mr. D. C. McCarter, Works Manager Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation Post Office Box 91 Watervliet, New York El89 Dear Mr. McCarter: FADIOMGICAL STATUS OF AL-TECH FACILITIES UTILIZED IN EARLY ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION CONTRACT WORK On August 19, 1976, representatives of the Energy Research and Development Administration visited the Al-Tech plant located on Spring Street Road in Watervliet, New York, to reevaluate the radiological status of the subject facilities. Rationale underlying this ERDA effort was indicated in the introductory letter to you dated August 5, 1976, from William T. Thornton of !ny staff. Based on our finding that (1) radiation levels as measured in the plant are indistinguishable from naturally occurring background levels, (2) ARC con-

56

Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Name United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Address International Environment House Chemin des Anémones 11-13 CH-1219 Châtelaine Place Geneva, Switzerland Phone number +41 22 917 8400 Website http://www.unitar.org/ References http://www.unitar.org/ No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization "The United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) is making concrete contributions to developing the capacities of tens of thousands of people around the world. Since its inception in 1965, UNITAR has built sustainable partnerships acquiring unique expertise and accumulating

59

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR) Quarterly Report No research of Professor Steven Reising, of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (located under at Colorado State University, please access our web page at http

60

Atmospheric Research Using Kites: Here We Go Again!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent campaign on Christmas Island in the equatorial Pacific has demonstrated that, at least under some conditions, simple and relatively inexpensive kites can serve as effective platforms for continuous monitoring of the tree atmosphere. ...

B. B. Balsley; C. L. Baisley; J. B. Williams; G. W. Tyrrell

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security United States, Russia Sign Agreement to Further Research and Development Collaboration in Nuclear Energy and Security September 16, 2013 - 11:18am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 VIENNA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Director General of the Russian Federation State Corporation "Rosatom" Sergey Kirienko today signed the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Russian Federation on Cooperation in Nuclear- and Energy-Related Scientific Research and Development on the margins of the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference in Vienna, Austria. The Agreement provides the legal framework necessary to expand cooperation

62

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

Schrempf, R.E. [ed.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

United States Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008 Dr. Antone L. Brooks tbrooks@tricity.wsu.edu September 2012 Review Draft i Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. v Summary ........................................................................................................................................ vi Acronyms and Initialisms ............................................................................................................. vii Chapter 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1

64

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

66

An Instrumented Aircraft for Atmospheric Research in New Zealand and the South Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Zealand Meteorological Service has instrumented a Fokker Friendship F27 aircraft as part of its research program in meteorology and the atmospheric sciences. The aircraft, which has large underwing pylons to carry sampling probes, has ...

H. R. Larsen; G. W. Fisher; R. A. Knobben; I. S. Lechner; M. J. Harvey

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Research Opportunities from Emerging Atmospheric Observing and Modeling Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Second Prospectus Development Team (PDT-2) of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged with identifying research opportunities that are best matched to emerging operational and experimental measurement and modeling methods. The ...

Walter F. Dabberdt; Thomas W. Schlatter

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1994 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) occurs in conjunction with the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) and with the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Program. Solicitations for proposals and peer review were used to select research projects for funding in FY 1995. Nearly all ongoing projects were brought to a close in FY 1994. Therefore, the articles in this volume include a summary of the long-term accomplishments as well as the FY 1994 progress made on these projects. The following articles present summaries of the progress in FY 1994 under these research tasks: continental and oceanic fate of pollutants; research aircraft operations; ASCOT program management; coupling/decoupling of synoptic and valley circulations; interactions between surface exchange processes and atmospheric circulations; and direct simulations of atmospheric turbulence. Climate change research at PNL is aimed at reducing uncertainties in the fundamental processes that control climate systems that currently prevent accurate predictions of climate change and its effects. PNL is responsible for coordinating and integrating the field and laboratory measurement programs, modeling studies, and data analysis activities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program. In FY 1994, PNL scientists conducted 3 research projects under the ARM program. In the first project, the sensitivity of GCM grid-ad meteorological properties to subgrid-scale variations in surface fluxes and subgrid-scale circulation patterns is being tested in a single column model. In the second project, a new and computationally efficient scheme has been developed for parameterizing stratus cloud microphysics in general circulation models. In the last project, a balloon-borne instrument package is being developed for making research-quality measurements of radiative flux divergence profiles in the lowest 1,500 meters of the Earth`s atmosphere.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Research, Washington, DC (United States) Sandia National Labs.,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

584878 SAND--95-2914 GeoEnergy technology 1980-12-31 USDOE Office of Energy 584878 SAND--95-2914 GeoEnergy technology 1980-12-31 USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States) Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States) English 2010-02-18 Technical Report http://www.osti.gov/geothermal/servlets/purl/584878-P1qAuZ/webviewable/ http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id=584878 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; COAL; PETROLEUM; NATURAL GAS; SYNTHETIC PETROLEUM; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; ENERGY CONVERSION; PRODUCTION; HEAT EXTRACTION; US DOE; IN-SITU GASIFICATION; ENHANCED RECOVERY; COAL LIQUEFACTION; GEOTHERMAL WELLS Geothermal Legacy 894529 894529 Use of Geothermal Energy for Aquaculture Purposes - Phase III Johnson, W.C.; Smith, K.C. 1981-09-01 USDOE Geo-Heat Center, Klamath Falls, OR English

70

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER FOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVER OF U.S. AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION MADE UNDER LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY SUBCONTRACT NO. 6911373 WITH UNITED TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH CENTER. W(l) 2012-009; CH-1609 The Petitioner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) , has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights in the following invention and any related patent applications : DOE Docket No.: S-127 , 171 Title : "Fuel-Flexible Fuel Injector" Abstract: a fuel injector and pre-mixer for an industrial gas turbine. The above-identified subject invention was made under subcontract 6911373 between UTRC and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) , which is managed and operated by The University of California under the prime contract DE-AC02-

71

Uncertainties in (E)UV model atmosphere fluxes (Research Note)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. During the comparison of synthetic spectra calculated with two NLTE model atmosphere codes, namely TMAP and TLUSTY, we encounter systematic differences in the EUV fluxes due to the treatment of level dissolution by pressure ionization. Aims. In the case of Sirius B, we demonstrate an uncertainty in modeling the EUV flux reliably in order to challenge theoreticians to improve the theory of level dissolution. Methods. We calculated synthetic spectra for hot, compact stars using state-of-the-art NLTE model-atmosphere techniques. Results. Systematic differences may occur due to a code-specific cutoff frequency of the H I Lyman bound-free opacity. This is the case for TMAP and TLUSTY. Both codes predict the same flux level at wavelengths lower than about 1500 Å for stars with effective temperatures (Teff) below about 30 000 K only, if the same cutoff frequency is chosen. Conclusions. The theory of level dissolution in high-density plasmas, which is available for hydrogen only should be generalized to all species. Especially, the cutoff frequencies for the bound-free opacities should be defined in order to make predictions of UV fluxes more reliable.

T. Rauch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

73

Program on Technology Innovation: Coastal Halogen Atmospheric Research on Mercury Deposition (CHARMeD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining mercury’s atmospheric transformation reactions is essential for atmospheric deposition models that are used for regulatory purposes. It is the oxidation of inorganic elemental Hg (Hg0) to its water-soluble ionic form (Hg2+) that determines the rate of Hg deposited in waterways. Substantial research has been done in the past on atmospheric Hg transformation reactions with ozone (O3) and the hydroxyl radical (OH), but O3 and OH may not be capable of fully causing mercury’s observed oxidation an...

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

75

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

United Technologies Research Center 8-kW prototype wind system. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center 8 kW prototype wind system underwent testing at the Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center from April 1980 through August 1980. During atmospheric testing, the machine survived wind speeds of 30.8 m/s (69 mph) without incurring damage and proved it was capable of meeting the design specification for power production (8 kW at 9 m/s - 20 mph). Erratic cycling of the generator speed detector was the only operational problem encountered. Vibration tests indicated the first and second bending modes of the tower were excited during actual machine operation, but modifications were not required. Noise measurements revealed that sound pressure levels of the UTRC are within an acceptable range and should pose no barriers to machine use.

Higashi, K. K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Characteristics of Drought and Persistent Wet Spells over the United States in the Atmosphere–Land–Ocean Coupled Model Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmosphere–land–ocean coupled model simulations are examined to diagnose the ability of models to simulate drought and persistent wet spells over the United States. A total of seven models are selected for this study. They are three versions of ...

Kingtse C. Mo; Lindsey N. Long; Jae-Kyung E. Schemm

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER, FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A SUBTIER CONTRACT UNDER SUBCONTRACT A SUBTIER CONTRACT UNDER SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000009920 UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-000R22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-04-010 [ORO-787] Petitioner, United Technologies Research Center(UTRC), has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under a subtier contract under Subcontract No 4000009920 with Capstone Turbine Corporation under DOE Prime Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of this work is to build upon prior work related to the development of an integrated cooling, heating, and power (CHP) system. Under this subtier contract with Capstone Turbine Corporation, UTRC will be responsible for performing detailed technology characterization and benefits quantification for three promising

79

REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER, FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000009518 UNDER DOE SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000009518 UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-01- 026 [ORO-766] Petitioner, United Technologies Research Center, has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Subcontract No 4000009518 under DOE Prime Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of this work is to develop a building combined heat and power (BCHP) system. In a BCHP, microturbines, high temperature fuel cells, and combinations of each produce electric power at the site while exhaust gas from the power plants is utilized to produce cooling, refrigeration, space heating, hot water and dehumidification for the building. This work is sponsored by the Office of Distributed Energy Resources, Office of Power Technologies.

80

Millimeter-Wavelength Radars: New Frontier in Atmospheric Cloud and Precipitation Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past 20 yr there has been substantial progress on the development and application of millimeter-wavelength (3.2 and 8.6 mm, corresponding to frequencies of 94 and 35 GHz) radars in atmospheric cloud research, boosted by continuous ...

P. Kollias; E. E. Clothiaux; M. A. Miller; B. A. Albrecht; G. L. Stephens; T. P. Ackerman

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model: CCM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3) is described. The changes in both physical and dynamical formulation from CCM2 to CCM3 are presented. The major differences in CCM3 compared ...

J. T. Kiehl; J. J. Hack; G. B. Bonan; B. A. Boville; D. L. Williamson; P. J. Rasch

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics  

SciTech Connect

Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

5-Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory Five Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere FY2001-FY2005 NETL PM Research Program Ambient Sampling & Analysis Control Technology R&D Source Characterization Predictive Modeling -iii- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B. Outlook for PM and the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. Program Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Current Program Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1. The Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

84

ATMOSPHERIC ~ ~ RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cloud para- meterization schemes (cumulus parameterization and ice parameterization) were used parameterization used in chemical transport model appreciably affects gas phase and aqueous chemistry calculations on the influence of different cloud treatment in a chemical transport model on gas phase distribution Nicole M61

Moelders, Nicole

85

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

86

Medical student dermatology research in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PC, The value of medical student research: the experience atfor successful medical student research, new mechanisms ofbenchwork. Medical student research activity increased

Wagner, Richard F MD; PharmD, Boris Ioffe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Technical Sessions Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Principal Investigator: S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 Introduction The availability of a rapid highly accurate multiple scattering radiative transfer model is essential to meet the objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The model must be capable of computing radiance at spectral intervals consistent with the monochromatic spectral variation of the atmospheric molecular absorption. The resolution of the spectrometers to be deployed at the ARM sites, 0.1 cm-1 and less, will provide an important assessment of our capability to perform radiative transfer calculations in the multiply scattered environment. A second important application forthe high-accuracy high-resolution model is to provide parameterizations and validations for

88

Summary of Breakout Sessions D. A. Randall National Center for Atmospheric Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakout Sessions Breakout Sessions D. A. Randall National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder CO 80307-3000 J. T. Kiehl Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 M. Bradley Lawrence Livermore National. Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550 Discussion of Intensive Operation Periods (lOPs) The group made several recommendations for lOPs in general. One of the main points was that members of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team should be given as much advance notification as possible of planned or potential lOPs. The group also recommended that a lead scientist be appointed for each lOP. This scientist should have expertise in the topic of primary focus of the lOP. The lead scientist's main responsibility would be to make sure that the operations carried out in the lOP

89

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

90

The Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar: A Collaboration to Enhance Research and Teaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A group of scientists from three universities across two different states and from one federal research laboratory joined together to build and deploy two mobile C-band Doppler weather radars to enhance research and promote meteorological ...

Michael I. Biggerstaff; Louis J. Wicker; Jerry Guynes; Conrad Ziegler; Jerry M. Straka; Erik N. Rasmussen; Arthur Doggett IV; Larry D. Carey; John L. Schroeder; Chris Weiss

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Evgueni Kassianov Evgueni Kassianov NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent Holben Holben , , & AERONET Team & AERONET Team Collaboration involving: Collaboration involving: NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC 4S 4S TAR TAR : : S S pectrometer for pectrometer for S S ky ky - - S S canning, canning, S S un un - - T T racking racking A A tmospheric tmospheric R R esearch esearch 4STAR: 4STAR: Spectrometer Spectrometer for for Sky Sky - - Scanning Scanning , , Sun Sun - - Tracking Tracking Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Research

92

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Anomalous North Pacific Atmospheric Circulation and Large Winter Floods in the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specific anomalous atmospheric circulation conditions over the North Pacific are conducive to the occurrence of the largest winter floods (?10-yr return period) on rivers in six hydroclimatic subregions of Arizona and southern Utah, Nevada, and ...

Lisa L. Ely; Yehouda Enzel; Daniel R. Cayan

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Improved Time to Publication in Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timely publication of manuscripts is important to authors and readers. AGU has significantly accelerated both the review and production processes for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres (JGR-Atmospheres). Via a number of mechanisms (e.g., shortening the time allotted for reviewer selection, manuscript reviews, and revisions), the mean time to first decision has been decreased from 98 days in 2007 to 50 days in 2011, and the mean time to final decision has been decreased from 132 days in 2007 to 71 days in 2011. By implementing a new content management system, adjusting the workflow for improved efficiency, requesting authors to proofread their manuscripts quicker, and improving monitoring and follow-up to author and vendor queries, the mean production time from manuscript acceptance to publication has been decreased from 128 days in 2010 to only 56 days in 2012. Thus, in the past few years the mean time to publication of JGRAtmospheres has been cut in half. These milestones have been achieved with no loss of quality of presentation or content. In addition, online posting of "papers in press" on JGR-Atmosphere’s home page typically occurs within a few days after acceptance. JGR-Atmospheres editors thank manuscript reviewers, authors, and AGU staff who have greatly contributed to the more timely review and publication processes. This information will be updated periodically on the JGR-Atmospheres home page. A chart showing the average time from acceptance to publication for all of AGU’s journals is available at http://www.agu.org/pubs/pdf/31May2012_Timeliness_Chart.pdf.

de Gouw, Joost A.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pryor, Sara; Rudich, Yinon; Zhang, Renyi

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

Atmospheric performance of the special-purpose Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thin-airfoil family  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), in cooperation with SeaWest Energy Group, has completed extensive atmospheric testing of the special-purpose SERI thin-airfoil family during the 1990 wind season. The purpose of this test program was to experimentally verify the predicted performance characteristics of the thin-airfoil family on a geometrically optimized blade, and to compare it to original-equipment blades under atmospheric wind conditions. The tests were run on two identical Micon 65/13 horizontal-axis wind turbines installed side-by-side in a wind farm. The thin-airfoil family 7.96 m blades were installed on one turbine, and AeroStar 7.41 m blades were installed on the other. This paper presents final performance results of the side-by-side comparative field test for both clean and dirty blade conditions. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Tangler, J; Smith, B; Jager, D; Olsen, T

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J.-F. Louis J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 The main purpose of the ARM program is to provide the necessary data to develop, test and validate the parameterization of clouds and of their interactions with the radiation field, and the computation of radiative transfer in climate models. For the most part, however, the ARM observations will be imperfect, incomplete, redundant, indirect, and unrepresentative. This is unavoidable, despite the best efforts at equipping the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site with the best instruments. To understand these limitations, we must consider the structure of a climate model and the observation constraints. The basic prognostic variables of any climate mode! are atmospheric temperature, horizontal wind components

97

Single-Column Modeling C. J. Walcek Atmospheric Sciences Research Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. J. Walcek C. J. Walcek Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction intense mid latitude cyclone developed and traversed this domain, allowing one to investigate cloud cover under a wide variety of meteorological environments. Large-scale numerical models of the atmosphere approximate the heterogeneous or subgrid-scale nature of cloudiness by assuming that a fraction of each grid area is occupied by clouds. This cloud cover fraction is used to apportion cloud effects into a "grid-averaged" forcing within areas that contain a mixture of clear and cloudy regions. Most models of tropospheric dynamics assume that the fractional cloud coverage is determined by the grid- averaged relative humidity, stability, or resolvable-scale

98

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

Investigation of the Summer Climate of the Contiguous United States and Mexico Using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part I: Model Climatology (1950–2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fifty-three years of the NCEP–NCAR Reanalysis I are dynamically downscaled using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to generate a regional climate model (RCM) climatology of the contiguous United States and Mexico. Data from the RAMS ...

Christopher L. Castro; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Jimmy O. Adegoke

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Research priorities for airborne particulates matter in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Despite substantial progress in reducing air pollution over the past 30 years, particulates remain a poorly understood health concern that requires further study. The article provides a brief overview of the work of an independent National Research Council (NRC) Committee on particulate matter (PM). It highlights the committee's process for developing during its deliberations. It reflects on the committee as a potential model to provide guidance on a broad research area in which findings may have significant policy implications. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Samet, J.; Wassle, R.; Holmes, K.J.; Abt, E.; Bakshi, K. [John Hopkins University (US). Bloomberg School of Public Health

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Multiyear Regional Climate Hindcast for the Western United States Using the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparation for studying the effects of increased CO2 on the hydrologic cycle in the western United States, an 8-yr hindcast was performed using a regional climate model (RCM) driven by the large-scale forcing from the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis. ...

Jinwon Kim; Jung-Eun Lee

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Sea Fog Research in the United Kingdom and United States: A Historical Essay Including Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A historical review of research on sea fog is presented. The period of interest is essentially the twentieth century, beginning with the celebrated work of G. I. Taylor in the aftermath of the Titanic tragedy. It has been argued that relative ...

J. M. Lewis; D. Kora?in; K. T. Redmond

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Technical Sessions J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and Environment Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-F. Louis -F. Louis Atmospheric and Environment Research, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02139 curve fitting and statistical interpolation.lrl fitting techniques, the fields are represented locally by analytical spline functions whose coefficients are determined by a least square method. Somewhat simpler malthematically, and more often used, statistical interpolation defines the value of the field at each grid point as the weighted average of nearby data. The Cressman and the Barnes techniques are two examples of statistical interpolation, which differ mainly by the shape of the weighting ful1ction. Generally, several passes through thedataare performed with different weighting functions, making successive corrections to the field to get as much information as possible out of the data.

106

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Implementation of a Two-Way Interactive Atmospheric and Ecological Model and Its Application to the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and ecosystem (CENTURY) modeling system has been developed to study regional-scale two-way interactions between the atmosphere and biosphere. Both atmospheric forcings and ecological ...

Lixin Lu; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Glen E. Liston; William J. Parton; Dennis Ojima; Melannie Hartman

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

Patrick Matthews

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

Elderkin, C.E.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Atmospheric Flow Applied to Wind Energy Research.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High resolution atmospheric flow modeling using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has many applications in the wind energy industry. A well designed model can accurately calculate… (more)

Russell, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 41 ,particles from an urban aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 26 ,carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols. Journal of Aerosol

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Summer Land–Atmosphere Coupling Strength over the United States: Results from the Regional Climate Model RegCM4–CLM3.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the land–atmosphere coupling strength during summer over the United States using the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4)–Community Land Model version 3.5 (CLM3.5). First, a 10-yr simulation driven with reanalysis ...

Rui Mei; Guiling Wang; Huanghe Gu

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER (UTRC) FOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER (UTRC) FOR UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER (UTRC) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-01NT41254 ENTITLED "DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH LATENT EFFECTIVENESS ENERGY RECOVERY VENTILATOR WITH INTEGRATION INTO ROOFTOP PACKAGE EQUIPMENT"; W(A)-02-006, CH1090. UTRC has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights on behalf of its parent company, United Technologies Corporation (UTC)to inventions its employees may conceive or first actually reduce to practice in the performance of Contract No. DE-FC26- 01NT41254. As brought out in the attached waiver petition, the scope of work includes developing and optimizing the design of an energy recovery ventilator air-to-air heat exchanger (ERV) that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Solar collector related research and development in the United States for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the research funded by the Research and Development Branch of the Heating and Cooling Division of Solar Energy of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration is described. Specifically, collector and collector materials research is reported on during FY-1977. The R and D Branch has funded research in open and closed cycle liquid heating flat plate collectors, air heating flat plate collectors, heat pipe collectors, concentrating collectors, collector heat transfer studies, honeycomb glazings, evacuated tube collectors, ponds both salt gradient and viscosity stabilized, materials exposure testing, collector testing standards, absorber surface coatings, and corrosion studies. A short description of the nature of the research is provided as well as a presentation of the significant results.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the contamination. • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste including debris deemed to be potential source material, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Pat Matthews

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder Atmosphere (PATMOS) Climate Dataset: A Resource for Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the joint National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Pathfinder program, the NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) has created ...

Herbert Jacobowitz; Larry L. Stowe; George Ohring; Andrew Heidinger; Kenneth Knapp; Nicholas R. Nalli

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

meeting summary: Future Directions for Research on Meter- and Submeter-Scale Atmospheric Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1970s, tremendous progress was made in the physics of atmospheric finescale turbulence. In subsequent decades, effort in this field has languished. Although many scientific and technological problems associated with finescale turbulence ...

Andreas Muschinski; Donald H. Lenschow

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Historical Research in the Atmospheric Sciences: The Value of Literature Reviews, Libraries, and Librarians  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a talk given at the sixth annual meeting of the Atmospheric Science Librarians International, this paper explores the author's experiences performing reviews of the scientific literature as a tool to advancing meteorology and studying ...

David M. Schultz

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-EE0003953; DOE WAIVER NO. W(A)2011-013; CH1596 The Petitioner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC). has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions in the above cited research and development contract issued by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). See attached UTRC's Petition, Answer 1. Subject of the R&D Contract Title: Integrated Whole Building Energy Diagnostics The objective of the contract is to develop and demonstrate a Whole-building energy management system (EMS) that integrated real-time energy fault detection and diagnostics

127

Microsoft Word - Oil Shale Research in the United States 2011_Draft2.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil Shale Research in the United States Oil Shale Research in the United States ______________________________________________________________________________ Profiles of Oil Shale Research and Development Activities In Universities, National Laboratories, and Public Agencies Prepared by INTEK, Inc. For the U.S. Department of Energy * Office of Petroleum Reserves Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Third Edition: September 2011 3 rd Edition Acknowledgements This report was prepared by INTEK, Inc. for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves (DOE/NPOSR) as a part of the AOC Petroleum Support Services, LLC (AOC-PSS) Contract Number DE-FE0000175 (Task 30). Mr. James C. Killen of DOE served as Technical Monitor and Mr. Khosrow Biglarbigi of INTEK, Inc. served as the Project Manager.

128

Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) combines x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). This combination provides spatially resolved bonding and oxidation state information. While there are reviews relevant to STXM/NEXAFS applications in other environmental fields (and magnetic materials) this chapter focuses on atmospheric aerosols. It provides an introduction to this technique in a manner approachable to non-experts. It begins with relevant background information on synchrotron radiation sources and a description of NEXAFS spectroscopy. The bulk of the chapter provides a survey of STXM/NEXAFS aerosol studies and is organized according to the type of aerosol investigated. The purpose is to illustrate the current range and recent growth of scientific investigations employing STXM-NEXAFS to probe atmospheric aerosol morphology, surface coatings, mixing states, and atmospheric processing.

Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

Sisterson, D. L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0471-1606) United Technologies Research Center -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rg rg Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0471-1606) United Technologies Research Center - Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Location{s) (City/County/State): Connecticut, Michigan Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of an advanced climate control system for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) utilizing a hybrid thermal battery that employs a unique approach of adsorbing refrigerant on a metal salt. Proposed work consists of indoor laboratory-based research and development and office-based engineering analysis, including (1) synthesis, characterization, and testing of metal salts and refrigerant fluids for use in the thermal battery system, (2) computer-based design and

133

H.: The Bonn University lidar at the Esrange: technical description and capabilties for atmospheric research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raman backscatter lidar at the Esrange near the Swedish city of Kiruna, north of the Arctic circle. The lidar system covers the atmosphere from about 4 km to 100 km altitude and it is capable of measuring aerosols in the tropo-, strato-, and mesosphere, as well as of determining temperature profiles in the aerosol-free part of the atmosphere (i.e. above 30-km altitude). Density tuned fixed-spacer etalons provide daylight capability and thus increased sensitivity to noctilucent clouds during polar summer. Polarisation measurements allow liquid and solid phase discrimination for aerosol and cloud particles in the tropo- and stratosphere. The derived temperature profiles can be used for the detection and analysis of atmospheric gravity waves. Although several lidar experiments are situated in polar latitudes, a comprehensive instrument which covers the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere, is daylight capable, and observes temperature profiles, as well as aerosols, is exceptional. In this article a technical description, in particular, of the optical configuration of this experiment is given, as well as an overview of achievable geophysical parameters. The potential for geophysical analyses is shown.

U. Blum; K. H. Fricke

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simple Modifications to Improve Fifth-Generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model Performance for the Phoenix, Arizona, Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal temperature cycle in the Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area, as represented in the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), is examined using a high-resolution 2-...

Joseph A. Zehnder

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Successful Introduction of Authentic Research Early in an Undergraduate Atmospheric Science Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Participating in scientific research as an undergraduate student provides an opportunity to increase understanding of how scientific knowledge is advanced, to learn new research tools, to develop the ability to critically analyze new ideas, and to ...

Kathleen Quardokus; Sonia Lasher-Trapp; Eric M. Riggs

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

138

Research and development activities on Three Mile Island Unit Two. Annual report for 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year 1985 was significant in the cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). Major milestones in the project included lifting the plenum assembly from the reactor vessel and the start of operations to remove the damaged fuel from the reactor. This report summarizes these milestones and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include the following: waste immobilization and management; fuel shipping cask delivery and testing; sample acquisition and evaluation; and decontamination and dose reduction. 26 figs.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTRACT DE-EE0003954; CONTRACT DE-EE0003954; DOE WAIVER NO. W(A)2011-005; CH1597 The Petitioner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions in the above cited research and development contract issued by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). See attached UTRC's Petition, Answer 1. Subject of the R&D Contract Title: Plug & Play Distributed Power Systems for Smart Grid Connected Building The objective of the contract is to advance and demonstrate a "plug and play" building energy microgrid concept for integrating energy storage, loads and sources at the building level with the external utility grid. The microgrid will be compatible with the Smart Grid concept, operate in

140

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH CENTER FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-EE0003955; DOE WAIVER NO. W(A)2011-014; CH1598 ~ The Petitioner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions in the above cited research and development cooperative agreement issued by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). See attached UTRC's Petition, Answer I. Subj ect of the R&D Contract Title: Natural Refrigerant Very High Efficiency HV AC Systems The objective of the cooperative agreement is to design, develop and demonstrate a safe low Global Wanning Potential (GWP) Very High Perfonnance Air-Conditioning (VHPAC) residential system. The 4 stage project will include design, analysis, fabrication and commissioning of a component test rigs to facilitate proof-of-concept testing of proposed

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141

Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.

Matos, J.E.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

Matthews, Patrick

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Temporal Variability of Land–Atmosphere Coupling and Its Implications for Drought over the Southeast United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Droughts represent a significant source of social and economic damage in the southeast United States. Having sufficient warning of these extreme events enables managers to prepare for and potentially mitigate the severity of their impacts. A ...

Joshua K. Roundy; Craig R. Ferguson; Eric F. Wood

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sat into three dimensions with the addition of information from the GOES Solar Insolation Product (GSIP) as well Interagency Land Dynamics Coordination Meeting at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory -6- #12;(CRREL) at Hanover, NH on February 12. These meetings are being held to better coordinate and share

146

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Insolation Product (GSIP) with a cloud classification system. This work's emphasis Jones, Theme Leader Coordinated DA research activities and made preparations for the CG/AR Annual review configured and coordinated several WRF-3DVAR runs in collaboration with Dr. Jones and obtained AFWA Land

147

1. TITLE OF PROPOSED RESEARCH: Performance Portability for Coupled AtmosphereOcean General Circulation Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Bldg. 6012 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831­6367 Phone : 423­574­3128 Fax : 423­574­0680 E­mail : worleyph@ornl, NCAR, and ORNL [6, 7]. This code uses an additional ``high level'' call structure or framework at ORNL. These resources are sufficient to begin the proposed research. We also expect to have access

148

Experiment plan for characterization of the properties of molten rock at atmospheric and elevated pressures: Magma Energy Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the properties of molten rock (magma) is of importance to the Magma Energy Research Project of Sandia Laboratories. Facilities have been set up at Sandia to study the physical properties, chemistry, and corrosive nature of magma to 1600/sup 0/C and from atmospheric pressure to 4 kbar (400 MPa). Experiments at atmospheric pressure are being done in the presence of multicomponent gas mixtures to control the chemical activities of oxygen and sulfur. The high-pressure apparatus includes cold-seal small-volume pressure vessels (to 1100/sup 0/C and 1 kbar) and a large (750 cm/sup 3/ sample volume), internally heated pressure vessel (to 1600/sup 0/C and 4 kbar). The large vessel contains a number of penetrations for electrical leads and pressure lines, and is linked to a computer for data acquisition and control of experiments. Water and other dissolved volatiles (CO/sub 2/, CO, SO/sub 2/, S/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, HCl, HF) have significant effects on all the properties of magma, and these effects will be studied in the high-pressure apparatus. Phase equilibria, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and materials compatibility will be the first properties to be examined under pressure. This report includes a review of the nature and chemical basis for the effects of dissolved volatiles on these properties of magma. 70 references, 10 figures.

Modreski, P.J.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PNNL: FCSD: Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change: Programs &...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs & Facilities Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and ARM Climate Research Facility ARM Aerial Facility Environmental...

150

Research needs for strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies reservoir characterization and reservoir management research needs and IOR process and related research needs for the fourth geologic class, strandplain/barrier island reservoirs. The 330 Class 4 reservoirs in the DOE Tertiary OH Recovery Information System (TORIS) database contain about 30.8 billion barrels of oil or about 9% of the total original oil-in-place (OOIP) in all United States reservoirs. The current projection of Class 4 ultimate recovery with current operations is only 38% of the OOIP, leaving 19 billion barrels as the target for future IOR projects. Using the TORIS database and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (surfactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, California, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000, which emphasizes the urgent need for the development and demonstration of cost-effective recovery technologies.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.S.; Young, M.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Applicability of AIRS Monthly Mean Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiles over the Tibetan Plateau Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research explores the applicability of the gridded (level 3) monthly tropospheric water vapor (version 5) retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on board the NASA Aqua ...

Yuwei Zhang; Donghai Wang; Panmao Zhai; Guojun Gu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

Patrick Matthews

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Response of Climate Simulation to a New Convective Parameterization in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the response of the climate simulation by the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM3) to the introduction of the Zhang and McFarlane convective parameterization in the model. It is shown that in ...

Guang J. Zhang; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Philip J. Rasch

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

157

Research on Fault Diagnosis of Hydropower Unit Based on Expert System and Hybrid Reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid development of computer and monitoring technologies in recent years, more and more online monitoring equipment of hydropower units have been installed and applied in hydropower plants, and so began the long-term accumulation of data. Although ... Keywords: fault diagnosis, hydropower unit, expert system, hybrid reasoning

Ye Zhou; Luoping Pan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Research of Distribution Transformer Remote Terminal Units Based on DSP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Based on the importance analysis of the distribution transformer remote terminal units ,Introduced the main performance and the hardware design of the distribution transformer intelligent monitoring terminal units which take the TMS320C5410 high ... Keywords: distribution monitoring terminal, DSP (Digital Signal Processor), Data acquisition

Li Yan; Lu Wenmei; Li Wencai

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Early Severe Thunderstorm Forecasting and Research by the United States weather Bureau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the early nineteenth century, fragmentary weather observing networks were established in portions of the United States, primarily to constitute a climatological history. The invention of the telegraph in 1833 and its availability to the public ...

Joseph O. Galway

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

Patrick Matthews

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ground coupled solar heat pump research program in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ground coupling research program funded by the Systems Development Division of the Office of Solar Applications of the US Department of Energy studies the use of the earth as a heat source/sink or storage element for solar heat pump space conditioning systems. The goal of this research program is to determine the feasibility of ground coupling, and if feasibility is confirmed, to create handbooks which facilitate widespread application of ground coupling. The research program is outlined and the research projects currently in progress and how they fit into the program are described. Progress toward the program goal is evaluated.

Metz, P D

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Study of Persistent Elevated Pollution Episodes in the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To examine chemical transformation within stagnant air masses and the atmospheric processes acting upon such air masses, the United States EPA sponsored a study in the summer of 1980 in the northeastern region of the country. Ten research ...

William M. Vaughan; Michael Chan; Bruce Cantrell; Francis Pooler

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Consortium of the United States Council for Automotive Research Nondestructive Evaluation Steering Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Industry September 6, 2006 United States Automotive Materials Partnership, A Consortium. This material is based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE), National Energy Technology .....................................................................................................11 Chapter 2 The Expanding Role of NDE in the Automotive Industry.................................13

Knowles, David William

166

SOLERAS - University Research Project: Georgia Institute of Technology. Atlas of satellite insolation in the United States, Mexico and South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary is given of the development, testing and applications of the satellite insolation estimation project of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys through Aerospace Remote Sensing (AgRISTARS) program. The NOAA/AgRISTARS procedure uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) to estimate daily total insolation (on a horizontal surface) at an array of 1 x 1 latitude-longitude locations throughout the continental United States, Mexico, and parts of South America. This methodology is compared with some other satellite techniques in terms of accuracy and applicability. Summary maps of monthly average daily total insolation for the period July 1982 through December 1983, as well as annual total maps for 1983, are presented for all three geographic coverage areas. As measures of temporal and spatial variability, monthly and annual data are also presented for the standard deviation of the daily insolation values about the monthly mean, and for root-mean-square values of both north-south and east-west differences over 1 latitude or longitude spacing. From the estimated error analysis the monthly mean values appear to be accurate to about 5% of the mean value, except for the western part of the United States when GOES-1 was put back into temporary service as the western GOES satellite.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

168

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refining District New Mexico Gross Inputs to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units (Thousand Barrels per Day)

169

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond • 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able • 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area • 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where the total effective dose at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Consolidated Research Program United States Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The logging research program in the DOE Geopressured-Geothermal Energy Project was set up to (a) carry out research on logging problems important to the DOE program; (b) provide advice on logging programs in DOE wells; (c) monitor log quality during data acquisition; (d) provide log analyses as requested by DOE and (e) provide other services as skills and time permit. Funding for the project amounted to about $50,000/year from 1979 to 1985 (direct cost plus overhead). In 1986 DOE funding began to increase and was about $100,000 per year for the last three years of the project (1988-91). In addition to DOE funding, the Gas Research Institute Tight Gas Sands Project contributed to our boron research by about $7,000 per year during 1989-91, plus about $100,000 worth of core and log data from five tight gas sand wells in East and West Texas and in Wyoming.

Dunlap, Henry F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area •05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able •05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton •05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area •05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), “equation of state” experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: •Conduct radiological surveys. •Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. •If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). •Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT  

SciTech Connect

This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is joint effort between the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation. It couples state-of-art atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land/vegetation/ ecological/ and major glaciers into a unified system or components can be run independently. (see https://www2.ucar.edu/for-staff/update/community-earth-system-model) CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere PI Name: Warren Washington PI Email: wmw@ucar.edu Institution: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 102.8 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Earth Science Researchers at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

175

Directory of Solar Energy Research Activities in the United States: First Edition, May 1980. [1220 projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information covering 1220, FY 1978 and FY 1979 solar energy research projects is included. In addition to the title and text of project summaries, the directory contains the following indexes: subject index, investigator index, performing organization index, and supporting organization index. This information was registered with the Smithsonian Science Information Exchange by Federal, State, and other supporting organizations. The project summaries are categorized in the following areas: biomass, ocean energy, wind energy,photovoltaics, photochemical energy conversion, photobiological energy conversion, solar heating and cooling, solar process heat, solar collectors and concentrators, solar thermal electric generation, and other solar energy conversion. (WHK)

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect

In December 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a Center of Excellence (Hyperspectral-Multispectral Algorithm Research Center, HyMARC) for promoting the research and development of algorithms to exploit spectral imagery. This center is located at the DOE Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, and is operated for the DOE by Bechtel Nevada. This paper presents the results to date of a research project begun at the center during 1998 to investigate the correction of hyperspectral data for atmospheric aerosols. Results of a project conducted by the Rochester Institute of Technology to define, implement, and test procedures for absolute calibration and correction of hyperspectral data to absolute units of high spectral resolution imagery will be presented. Hybrid techniques for atmospheric correction using image or spectral scene data coupled through radiative propagation models will be specifically addressed. Results of this effort to analyze HYDICE sensor data will be included. Preliminary results based on studying the performance of standard routines, such as Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption and Nonlinear Least Squares Spectral Fit, in retrieving reflectance spectra show overall reflectance retrieval errors of approximately one to two reflectance units in the 0.4- to 2.5-micron-wavelength region (outside of the absorption features). These results are based on HYDICE sensor data collected from the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site during overflights conducted in July of 1997. Results of an upgrade made in the model-based atmospheric correction techniques, which take advantage of updates made to the moderate resolution atmospheric transmittance model (MODTRAN 4.0) software, will also be presented. Data will be shown to demonstrate how the reflectance retrieval in the shorter wavelengths of the blue-green region will be improved because of enhanced modeling of multiple scattering effects.

R. J. Pollina

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Biomass Feedstock Research and Development for Multiple Products in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent presidential Executive Order to triple current levels of bioenergy and biobased production by 2010 has increased interest in determining whether sufficient biomass resources will be economically available to support the goal. The US has a well-structured program of research and development which is focusing on increasing potential energy crop and crop residue availability under economically and environmentally sustainable conditions. Genetic improvement programs are ongoing in three U. S. locations for hybrid poplar and cottonwood, in one location for willow, and in four locations for switchgrass. Variety testing and cropping systems development is being conducted at wider variety of sites for all three crops. Molecular genetics is providing important information and tools for identifying and controlling desired traits. The program is also expanding to address supply logistics issues for both energy crop and residues. Equilibrium model analysis performed jointly with the US Department of Agriculture suggests that at farmgate prices of about $33 dt and $44 dt, between 7 and 17 million ha of land could convert to energy crop production without negatively affecting food supplies. Large amounts of crop residue also become profitable for farmers to collect at similar prices. This potential for supporting significant bioenergy and biobased products industries in the US will only be realized if the environmental and economic values to local communities are recognized and factored into energy and environmental policy.

Wright, L.L.

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Acoustic Waves in the Turbulent Atmosphere: A Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of atmospheric acoustics and its role in atmospheric research and in development of modern methods of ground-based remote sensing of the atmosphere are outlined. A historical overview of investigations of the effect of atmospheric ...

M. A. Kallistratova

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Halthore R. N., Schwartz, S. E., Michalsky, J. J., Anderson, G. P., Ferrare R. A., Holben B. N., and ten Brink H. M. 1997. "Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance," J. Geophys. Res. 102(D25): 29991-30002 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, Figure 1, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the

182

Characteristics of Snowfall over the Eastern Half of the United States and Relationships with Principal Modes of Low-Frequency Atmospheric Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly data from 206 stations for the period 1947–93 are used to examine characteristics of snowfall over the eastern half of the United States and relationships with precipitation and the maximum temperature on precipitation days. Linkages ...

Mark C. Serreze; Martyn P. Clark; David L. McGinnis; David A. Robinson

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

On the Potential Change in Surface Water Vapor Deposition over the Continental United States due to Increases in Atmospheric Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of surface water vapor deposition (WVD) over the continental United States under the present climate and a future climate scenario reflecting the mid-twenty-first-century increased greenhouse gas concentrations were evaluated by ...

Zaitao Pan; Moti Segal; Charles Graves

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide -- A continuation  

SciTech Connect

In the past year, the authors have reached several important milestones in the modeling and analysis of increased greenhouse-gas-caused climate change. Some of this work was highlighted in the recent update of the 1992 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. The milestones are (1) analysis of the ongoing control and transient experiments out to 70 years, (2) development and testing of a new-generation coupled model, (3) analysis of natural variability and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate change, (4) examination of the role of cirrus albedo in global climate sensitivity, (5) participation in various model intercomparisons, and (6) assistance with an exhibit on the greenhouse effect at the Franklin Institute Museum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Although this latter activity was not part of the planned research, they felt that the contribution to the exhibit would benefit science education).

Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

REVISED FINAL REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK – DCN 0496-SR-06-1  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT OF STORMWATER AND WASTEWATER AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT (SPRU) DISPOSITION PROJECT, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating the water management procedures at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU). The facility has three issues related to water management that require technical assistance: (1) due to a excessive rainfall event in October, 2010, contaminated water collected in basements of G2 and H2 buildings. As a result of this event, the contractor has had to collect and dispose of water offsite; (2) The failure of a sump pump at a KAPL outfall resulted in a Notice of Violation issued by the New York State Department of Environment and Conservation (NYSDEC) and subsequent Consent Order. On-site water now requires treatment and off-site disposition; and (3) stormwater infiltration has resulted in Strontium-90 levels discharged to the storm drains that exceed NR standards. The contractor has indicated that water management at SPRU requires major staff resources (at least 50 persons). The purpose of this review is to determine if the contractor's technical approach warrants the large number of staff resources and to ensure that the technical approach is compliant and in accordance with federal, state and NR requirements.

Abitz, R.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear waste into marine sediments would create high temperature-high gamma radiation environments adjacent to waste canisters. Under these conditions sediments will react producing pore waters that differ significantly from those occurring naturally. These changes may enhance canister corrosion or facilitate transport of radionuclides through unreacted sediments beyond the heated zone. In addition, the term ''near field'' needs clarification, as it is used widely without having a precise meaning. Research in three areas was undertaken to improve our understanding of near field chemical processes. Initially, isothermal experiments were carried out in ''Dickson'' hydrothermal systems. These were followed by an experimental program directed at understanding the chemical effects of temperature-gradient induced transport. Finally, additional experimentation was done to study the combined effects of hydrothermal conditions and intense gamma radiation. Having completed this body of experimental work, it was concluded that near field conditions are not an obstacle to the safe use of abyssal marine sediments for the disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear wastes. 41 refs., 6 figs., 17 tabs.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements by adapting a theoretical approach previously developed for the AERONET measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1) an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2) and an offset (i.e. uncertainty) of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the upwelling and downwelling broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03), and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or ±0.04). Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 Wm-2).

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Enhanced research program on the long-range climatic effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and sulfate aerosols. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Consistent with the objectives to extract as much as possible from existing models on the role of the oceans in the greenhouse effect and to improve various aspects of the coupled system, the authors made significant progress in three areas. (1) In a series of manuscripts, they documented how the El Nino-Southern Oscillation operates in the model and how it is enhanced with increased carbon dioxide. (2) In studies with collaborators Branstator, Karoly, and Karl, they explored the possible carbon dioxide ``fingerprint`` in zonal mean temperatures, the effects of changes in extratropical teleconnections, and the regional effects of low-frequency variability and climate change. (3) They experimented with an advanced version of the NCAR community climate model (CCM0) that also includes the Ramanathan and Collins cirrus albedo feedback mechanism. This model was run with a mixed layer and was tested with the 1{degree} 20-level Semtner and Chervin ocean model. The latter includes the Arctic Ocean and dynamic sea ice, both showing realistic results. The authors completed the coupling of the advanced models. The dynamic ocean model was a 1{degree}x1{degree} version of the Semtner-Chervin 1/2{degree}x1/2{degree} ocean model with 20 vertical levels. The 1{degree}x1{degree} version of the Semtner-Chervin model used in this research explicitly resolved some aspects of the mesoscale eddies as did the parent model. The new coupled model system for greenhouse gas simulations on climate change was tested on multidecadal runs.

Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction ?ep(?) can be retrieved from ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) routine measurements was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at its ambient concentration and thermodynamic state (i.e. ?ep(?) either free of or corrected for sampling artifacts) and includes the following ACRF routine methods: Raman Lidar, Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and in-situ aerosol profiles (IAP) with a small aircraft. Profiles of aerosol optical depth ?p(???, from which the profiles of ?ep(???are derived through vertical differentiation, were measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14); these data were used as truth in this evaluation. The ACRF IAP ?ep(550 nm) were lower by 16% (during AIOP) and higher by 10% (during ALIVE) when compared to AATS-14. The ACRF MPL ?ep(523 nm) were higher by 24% (AIOP) and 19%-21% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14 but the correlation improved significantly during ALIVE. In the AIOP a second MPL operated by NASA showed a smaller positive bias (13%) with respect to AATS-14. The ACRF Raman Lidar ?ep(355 nm) were higher by 54% (AIOP) and higher by 6% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14. The large bias in AIOP stemmed from a gradual loss of the sensitivity of the Raman Lidar starting about the end of 2001 going unnoticed until after AIOP. A major refurbishment and upgrade of the instrument and improvements to a data-processing algorithm led to the significant improvement and very small bias in ALIVE. Finally we find that during ALIVE the Raman Lidar water vapor densities ?w are higher by 8% when compared to AATS-14, whereas comparisons between AATS-14 and in-situ measured ?w aboard two different aircraft showed small negative biases (0 to -3%).

Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard; Clayton, Marian F.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P. B.; Gore, W.; Dominguez, Roseanne

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference:...

193

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

194

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and validation of a black carbon mixing state resolved three-dimensional model: Aging processes and radiative impact." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ,...

195

Research Highlight  

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Pollution + Storm Clouds Warmer Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation...

196

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols Using MFRSR Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties...

197

The Eastern United States Side-Door Cold Front of 22 April 1987: A Case Study of an Intense Atmospheric Density Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented of an unusual cold front that affected the east coast of the United States on 22 April 1987. Noteworthy aspects of this front are its genesis behind a preexisting back-door cold front its propagation to the southwest, ...

Gregory J. Hakim

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The United States' Department of Energy and the People's Republic of China's Chinese Academy of Sciences Joint Research on the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy and the People's Republic of China (PRC) Chinese Academy of Sciences signed an agreement on 19 August 1987 to carry out a joint research program on the study of CO2-induced climate changes. The joint program ...

F. A. Koomanoff; M. R. Riches; Ye Duzheng; Zhao Jianping; W-C. Wang; Tao Shiyan

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A New Bruker IFS 125HR FTIR Spectrometer for the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada: Measurements and Comparison with the Existing Bomem DA8 Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer has been installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80.05°N, 86.42°W). This instrument will become the Network for the Detection of ...

Rebecca L. Batchelor; Kimberly Strong; Rodica Lindenmaier; Richard L. Mittermeier; Hans Fast; James R. Drummond; Pierre F. Fogal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The United States' Next Generation of Atmospheric Composition and Coastal Ecosystem Measurements: NASA's Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission was recommended by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Earth Science Decadal Survey to measure tropospheric trace gases and aerosols and coastal ocean phytoplankton, water quality, ...

J. Fishman; L. T. Iraci; J. Al-Saadi; K. Chance; F. Chavez; M. Chin; P. Coble; C. Davis; P. M. DiGiacomo; D. Edwards; A. Eldering; J. Goes; J. Herman; C. Hu; D. J. Jacob; C. Jordan; S. R. Kawa; R. Key; X. Liu; S. Lohrenz; A. Mannino; V. Natraj; D. Neil; J. Neu; M. Newchurch; K. Pickering; J. Salisbury; H. Sosik; A. Subramaniam; M. Tzortziou; J. Wang; M. Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Atmospheric CO2 Records fFrom Sites Operated by the Fraunhofer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric Environment Research Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany Wank Peak, Germany Zugspitze, Germany Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric...

202

Atmospheric Fluoroform (CHF3, HFC-23) at Cape Grim, Tasmania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHF3, HFC-23 at Cape Grim, Tasmania CHF3, HFC-23 at Cape Grim, Tasmania Atmospheric Fluoroform (CHF3, HFC-23) at Cape Grim, Tasmania graphics Graphics data Data Authors D. E. Oram,1 W. T. Sturges,1 S. A. Penkett,1 A. McCulloch,2 and P. J. Fraser3 1School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, United Kingdom 2ICI Chemicals & Polymers Ltd., Safety and Environment Department, Runcorn, Cheshire, WA7 4QD, United Kingdom 3CRC for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology, Division of Atmospheric Research, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Private Bag No. 1, Aspendale, Victoria 3195, Australia Period of Record 1978-1995 Methods The sampling and analytical methods are described more fully in Oram et al. (1998). In summary, air samples were taken from the archive of Cape Grim,

203

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 569 comprises the following nine corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area • 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area • 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area • 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area • 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area • 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area • 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area • 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area • 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 569 based on the implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-2.

Sloop, Christy

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A U. S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S. Department of Energy User Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program DOESC-ARM...

205

Dynamical Processes of Equatorial Atmospheric Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical processes that drive intraseasonal equatorial atmospheric angular momentum (EAAM) fluctuations are examined with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis data. ...

Steven B. Feldstein

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Final report, Volume 3. Engineering field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-powered air conditioning system was designed, constructed, and installed at a Phoenix, Arizona site whose climatic conditions approximate those of Saudi Arabia. The nominal 18 ton capacity Rankine cycle chiller system with hot and cold storage and conventional fan/coil delivery units was operated for two cooling seasons and met its design objectives.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Atmospheric Transient Adjustment and Its Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical mechanisms underlying the transient circulation adjustment in the extratropical atmosphere after the instantaneous doubling of carbon dioxide are investigated using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere ...

Yutian Wu; Richard Seager; Tiffany A. Shaw; Mingfang Ting; Naomi Naik

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Large-Scale Aspects of the United States Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large-scale, gridpoint, atmospheric, hydrologic climatology consisting of atmospheric precipitable water, precipitation, atmospheric moisture flux convergence, and a residual evaporation for the conterminous United States is described. A large-...

John O. Roads; Shyh-C. Chen; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Onsite Research Publications Computed Tomography and Statistical Analysis of Bubble Size Distributions in Atmospheric-Generated Foamed Cement (August 9, 2013) Comparison...

211

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

212

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility...

213

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Investigating Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Byron Meadows - NASALangley Research Center May 14, 1991 Demonstrations of weather forecasting tools and techniques for experiments in the atmosphere and of lasers used to...

214

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: A human tissue research program. USTUR annual report for October 1, 1997 through January 31, 1999  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) are a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This annual report covers October 1, 1997, through January 31, 1999; the reporting period has been extended so that future annual reports will coincide with the period covered by the grant itself.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

united stadium. united station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??DC United is one of Major League Soccerâs most decorated franchises, yet it still plays its home games within the crumbling confines of RFK Stadium.… (more)

Groff, David R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 7, PAGES 1231-1234, APRIL 1, 2001 Anthropogenic emission of mercury to the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at a regional scale in the northeast United States. This region has the highest Hg emission of the country [US by fossil fuel consumption [US EPA, 1997]. Third, anthropogenic C source strength is well understood measurement, we only use observations made in the daytime, convective conditions when the sur- face values

Lee, Xuhui

218

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Transition and Equilibration of Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow in One-Way Nested Large-Eddy Simulations Using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Model permits finescale large-eddy simulations (LES) to be nested within coarser simulations, an approach that can generate more accurate turbulence statistics and improve other aspects of simulated flows. ...

Jeff Mirocha; Gokhan Kirkil; Elie Bou-Zeid; Fotini Katopodes Chow; Branko Kosovi?

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Characterizing Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shupe MD, VP Walden, E Eloranta, T Uttal, JR Campbell, SM Starkweather, and M Shiobara. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part I: occurrence and macrophysical properties." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 626-644. Shupe MD. 2011. "Clouds at Arctic atmospheric observatories, part II: thermodynamic phase characteristics." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 50(3), 645-661. Figure 1: (a) Annual cycles of monthly mean cloud occurrence fraction at six Arctic atmospheric observatories. The average cloud fraction for all

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

222

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Troposphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and EJ Mlawer. 2010. "The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC)." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2904.1. (a) Atmospheric transmittance at 1 cm-1 resolution in the far-infrared for three atmospheres that are representative of the ARM SGP site, NSA site, and RHUBC-II site in the Chajnantor plateau (CJC). (b) The transmittance

223

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Field Campaign Resource Allocation Using Statistical Decision Analysis Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hanlon, C., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hanlon CJ, JB Stefik, AA Small, J Verlinde, and GS Young. 2013. "Statistical decision analysis for flight decision support: The SPartICus campaign." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , . ACCEPTED. In many atmospheric science field campaigns, investigators are budgeted some number of flight hours to collect data under specific, imperfectly forecastable atmospheric conditions. In such field campaigns, investigators must assess atmospheric conditions each day and make a resource-allocation decision: are conditions good enough to use some of our scarce flight hours

224

Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Current practices in library/informatics instruction in academic libraries serving medical schools in the western United States: a three-phase action research study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.0 services in academic, medical and research libraries: agrowing body of medical education research literature. Pageinto Medical Curricula: Report of the 2010 LiME Research

Eldredge, Jonathan D; Heskett, Karen M; Henner, Terry; Tan, Josephine P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TR-081.2 iii Abstract This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval...

227

Estimates of Meridional Atmosphere and Ocean Heat Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New estimates of the poleward energy transport based on atmospheric reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; Julie M. Caron

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Variational Objective Analysis for Atmospheric Field Programs: A Model Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the variational objective analysis (VOA) for producing realistic diagnoses of atmospheric field program data. Simulations from the Naval Research Laboratory's Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere ...

D. E. Waliser; J. A. Ridout; S. Xie; M. Zhang

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvénic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

230

Research training and national innovation systems in Australia, Finland and the United States : a policy and systems study supported by 30 case studies of research students in the fields of geospatial science, wireless communication.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reforms to the national research and research training system by the Commonwealth Government of Australia sought to effectively connect research conducted in universities to Australia's… (more)

Haukka, S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Research training and national innovation systems in Australia, Finland and the United States : a policy and systems study supported by 30 case studies of research students in the fields of geospatial science, wireless communication, biosciences, and materials science and engineering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reforms to the national research and research training system by the Commonwealth Government of Australia sought to effectively connect research conducted in universities to Australia's… (more)

Haukka, Sandra

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

233

Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters  

SciTech Connect

Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

235

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2011. "Spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(12), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-060.1. Ratio of reflectance Rλ plus transmittance Tλ over single scattering albedo ω0λ plotted against the sum Rλ+Tλ for two cloud optical depths: 5 and 10. The aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm is 0.2 (rural type of aerosol). Different dots correspond to different wavelengths from 0.4 to

236

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Surface Radiation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S.A., Long, C.N., and Flynn, D., Nauru Island Effect Study, Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, March 22 to 26, 2004, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Nauru Island, about 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea in the western South Pacific, is one of three instrumented island sites that comprise ARM's Tropical Western Pacific locale. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to identify interactions between the processes that determine the radiative properties of an atmospheric column, including

237

Regional Climate Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Workshop on Regional Climate Research: Needs and Opportunities was held 2–4 April 2001 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado. The workshop was cosponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department of ...

L. Ruby Leung; Linda O. Mearns; Filippo Giorgi; Robert L. Wilby

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, (DOE/EIS-0310-SA-01) (08/05/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-SA-01 0-SA-01 Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility Introduction and Background The Department of Energy (DOE), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), issued the Final PEIS for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (Nuclear Infrastructure (NI) PEIS, DOE/EIS-0310) in December 2000. Under the Authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the DOE's missions include: (1) producing isotopes for research and applications

239

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, SW Powell, RA Houze, P Ciesielski, N Guy, H Pierce, and T Matsui. 2013. "A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-050.1. The sun, seen through a dusty atmosphere, sets at Niamey, the capital of Niger, which is located in the African Sahara. Anvil clouds that accompany thunderstorms. Contrasts often provide unique perspectives, and scientists seize any such opportunity-when it arises. In a new research paper, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences,

240

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ivanova, K., Pennsylvania State University Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ivanova K and TP Ackerman. 2009. "Tracking nucleation-growth-sublimation in cirrus clouds using ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , D06113, 10.1029/2008JD010271. Figure 1. Values of the drift and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation derived from the MMCR radar reflectivity observations. The diffusion coefficient characterizes the small scale, fast

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Weather and Atmospheric Overview During Study of Natural and Urban Emissions (CARES) Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fast, J. ., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fast JD, WI Gustafson, LK Berg, WJ Shaw, M Pekour, M Shrivastava, JC Barnard, RA Ferrare, CA Hostetler, JA Hair, M Erickson, BT Jobson, B Flowers, MK Dubey, S Springston, RB Pierce, L Dolislager, J Pederson, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Transport and mixing patterns over central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, 1759-1783. Aircraft sampling flight patterns are shown over central California in this aerial overlay. Researchers collected and analyzed measurements from

242

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Trüssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G König-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

243

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D08212, doi:10.1029/2010JD015135. The distribution of downwelling 10-micron infrared radiance observed at the SGP site by the AERI from June 1996 to May 2010, separated into all-sky (all samples) and the three distinct sky classifications.

244

Legend Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Syntax: LEGEND UNIT units> where is an integer number or parameter in the range 1 to 100 that specifies the legend identifier; and ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Atmospheric CO2 Record from Continuous Measurements at Jubany...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNRA (National Research Program in Antarctica) began continuous atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements at Jubany in 1994. The laboratory at Jubany Station is operated...

246

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABBREVIATION DESCRIPTION ABBREVIATION DESCRIPTION AAVP ARM Aerial Vehicles Program ACP Atmospheric Chemistry Program ACP - CE ACP - Capital Equipment AmeriFlux AmeriFlux ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) ARM - CE ARM - Capital Equipment ARM – Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility ARM – Facility- CCRI Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (Climate Change Research Initiative) ARM - Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Program ARM-CCRI ARM-CCRI ARM-Infrastr Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Infrastructure Artificial Retina ASP Atmospheric Science Program

247

ATMO 642 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere Jan. 17, 2012 ATMO 642: Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATMO 642 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere Jan. 17, 2012 ATMO 642: Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere. 15 % Exam 1 15 % Exam 2 15 % Exam 3 30 % Homework/In class exercises 25 % Project #12;ATMO 642 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere Jan. 17, 2012 Project: We are going to have a semester long research project

Peterson, Blake R.

248

A Characterization of Tropical Transient Activity in the CAM3 Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) is the latest generation of a long lineage of general circulation models produced by a collaboration between the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the scientific research ...

Philip J. Rasch; Mark J. Stevens; Lucrezia Ricciardulli; Aiguo Dai; Andrew Negri; Robert Wood; Byron A. Boville; Brian Eaton; James J. Hack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) Pilot Experiment at NYC" - Michael Reynolds, BNL 17:30 "EML Pilot Studies for the Urban Atmospheric Observatory" - Hsi-Na (Sam) Lee, EML 17:40 "A...

250

ORISE Climate and Atmospheric Research: Contact Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us Dr. Bruce Baker Director, NOAAARLATDD Work: 865.576.1233 Bruce.Baker@noaa.gov Location: 456 South Illinois Ave. P.O. Box 2456 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-2456...

251

Program on Technology Innovation: Literature Review of Issues Related to the Atmospheric Impacts of Natural Gas Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas is set to become an increasingly larger portion of the power generation fuel mix in the United States in upcoming years. The EIA estimates that 96.65 gigawatts (GW) of new electricity capacity will be added in the United States between 2009 and 2015. With the renewed interest in the use of this fuel in a variety of power plant designs, a review of recent research investigating the environmental impacts of natural gas power plantsin particular those from atmospheric emissionswas warranted. Thi...

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Study of Persistence in the Land–Atmosphere System Using a General Circulation Model and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Persistence in the land–atmosphere system simulated with the National Center for Atmosphere Research Community Climate Model Version 2 (CCM2) coupled with the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) is examined. BATS simulates various ...

Yongqiang Liu; Roni Avissar

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Coupled Atmosphere–Wave–Ocean Modeling System: Simulation of the Intensity of an Idealized Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled atmosphere–wave–ocean modeling system (CAWOMS) based on the integration of atmosphere–wave, atmosphere–ocean, and wave–current interaction processes is developed. The component models consist of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)...

Bin Liu; Huiqing Liu; Lian Xie; Changlong Guan; Dongliang Zhao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Study of Persistence in the Land–Atmosphere System with a Fourth-Order Analytical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion paper, Y. Liu and R. Avissar analyzed the features of persistence in the land–atmosphere system simulated with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model Version 2 coupled with the Biosphere–Atmosphere ...

Yongqiang Liu; Roni Avissar

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

256

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

257

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Song X, GJ Zhang, and JF Li. 2012. "Evaluation of microphysics parameterization for convective clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5." Journal of Climate, 25(24), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00563.1. Rainfall in the tropics. By improving an existing, sophisticated, global climate model, scientists can now simulate cloud and rainfall more accurately. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric System Research program, a research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and

258

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

259

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

260

EAQUATE: An International Experiment For Hyperspectral Atmospheric Sounding Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international experiment called the European Aqua Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) was held in September 2004 in Italy and the United Kingdom to validate Aqua satellite Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance measurements and derived ...

J. P. Taylor; S. Newman; W. L. Smith; V. Cuomo; F. Romano; G. Pappalardo; G. Pavese; L. Mona; A. Amodeo; A. M. Larar; D. K. Zhou; C. Serio; P. Di Girolamo; F. Esposito; G. Grieco; D. Summa; R. Restieri; G. Masiello; T. Maestri; R. Rizzi; P. Antonelli; S. Mango; G. Pisani

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mesoscale Modeling of Boundary Layer Refractivity and Atmospheric Ducting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study four mesoscale forecasting systems were used to investigate the four-dimensional structure of atmospheric refractivity and ducting layers that occur within evolving synoptic conditions over the eastern seaboard of the United States. ...

Tracy Haack; Changgui Wang; Sally Garrett; Anna Glazer; Jocelyn Mailhot; Robert Marshall

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Material Sustainability Issues for the North American Electric Power Industry: Results of Research with Electric Power Companies and Stakeholders in the United States and Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of research regarding sustainability issues faced by the electric power industry. Specifically, the research effort was directed toward identifying which sustainability issues affecting the power companies in North America are considered to be the most relevant, or material, and gathering perspectives on those issues from the industry and its stakeholders.The research team collected information from three sources: direct interviews with utility managers and ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1-2 Nm Particle First Measurements of Neutral Atmospheric Cluster and 1-2 Nm Particle Number Distributions During Nucleation Events Download a printable PDF Submitter: McMurry, P. ., University of Minnesota Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jiang J, J Zhao, M Chen, J Scheckman, BJ Williams, FL Eisele, and PH McMurry. 2011. "First measurements of neutral atmospheric cluster and 1-2 nm particle number distributions during nucleation events." Aerosol Science and Technology, 45, doi:10.1080/02786826.2010.546817. Jiang J, M Chen, C Kuang, M Attoui, and PH McMurry. 2011. "Electrical mobility spectrometer using a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter for measurement of aerosol size distributions down to 1 nm."

264

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap Download a printable PDF Submitter: Naud, C. M., Columbia University/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Del Genio, A. D., NASA Mace, G., Utah State University Benson, S., Utah State University Clothiaux, E. E., Pennsylvania State University Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Naud, C, A Del Genio, GG Mace, S Benson, EE Clothiaux, and P Kollias. "Impact of dynamics and atmospheric state on cloud vertical overlap." Journal of Climate 218: 1758-1770. Mean overlap parameter α as a function of separation: (a,b) at SGP for all winter months of 2002-2004 and for 4 subsets of increasing 500 mb ω such

265

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of Climate, 24, 1897-1912. This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the mean conditions on Earth. The current study

266

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Submitter: Pawlak, D. T., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pawlak, DT, EJ Clothiaux, MF Modest, and JNS Cole. 2004. Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 61: 2588-2601. Of all the physical and dynamical calculations required in numerical weather prediction and climate modeling, radiation calculations consume the most computational time. This is because the radiation transfer physics of the atmosphere involve molecular absorption that occurs in narrowly defined absorption bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The exact location in the

267

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR Wm-2) signals in the tropics averaged between 10°S and 10°N from (a) a regional simulation with moisture constrained by observations and (b) NOAA-CPC satellite observations. The lines mark the eastward MJO propagation speed of 4 m/s. The constrained model is able to reproduce the key OLR features in the observations. Originating over the Indian Ocean, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an equatorial planetary-scale envelope of complex multi-scale cloud systems

268

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Preferred States of the Winter Arctic Atmosphere, Surface, and Sub-Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Stramler K, AD Del Genio, and WB Rossow. 2011. "Synoptically driven Arctic winter states." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3817.1. SHEBA winter hourly surface net (down - up) longwave radiation flux versus surface temperature. Blue circles indicate times when a combined radar-lidar cloud detection indicated clear skies, and red plus signs indicate times when clouds were detected. Time series of SHEBA winter hourly temperatures at the atmospheric temperature inversion altitude (magenta), surface (black), snow-sea ice

269

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1. Illustration of daytime heating producing a thermal internal boundary layer effect over Nauru, which in turn produces cumulous clouds above the boundary layer. Figure 2. Illustration of Nauru heat-island produced by convective rolls forming cloud streets. Figure 3. Satellite images of Nauru on December 13, 2000 showing the cloud

270

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean profiles of (first column) total precipitation normalized Q1, (second column) convective precipitation normalized convective heating, (third column) stratiform heating, and (fourth column) convective mass flux for the (top) wet, (middle) dry, and (bottom) break period from models and available observational estimates. Dashed lines are fine resolution model results. Note the different x axis scale for the third and fourth columns. An intercomparison of global atmospheric model simulations of tropical

271

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Tropical Radiosonde Comparisons May Improve Past and Present Humidity Data Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Westwater, E.R., B.B. Stankov, D.Cimini, Y. Han, J.A. Shaw, B.M. Lesht, C.N. Long, 2003, Radiosonde Humidity Soundings and Microwave Radiometers during Nauru99, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, Vol. 21. ARM's Nauru99 campaign provided a rare opportunity to compare original and corrected land-based radiosonde temperature and humidity measurements with those obtained at sea. (ARM photo) Key Contributors: B. B. Stankov, D. Cimini, Y. Han, J. A Shaw, B. M. Lesht, C. N. Long Along the equator in the Central Pacific, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation

272

English Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

English Units. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: English Units, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (ft.), 0, ft. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

Unit Conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... volume flow units, which contain "atm", assume that the gas is: ideal; at a pressure of 101325 Pa; at a temperature of 0 °C. Be aware that the unit "atm ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Atmospheric Science Experiments Applicable to Space Shuttle Spacelab Missions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present lack of a lower atmosphere research satellite program for the 1980s has prompted consideration of the Space Shuttle/Spacelab system as a means of flying sensor complements geared toward specific research problems, as well as continued ...

F. R. Robertson; S. J. Goodman; G. S. Wilson; H. J. Christian Jr.; G. H. Fichtl; W. W. Vaughan

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

276

United States Environmental Protection Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Salford, Salford, UK. Nigel Langford is in the BNFL Corporate Communication Research Unit, University of Salford, Salford, UK. Richard J. Varey is in the BNFL Corporate Communication Research Unit University Press . ISSN 1356-3289 #12;As organizations grow and segment through specialization, so do zones

277

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

278

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: DeSlover, D. H. 1996. Analysis of Visible and Infrared Cirrus Cloud Optical Properties Using High Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing, M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ho, S.-P. 1997. Atmospheric Profiles From Simultaneous Observations of Upwelling and Downwelling Spectral Radiance, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Knuteson, R. O., F. A. Best, H. B. Howell, P. Minnett, H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith. 1997. "High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations at the Ocean-Atmosphere Interface in the Tropical Western Pacific using a Marine

279

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

280

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Indirect Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Platnick, S., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Platnick, S, and L Oreopoulos. 2008. "Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 1. Theoretical analysis and examples from MODIS." Journal of Geophysical Research doi:10.1029/2007JD009654, in press. Oreopoulos, L., and S. Platnick. 2008. Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2007JD009655, in press. Theoretical calculations with a shortwave broadband radiative transfer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Wang, T., State University of New York, Albany Duan, M., Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Min Q, T Wang, CN Long, and M Duan. 2008. "Estimating fractional sky cover from spectral measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D20208, doi:10.1029/2008JD010278. Retrieved and observed cloud fractions and corresponding TSI cloud imagers on 8 July 2005 at Pt. Reyes. Scatterplot of retrieved cloud fraction from spectral ratio method and SW

282

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud The Surprisingly Large Contribution of Small Marine Clouds to Cloud Fraction and Reflectance Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Feingold, G., NOAA - Earth System Research Laboratory Koren, I., Weizmann Institute of Science Remer, L., NASA - GSFC, Laboratory for Atmospheres Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Koren, I, L Oreopoulos, G Feingold, LA Remer, and O Altaratz. 2008. "How small is a small cloud?" Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Journal, in press Cloud mask for a sparse cumulus cloud field as inferred by using the same threshold at four different spatial resolutions. The upper-left panel is for the original Landsat resolution and the lower-right panel is for a

283

ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ix ix Acrononyms and Abbreviations Acronyms and Abbreviations ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System ACSYS Arctic Climate System Study AER Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AFOSR Air Force Office of Scientific Research AGARD Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development ALFA AER Local Forecast and Assimilation (model) AMIP Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project ARCS Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Stations ARCSS Arctic System Science (NSF) ARCSYM Arctic Regional Climate System Model ARINC Aerodynamic Research Incorporated Communication ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program AS anvil stratus ASTER Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research ASTEX Altantic Stratocumulus Transition EXperiment

284

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

285

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

286

per year that would otherwise be released in the atmosphere, as  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

per year that would otherwise be released in the atmosphere, as per year that would otherwise be released in the atmosphere, as well as recover 1.6 to 3.1 million additional barrels of domestic oil annually. This event also marks a milestone in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) Program by progressing beyond research and development (R&D) to a demonstration scale that can be replicated and deployed within the industry. The ICCS Program's goals are to mitigate potential climate change through CCUS, create jobs, and position the United States as a world leader in carbon capture technologies. The project is funded in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and managed by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National

287

United States Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal program. Special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, 1 December 1978-30 October 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work for the period, December 1, 1978 through October 31, 1980, is documented. The following activities are covered: project technical coordination assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance for geopressured-geothermal test wells; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface utilization program; legal research; and special projects. (MHR)

Dorfman, M.H.; Morton, R.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fourteenth Annual National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities in the United States. Phase XV. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the conduct of the Fourteenth Annual National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. This survey utilizes the survey design developed for the first annual survey, taking into account the DOE acceptances and modification of the recommendations contained in Battelle's Columbus Laboratories final report of the previous surveys. The contract scope of work specified that the survey should obtain information concerning compensation and compensation-related characteristics of both nondegreed and degreed scientists and engineers engaged in research and development. Information was to be obtained concerning both the employees and employers. The survey variables for which information was to be obtained were specified. As before, the universe specifications were to encompass industrial establishments, educational institutions, nonprofit research institutes, federal laboratories and federally funded research and development centers. The sampling plan was to be the same as for the previous surveys. The sample size was to be maintained at approximately 300 to 325 establishments. The sampling plan incorporated stratification and clustering based upon: (1) establishment size in terms of numbers of scientists and engineers employed; and (2) size of the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) in terms of scientists and engineers in the area. Trend analyses, showing changes in salary levels over a five-year period, were to be prepared. Tabulated results of the survey are presented.

Spurgeon, M.; Evans, P.; Beatty, G.H.; Arnold, L.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Phase XIV: the thirteenth annual national survey of compensation paid to scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thirteenth Annual National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development in 1980 is summarized. The contract scope of work specified that the survey should obtain information concerning compensation and compensation-related characteristics of both nondegreed and degreed scientists and engineers engaged in research and development. Information was to be obtained concerning both the employees and employers. The survey variables for which information was to be obtained were specified. As before, the universe specifications were to encompass industrial establishments, educational institutions, nonprofit research institutes, federal laboratories, and federally funded research and development centers. The sampling plan was to be the same as for the previous surveys. The sample size was to be maintained at approximately 300 to 325 establishments. The sampling plan incorporated stratification and clustering based upon (a) establishment size in terms of numbers of scientists and engineers employed and (b) size of the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) in terms of scientists and engineers in the area. Trend analyses, showing changes in salary levels over a five-year period, were to be prepared.

Newborg, J.; Gabel, J.; Beatty, G.H.; Spurgeon, M.; Newman, S.

1980-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications in green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and fire safety. A related issue is the degree to which new standards are adopted and enforced. In the U.S., standards are developed using a consensus process, and local government agencies are free to implement these standards or to ignore them. For example, some U.S. states are still using 2003 versions of the building efficiency standards. There is also a great variation in the degree to which the locally adopted standards are enforced in different U.S. cities and states. With a more central process in China, these issues are different, but possible impacts of variable enforcement efficacy may also exist. Therefore, current building codes in China will be compared to the current state of building fire-safety and energy-efficiency codes in the U.S. and areas for possible improvements in both countries will be explored. In particular, the focus of the applications in China will be on green buildings. The terminology of 'green buildings' has different meanings to different audiences. The U.S. research is interested in both new, green buildings, and on retrofitting existing inefficient buildings. An initial effort will be made to clarify the scope of the pertinent wall insulation systems for these applications.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Song, Bo [China Academy of Building Research; Zhang, Sisi [China Academy of Building Research

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Department of Defense report on the merit-review process for competitive selection of university research projects and an analysis of the potential for expanding the geographic distribution of research for the committees on appropriations, United States Congress  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to the Committee on Conference request, DoD Appropriations Act, 1987 as set forth in the following. With the establishment of the University Research Initiative in fiscal year 1986 and rising funds for the Strategic Defense Initiative, the Department of Defense's investment in university-based research is increasing. Consequently, the appropriations committees need to ensure that the peer-review process for the allocation of university funding is working effectively, and that mechanisms are in pace to broaden the base of DoD university research commensurate with these increasing resources. Therefore, the conferees direct the Department of Defense to submit a report to the appropriations committees by March 1, 1987, which (1) explains in detail the current peer-review process in a step-by-step fashion; (2) explains current participants in this process, including peer-review panels, boards, or conferences, and how such peer reviewers are evaluated and chosen; and (3) an analysis of the potential for expanding the research base into geographical areas which at the present time receive little defense-related university funding. This report explains DoD's merit-review process and the participants in that process and also describes the current distribution of DoD research funding to universities and the potential for geographic expansion.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

United States Gulf Coast Geopressured Geothermal Program: special projects research and coordination assistance. Final report, October 1, 1977-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities involved in the coordination assistance function are reviewed including: technical assistance and liaison; technical assistance for review and evaluation of proposals and contract results; technical assistance and coordination for geopressure geothermal test well; technical assistance, coordination, and planning of surface component test facility; legal research in geopressure geothermal resource development; and operation of geopressure geothermal information service. This function takes the form of providing liaison with various industrial components that participate in the program and with state and local agencies. (MHR)

Dorfman, M.H.; Bebout, D.G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Strategic Activities to Address Material Sustainability Issues in the Electric Power Industry: Results of Research with Electric Power Companies and Stakeholders in the United States and Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses activities that electric utilities can take to address the 15 key “material” sustainability issues that were identified in Material Sustainability Issues for the North American Electric Power Industry (EPRI report 3002000920). This report adds insight to that previous analysis by considering activities and actions for addressing the 15 material sustainability issues. Overall, the research identified 145 possible activities across all 15 material issues, and ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

294

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

295

The Impact of Land Surface and Atmospheric Initialization on Seasonal Forecasts with CCSM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Series of forecast experiments for two seasons investigate the impact of specifying realistic initial states of the land in conjunction with the observed states of the ocean and atmosphere while using the National Center for Atmospheric Research (...

Daniel A. Paolino; James L. Kinter III; Ben P. Kirtman; Dughong Min; David M. Straus

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

W.-C. Wang X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York 100 Fuller Road Albany, NY 12205 We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation...

297

Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere–Ice Response to Variations in the Southern Annular Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coupled ocean–atmosphere–ice response to variations in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is examined in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Coupled Climate Model (version 2). The model shows considerable skill in ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Matthew H. England

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Evolution of Climate Sensitivity and Climate Feedbacks in the Community Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major evolution of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is used to diagnose climate feedbacks, understand how climate feedbacks change with different physical parameterizations, and identify the ...

A. Gettelman; J. E. Kay; K. M. Shell

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Spatial Variability of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure over the Eastern Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in the atmospheric boundary layer structure over the eastern equatorial Pacific are analyzed using 916 soundings collected during the First Global Atmospheric Research Program Global Experiment. Unstable boundary layer structures are ...

Bingfan Yin; Bruce A. Albrecht

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

One-Way Coupling of an Atmospheric and a Hydrologic Model in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the accuracy of high-resolution nested mesoscale model simulations of surface climate. The nesting capabilities of the atmospheric fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University (PSU)–National Center for Atmospheric Research (...

L. E. Hay; M. P. Clark; M. Pagowski; G. H. Leavesley; W. J. Gutowski Jr.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The NCEP–NCAR, NCEP–DOE, and TRMM Tropical Atmosphere Hydrologic Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates for the tropical atmospheric hydrologic cycle from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP–NCAR) reanalysis I (RI), the NCEP–Department of Energy (NCEP–DOE) reanalysis II (RII), ...

John Roads

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

banner banner Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments Measurements Data News Publications Education Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings Propose a Campaign Submitting Proposals: Guidelines Featured Campaigns Campaign Data List of Campaigns Aerial Facility Eastern North Atlantic Mobile Facilities North Slope of Alaska Southern Great Plains Tropical Western Pacific Location Table Contacts Instrument Datastreams Value-Added Products PI Data Products Field Campaign Data Related Data

303

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

304

Metric Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: Metric Units, Elevation Converter, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (m), 0, m, ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

306

ORISE: Center for Epidemiologic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occupational health studies and DOE worker populations. ORISE's researchers and skills coalesced into an operating unit that became the Center for Epidemiologic Research...

307

Standard model atmospheres for A-type stars and non-LTE effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The current status of NLTE model atmosphere calculations of A type stars is reviewed. During the last decade the research has concentrated on solving the restricted NLTE line formation problem for trace elements assuming LTE model atmospheres. There is a general lack of calculated NLTE line blanketed model atmospheres for A type stars, despite the availability of powerful methods and computer codes that are able to solve this task. Some directions for future model atmosphere research are suggested.

Daniela Kor?áková

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Building and Fire Research Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 4827 Building and Fire Research Laboratory Publications, 1991 Nora H. Jason N lsr United States Department ...

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Land Surface Heterogeneity in the Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97). Part II: Analysis of Spatial Heterogeneity and Its Scaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiscale atmospheric forcing data at 1-, 5-, and 10-km scales from the 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) were used to drive three uncoupled land surface models: the National Center for Atmospheric Research Land ...

David N. Yates; Fei Chen; Haruyasu Nagai

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

300 300 84-ER-14 Vitreous State Laboratory... . --- 5rooo 84-ER-15 National Center for Chemical -. Research .,.,,,..,.,,,..*..ll...* --- 51000...

311

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Submitter: Lovejoy, S., McGill University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lovejoy, S., D. Schertzer, J. D. Stanway, 2001: "Direct Evidence of planetary scale atmospheric cascade dynamics," Phys. Rev. Lett. 86(22): 5200-5203. Left: Power spectrum of the 5 different aircraft measured liquid water data sets from the FIRE experiment (averaged over 10 equally logarithmically spaced points on the k-axis and vertically offset). The absolute slopes with Î’ = 1.45 is indicated (straight line on top of graph) for reference. The number of sets used to compute the average from top to bottom: 4, 3, 1, 2, 5. A constant aircraft speed of 100m/s has been assumed. Right: Ensemble

312

Research Highlight  

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Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation of Surface Models Submitter: Robock, A., Rutgers University Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Robock, A., Luo, L., Wood, E. F., Wen, F., Mitchell, K. E., Houser, P. R., Schaake, J. C., Lohmann, D., Cosgrove, B., Sheffield, J., Duan, Q., Higgins, R. W., Pinker, R. T., Tarpley, J. D., Basara, J. D., Crawford, K. C., Evaluation of the North American Land Data Assimilation System over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D22), 8846, doi:10.1029/2002JD003245, 2003 An example of the model discrepancies is shown in a comparison of monthly mean diurnal cycle data from July 1999 at the ARM Southern Great Plains

313

Research Highlight  

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Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Improved Simulation of Boundary Layer Clouds Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Comparison of Boundary Layer Clouds Schemes in Climate Models with Satellite Observations Key Contributors: James McCaa, as part of his Ph.D. dissertation at University of Washington Chris Bretherton, University of Washington Dennis Hartmann, University of Washington Steven Ghan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine boundary layer clouds are among the most difficult clouds to represent in climate models. A team of atmospheric scientists from the University of Washington (UW) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

314

Research Highlight  

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A Comparison of Integrated Water Vapor Sensors: WVIOP-96 A Comparison of Integrated Water Vapor Sensors: WVIOP-96 Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 The 1996 Water Vapor Intensive Operations Period (WVIOP-96) was conducted at the SGP CART central facility in September in order to assess the skill of a wide variety of sensors in measuring atmospheric water vapor. Here we present a comparison of radiometric brightness temperatures (TB) and vertically-integrated or "precipitable" water vapor (PWV) amounts derived from eight collocated ARM microwave radiometers, as well as microwave radiometers from the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory

315

Research Highlight  

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a Cloud-Resolving Model to Identify the Role of Aerosols on Clouds a Cloud-Resolving Model to Identify the Role of Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Tao, W., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol, Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Tao, W.-K., X. Li, A. Khain, T. Matsui, S. Lang, and J. Simpson, 2007: The role of atmospheric aerosol concentration on deep convective precipitation: Cloud-resolving model simulations. J. Geophy. Res., (accepted). Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Lang, A. Y. Hou, M. Zhang, and J. Simpson, 2007: On the sensitivity of atmospheric ensemble states to cloud microphyics in long-term cloud-resolving model simulations. J. Meteor. Soc. Jpn., (submitted). Figure 1. Dirty environment (or high CCN) enhances precipitation in a

316

Research Highlight  

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Comparisons Between Radiosondes and Remote Sensors During the 2004 NSA Comparisons Between Radiosondes and Remote Sensors During the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mattioli, V, ER Westwater, D Cimini, JS Liljegren, BM Lesht, SI Gutman, and FJ Schmidlin. 2007. "Analysis of radiosonde and ground-based remotely sensed PWV data from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 243: 415-431. Description of radiosondes launched during the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment. Dual-radiosonde launch of the Vaisala RS90 and Chilled Mirror radiosondes is pictured here.

317

Research Highlight  

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More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cappa CD, TB Onasch, P Massoli, DR Worsnop, TS Bates, ES Cross, P Davidovits, J Hakala, KL Hayden, BT Jobson, KR Kolesar, DA Lack, BM Lerner, SM Li, D Mellon, I Nuaaman, JS Olfert, T Petaja, PK Quinn, C Song, R Subramanian, EJ Williams, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon." Science, 337(6098), doi:10.1126/science.1223447. Black to the core: Scientists are combining field and laboratory measurements to understand more about the physical properties of aerosols

318

Research Highlight  

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New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part I: theoretical development." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-040.1. Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part II: parcel model corroboration." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0152.1. A close-up of ice crystals. Ever noticed the different shapes of snowflakes sticking on the windowpane

319

Research Highlight  

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Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of height versus time displays obtained on July 29, 2002, during the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment. Depicted are strong depolarizing upper tropospheric clouds (~10km), aerosols (δ ~.10 to .15) extending up to ~5.5km, and at lower right (scale adjusted to account for signal

320

Research Highlight  

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First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Heavy loading of aerosols in China is widely known, but little is known about their impact on regional radiation budgets, which is often expressed as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Depending on their composition, aerosols can absorb a substantial amount of solar radiation, leading to a warming of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface. Many investigations have been made to characterize atmospheric aerosols and their radiative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McComiskey A and G Feingold. 2012. "The scale problem in quantifying aerosol indirect effects." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-1031-2012. Differing values: Values derived from aircraft and surface observations, which represent disaggregated data, differ from those derived from satellite-based data, which represent data aggregated at a range of levels. Currently, many climate change models treat the two types of data the same. Aerosols-tiny airborne particles from sources like pollution or desert

322

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, and P. Yang, 2003: "Cloud Phase Determination Using Ground-Based AERI Observations at SHEBA," Journal of Applied Meteorology 42(6):701-715. The SHEBA experiment in Barrow, Alaska used data collected by the ground-based radiation observations from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). (Photo Credit: SHEBA Project Office) Key Contributors: S.A. Ackerman, B.A. Baum, H.E. Revercomb, P. Yang, In the frigid environs of the Acrtic, ARM scientists at the North Slope of

323

Research Highlight  

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Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tridon F, A Battaglia, P Kollias, E Luke, and C Williams. 2013. "Signal post-processing and reflectivity calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915 MHz wind profilers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(6), doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00146.1. Because ARM's wind profilers (foreground) can take vertical as well as horizontal measurements, the instruments can be used with appropriate processing and calibration to help study rainfall. For more than two decades, radar wind profilers of the U.S. Department of

324

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees When Pollution Gets a Whiff of Trees Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shilling, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Shilling JE, RA Zaveri, JD Fast, L Kleinman, M Alexander, MR Canagaratna, E Fortner, JM Hubbe, JT Jayne, A Sedlacek, A Setyan, S Springston, DR Worsnop, and Q Zhang. 2013. "Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-2091-2013. Organic aerosols from tree emissions increase when mixed with manmade sources, impacting the climate. It's easy to visualize particles and gases from vehicle exhaust or burning trash wafting into the atmosphere. It's harder to envision similar gases

325

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Progress Towards Climate Projections of Central U.S. Rainfall Using a Global Model with Embedded Explicit Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Pritchard, M. S., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Pritchard MS, MW Moncrieff, and RC Somerville. 2011. "Orogenic propagating precipitation systems over the US in a global climate model with embedded explicit convection." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68, doi:10.1175/2011JAS3699.1. Characteristic time-longitude structure of central U.S. summer diurnal convection (35-45 N) (a) as observed in 2005 from space-borne infrared imagers, and as simulated by (b) the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) v3.5

326

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Increased Accuracy for Sky Imager Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Long CN. 2010. "Correcting for circumsolar and near-horizon errors in sky cover retrievals from sky images." The Open Atmospheric Science Journal, 4, doi:10.2174/1874282301004010045. Long CN, JM Sabburg, J Calbo, and D Pages. 2006. "Retrieving cloud characteristics from ground-based daytime all-sky images." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 23, 633-652. Sample sky image (left) and corresponding cloud decision image (right) showing an example of the over-estimating problem. White and gray in the

327

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. Radiative cooling across the full infrared spectrum: The far-infrared (the left half of the figure, from 15 to 1000 microns) plays a key role in heat transfer in the atmosphere, but scientists could not measure it, and model calculations were consequently very uncertain. Field observations from

328

Research Highlight  

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Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Crewell, S., University of Cologne Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ebell, K., University of Cologne Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lohnert U, DD Turner, and S Crewell. 2009. "Ground-based temperature and humidity profiling using spectral infrared and microwave observations. Part I: Simulated retrieval performance in clear-sky conditions." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 48(5), 1017-1032. Crewell S, K Ebell, U Loehnert, and DD Turner. 2009. "Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?"

329

Research Highlight  

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Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Keppel-Aleks, G., University of Michigan Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Keppel-Aleks G, JT Randerson, K Lindsay, BB Stephens, JK Moore, SC Doney, PE Thornton, NM Mahowald, FM Hoffman, C Sweeney, PP Tans, PO Wennberg, and SC Wofsy. 2013. "Atmospheric carbon dioxide variability in the Community Earth System Model: evaluation and transient dynamics during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries." Journal of Climate, 26(13), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00589.1. How models, such as the Community Earth System Model, simulate the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere will likely hold the key to monitoring climate

330

Utah Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 10 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southeast United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Geothermal Operations/Research project was initiated to investigate geothermal development in the five states within the region: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Although the region changed during the first year to include Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the project objectives and procedures remained unchanged. The project was funded by the DOE/DGE and the Four Corners Regional Commission with participation by the New Mexico Energy Resources Board. The study was coordinated by the New Mexico Energy Institute at New Mexico State University, acting through a 'Core Team'. A 'state' team, assigned by the states, conducted the project within each state. This report details most of the findings of the first year's efforts by the Utah Operations/Research team. It is a conscientious effort to report the findings and activities of the Utah team, either explicitly or by reference. The results are neither comprehensive nor final, and should be regarded as preliminary efforts to much of what the Operations/Research project was envisioned to accomplish. In some cases the report is probably too detailed, in other cases too vague; hopefully, however, the material in the report, combined with the Appendices, will be able to serve as source material for others interested in geothermal development in Utah.

Green, Stanley; Wagstaff, Lyle W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Utah Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 10 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southeast United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Regional Geothermal Operations/Research project was initiated to investigate geothermal development in the five states within the region: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Although the region changed during the first year to include Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming, the project objectives and procedures remained unchanged. The project was funded by the DOE/DGE and the Four Corners Regional Commission with participation by the New Mexico Energy Resources Board. The study was coordinated by the New Mexico Energy Institute at New Mexico State University, acting through a 'Core Team'. A 'state' team, assigned by the states, conducted the project within each state. This report details most of the findings of the first year's efforts by the Utah Operations/Research team. It is a conscientious effort to report the findings and activities of the Utah team, either explicitly or by reference. The results are neither comprehensive nor final, and should be regarded as preliminary efforts to much of what the Operations/Research project was envisioned to accomplish. In some cases the report is probably too detailed, in other cases too vague; hopefully, however, the material in the report, combined with the Appendices, will be able to serve as source material for others interested in geothermal development in Utah.

Green, Stanley; Wagstaff, Lyle W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Simulation of Atmospheric Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral atmospheric circulation model is time-integrated for approximately 18 years. The model has a global computational domain and realistic geography and topography. The model undergoes an annual cycle as daily values of seasonally varying ...

Syukuro Manabe; Douglas G. Hahn

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Atmospheric Laser Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly ...

Kenneth W. Fischer*Michael R. Witiw; Jeffrey A. Baars+; T. R. Oke

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Atmospheric Available Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total potential energy of the atmosphere is the sum of its internal and gravitational energies. The portion of this total energy available to be converted into kinetic energy is determined relative to an isothermal, hydrostatic, equilibrium ...

Peter R. Bannon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Atmospheric optical calibration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

University Corporation for Atmospheric Research National Center for Atmospheric Research UCAR Office of Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NCAR), we submit the following recommendations for the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 the following specific recommendations for the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009: 1) Retain The Honorable Henry A. Waxman The Honorable Joe Barton Chairman Ranking Member Committee on Energy

338

New Mexico Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. Appendix 9 of regional operations research program for development of geothermal energy in the Southwest United States. Final technical report, June 1977--August 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the findings and conclusions of the New Mexico Team during the first project year of the Southwest Regional Geothermal Development Operations Research Project. The purpose of this project is to help realize a goal of the USDOE , Division of Geothermal Energy (DOE/DGE), to accelerate the actual commercial utilization of geothermal energy. This was done by: (1) identifying the potential for development of geothermal energy in the five-state regions of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah; and (2) identifying the actions needed to accomplish that development.

Ortiz, Thomas A.; Fedor, Dennis

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home United States and South Africa Sign Agreement on Cooperation in Nuclear Energy Research and Development United States...

340

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting the Pieces Together Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T07, doi:10.1029/2010JD015375. PNNL's Arctic mixed-phase cloud research was augmented with field observations from the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in Northern Alaska. Photo courtesy of A. Korolev, Environment Canada. Vertical cross sections of (a) the vertical velocity (the contour lines)

342

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., NOAA - Coop. Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. "Representing the ice fall speed in climate models: Results from Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T03, doi:10.1029/2010JD015433. Relationship between De and Vm for all tropical cirrus cloud types (solid

343

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sun L, R Sun, XW Li, SL Liang, and RH Zhang. 2012. "Monitoring surface soil moisture status based on remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation index information." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.015. Shown here is the SGP Central Facility, where the most comprehensive instrument suite is hosted. Moisture trapped in soil provides water necessary for vegetation and crops, but how much of that moisture makes its way into the atmosphere and influences regional meteorology? The poor understanding of the role of soil

344

Characteristics of Land–Atmosphere Interaction Parameters over the Tibetan Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, eddy covariance flux data collected from three research stations on the Tibetan Plateau—Qomolangma for Atmospheric and Environmental Observation and Research, Nam Co for Multisphere Observation and Research, and Southeast Tibet ...

Shuzhou Wang; Yaoming Ma

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Development of a Coupled Groundwater–Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete models of the hydrologic cycle have gained recent attention as research has shown interdependence between the coupled land and energy balance of the subsurface, land surface, and lower atmosphere. PF.WRF is a new model that is a ...

Reed M. Maxwell; Julie K. Lundquist; Jeffrey D. Mirocha; Steven G. Smith; Carol S. Woodward; Andrew F. B. Tompson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Energy Budget of the Polar Atmosphere in MERRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Components of the atmospheric energy budget from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) are evaluated in polar regions for the period 1979–2005 and compared with previous estimates, in situ observations, and ...

Richard I. Cullather; Michael G. Bosilovich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Moisture Budget of the Polar Atmosphere in MERRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric moisture budget from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) is evaluated in polar regions for the period 1979–2005 and compared with previous estimates, accumulation syntheses over polar ice ...

Richard I. Cullather; Michael G. Bosilovich

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

Johnson, Robert E., E-mail: rej@virginia.ed [Engineering Physics, Thornton Hall B102, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Lake-atmosphere feedbacks associated with paleolakes Bonneville and Lahontan  

SciTech Connect

A high-resolution, regional climate model nested within a general circulation model was used to study the interactions between the atmosphere and the large Pleistocene lakes in the Great Basin of the United States. Simulations for January and July 18,000 years ago indicate that moisture provided by synoptic-scale atmospheric circulation features was the primary component of the hydrologic budgets of Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville. In addition, lake-generated precipitation was a substantial component of the hydrologic budget of Lake Bonneville at that time. This local lake-atmosphere interaction may help explain differences in the relative size of these lakes 18,000 years ago.

Hostetler, S.W. (Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States)); Giorgi, F.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Bartlein, P.J. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States))

1994-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

351

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

352

Article Atmospheric Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

353

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric moisture The moisture content of the air as indicated by several measurements including relative humidity, specific humidity, dewpoint, vapor pressure, water vapor mixing ratio, and water vapor density; note that precipitable water is a separate type. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer

354

Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal sum ...

355

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

356

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

357

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

358

Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

360

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

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361

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

362

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

363

Simulation of the atmospheric behavior for the environment of a small-scale wind turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates a method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model low-elevation atmospheric conditions. There are three goals in this research: to analyze the… (more)

Nguyen, Viet

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is time for the atmospheric science community to lay to rest these discussions of extreme solar absorption in cloudy atmospheric columns. ARESE I ran from September 22 through...

365

Automated Sample collection and Analysis unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Autoramp is an atmospheric radionuclide collection and analysis unit designed for unattended operation. A large volume of air passes through one of 31 filter cartridges which is then moved from a sampling chamber and past a bar code reader, to a shielded enclosure. The collected dust-borne radionuclides are counted with a high resolution germanium gamma-ray detector. An analysis is made and the results are transmitted to a central station that can also remotely control the unit.

Latner, Norman; Sanderson, Colin G.; Negro, Vincent C.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Precomputed atmospheric scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new and accurate method to render the atmosphere in real time from any viewpoint from ground level to outer space, while taking Rayleigh and Mie multiple scattering into account. Our method reproduces many effects of the scattering of light, ...

Eric Bruneton; Fabrice Neyret

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Research Highlight  

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Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, D Liu, and M Zhao. 2012. "Quantifying the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, L18805, doi:10.1029/2012GL052831. An example of dusty MSSC: (a) CALIOP TAB profiles at 532nm; (b) CALIOP depolarization profiles at 532nm; (c) CloudSat CPR radar reflectivity profiles; (d) Identified dust layers and MSSC; (e) Global distribution of

368

Research Highlight  

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Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

369

Research Highlight  

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Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of the precipitable water vapor observed by the Raman lidar and the collocated microwave radiometer. The time-height cross sections, as well as the integrated field, show the large variability in water vapor that exists over the ARM Southern Great Plains site. After years of sustained research efforts into the accuracy of atmospheric

370

Research Highlight  

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How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D ≥ 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles

371

Research Highlight  

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CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences CCN and Vertical Velocity Influences Submitter: Hudson, J. G., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Hudson JG and S Noble. 2013. "CCN and vertical velocity influences on droplet concentrations and supersaturations in clean and polluted stratus clouds." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, , . ACCEPTED. Figure 1. Effective cloud supersaturation (Seff) against CCN concentration at 1% S (N1%) for horizontal cloud penetrations, 50 for MASE and 34 for POST. Seff is the S for which nearby below cloud CCN spectra, NCCN(S), equals mean droplet concentration (Nc). Figure 2. One second droplet concentration, Nc, and vertical velocity

372

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Aerosols Help Heat Up the Yangtze River Delta in China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Flynn, C. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu J, Z Li, Y Zheng, C Flynn, and M Cribb. 2012. "Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D00K38, doi:10.1029/2011JD016490. A team of scientists found that aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Aerosols were identified from as far away as Mongolia and Siberia. These findings have considerable implications for atmospheric

373

Research Highlight  

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Invisible Giants in the Sky Invisible Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovink, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Photo courtesy of the U.S. National Park Service Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and

374

Research Highlight  

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Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: Climatology of Aerosol Optical Depth in North-Central Oklahoma: 1992-2008 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Michalsky J, F Denn, C Flynn, G Hodges, P Kiedron, A Koontz, J Schlemmer, and SE Schwartz. 2010. "Climatology of aerosol optical depth in north-central Oklahoma: 1992-2008." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D07203, doi: 10.1029/2009JD012197. Box plots of each complete year\'s daily averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm. The dark horizontal line in each box plot is the median daily averaged AOD for the year; the top and bottom of the rectangular box spans the middle 50% of the data. The mean values for the year are plotted

375

Research Highlight  

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Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kishcha, P., Tel-Aviv University Starobinets, B., Tel-Aviv University Kalashnikova, O., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alpert, P., Tel-Aviv University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Kishcha P, B Starobinets, O Kalashnikova, CN Long, and P Alpert. 2009. "Variations of meridional aerosol distribution and solar dimming." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D14, 10.1029/2008JD010975. The distribution of four-year aerosol differences (δAOT/δFAOT) between the last four years (March 2004 - February 2008) and the first four years

376

Research Highlight  

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Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds Understanding Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Boundary-Layer Clouds During ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Avramov A, AS Ackerman, AM Fridlind, B van Diedenhoven, G Botta, K Aydin, J Verlinde, KV Alexei, W Strapp, GM McFarquhar, R Jackson, SD Brooks, A Glen, and M Wolde. 2011. "Towards ice formation closure in Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T08, doi:10.1029/2011JD015910. Ice number size distributions as simulated (dendrites in red, aggregates in

377

Research Highlight  

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Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 45, 2006, pp. 210-235. Figure 1 Figure 2 Because surface reflection of solar radiation plays a fundamental role in the surface energy budget, knowledge of its spatial and temporal variability is important for understanding the weather and climate of a specific region. Research instrumentation at the U.S. Southern Great Plains site-one of three locales around the world managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program-continuously collects these types of data to help scientist investigate differences in

378

Research Highlight  

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Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: McComiskey, A, SE Schwartz, B Schmid, H Guan, ER Lewis, P Ricchiazzi, and JA Ogren. 2008. "Direct aerosol forcing: Calculation from observables and sensitivities to inputs." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D09202, doi:10.1029/2007JD009170. Figure 1. The sensitivity of calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing to input parameters has been examined to determine the consequences of uncertainties in these input parameters on calculated radiative forcing and to identify areas where measurements might be most profitably improved. Input

379

Research Highlight  

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Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation." Environmental Research Letters, 7(4), 044007, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the concrete roof is considerably more reflective than the tar roof

380

Research Highlight  

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Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Climate Warming Due to Soot and Smoke? Maybe Not. Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Penner, J.E., S.Y. Zhang, and C.C. Chuang, Soot and smoke aerosol may not warm climate, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D21), 4657, doi:10.1029/2003JD003409, 2003. New research results from the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program suggest that fossil fuel soot emissions and biomass smoke may actually have a negligible warming effect and, in some cases, may even result in a net cooling effect. Black carbon is the absorbing component of smoke aerosols that result from the incomplete combustion of various fuels, the most significant sources being fossil fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Research Highlight  

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Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, S Niu, S Krueger, and T Wagner. 2013. "Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(1), doi:10.1029/2012JD018464. Relationships between the three microphysical measures of homogeneous mixing degree (ψ1, ψ2, ψ3) and the two transition scale numbers (NLa, NL0), respectively. The results shown here are from the EMPM simulations.

382

Research Highlight  

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Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave CRF (black) and longwave CRF (red) for all periods with shallow cumuli. (a) Hourly average shortwave CRF (circles), binned shortwave CRF (squares); (b) total number of hourly averages for each sky cover bin; and (c) the change in shortwave TED as a function of sky cover for all hours with

383

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life The Short and the Long of Storms: Tracing a Deep Convective System's Life in the Midlatitude Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, X Dong, B Xi, S McFarlane, A Kennedy, B Lin, and P Minnis. 2012. "Life cycle of midlatitude deep convective systems in a Lagrangian framework." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117(D23), D23201, doi:10.1029/2012JD018362. The life cycle of a convective system tracked by the automated tracking algorithm in the study domain. Time increases from the top left to the bottom right, and each image represents an hour. The colors represent regions given by the hybrid classification.

384

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Hemispherical Simulations Show Impact of Aerosols on Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Rotstayn, L., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Rotstayn, L., and Y. Liu, Sensitivity of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect to an Increase in Cloud Droplet Spectral Dispersion with Droplet Number Concentration, Journal of Climate: Vol. 16, No. 21, pp.3476-3481, May 2003. Figure 1. Measurements of the relation between the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet spectrum and the cloud droplet number concentration (N). The lower, middle, and upper curves show the parameterizations used in the LOWER, MIDDLE, and UPPER simulations, respectively. A recent study by DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

385

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kafle, D. N., University of California, Riverside Coulter, R. L., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kafle DN and RL Coulter. 2013. "Micropulse lidar-derived aerosol optical depth climatology at ARM sites worldwide." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(13), 10.1002/jgrd.50536. Vertical profiles of multi-year annually averaged AOD (z) at different ARM sites: SGP, NSA, TWP, GRW, and FKB. Inset plots are the profiles of corresponding relative standard deviation, Srel (z). The corresponding 1-sigma measurement errors are given in horizontal bars.

386

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovchinnikov, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ovchinnikov M, A Korolev, and J Fan. 2011. "Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T06, doi:10.1029/2011JD015888. The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively delicate but has the power to tip the balance between ice and water in Arctic clouds. This image of an ice crystal was obtained from a Cloud Particle Imager during ISDAC. The imager was mounted on aircraft flying through clouds at a speed of 100 m/s.

387

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

388

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., Tech-X Corporation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106, 10.1029/2009JD012968. The mean AERI-ER radiances for a select set of cloud-free cases at NSA in 2007 are presented in the top panel. The bottom panel presents mean spectral differences between the measurements and model calculations. The red line demonstrates the differences when using the pre-RHUBC version of

389

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Probabilistic Approach Useful for Evaluating Cloud System Models Submitter: Jakob, C., Monash University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Jakob, C., R. Pincus, C. Hannay, and K.M. Xu (2004). Use of cloud radar observations for model evaluation: A probabilistic approach, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D03202, doi:10.1029/2003JD003473. In evaluating climate models, time and space represent key challenges when extrapolating observations into simulations. Researchers supported by DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program have explored an alternative method based on "point series data" to arrive at model cloud predictions. Point series data are obtained over time through measurements

390

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern The Mixing State of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles in Northern and Southern California Measured During CARES and CalNex Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cahill JF, K Suski, JH Seinfeld, RA Zaveri, and KA Prather. 2012. "The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-10989-2012. The CARES campaign took place in Sacramento in order to sample the city's urban plume. Photo courtesy of Jason Tomlinson. Researchers, including DOE scientists working at Pacific Northwest National

391

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Absorption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. For seven AERI cases with 4-6 cm PWV: (a) average AERI radiances (black) and corresponding calculations using radiation code with previous version of MT_CKD continuum model (red); (b) residuals between AERI and calculations with older model; (c) residuals after the CO2 continuum in

392

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Invisible" Giants in the Sky "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and their PM1.0 (red) and PM2.5 (green) counterparts at the CARES (left) T0 and (right) T1 sites.

393

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Zhang Y, CN Long, WB Rossow, and EG Dutton. 2010. "Exploiting diurnal variations to evaluate the ISCCP-FD flux calculations and radiative-flux-analysis-processed surface observations from BSRN, ARM, and SURFRAD." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D00K11, 10.1029/2009JD012812. Figure 1: Scatter plot for the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, measured at the surface (PSO) and used as input for the ISCCP-FD calculations (FD) at 10 ARM/SURFRAD/BSRN stations. The robust linear regression line is also shown.

394

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds Clouds Get in the Way: How Climate Models Calculate the Effects of Clouds on Earth's Warming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Qian, Y., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Qian Y, CN Long, H Wang, JM Comstock, SA McFarlane, and S Xie. 2012. "Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12(4), doi:10.5194/acp-12-1785-2012. Clouds get in the way of the dawn light, perfectly framing the Raman lidar instrument at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. This ground-based laser is a remote sensing instrument used for measuring

395

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Vertical Size Profile Using MODIS Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ou, S., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang X, KN Liou, SS Ou, GG Mace, and M Deng. 2009. "Remote sensing of cirrus cloud vertical size profile using MODIS data." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D09205, doi:10.1029/2008JD011327. (a) MODIS true color composite images for March 6, 2001 at 1736UTC, (b) retrieved Τc; (c) retrieved Dt for selected domain; (d) retrieved Db for selected domain; (e) scatter plot for retrieved Τc versus MODIS Τc for selected domain; (f) scatter plot for retrieved De versus MODIS De for

396

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

397

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hansell, R. A., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Hansell R, KN Liou, SC Ou, SC Tsay, Q Ji, and JS Reid. 2008. "Remote sensing of mineral dust aerosol using AERI during the UAE2: A modeling and sensitivity study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D18202, doi:10.1029/2008JD010246. BT sensitivity to dust optical depth at 962 cm-1 with markers denoting locations of AERI subbands 1-17 from left to right. (a) Volz compact hexagon model spectra for four optical depths with best fit AERI spectrum. (b) Same as (a) but for a kaolinite/50% calcium carbonate mixturedust model.

398

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

399

NETL: Advanced Research - Pathways to Commercial Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Pathways to Commercial Applications CHALLENGE: Separating H2 and CO2 Pilot plant pyrolysis unit with biomass feedstack system. Pilot plant pyrolysis unit with biomass...

400

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of molecular oxygen ions in the upper-most atmosphere of Dione. March 3, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

402

UNITED STATES ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AREA CODE 615 AREA CODE 615 TELEPHONE 483-8611 March 8, 1977 Assistant Director for Health Protection, DSSC-HQ ATTN: R. H. Kennedy, DSSC-HQ ERDA RESURVEY PROGRAM - BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY, SEYMOUR, CONNECTICUT On January 26, 1977, H. W. Dickson and M. T. Ryan of ORNL and I visited the Bridgeport Brass Plant in Seymour, Connecticut, to reassess the radiological status of facilities used under AEC contract during the period 1962-64. On October 21, 1964, a closeout radiological survey of the subject facility was conducted by HASL. A copy of the report is enclosed. Data from a prior company survey is also included in the HASL report. ERDA measurements on January 26 indicated residual alpha contamination to be generally lower than that reported by HASL. Beta-gamma levels remain

403

United States Global Change Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

world. Read more... More Articles... Protect the Electric Grid from Increasingly Severe Weather Due to Climate Change, Says Joint White House and Department of Energy Report...

404

United States stem cells research boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent empirical work has demonstrated the importance of a number of elements of scientific infrastructure that seem to be crucial particularly in fields such as molecular and cellular biology in which the materiality of ...

Elichabe, Benoît

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Rail Technology Unit RTU Consultancy & Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vampire and in-house models · Vehicle-track interaction and track quality · Vehicle performance including of increased axle load including costs, benefits and component assessment · Extending asset life including haul operations are subjected to a combination of mechanical and thermal loads, both of which can

406

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

407

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

408

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

409

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

410

Hydrostatic Adjustment in Nonisothermal Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author examines hydrostatic adjustment due to heating in two nonisothermal atmospheres. In the first case both the temperature and lapse rate decrease with height; in the second case the atmosphere consists of a troposphere with constant ...

Dean G. Duffy

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Efficient rendering of atmospheric phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rendering of atmospheric bodies involves modeling the complex interaction of light throughout the highly scattering medium of water and air particles. Scattering by these particles creates many well-known atmospheric optical phenomena including rainbows, ...

Kirk Riley; David S. Ebert; Martin Kraus; Jerry Tessendorf; Charles Hansen

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Role of the Tibetan Plateau on the Annual Variation of Mean Atmospheric Circulation and Storm-Track Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reexamines how the Tibetan Plateau (TP) modulates the annual variation of atmospheric circulation and storm-track activity based on the Meteorological Research Institute's atmosphere–ocean coupled model experiments with a progressive TP ...

Sun-Seon Lee; June-Yi Lee; Kyung-Ja Ha; Bin Wang; Akio Kitoh; Yoshiyuki Kajikawa; Manabu Abe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The New GFDL Global Atmosphere and Land Model AM2–LM2: Evaluation with Prescribed SST Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The configuration and performance of a new global atmosphere and land model for climate research developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) are presented. The atmosphere model, known as AM2, includes a new gridpoint dynamical ...

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

415

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uV,./ J.r./ i L .. * i. uV,./ J.r./ i L .. * i. 0 r '± J o ,. NL . Jurt -. rur.mO rI[ V Jg, ]VJUU"/UU4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: January 10, 2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT029) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-06 SUBJECT: Review of the Independent Auditor's Report on The Institute for Genomic Research for the Year Ending December 31, 2004 * TO: Manager, Chicago Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Institute for Genomic Research (Institute) in Rockville, Maryland is a not-for- profit center that studies areas such as plant, microbial and mammalian genomics. The Institute receives funding from seven Federal agencies to advance its research and development. As required by the Office of Management and Budget (0MB)

417

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

418

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

419

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

420

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "atmospheric research united" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

422

Next Generation Rooftop Unit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit Next Generation Rooftop Unit The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research in a next generation rooftop unit (RTU). More than half of U.S. commercial building space is cooled by packaged heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Existing rooftop HVAC units consume more than 1.3% of the United States' annual energy usage annually. Project Description This project seeks to evaluate optimal design strategies for significantly improving the efficiency of rooftop units. The primary market for this project is commercial buildings, such as supermarkets and hotels. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National

423

An Air-Launched Atmospheric Sounding System (ALMET)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a system to provide standard atmospheric soundings in remote oceanic regions. Deployed from an aircraft, the expendable unit descends to within 15 m of the ocean surface on a parachute and then releases a 500-g balloon and ...

Michael A. Bellmore; D. Ray Booker; Ken Winter

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Major Unit Sponsored Funding by Academic Credit over the past three Fiscal Years Major Unit Name  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major Unit Sponsored Funding by Academic Credit over the past three Fiscal Years Major Unit Name SCIENCES $ 0$ 0$ 0 Academic and Administrative Units VP FOR RESEARCH UNITS $ 21,255,194$ 21,236,451$ 26 AND PROVOST $ 46,734$ 47,608$ 270,234 SR VP FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS UNITS $ 5,174,939$ 6,228,485$ 5,456,032 SR VP

Arnold, Jonathan

425

Retrieval of Atmospheric Temperature Profiles from AMSU-A Measurement Using a Neural Network Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Backpropagation neural networks are applied to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles and tropopause variables from the NOAA-15 Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) measurement based on two different data sources. The first case uses ...

Lei Shi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Synoptic Forcing Of Coastal-Trapped Disturbances in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by recent observations along the west coast of the United States, the authors investigate the generation and propagation of coastal-trapped disturbances in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Analytic solutions are obtained in a ...

A. M. Rogerson; R. M. Samelson

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Initial Field Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption at 9–11 ?m Wavelengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field adapted spectrophone system employing a tuneable CO2 laser source (over wavelengths 9.2–10.8 ?m) was used to measure atmospheric gaseous and particulate absorption at an isolated desert location in the southwestern United States. ...

C. W. Bruce; Y. P. Yee; B. D. Hinds; R. J. Brewer; J. Minjares; R. G. Pinnick

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attenuation of solar radiation by the atmosphere between the heliostat and receiver of a Central Receiver solar energy system has been computed for a number of atmospheric conditions and tower-heliostat distances. The most important atmospheric variable is found to be the atmospheric aerosol content. No dependence of atmospheric water vapor is found and only a weak dependence on solar zenith angle. For a 500 m heliostat-tower distance two to four percent reductions are expected under typical desert conditions (50 to 120 km visibility). The reduction is approximately linear with heliostat-tower distance. A representative value of the attenuation coefficient is 0.051 km/sup -1/.

Randall, C.M.

1977-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

The Predictability of Winter Snow Cover over the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of model runs was made with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model, version 3 (CCM3) to investigate and help assess the relative roles of snow cover anomalies and initial atmospheric states on the ...

Susan Marshall; Robert J. Oglesby; Anne W. Nolin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse gas and plays an important role in regulating the climate. Changes in water vapor from human in the atmosphere, water vapor is not counted in the United States or international greenhouse gas inventories3 . Why do greenhouse gas levels matter? Atmospheric concentrations of several important greenhouse gases

431

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

432

DART/CAM: An Ensemble Data Assimilation System for CESM Atmospheric Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) has been interfaced to the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), a community facility for ensemble data assimilation. This provides a large set of data assimilation tools for climate model research and ...

Kevin Raeder; Jeffrey L. Anderson; Nancy Collins; Timothy J. Hoar; Jennifer E. Kay; Peter H. Lauritzen; Robert Pincus

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fossil Energy Research Benefits Carbon Capture and Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Through Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Through Office of Fossil Energy (FE) research and development (R&D), the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage (CCS) science and technology. CCS is a group of technologies for effectively capturing, compressing and transporting, and permanently injecting and storing in geologic formations carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from industrial or power plants. It is one part of a wider portfolio strategy (including greater use of renewable and nuclear energy, and higher efficiencies) that many scientists and nations favor for achieving significant cuts in atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Fossil Energy Research Benefits Carbon Capture and Storage FE and its research facility, the National Energy Technology

434

NETL: News Release - Advanced Research Awards to Reveal Mechanisms of  

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Advanced Research Awards to Reveal Mechanisms of Mercury Chemistry, Lead to Lower Mercury Emission Advanced Research Awards to Reveal Mechanisms of Mercury Chemistry, Lead to Lower Mercury Emission PITTSBURGH, PA - The Department of Energy has announced four awards totaling $1.4 million for advanced research to aid the removal of mercury from existing fossil-fueled power plants. The four new projects support the President's call for dramatic cuts in mercury emissions by providing an understanding of the mechanisms of mercury chemistry, and leading to novel approaches to measure and remove mercury from flue gas. Coal contains only trace amounts of mercury, but when coal is consumed to produce power, gaseous species of mercury are formed and emitted into the atmosphere. These emissions are the largest human-created source of mercury emissions in the United States, and may contribute to a variety of health and environmental problems.

435

Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Nucleation and Growth of Atmospheric Particles  

SciTech Connect

New particle formation (NPF) in the atmospheric is a two-step process: Nucleation leads to the birth of stable nuclei that subsequently grow to sizes that can be detected and affect the atmosphere’s radiative properties. Our group is studying both of these processes. Our nucleation research is largely supported by NSF and involves measurements of neutral molecular clusters formed by nucleation with a new custom-designed mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) and measurements of nanoparticle size distributions as small as 1 nm with a new aerosol spectrometer (the DEG SMPS). These measurements are providing new insights into aspects of cluster behavior that affect nucleation rates. The U.S. DOE supports our research on nanoparticle growth rates. This research couples physical and chemical measurements of aerosol properties and behavior. The TDCIMS, which enables real-time measurements of composition for freshly nucleated particles as small as 8 nm and was developed with support from DOE, is the most important tool in this work. Our most important discoveries about processes that affect growth rates are summarized in a recent PNAS article (doi:10.1073/pnas.0912127107). In short, this work has shown that alkylammonium-carboxylate salts, formed, for example, by reactions between amines and carboxylic acids, account for 20–50% of the mass of freshly nucleated particles in locations that include Atlanta, Mexico City, Boulder, and Hyytiälä, while sulfates account for only about 10%. These newly discovered compounds help to explain the high growth rates of freshly nucleated particles that have been observed around the globe and help to explain why nucleation is an important atmospheric process, not just a scientific curiosity. Our poster will provide an overview of this work.

McMurry, P.; Kuang, C.; Barsanti, K.; Eisele, F.; Friedli, H.; Scheckman, J.; Titcombe, M.; Williams, B.; Zhao, J.; Smith, J.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Jun Wang1, Sundar A Christopher1, Xiong Liu2, Jeffrey S. Reid3, Elizabeth A. Reid3, Hal Maring4 1Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alabama-Huntsville 3Marine Meteorology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Monterey, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) PI: Philip B. Russell MS 245-5, NASA Ames Research Center Moffett new analyses of aerosol radiative forcing sensitivity, single scattering albedo, and the solar spectral radiative energy budget. (h) Derive aerosol size distributions from optical depth and extinction

Wang, Jun

438

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, W. F. Feltz, R. D. Knuteson, and D. D. Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin B. M. Lesht Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois L. Strow University of Maryland College Park, Maryland C. Barnet Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology Baltimore, Maryland E. Fetzer National Aeronautics Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, California Introduction The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution infrared sounder on the earth observing plan (EOS) Aqua platform. Temperature and water vapor profile retrievals from AIRS are

439

Research Highlight  

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Ground-Based Cloud Measurements Utilized to Evaluate the Simulation of Ground-Based Cloud Measurements Utilized to Evaluate the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM4 Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, W Chapman, JE Kay, B Medeiros, MD Shupe, S Vavrus, and JE Walsh. 2011. "A characterization of the present-day Arctic atmosphere in CCSM4." Journal of Climate, 25(8), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00228.1. Time-height cross-sections of simulated (top) and observed (second row) cloud phase at Barrow, Alaska. The difference between the frequencies of occurrence of each phase is indicated in the third row. Monthly distributions of liquid (dark) and ice (light) water paths at

440

Research Highlight  

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Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Processes, and Intraseasonal Dynamic Variations Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, Graeme L., Webster, Peter J., Johnson, Richard H., Engelen, Richard, L'Ecuyer, Tristan. 2004: Observational Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures. Journal of Climate: Vol. 17, No. 11, pp. 2213-2224. The "humidistat" feedback mechanism suggests that the hydrological cycle and sea surface temperatures mutually regulate each other in phases: the destabilization phase, the convective phase, and the restoring phase. These

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441

Research Highlight  

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Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Integrated Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Water at MCTEX Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water measurements were obtained during the Maritime Continent Thunderstorm Experiment (MCTEX) by Eugene Clothiaux and Tom Ackerman of Penn State University using an ARM microwave radiometer. The radiometer was deployed at Pularumpi, Melville Island (11.55 S, 130.56 E) off the north coast of Australia for November-December 1995. Time series of these results are shown in Figure 1. Time series of integrated or "precipitable" water vapor (PWV) and liquid

442

Research Highlight  

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The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale The Role of Microphysics Parameterization in Simulating Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Download a printable PDF Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, AM Vogelmann, W Lin, EP Luke, AT Cialella, P Minnis, MM Khaiyer, ER Boer, and MP Jensen. 2013. "The role of cloud microphysics parameterization in the simulation of mesoscale convective system clouds and precipitation in the Tropical Western Pacific." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(4), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0104.1. The spatial distribution of cloud types at 3 UTC on 27 December 2003 as observed by GOES-9 and as simulated by the three commonly used microphysics

443

Research Highlight  

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Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Jeong, M.-J., Z. Li, E. Andrews, and S.-C. Tsay (2007). Effect of aerosol humidification on the column aerosol optical thickness over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10202, doi:10.1029/2006JD007176. (a)-(j) Column-mean aerosol humidification factor as functions of the weighted column mean RH, . The ambient RH at one of the ten level-legs of the In-situ Aerosol Profile (IAP) measurements is replaced with RH equals 99%. Comparison of estimated column R(RH) following six different methods (M1~M6). Gray solid lines and black dashed lines are linear fit and

444

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., B. Xi, and P. Minnis, 2006: Observational Evidence of Changes in Water vapor, Clouds, and Radiation at the ARM SGP site. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L19818,doi:10.1029/2006GL027132. Figure 1. This plot shows that atmospheric precipitable water vapor and downwelling infrared radiation decreased, but solar radiation increased at the SGP site from 1997 to 2004. The amount of water vapor, the dominant greenhouse gas, has a greater effect on infrared radiation than on solar. Figure 2. This plot shows that solar radiation at the surface increased

445

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Cirrus Cloud Bimodal Size Distributions from ARM Remote Sensing Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhao Y, GG Mace, and JM Comstock. 2011. "The occurrence of particle size distribution bimodality in midlatitude cirrus as inferred from ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(6), doi:10.1175/2010JAS3354.1. Figure 1. Frequency distribution of ice water content (top), effective radius (middle), and crystal concentration (bottom) derived from 313 h of cloud property retrievals using the bimodal algorithm. The distributions are shown as a function of the layer-mean temperature shown in the legend.

446

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Luke, E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, EP Luke, and P Kollias. 2010. "Automated retrievals of precipitation parameters using non-Rayleigh scattering at 95-GHz." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 27(9), 10.1175/2010JTECHA1343.1. Time-height mapping of the retrieved vertical air motion for the 1 May 2007 event at SGP. Simultaneous measurements of vertical air motion and raindrop size distribution parameters in precipitation are challenging. The ARM W-band radars (95-GHz), despite being used primarily for cloud sensing, offer

447

Research Highlight  

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An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative Transfer Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Pincus, R., H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogenous cloud fields, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 108, No. D13, 4376, doi:10.1029/2002JD003322, 2003 Key Contributors: H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette Cloud radiative feedback-the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed by clouds before it reaches the earth and bounces back into the atmosphere-is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. However, cloud properties

448

Research Highlight  

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New Technique Successful for Measuring Thickness of Broken Clouds New Technique Successful for Measuring Thickness of Broken Clouds Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Marshak, A, Y Knyazikhin, K.D. Evans, and W.J. Wiscomb, (2004): The "RED versus NIR" Plane to Retrieve Broken-Cloud Optical Depth from Ground-Based Measurements, Journal of Atmospheric Sciences , 61, 1911-1925. In the "lookup table," vertical lines within the curves show calculated values of cloud optical depth. Observed data points show actual RED and NIR values; the cloud cover and optical depth are read from the overlaid lines. Cloud optical depth (or thickness) is a fundamental property for calculating the amount of solar radiation entering and leaving earth's

449

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Formulation for Representing Cloud-to-Rain Transition in General Formulation for Representing Cloud-to-Rain Transition in Atmospheric Models Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol, Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Liu, Y., P. H. Daum, R. McGraw, M. Miller, and S. Niu, 2007: Theoretical formulation for autoconversion rate of cloud droplet concentration. Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L116821, doi:10.1029/2007GL030389 Figure 1. The typical drop radius r* as a function of the volume-mean radius r3 derived from the new theoretical formulation. Note that a constant r* corresponds to the commonly used assumption that the autoconversion rate for droplet concentration is linearly proportional to

450

Research Highlight  

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Measurement of Convective Entrainment Using Lagrangian Particles Measurement of Convective Entrainment Using Lagrangian Particles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Romps, D., University of California, Berkeley Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Yeo K and DM Romps. 2013. "Measurement of convective entrainment using Lagrangian particles." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(1), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0144.1. Trajectories of seven particles that are entrained at the cloud base and transported to the cloud top. Colors denote the mixing ratio of condensed water. Previous work by Romps (2010) found large entrainment rates of ~100% per kilometer for deep convection using a new technique for large-eddy simulations (LES) called "Eulerian direct measurement". These results

451

Research Highlight  

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Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear and Cloudy Regions Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Chiu, J., University of Reading Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Pilewskie, P., University of Colorado Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Chiu C, A Marshak, Y Knyazikhin, P Pilewskie, and W Wiscombe. 2009. "Physical interpretation of the spectral radiative signature in the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy regions." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1419-1430. (a) Total sky images on 18 May 2007, and (b) plot of SWS normalized zenith radiances. In (b), arrows pointed at the time axis correspond to the times

452

Research Highlight  

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Evaluation of Microwave Radiometer Performance in Alaska Evaluation of Microwave Radiometer Performance in Alaska Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 In order to determine the extent to which the ARM microwave radiometers would need to be modified to accommodate Arctic operations, an instrument designed for the Tropical Western Pacific was deployed at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks and continuously operated from 14 December 1995 through 20 June 1996 with the assistance of North Slope Site Scientist Knut Stamnes and Deputy Site Scientist Abdul Alkezweeny. Time series plots of the data are presented in Figure 1.

453

Research Highlight  

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A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Li, Z., A.P. Trishchenko, H.W. Barker, G.L. Stephens, and P. Partain, 1999: "Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption," J. of Geophys. Res. 104(D16):19127-19134 Figure 1. Comparisons of TOA albedos inferred from measurements made by TSBR, GOES-8, and SSP. Two sets of GOES-based estimates are shown for an aircraft along the Egrett's flight path: one for an aircraft skimming the cloud tops (dotted lines); and another for one at 14 km (thin solid lines).

454

Research Highlight  

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A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and Cloud Top Height Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Prigarin, S, and A Marshak. 2008. "A simple stochastic model for generating broken cloud optical depth and cloud top height fields." Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, in press. Fig. 1. A 68-km by 68-km region in Brazil centered at 17o S and 42o W collected on August 9, 2001, at 1015 local time. The solar zenith angle 410; the solar azimuth angle 23o (from the top). (a) moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) true color red, green, blue (RGB) 1-km

455

Research Highlight  

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To Rain or Not to Rain...Aerosols May Be the Answer To Rain or Not to Rain...Aerosols May Be the Answer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Niu F and Z Li. 2012. "Systematic variations of cloud top temperature and precipitation rate with aerosols over the global tropics." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8491-2012. Cloud-top temperature (A, C) and ice water path (B, D) as functions of AI/AOT for warm (blue dots) and cold (red dots) base mixed-phase clouds and liquid clouds (green dots) over the ocean (upper panels) and land (lower panels). The right-hand axes of (A) and (C) are for liquid clouds. Precipitation rate as a function of AI for mixed-phase (blue dots) and

456

Research Highlight  

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Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

457

Research Highlight  

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"Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde "Radiance Assimilation" Correction Method Improves Water Vapor Radiosonde Observations in the Upper Troposphere Submitter: Soden, B. J., University of Miami Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Soden, B.J., D.D. Turner, B.M. Lesht, and L.M. Miloshevich (2004), An analysis of satellite, radiosonde, and lidar observations of upper tropospheric water vapor from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D04105, doi:10/1029/2003JD003828. Time-average relative humidity profiles from both original (black) and radiance-adjusted (blue) radiosonde soundings compared to the lidar (red) retrievals from field campaigns in 1996, 1997, 1999, and 2000.

458

Research Highlight  

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The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

459

Research Highlight  

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New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models New Characterization of Organic Aerosol Evolution Will Help Improve Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Jimenez, J., University of Colorado Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Jimenez JL and . et al. 2009. "Evolution of organic aerosols in the atmosphere." Science, 326, doi: 10.1126/science.1180353. Total mass concentration (in micrograms per cubic meter) and mass fractions of non-refractory inorganic species and organic components in submicrometer aerosols measured with the AMS at multiple surface locations in the Northern Hemisphere. Inset: Distributions of O:C for the OA components identified at the different sites. Relationship between O:C and hygroscopicity (k, or equivalently the

460

Research Highlight  

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Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Impact of Anthropogenic Emissions on Organic Aerosols During CARES Submitter: Zhang, Q., University of California, Davis Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Setyan A, Q Zhang, M Merkel, WB Knighton, Y Sun, C Song, J Shilling, TB Onasch, S Herndon, D Worsnop, JD Fast, R Zaveri, LK Berg, A Wiedensohler, BA Flowers, MK Dubey, and R Subramanian. 2012. "Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: Results from CARES." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-8131-2012. High-resolution mass spectra (colored by ion category) and elemental ratios of the OA factors. Average contribution of ion categories to the total

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461

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Persist with Little Help from the Local Surface Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Shupe MD, OG Persson, IM Brooks, M Tjernstrom, J Sedlar, T Mauritsen, S Sjogren, and C Leck. 2013. "Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 13, doi:10.5194/acp-13-9379-2013. Figure 1. Normalized profiles of (a) vertical velocity skewness and (b) variance, (c) turbulent dissipation rate, and (d) potential temperature. Black curves are all data, while red and green are for decoupled and coupled cases, respectively. Normalization is relative to the cloud top

462

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

463

Research Highlight  

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An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar An Application of Linear Programming Techniques to ARM Polarimetric Radar Processing Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, R McGraw, and L Lei. 2013. "An application of linear programming to polarimetric radar differential phase processing." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, , . ACCEPTED. C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar fields of radar reflectivity factor Z and processed specific differential phase KDP for a section of a Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) convective event as output from LP methods implemented for the ARM PyART processing suite. Detailed microphysical insights from weather radar systems are in demand

464

Research Highlight  

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Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Crewell, S., University of Cologne Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner DD, MP Cadeddu, U Loehnert, S Crewell, and A Vogelmann. 2009. "Modifications to the water vapor continuum in the microwave suggested by ground-based 150 GHz observations." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 47(10), 3326-3337. Figure 1: The top panel shows downwelling microwave brightness temperature

465

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the Estimating Cloud and Rainfall Parameters in a Vertical Column Above the ACRF SGP Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Matrosov, S. Y., CIRES/NOAA/ESRL/University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: N/A An example of MMCR (a) and WACR (b) ARM radar measurements of a stratiform precipitating event and the corresponding estimates of mean rain rate (c) and cloud IWP and LWP (d). A comprehensive characterization of all hydrometeors in the vertical column is an important task, which is crucial for model parameterization and validation purposes. For many years, the remote sensing efforts within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program were focused primarily on either non-precipitating or only weakly-precipitating (e.g., drizzling)

466

Research Highlight  

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Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Optimal numerical methods for determining the orientation averages of single-scattering properties of atmospheric ice crystals." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 127, doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.020. Fig.1. Idealized shapes of ice crystals used in this study: (a) Gaussian random sphere (GS), (b) droxtal (DX), (c) budding Bucky ball (3B), and (d) column (COL). All models are visualized with dipoles. For (b), (c), and (d)

467

Research Highlight  

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Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Morrison H and WW Grabowski. 2011. "Cloud-system resolving model simulations of aerosol indirect effects on tropical deep convection and its thermodynamic environment." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(20), doi:10.5194/acp-11-10503-201. Profiles of ensemble- and horizontally averaged a) cloud water mixing ratio, b) rain mixing ratio, c) ice mixing ratio, d) cloud droplet concentration, e) rain number concentration, and f) ice number concentration, Ni, for pristine (blue), polluted (green), and highly

468

Research Highlight  

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Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and ARM Data Single-Column Modeling, GCM Parameterizations and ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Randall, D.A., K.-M. Xu, R.C.J. Somerville, and S. Iacobellis, 1996: "Single-Column Models and Cloud Ensemble Models as Links between Observations and Climate Models," J. Climate 9(8)1683-1697. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 We have developed a Single-Column Model (SCM) to validate GCM cloud-radiation parameterizations against ARM observational data. The SCM is a computationally efficient one-dimensional representation of the atmospheric column overlying a single GCM grid cell. The SCM is integrated

469

Research Highlight  

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Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud-Top Humidity Inversions and the Maintenance of Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Submitter: Solomon, A., NOAA/ESRL/Physical Sciences Division Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Solomon A, MD Shupe, O Persson, and H Morrison. 2011. "Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi:10.5194/acp-11-10127-2011. Soundings of mid-day decoupled stratocumulus at Barrow, Alaska. (A) Measured 17:34Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.61W). (B) 50-m LES simulation 20Z 8 April 2008 at (71.33N,156.91W). Gray shading marks the extent of the

470

Research Highlight  

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Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Overlap Assumptions Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pincus, R., R. Hemler, and S.A. Klein, 2006: Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev., 134, 3644-3656. As shown by the difference between the two panels, the standard way (AM2, top panel) of mixing solar reflection and transmission differs systematically from the Independent Column Approximation approach. Because cloud-radiation interactions depend critically on the vertical amount of clouds, different assumptions about how this alignment occurs

471

Research Highlight  

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When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penide, G., Laboratoire d\\\'Optique Atmospherique Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Penide G, V Kumar, A Protat, and P May. 2013. "Statistics of drop size distribution parameters and rain rates for stratiform and convective precipitation during the North Australian wet season." Monthly Weather Review, 141(9), 10.1175 /mwr-d-12-00262.1. Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement facility at Darwin, Australia, helped scientists determine how drop size distribution and rain rates are affected by larger-scale weather patterns. Rainfall comes in a variety of forms: mist, drizzle, showers, downpours. The type and frequency of rainfall usually depends on the season and

472

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter Satellite Constraints on Cloud-Top Phase, Ice Size, and Asymmetry Parameter over Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: van Diedenhoven, B., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Fridlind, A. M., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: van Diedenhoven B, AM Fridlind, AS Ackerman, and B Cairns. 2012. "Evaluation of hydrometeor phase and ice properties in cloud-resolving model simulations of tropical deep convection using radiance and polarization measurements." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 69(11), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-0314.1. Liquid index (LI) values are directly derived from multi-directional polarized reflectances. POLDER measurements (dashed line envelop) show

473

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer Calculations Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarlane SA, K Gaustad, E Mlawer, C Long, and J Delamere. 2011. "Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 4, 1713-1733. Time series of daily percent vegetation derived from MFR measurements for (top) 2001-2008 at 10-m tower, which is located over an unmanaged pasture; (middle) 2001-2004 at 25-m tower, which is located over a managed field; and (bottom) 2005-2008 at 25-m tower. The different seasonal cycles at the

474

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Taking place during the arid Arctic winter, the RHUBC will obtain measurements in the far-infrared (15-40 microns), when the so-called "Arctic" infrared window between 16 and 40 microns is semi-transparent. Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations will be collected by three state-of-the-art Fourier Transform Spectrometers sampling at different bands in the far-infrared. The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, or RHUBC (pronounced "roobik"), will make detailed observations

475

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, WD Collins, S Menon, and CN Long. 2011. "Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of mixed-phase clouds: An example from M-PACE." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi: 10.5194/acp-11-11937-2011. Measured and retrieved cloud properties on 10 October 2004. Included are (top to bottom) AHSRL bacscatter cross-section, AHSRL depolarization ratio, MMCR reflectivity, and profiles of liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), and liquid (r_{e,liq}) and ice (r$_{e,ice}$) effective